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  • 1.
    Andersson, Lars-Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Danley, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Henning, Martin
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Workers’ participation in regional economic change following establishment closure2020In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 589-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses if and when workers affected by economic destruction in the form of establishment closures move to more productive or newly started establishments in the region, become self-employed, leave the region or become displaced. Results from multinominal probit models show that the majority of these workers face destructive employment outcomes from a Schumpeterian point of view compared to a matched sample of workers not subject to a closure. However, we do find indications of a creative destruction as a small, albeit significant, share become employed in young establishments. Different types of human capital influence the likelihood of triggering positive or negative regional outcomes. While higher education significantly decreases the risk for unemployment, high-income earners more often become engaged in creative outcomes. Firm tenure increases the likelihood of becoming employed in younger establishments. There are significant spatial differences where metropolitan regions excel as loci of creative change, whereas smaller and peripheral regions face far less creative outcomes of economic transformation.

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  • 2.
    Berggren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH.
    Olofsson, Christer
    SLU.
    Silver, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Control aversion and the search for external financing in Swedish SMEs2000In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cyron, Thomas
    et al.
    Media, Management and Transformation Center (MMTC), Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Garz, Marcel
    Media, Management and Transformation Center (MMTC), Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE). Media, Management and Transformation Center (MMTC), Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Beware the community type: engagement and growth in core vs. open online communities2023In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurs can benefit from the communities they build. Therefore, many entrepreneurs create online communities that allow self-selected stakeholders, such as customers, crowd investors, or enthusiasts, to interact with the venture and other like-minded individuals. However, research on how entrepreneurs can successfully engage community members and grow such online communities is only slowly emerging. In particular, it is unclear if, how much, and which content entrepreneurs should contribute to foster engagement in different types of communities and which role these community types play in the community’s overall growth. Based on a longitudinal case study in the video game industry, we first theorize and show that—depending on the community type—both too much and too little entrepreneur-provided content fails to leverage community engagement potential and that different communities require more or less diverging content. We then theorize and show that community growth is largely driven by engagement in open communities, such as those hosted on social media. We outline the implications this has for entrepreneurs, our understanding of online communities, and entrepreneurial communities more generally.

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  • 4.
    Eliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Hansson, Pär
    Growth Analysis, Box 574, 101 31, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindvert, Markus
    Growth Analysis, Studentplan 3, 831 40, Östersund, Sweden.
    Do firms learn by exporting or learn to export?: evidence from small and medium-sized enterprises2012In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 453-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a matching approach, we compare the productivity trajectories of future export-entrants and matched nonentrants. Future exporters have higher productivity than do nonentrants before entry into international markets, which indicates self-selection into exports. More interestingly, we also observe a productivity increase among export-entrants relative to nonentrants before export entry. This might be explained by higher investments in physical capital prior to export entry. We find no evidence that the productivity gap between export-entrants and nonentrants continues to grow after export entry. Our results suggest that learning to export occurs but that learning by exporting does not. In contrast to previous studies on Swedish manufacturing, we focus particularly on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

  • 5.
    Eliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Growth Analysis, Studentplan 3, 831 40 Östersund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Pär
    Lindvert, Markus
    Effects of foreign acquisitions on R&D and high-skill activities2017In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 163-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish microdata, we find no evidence for the concerns circulating in the public debate that foreign acquisitions lead to reductions in both R&D expenditures and high-skilled activities in targeted domestic firms for either MNEs or non-MNEs. Previous studies have only focused on larger firms. In this paper, we are able to study the impact on smaller firms (fewer than 50 employees), which is important because 90% of the firms acquired by foreign enterprises meet this criterion. For this group of firms, there is no information on R&D, but by using the register of educational attainment, we obtain data on the share of high-skilled labour in all Swedish firms, irrespective of size. Interestingly, we find that among smaller firms, foreign enterprises tend to acquire high-productive, skill-intensive firms (cherry-picking). After the acquisitions, skill upgrading appears in acquired smaller, non-MNE firms, particularly in the service sector.

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  • 6.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Subjective well-being among the self-employed in Europe: macroeconomy, gender and immigrant status2016In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that the self-employed generally experience a higher degree of job satisfaction compared to regular employees. However, our knowledge of subjective well-being among the self-employed, the differences between various groups of self-employed and the potential influence of contextual factors is somewhat limited. The purpose of the present paper is to address this gap by taking macroeconomic conditions, gender and immigrant status into consideration. The results show that self-employment is positively related to subjective well-being, but there are also differences between groups of the self-employed; self-employed with employees report a higher level of life satisfaction than the self-employed without employees. Economic growth is more important for the level of life satisfaction among the self-employed than among employees. The analyses also point to different patterns for female and male self-employed without employees: only women experience a higher level of life satisfaction compared to employees. The results also show that the relationship is stronger among immigrants than natives. The results of this study confirm the importance of considering potential heterogeneity when examining subjective well-being among the self-employed.

  • 7.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Grichnik, Dietmar
    Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Brinckmann, Jan
    ESADE Business School, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
    Kapsa, Diana
    UBS AG, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Strategic orientations of nascent entrepreneurs: antecedents of prediction and risk orientation2019In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 859-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial judgment is crucial for entrepreneurial success. Extant literature argues that prior experience influences entrepreneurial decisions and the identification of attractive decision spaces for entrepreneurial activity is impacted by subjective risk perception and response to this risk. We posit that entrepreneurs develop different preferences for risk and prediction and their decisions reflect these preferences. To understand the strategic orientations of nascent entrepreneurs, using a sample of 262 nascent entrepreneurs, we study the impact of prior experience and the environmental context on the development of two strategic orientations of nascent entrepreneurs: risk orientation, i.e., the extent to which an individual perceives risk as downside loss or an upside opportunity and the prediction orientation, i.e., the extent to which an individual focuses on prediction. In doing so, our study contributes to a better understanding of the strategy formation process among nascent entrepreneurs.

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  • 8.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gender (in)equality within the household and business start-up among mothers2021In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 56, p. 903-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data on all businesses started by mothers of young children in Sweden between 2000 and 2014, we explore which factors are associated with entrepreneurship among mothers. We find that being unemployed or being an immigrant is positively associated with business start-up by mothers; however, our findings show that what matters more is the paternity leave taken by the mothers’ partners. These findings suggest that in institutional contexts such as Sweden, gender inequality is not a persistent feature of most households and that women can make career choices by negotiating with their partners who will make use of the parental benefits offered by the government.

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  • 9.
    Silver, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Berggren, Björn
    Olofsson, Christer
    Control Aversion and the Search for External Financing in Swedish SMEs2000In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Weber, Clarissa E.
    et al.
    Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Media, Management and Transformation Center, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    Faculty of Management, Economics and Society, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    After successful fundraising: how overfunding and category spanning affect the release and audience-perceived quality of crowdfunded products2023In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 1009-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overfunding of crowdfunded productdevelopment projects would seem to be a welcome outcome for entrepreneurs, yet initial theory and evidence suggest that overfunding can have both positive and negative consequences. To overcome these contradictory predictions, we develop theory linking research on slack resources, audience expectations, and product category spanning to hypothesize boundary conditions for whether and when overfunding has a positive or negative effect on the product-development outcomes of product release and audience-perceived product quality. Post-crowdfunding data on video-game development projects show that entrepreneurs with high-category-spanning products benefit substantially less from overfunding than entrepreneurs with low-category-spanning products. Our study provides novel insights into the relation between overfunding and product release as well as audience-perceived product quality. It also contributes to our emerging understanding of the role of categories in the context of crowdfunding. We discuss implications for theory and practice.

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1 - 10 of 10
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  • ieee
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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