Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Johansson-Stenman, Olof
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Business Econ & Law, Dept Econ, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Positional preferences in time and space: Optimal income taxation with dynamic social comparisons2014In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 101, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns optimal redistributive non-linear income taxation in an OLG model, where people care about their own consumption relative to (i) other people's current consumption, (ii) own past consumption, and (iii) other people's past consumption. We show that both (i) and (iii) affect the marginal income tax structure whereas (ii) does not. We also derive conditions under which atemporal and intertemporal consumption comparisons give rise to exactly the same tax policy responses. On the basis of the available empirical estimates, comparisons with other people's current and past consumption tend to substantially increase the optimal marginal labor income tax rates. Yet, such comparisons may either increase or decrease the optimal marginal capital income tax rates.

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Mannberg, Andrea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Tromsø University Business School, Tromsø, Norway.
    Relative consumption of housing: marginal saving subsidies and income taxes as a second-best policy?2015In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 116, p. 439-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether marginal taxation of labor and capital income are useful second best instruments for internalizing the externalities caused by conspicuous housing consumption, when the government is unable to implement a first best corrective tax on housing wealth. The rationale for studying income taxation in this particular context is that first best taxes on housing wealth may be infeasible (at least in a shorter time perspective), while income taxes indirectly affect both the level and composition of accumulated wealth. We show that a suboptimally low tax on housing wealth provides an incentive for the government to subsidize financial saving and tax labor income at the margin.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Sjögren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Tax policy and present-biased preferences: paternalism under international capital mobility2014In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 106, no October, p. 298-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with tax-policy responses to quasi-hyperbolic discounting. Earlier research on optimal paternalism typically abstracts from capital mobility. If capital is mobile between countries, it may no longer be possible for national governments to control domestic savings via capital taxation (as in a closed economy). In this paper, we take a broad perspective on public policy responses to self-control problems by showing how these responses vary (i) between closed and open economies, (ii) between small open and large open economies, and (iii) depending on whether or not both source based and residence based capital taxes can be used.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4. Arvaniti, Maria
    et al.
    B. Krishnamurthy, Chandra Kiran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Crepin, Anne-Sophie
    Time-consistent renewable resource management with present bias and regime shifts2023In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 207, p. 479-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the extraction plan of present-biased decision makers managing a renew-able resource stock whose growth is uncertain and which could undergo a rapid and sig-nificant change when stock falls below a threshold. We show that the Markov-Nash equi-librium extraction policy is unique, time consistent, and increasing in resource stock. An increase in the threshold leads to increased resource extraction, rather than the precau-tionary reduction in extraction often observed with exponential discounting. An increase in the degree of present bias also leads to an increase in resource extraction. Our analy-sis suggests that accounting for and appropriately dealing with resource managers' present bias may be important to understand resource use sustainability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Arvaniti, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Italy.
    Sjögren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Temptation in consumption and optimal taxation2023In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 205, p. 687-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to integrate temptation preferences into the theory of optimal taxation with heterogenous agents and asymmetric information. Consumers are tempted to over-consume a commodity which may lead to an over-supply of labor. Resisting this temptation implies a utility cost and any policy that reduces this cost is welfare improving. We uncover novel channels for government intervention and the interaction between the welfare improving and redistributive roles of public policy. We also identify a commitment mechanism that works through the endogenous labor choice and affects the design and effectiveness of the optimal tax policy.

  • 6. Berge, Lars Ivar Oppedal
    et al.
    Juniwaty, Kartika Sari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Helleveien 30, 5045 Bergen, Norway; Center for International Forestry Research, Bogor 16115, Indonesia and Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia.
    Sekei, Linda Helgesson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Gender composition and group dynamics: Evidence from a laboratory experiment with microfinance clients2016In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 131, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of gender composition on the group dynamics of microfinance clients in Tanzania using a laboratory experiment. We focus on three dimensions: (i) the ability to collaborate on problem-solving, (ii) joint decision-making in risk taking, and (iii) the willingness to cooperate in a public-goods game. Our main finding is that female groups are better at collaborating in problem-solving than male and mixed groups, and are also more willing to take risks. However, in the public-goods game we find no robust evidence of female groups contributing more than male and mixed groups. Our findings suggest that one reason why female loan groups often have higher repayment rates than male and mixed groups may be that female groups are more able to collaborate and find common solutions to common challenges.

  • 7.
    Janssen, Aljoscha
    et al.
    Singapore Management University, Department of Economics, 90 Stamford Rd, Singapore.
    Granlund, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    The importance of the first generic substitution: Evidence from Sweden2023In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 213, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze changes in the willingness to substitute from prescribed pharmaceuticals to more affordable generic equivalents in response to the first experience with a substitution. Using Swedish individual-level data of prescribed and dispensed pharmaceuticals, we employ a dynamic event study and an instrumental variable approach to show that an initial substitution reduces the probability of opposing subsequent substitutions by 39 percentage points. We recommend that policy-makers target patients with a history of opposed substitution and offer additional discounts to promote substitution as long-term savings outweigh one-time costs.

  • 8.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    On the economics of increasing complexity: With some special focus on culture2010In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution seeks to find a setting in which evolution in terms of changing structure, rather than growth within a given structure, can be modelled. In particular the evolution of increasing complexity is focused. The setting chosen uses Lancasterian property space as an invariant in which the changing, emerging, and disappearing actual implements are property bundles. The aim is to produce a development tree like the Darwinian, and the tool used for modelling the branching bifurcations is catastrophe theory.

  • 9.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    On the stability of Cournot equilibrium when the number of competitors increases2008In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 66, no 3–4, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reconsiders whether the Cournot equilibrium really becomes a perfect competition equilibrium when the number of competitors goes to infinity. It has been questioned whether the equilibrium remains stable with an increasing number of firms. Contraindications were given for linear and for isoelastic demand functions. However, marginal costs were then taken as constant, which means adding more potentially infinite-sized firms. As we want to compare cases with few large firms to cases with many small firms, the model is tuned so as to incorporate capacity limits, decreasing with an increasing number of firms. Then destabilization is avoided.

  • 10.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    On the Stability of Cournot Equilibrium when the Number of Competitors Increases2008In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 66, no 3-4, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reconsiders whether the Cournot equilibrium really becomes a perfect competition equilibrium when the number of competitors goes to infinity. It has been questioned whether the equilibrium remains stable with an increasing number of firms. Contraindications were given for linear and for isoelastic demand functions. However, marginal costs were then taken as constant, which means adding more potentially infinite-sized firms. As we want to compare cases with few large firms to cases with many small firms, the model is tuned so as to incorporate capacity limits, decreasing with an increasing number of firms. Then destabilization is avoided.

  • 11.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The chaotic duopolists revisited1998In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 385-394Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The adjustment process of three oligopolists is studied, under Cournot and Stackelberg action. It is demonstrated that with an iso-elastic demand function and constant marginal costs, the system can result in periodic or in chaotic behaviour. In particular, the case with two identical and one different oligopolists is focused, which turns into a virtual duopoly, though displaying a wider set of bifurcations than can occur in genuine duopoly.

  • 12.
    Puu, Tönu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Gardini, Laura
    Department of Economics, University of Urbino, Italy.
    Sushko, Irina
    Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine.
    A Hicksian multiplier-accelerator model with floor determined by capital stock2005In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 331-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reconsiders the Hicksian multiplier-accelerator model with the “floor” related to the depreciation on actual capital stock. Through the introduction of the capital variable, a growth trend is created endogenously by the model itself, along with growth rate oscillations around it. The “ceiling” can be dispensed with altogether. As everything is growing in such a model, a variable transformation is introduced to focus relative dynamics of the income growth rate and the actual capital output ratio.

  • 13.
    Puu, Tönu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Gardini, Laura
    Department of Economics, University of Urbino, Italy.
    Sushko, Irina
    Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    A Hicksian multiplier-accelerator model with floor determined by capital stock2005In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 331-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reconsiders the Hicksian multiplier-accelerator model with the “floor” related to the depreciation on actual capital stock. Through the introduction of the capital variable, a growth trend is created endogenously by the model itself, along with growth rate oscillations around it. The “ceiling” can be dispensed with altogether. As everything is growing in such a model, a variable transformation is introduced to focus relative dynamics of the income growth rate and the actual capital output ratio.

  • 14.
    Stern, Charlotta
    et al.
    Ratio institute and Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sex differences and occupational choice Theorizing for policy informed by behavioral science✰2022In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 202, p. 694-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupations are segregated with respect to sex, even in modern, egalitarian societies. There are strong pressures to eliminate segregation and therefore strong reasons to correctly theorize why segregation persists. The dominant view underpinning most public policies is essentially that environmental factors nudge women and men into different occupational paths. Nudging, however, ignores research suggesting that psychological traits that influence occupational choice differs between women and men, on average. Some of the most well-documented and persistent average sex differences between men and women suggest that the taken-for-granted assumption that an egalitarian society would exhibit a more or less equal distribution of men and women across the occupational landscape may be mistaken. Rather, models of occupational choice informed by individual differences in preferences, broadly understood, would help us better explain how men and women behave in the labor market. Differences in occupational preferences will affect choices. Therefore, differences in proportions of women and men across professions may be in line with an egalitarian society and the well-being and best interest of both men and women in society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Sushko, Iryna
    et al.
    Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, and Kyiv School of Economics, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Gardini, Laura
    Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Urbino, Italy.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Regular and chaotic growth in a Hicksian Floor/ceiling model2010In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 77-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some previous papers the present authors reassembled the Hicksian trade cycle model in a new way. The floor was tied to depreciation on capital, itself the cumulative sum of past net investments, for which the principle of acceleration provided an explanation. Hence no alien elements were needed to include capital, and so close the system. The resulting model created a growth trend along with growth rate cycles, which could be periodic or quasiperiodic. In the current paper, the ceiling, using capital stock as a capacity limit for production, is added. It then turns out that pure growth no longer exists, and chaos and multistability become possible, which they were not in the previous model. A variety of bifurcation scenarios is explored, and a full understanding of the working of the four-piece, originally three-dimensional, piecewise smooth map, is attained, using a reduction to a one-dimensional return map.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf