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  • 1.
    Anugwom, Ikenna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Rujana, L.
    Wärnå, J.
    Hedenström, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    In quest for the optimal delignification of lignocellulosic biomass using hydrated, SO2 switched DBU MEASIL switchable ionic liquid2016In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 297, p. 256-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, various process parameters aiming at optimal short-time-high-temperature (STHT) process were studied upon fractionation of Nordic woody biomass into its primary constituents. Highly diluted, aqueous 'SO2-switched' switchable ionic liquid (SIL) based on an alkanol amine (monoethanol amine, MEA) and an organic superbase (1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene, DBU) was applied. The ultimate goal was to develop a more sustainable, environmentally friendly and cost efficient systems for efficient separation of the lignocellulosic fractions. One of the main products from the SIL fractionation is cellulose-rich pulp with very low lignin content, complemented with hemicelluloses. The NMR results reveal that substantial removal of lignin occurs even when relatively low amount of SIL was used. Further, a simple mathematical model describing the dissolution of the lignocellulose components (hemicellulose and lignin) and weight loss of wood as a function of time is described. Moreover, the most efficient process involved the use of SpinChem (R) rotating bed reactor while upon use of a flow through (loop) reactor, promising results were obtained at a treatment time of 4 h. Still, all the reactor systems studied gave rise to a rather low removal of hemicelluloses which mean that the solvent system is primary selective towards lignin dissolution.

  • 2.
    Benavente, Veronica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lage, Sandra
    Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gentili, Francesco G.
    Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Influence of lipid extraction and processing conditions on hydrothermal conversion of microalgae feedstocks – Effect on hydrochar composition, secondary char formation and phytotoxicity2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 428, article id 129559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect of lipid extraction of microalgae feedstocks subjected to hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) with regard to the carbonization degree, chemical composition and phytotoxicity of hydrochars produced under different reaction temperatures and residence times. Special attention was given to the formation and composition of secondary char, as this part of the hydrochar may be of particular importance for environmental and technical applications. A microalgae polyculture grown in municipal wastewater was extracted to retrieve lipids, and both unextracted (MA) and extracted microalgae (EMA) were used to produce hydrochars at 180–240 °C for 1–4 h. The composition of the hydrochars was thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. MA exhibited a greater carbonization degree than EMA and contained higher amounts of secondary char under the same processing conditions. During the carbonization of EMA, more decomposition products remained in the liquid phase and less polymerization occurred than for MA, which explained the lower solid yield of EMA-derived hydrochars in comparison to MA hydrochars. Consequently, although they contained potentially toxic substances (i.e., carboxylic acids, aldehydes and ketones), the EMA-derived hydrochars exhibited a lower phytotoxic potential. This indicates that low-temperature hydrochars containing less than 10% of extractives might be suitable as soil amendments, whereas extractive-rich hydrochars would be more appropriate for other long-term applications, such as adsorbents for contaminant removal, energy storage and composite materials. Detailed characterization of microalgae-derived hydrochars is required to enable the most suitable application areas to be identified for these materials, and thereby make full use of their function as carbon sinks.

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  • 3.
    Essalhi, Mohamed
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ismail, Norafiqah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tesfalidet, Solomon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pan, Jun
    Wang, Qian
    Cui, Zhoaliang
    García-Payo, M. C.
    Khayet, Mohamed
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Sarmad, Shokat
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bouyer, Denis
    Zhao, Yun
    Li, Baohua
    Ohlin, C. André
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tavajohi Hassan Kiadeh, Naser
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Polyvinylidene fluoride membrane formation using carbon dioxide as a non-solvent additive for nuclear wastewater decontamination2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 446, no 4, article id 137300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes were prepared by phase inversion in the most commonly used solvents for membrane manufacture, with CO2 as a non-solvent additive. The effects of changing the polymer concentration (10, 12.5 and 15% by weight), the type of solvent (NMP, DMAc and DMF) and the coagulation bath with three levels of CO2 concentration on the phase inversion process, as well as the phase diagram, morphology and transport properties of the membranes were studied. The best performing membranes were used to desalinate salt aqueous solutions and decontaminated simulated nuclear wastewater by membrane distillation using two configurations (DCMD and AGMD). All selected membranes showed high rejection with acceptable permeate fluxes reaching an infinite decontamination factor. The proposed approach of this novel idea of using CO2 dissolved in water as a coagulation medium in the field of membranes avoids the increase of the harmful effect on the environment caused by the addition of a harsh non-solvent to the coagulation bath. It constitutes a beneficial use of carbon dioxide that reduces the negative environmental impact of membrane manufacturing and represents a decisive step towards its sustainability. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential benefits of using these membranes in DM for desalination and treatment of simulated nuclear wastewater.

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  • 4.
    Essalhi, Mohamed
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Structure of Matter, Thermal Physics and Electronics, Faculty of Physics, University Complutense of Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, Madrid, Spain.
    Khayet, Mohamed
    Department of Structure of Matter, Thermal Physics and Electronics, Faculty of Physics, University Complutense of Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, Madrid, Spain; Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Water Institute), Calle Punto Net N° 4, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Tesfalidet, Solomon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Alsultan, Mohammed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tavajohi Hassan Kiadeh, Naser
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Desalination by direct contact membrane distillation using mixed matrix electrospun nanofibrous membranes with carbon-based nanofillers: a strategic improvement2021In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 426, article id 131316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robust hydrophobic and superhydrophobic mixed matrix electrospun nanofibrous membranes (MM-ENMs) have been prepared from low- and high- molecular weight polyvinylidene fluoride with either multi-walled carbon nanotubes or graphene oxide nanofillers (0.05–0.5 wt%). The polymer solutions' properties, including their electrical conductivity, viscosity, and surface tension, were determined and used to guide the design of single-, dual-, and triple-layered MM-ENMs combining layers with different hydrophobic character. All MM-ENMs were subsequently prepared and characterized in terms of their morphology, hydrophobicity, mechanical properties, and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) performance. A thinner hydrophobic layer with a thicker hydrophilic support layer in dual-layered MM-ENMs reduced water vapor transport resistance and improved DCMD performance relative to single-layer MM-ENMs. Conversely, placing an intermediate hydrophilic layer between two hydrophobic layers in triple-layered MM-ENMs promoted water condensation (water pocket formation) and thus reduced DCMD performance. Over 10 h DCMD, the best-performing dual-layered MM-ENM allowed ultra-high permeate fluxes of up to 74.7 kg/m2 h while maintaining a stable permeate electrical conductivity of around 7.63 μS/cm and a salt (NaCl) rejection factor of up to 99.995% when operated with a feed temperature of 80°C, a permeate temperature of 20°C, and a feed solution containing NaCl at a concentration of 30 g/L.

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  • 5.
    Eta, Valerie
    et al.
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Anugwom, Ikenna
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Virtanen, Pasi
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Eränen, Kari
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Mäki-Arvela, P
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku FI-20500, Finland.
    Loop vs. batch reactor setups in the fractionation of birch chips using switchable ionic liquids2014In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 238, p. 242-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fractionation of lignocellulosic feedstock into its major components with high purity represents an important commercialization milestone in the transformation of lignocellulosic forest derived products into fuels and commodity chemicals. A comparison between the traditionally used batch reactor and loop reactor systems demonstrates that improved dissolution of hemicelluloses and lignin are obtained using switchable ionic liquids in a loop reactor system which facilitates decreased heat and mass transfer restrictions. The treatment of birch chips using switchable ionic liquid (SIL) based on 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene, CO2 and diethanolamine at 120 °C for 30 h in a loop reactor resulted in 24% loss of original weight of wood corresponding to dissolution of 52 wt.% of hemicelluloses and 42 wt.% of lignin, respectively, as opposed to 20% weight loss corresponding to 43 wt.% dissolution of hemicelluloses and 38 wt.% of lignin in the batch system. The non-dissolved material obtained from both reactors was efficiently fibrillated and softened cellulose fibres. The flow of switchable ionic liquid through the loop reactor and agitation of the chips enhanced the dissolution of hemicelluloses and lignin. The dissolved fractions recovered from spent SIL after treatment contained both hemicelluloses and lignin.

  • 6. Hey, G
    et al.
    Grabic, Roman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ledin, A.
    Jansen, J. la Cour
    Andersen, H. R.
    Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in biologically treated wastewater2012In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 185, p. 236-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologically treated wastewater spiked with a mixture of 56 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was treated with 0-20 mg/L chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in laboratory-scale experiments. Wastewater effluents were collected from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with extended nitrogen removal (low COD) and one without (high COD). About one third of the tested APIs resisted degradation even at the highest ClO2 dose (20 mg/L), while others were reduced by more than 90% at the lowest ClO2 level (0.5 mg/L). In the low COD effluent, more than half of the APIs were oxidized at 5 mg/L ClO2, while in high COD effluent a significant increase in API oxidation was observed after treatment with 8 mg/L ClO2. This study illustrates the successful degradation of several APIs during treatment of wastewater effluents with chlorine dioxide.

  • 7.
    Hong, Jie
    et al.
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Chen, Mengshan
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhejiang, Zhoushan, China.
    Zhang, Lei
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Qin, Lai
    School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Shandong, Zibo, China.
    Hu, Jinsong
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Huang, Xinhua
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Zhou, Chunhui
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Zhou, Yingtang
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhejiang, Zhoushan, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Yunnan, Kunming, China.
    Asymmetrically coupled co single-atom and co nanoparticle in double-shelled carbon-based nanoreactor for enhanced reversible oxygen catalysis2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 455, article id 140401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simultaneous construction of size-asymmetric metal single atoms and nanoparticle active sites in advanced and robust carrier materials is particularly important yet challenging for efficient reversible oxygen catalysis. Herein, a facile “chemical etching/in-Situ capture” synthesis strategy was developed to fabricate a unique double-shelled carbon-based nanobox integrated with size-asymmetric Co single-atom (CoSA) and metallic Co nanoparticle (CoNP) moiety. As expected, this well-managed catalyst product yielded remarkable bifunctional electrocatalytic performances in alkaline electrolytes, with a decent half-wave potential of 0.886 V for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and a small overpotential of 341 mV at 10 mA/cm2 for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Besides, this nanobox catalyst served as a cost-effective and efficient oxygen electrode in the assembled rechargeable ZABs, exceeding the mixed electrocatalyst of expensive Pt/C-RuO2, in terms of the elevated peak power density of 239 mW/cm2, the promoted specific capacity of 770 mAh/gZn, as well as the appreciable charge–discharge cycle stability. Theoretical calculations revealed that the strong interaction between the delicate CoSA site and CoNP phase, could effectively optimize the adsorption and desorption energy barriers of reaction intermediates on the designed catalyst surface, thus achieving synergistic enhancement of electrocatalytic activity towards ORR and OER. This finding affords a feasible and effective strategy to achieve highly active and durable bifunctional catalysts for both fundamental research and practical rechargeable ZABs applications.

  • 8.
    Jogunola, Olatunde
    et al.
    Åbo Akad Univ, Proc Chem Ctr, FI-20500 Turku, Finland .
    Salmi, Tapio
    Åbo Akad Univ, Proc Chem Ctr, FI-20500 Turku, Finland .
    Kangas, Matias
    Åbo Akad Univ, Proc Chem Ctr, FI-20500 Turku, Finland .
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Determination of the kinetics and mechanism of methyl formate synthesis in the presence of a homogeneous catalyst2012In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 203, p. 469-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The kinetics and mechanism of methyl formate synthesis, the key intermediate of the formic acid process was determined. Methyl formate was prepared from carbon monoxide and methanol in the presence of potassium methoxide as a homogeneous catalyst. Experimental work was carried out in a laboratory-scale semi-batch autoclave to obtain the intrinsic reaction kinetics. The experimental results were described with a plausible reaction mechanism comprising the reaction of potassium methoxide with carbon monoxide, followed by the proton transfer from methanol to the reaction intermediate to restore the catalyst. It was observed that simple first order kinetics fits the experimental data of the catalyst decomposition. A model for the gas-liquid mass transfer, coupled to the synthesis reaction was developed and the reaction of potassium methoxide was assumed to be the rate-determining step. The equilibrium, mass transfer and rate parameters included in the completely new kinetic model were determined with non-linear regression analysis. A comparison of the modeling results with the experimental data illustrated a good agreement between the model and the actual data. The kinetic and mass transfer models can be used for the scale-up of the methyl formate synthesis.

  • 9. Kataria, Rashmi
    et al.
    Ruhal, Rohit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Babu, Ramesh
    Ghosh, Sanjoy
    Saccharification of alkali treated biomass of Kans grass contributes higher sugar in contrast to acid treated biomass2013In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 230, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economical production of biofuel is prerequisite to depletion of fossil fuel. In recent years, biomass of numerous food crops was used as a feedstock for bioethanol production. Unfortunately, due to limited availability as well as confliction with food, these sources may hold back for continuous production of bioethanol. Therefore, in the present study a waste land crop "Kans grass" was utilized as feedstock for microbial production of bio-ethanol. The Kans grass biomass obtained after NaOH pretreatment at optimum conditions (in term of lignin removal) was subjected to enzymatic saccharification by using crude enzyme (obtained from Trichoderma reesei) to total reducing sugars (TRSs), which was further fermented for bioethanol production using yeast strains. Different time (30, 60, 90 and 120min), concentrations of NaOH (0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and 2%) as well as temperatures (100, 110 and 120°C) were used for pretreatment study. At 120°C, approximately more than 50% of delignification was observed. Moreover, subsequent enzymatic saccharification contributed 350mgg-1 dry biomass of total reducing sugar (TRS) production. Interestingly, TRS was approx. fivefold higher than enzymatic saccharification of acid pretreated biomass (69.08mgg-1) as reported previously (Kataria et al., 2011) and fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysate using microbes resulted in the 0.44-0.46gg-1 ethanol yield which is a high yield when compared to the other existing literature. Another advantage of alkali pre-treatment was without production of toxic compounds in comparison to acid pre-treatment method. In conclusion, Kans grass was shown as potential feedstock for biofuel production via alkali and enzymatic saccharification in contrast to acid pre-treatment.

  • 10. Leino, Ewelina
    et al.
    Mäki-Arvela, Päivi
    Eränen, Kari
    Tenho, Mikko
    Murzin, Dmitry Yu
    Salmi, Tapio
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Enhanced yields of diethyl carbonate via one-pot synthesis from ethanol, carbon dioxide and butylene oxide over cerium (IV) oxide2011In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 176-177, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a considerable industrial interest towards short-chain dialkylcarbonate production technologies due to their attractive properties and apparent commercial applications. Over the years, dimethyl carbonate (DMC), in contrast to diethyl carbonate (DEC), was mainly explored in seeking novel synthesis ideas in academic investigations. Therefore, this work has been devoted to the synthesis of diethyl carbonate. The preliminary results showed that the formation of DEC via direct route starting from ethanol and carbon dioxide (CO2) is limited by the reaction equilibrium and therefore thermodynamics of the reaction has been estimated. Consecutively, butylene oxide was introduced to the reaction system as a dehydrating agent in order to overcome thermodynamic constrains and shift the equilibrium towards diethyl carbonate production. The underlying reason for choosing a longer chain epoxide (i.e. butyl instead of e.g. propyl) was the acute toxicity of short-chain epoxides. A 9-fold enhancement in DEC yield compared to the method without any water removal was achieved over cerium (IV) oxide (CeO2) in the presence of butylene oxide at 180 °C and 9 MPa of total final pressure unequivocally indicating that butylene oxide is an efficient chemical water trap. The highest obtained yield of diethyl carbonate was 2.5 mmol, corresponding to ethanol conversion of 15.6% and selectivity to DEC 10% on ethanol basis. Moreover, kinetic studies were conducted facilitating understanding of the reaction pathway and influence of various parameters on the reaction.

     

  • 11. Lin, Hao
    et al.
    Yang, Jie
    Liu, Yong-feng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Zeng, Fan-ju
    Tang, Xiao-Sheng
    Yao, Zhi-qiang
    Guan, Hong-ling
    Xiong, Qian
    Zhou, Jia-er
    Wu, Dao-fu
    Du, Juan
    Stable and efficient hybrid Ag-In-S/ZnS@SiO2-carbon quantum dots nanocomposites for white light-emitting diodes2020In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 393, article id 124654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a promising energy-saving technique, the eco-friendly and low-cost solid-state white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) based on quantum dots (QDs) have been widely studied. Herein, a WLED device prepared by core-shell structure nanocomposites based on Ag-In-S/ZnS@SiO2 quantum dots (AIS@SiO2) and carbon quantum dots (CDs) was successfully constructed. CDs were combined onto the surface of AIS@SiO2 QDs to synthesize Ag-In-S/ZnS@SiO2-Carbon quantum dots (AIS-CDs) nanocomposites with a white-light emission, which successfully overcome the quenching effect of CDs induced by conventional aggregation. The as-prepared AIS-CDs nanocomposites presented high stability and a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 35%. Moreover, the corresponding AIS-CDs nanocomposites-based WLEDs demonstrated the color coordinate of (0.32, 0.33), which is comparable to the pure white light (0.33, 0.33); furthermore, the luminous efficiency of the as-prepared WLEDs showed 15.1 lm W-1. These results reported herein may open up a new avenue for the development of high-performance, low-cost, and environmentally-friendly WLEDs.

  • 12. Liu, Niantao
    et al.
    Mamat, Xamxikamar
    Jiang, Ruyuan
    Tong, Wei
    Huang, Yudai
    Jia, Dianzeng
    Li, Yongtao
    Wang, Lei
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China.
    Facile high-voltage sputtering synthesis of three-dimensional hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped carbon coated Si composite for high performance lithium-ion batteries2018In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 343, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various kinds of efforts have been devoted to ameliorate the serious volume-expansion effect and low electron conductivity of silicon-based materials in lithium ion batteries. Here, we report a facile high voltage sputtering process to prepare three-dimensional hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped carbon coated Si microsphere to significantly improve the lithium storage performance. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the as-prepared composite is composed of silicon nanoparticles (similar to 100 nm) coated with conductive thin carbon layer (similar to 8.5 nm). The composite shows excellent lithium storage performance with a reversible capacity of 1565 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), as well as a long cycling performance at the high current density of 2 A g(-1). The facile preparation process and highly silicon-loading (similar to 78%) makes the prepared material be a great potential application in lithium-ion batteries.

  • 13.
    Ma, Xin
    et al.
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Guo, Qin
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Zhang, Jingmei
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Su, Zhi
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Zhou, Shuxing
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Hubei University of Arts and Science, Xiangyang, China.
    Wei, Longyang
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Li, Shouzhu
    Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China.
    Yue, Fan
    Key Laboratory of Oil & Gas Fine Chemicals Ministry of Education, Xinjiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Laboratory of Nanofiber Membrane Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Institute of Technology, Akesu, China; Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    [CH3NH3][M(HCOO)3]-based 2D porous NiCo2S4 nanosheets for high-performance supercapacitors with high power densities2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 437, article id 135337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost-effective and high-performance electrode materials for energy storage and conversion are essential for commercial applications. In this work, the influence of solvent on the morphologies of [CH3NH3][M(HCOO)3] precursors was studied to design and synthesize two-dimensional (2D) porous NiCo2S4 nanosheets with different structures. As an electrode material for supercapacitors, Microflower-NiCo2S4 exhibits excellent capacitance (1,141 F g−1 at 1 A g−1) and stability (88.2% of initial capacitance maintained after 5,000 cycles at 5 A g−1). Moreover, an asymmetric capacitor was constructed using Microflower-NiCo2S4 and porous carbon (PC) and demonstrated an energy density of 51.25 Wh kg−1 at a power density of 397.5 W kg−1. When two Microflower-NiCo2S4//PC asymmetric supercapacitors were assembled in series, the device supplied power for an alarm clock with dimensions of 6.1 × 6.1 cm2 for more than 32 min. Therefore, the preparation of metal sulfides and metal oxides with hollow structures using a [CH3NH3][M(HCOO)3]-template has potential applications in energy storage and conversion.

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  • 14. Muhammad, Yaseen
    et al.
    Rashid, Haroon Ur
    Subhan, Sidra
    Rahman, Ata Ur
    Sahibzada, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tong, Zhangfa
    Boosting the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene efficiency of Mn decorated (Co/Ni)-Mo/Al2O3 catalysts at mild temperature and pressure by coupling with phosphonium based ionic liquids2019In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 375, article id 121957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of fuel oils is the most viable and commercially acceptable approach operated under harsh operating conditions. To avoid harsh reaction conditions, this study is designed on the HDS of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under the combined effect of five types of Phosphonium based ionic liquids (PILs) i.e. [C4H9)3(C14H29)P]Br, [(C8H17)(C4H9)3P]Br [(C4H9)4P]Cl, [BMIM]PF6 and [C4H9)3(C16H33)P]Br with 5 wt% Mn promoted (Co or Ni)-Mo/Al2O3 catalysts at extremely ambient temperature and pressure. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation technique followed by their sulfidation (30% CS2 in cyclohexane) and textural characterization via SEM, BET, PXRD and XPS techniques. Catalytic activity results indicated that DBT conversion was boosted from 24% (by mere Mn-Ni-Mo/Al2O3) to 84% (by Mn-Ni-Mo/Al2O3 coupled with 10 g of [(C4H9)3(C16H33)P]Br) at 3 MPa H2 pressure, 120 °C and 4 h reaction time. Among the five types of PILs, the enhancement in HDS activity combined with solid catalyst was found dependent on the type and length of cation chain. The enhanced DBT conversion caused by Mn-Ni-Mo/Al2O3 solid catalyst coupled with IL was envisioned to be due the synergy between hydrogenation reaction (by the former) and extractive desulfurization (by the later) with an overall HDS activity order of: Mn-Ni-Mo/Al2O3 > Mn-Co-Mo/Al2O3 > Ni-Mo/Al2O3 > Co-Mo/Al2O3. HDS products were analyzed by GC-MS and possible reaction route was anticipated. This study successfully discovered and elaborated of boosting of HDS of DBT at extremely mild operation conditions under the integrated effect of solid catalyst and PILs and hence can be pragmatically envisaged as an alternative approach for fuel oils desulfurization and other similar reactions on industrial level.

  • 15.
    Nie, Zhicheng
    et al.
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Chen, Mengshan
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhejiang, Zhoushan, China.
    Zhang, Lei
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Feng, Qing
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Hu, Jinsong
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Huang, Xinhua
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Zhou, Chunhui
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Zhou, Yingtang
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhejiang, Zhoushan, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Yunnan, Kunming, China.
    Tailoring the d-band center by intermetallic charge-transfer manipulation in bimetal alloy nanoparticle confined in N-doped carbon nanobox for efficient rechargeable Zn-air battery2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 463, article id 142411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this effort, the electronic-structure modulation strategy through nano-alloying was rationally designed to fabricate Fe-Ni alloy particles embedded in an N-doped carbon nanobox. The as-developed catalyst outperformed the commercialized noble-metal benchmarks with a decent half-wave potential of 0.891 V for ORR and a small overpotential of 325 mV at 10 mA/cm2 for OER both in 0.1 M KOH solution. Beyond that, a highly-efficient regenerative Zn-air battery was also successfully constructed, evidenced by a small potential gap of 0.664 V (between Ej=10 and E1/2), a high specific capacity of 763 mAh/g, a large peak power density of 270 mW/cm2, and robust stability. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical simulation confirmed that the alloying of Ni into Fe could well manipulate the electronic structure, leading to favorable intermetallic charge-transfer and then downshifting the d-band center of Fe adsorption sites, all of which help to significantly lower the reaction barriers of the involved intermediates during the electrocatalytic ORR/OER processes.

  • 16.
    Tan, Fang
    et al.
    School of Chemical Science and Technology, Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Zhou, Yingtang
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, China.
    Zhang, Hua
    School of Chemical Science and Technology, Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Sun, Pengliang
    School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, China.
    Li, Hongyi
    Guangzhou Panyu Polytechnic, Guangzhou, China.
    Liu, Xijun
    MOE Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Non-ferrous Metals and Materials, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Processing for Non-ferrous Metals and Featured Materials, Guangxi University, Guangxi, Nanning, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. School of Chemical Science and Technology, Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Improving the hydrogen evolution reaction activity of molybdenum-based heterojunction nanocluster capsules via electronic modulation by erbium–nitrogen–phosphorus ternary doping2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 454, no Part 1, article id 140079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of a hydrogen-based economy with robust hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts remains a challenge. In this study, we prepared MoO2/Mo2N3 heterostructure nanoclusters co-doped with nitrogen, phosphorus, and erbium for the first time. The introduction of the nitrogen and phosphorus atoms into the transition metal increases the d-electron density and contracts the d-band, which leads to a rearranged electronic structure of the MoO2/Mo2N3 heterojunction. The coupling of the rare earth erbium dopant with the valence band of the heterojunction leads to the redistribution of the electron density in the catalyst and promotes covalent interaction with the adsorbed intermediates, thereby optimizing the Gibbs free energy of intermediate adsorption and improving the catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Not only is an efficient and economical catalyst for electrolytic aquatic hydrogen production provided in this work, but a new synthesis scheme is also proposed for the rational synthesis of homologous core–shell polymetallic nanostructures with broad application prospects.

  • 17.
    Vucetic, Nemanja
    et al.
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Virtanen, Pasi
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Shchukarev, Andrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Competing commercial catalysts: Unprecedented catalyst activity and stability of Mizoroki-Heck reaction in a continuous packed bed reactor2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 433, article id 134432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Main obstacle for adopting continuous processes as a standard technology for Mizoroki-Heck reaction usually lies in its specific reaction mechanism. Here we present an important step forward answering the challenges unraveled through a comprehensive study that provides deeper understanding on the Mizoroki-Heck reaction, in particular the case when iodobenzene and butyl acrylate react in a continuous packed bed reactor in the presence of a Pd Supported Ionic Liquid Catalyst (SILCA). On-line UV–VIS spectrometry supported by ICP-OES, TEM and XPS measurements were carried out and the catalyst leaching was minimized. Finally, simple continuous flow process was proposed resulting in a high catalytic activity (up to 1470 molArI molPd−1h−1) and reaching productivity in the range of 12,000 to 16,000 molArI molPd−1 thus competing with the performance of commercial catalysts.

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  • 18.
    Weidemann, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Doctoral School, Umeå University.
    Lundin, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Behavior of PCDF, PCDD, PCN and PCB during low temperature thermal treatment of MSW incineration fly ash2015In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 279, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For both economic and ecological reasons better knowledge of effects of incinerating waste on its persistent organic pollutant (POP) contents is needed. Thus, ash from three municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants was collected and analyzed for elemental composition, carbon speciation and POP (PCDF, PCDD, PCN and PCB) contents. The ash was then subjected to two thermal treatments: a small batch treatment (3 g) in sealed glass ampoules and a large batch treatment (0.7 kg, in a kiln) under oxygen-deficient conditions. The POP contents of the ash (and the gas phase generated by the large batch treatment) were subsequently re-analyzed. Finally, principal component analysis of congener profiles were used to clarify the POPs' behavior in the treated ash. The results indicate that the thermal treatments had similar effects on PCDDs and PCBs, which apparently degraded but did not reform. They also had similar effects on PCDFs and PCNs, which were degraded but selectively reformed (both during and after the treatment). Furthermore, the ash composition did not significantly influence the homologue-specific congener patterns of the formed PCDFs and PCNs, but they had markedly lower chlorination degrees than those in the untreated ash and their overall toxicity was reduced by the kiln treatment, regardless of post-kiln concentrations and ash composition. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Yang, Di
    et al.
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Deng, Ziai
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Wang, Shaochi
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Yin, Xuechi
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Xi, Jiafeng
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wang, Jianlong
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Zhang, Daohong
    College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China.
    Polydopamine-coated two-dimensional nanomaterials as high-affinity photothermal signal tag towards dual-signal detection of Salmonella typhimurium by lateral flow immunoassay2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 472, article id 145110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as signal reporters has been extensively utilized for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Nevertheless, it’s challenging for LFIA to obtain sensitive detection, because of the inefficient coupling of AuNPs and antibodies and the poor colorimetric signals. To improve on this, we used a two-dimensional nanomaterial (Cu2MoS4) modified with PDA (CMS@PDA) that provides superior bio-affinity and excellent photothermal signal qualities. With the CMS@PDA material, we successfully constructed a portable LFIA device for specific detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) using a dual-signal probe that combines colorimetric and photothermal signals (CM/PT). The dynamic detection range of the CMS@PDA-LFIA is 103 to 107 cfu mL−1. Notably, the detection limit of 103 cfu mL−1 is 100 times more sensitive compared to AuNPs-based LFIA. Moreover, the assay exhibits satisfactory recovery rates for S. typhimurium detection in food samples. In this research, the coating of PDA solves the problem of low water-solubility of CMS, making the proposed CMS@PDA nanocomposite showcase better performance in the CM/PT mode detection by LFIA. Beyond all doubt, this work offers a novel supplement for applying multifunctional two-dimensional nanomaterials in LFIAs.

  • 20.
    Ye, Ying
    et al.
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Zhang, Lei
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Nie, Zhicheng
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China.
    Li, Nianpeng
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Mining Response and Disaster Prevention and Control in Deep Coal Mines, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Anhui, Huainan, China; Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Yunnan, Kunming, China.
    Zhou, Shuxing
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Hubei University of Arts and Science, Xiangyang, China.
    Wang, Huaisheng
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Yunnan, Kunming, China.
    Simultaneously promoting charge and mass transports in carved particle-in-box nanoreactor for rechargeable Zn-air battery2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 446, article id 137210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fundamental understanding of fabricating promoted bi-functional electrocatalyst to achieve fast charge-transfer and smooth mass-transport in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) through the rational management of catalyst composition and ingenious design of nanostructure is highly desired but still a formidable challenge. Herein, an advanced carved particle-in-box nanoreactor, composed of small Fe-Co-Ni tri-metallic alloy nanoparticles confined in porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanocage, was developed through a spatially-confined pyrolysis strategy. Tri-metal alloy could optimize the electronic structure of the catalyst, thus inducing the charge redistribution, and then regulating the adsorption and desorption energy barriers of intermediates in electrochemical reactions. Unique nano-hole design provided convenient and efficient channels for mass transfer during ORR and OER processes. Thanks to these attributes, the hybrid electrocatalyst delivered decent reversible oxygen catalytic activities, evidenced by a high half-wave potential of 0.850 V towards ORR and a low overpotential of 355 mV at 10 mA/cm2 for OER both in alkaline electrolyte. As a proof-of-concept, this as-developed carved particle-in-box nanoreactor enabled the assembled Zn-air battery to deliver a narrow potential gap of 0.735 V, a decent power density of 315 mW/cm2, a notable specific capacity of 754 mAh/gZn and excellent durability up to 165 h of continuous charge and discharge operations, thus implying the potential applications of this sophisticated catalyst model for promising energy conversion.

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  • 21. Zhang, Wei
    et al.
    Ling, Chen
    Liu, Haoyang
    Zhang, Aini
    Mao, Lu
    Wang, Jing
    Chao, Jie
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Yao, Qingqiang
    Chen, Jialin
    Tannic acid-mediated dual peptide-functionalized scaffolds to direct stem cell behavior and osteochondral regeneration2020In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 396, article id 125232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of cell-instructive scaffolds, which provide biochemical cues to direct endogenous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) behavior, has the potential to revolutionize osteochondral tissue engineering. However, scaffold material itself is generally lacking the inductive signals. Here, a novel peptide-functionalized scaffold was prepared by prime-coating Ca-alginate scaffold with tannic acid (TA) followed by conjugation of E7/P15 peptides (CA-TA-E7/P15). The system leveraged TA as a reactive intermediate between Ca-alginate and peptides due to the multiple functional groups of TA. These interactions induced by TA prime-coating contributed to enhanced scaffold stability and mechanical properties, increased peptide conjugation and sustained release of peptides without affecting their bioactivity, in a TA concentration-dependent manner. The conjugation of E7/P15 peptides endowed the scaffold with the potential to enhance BMSCs recruitment and deposition of cartilage and bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, the prepared CA-TA-E7/P15 scaffold showed a promoted biological performance of simultaneous cartilage and subchondral bone regeneration in rabbit osteochondral defect model. These findings indicate that TA is an effective surface modification intermediate and crosslinking aid, and that the CA-TA-E7/P15 scaffold developed in this study serves as a promising cell-instructive scaffold for osteochondral regeneration.

  • 22.
    Zhao, Xue
    et al.
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China; College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Jia, Xiuxiu
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Li, Hongyi
    Guangzhou Panyu Polytechnic, Guangzhou, China.
    Zhang, Haibo
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhou, Xiaohai
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhou, Yingtang
    National Engineering Research Center for Marine Aquaculture, Marine Science and Technology College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, China.
    Wang, Huaisheng
    School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, China.
    Yin, Lifeng
    State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Efficient degradation of Health-threatening organic pollutants in water by atomically dispersed Cobalt-Activated peroxymonosulfate2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 450, article id 138098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Degrading health-threatening organic pollutants (HTOPs) in water systems through advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective way to treat environmental wastewater; however, such processes require advanced catalysts. This study combined complexation effects and structural confinement strategies to rapidly prepare Co2+-isolated metal–organic framework polymers and utilized a thermal treatment process to achieve the efficient anchoring of atom-dispersed Co in a boron–carbon-nitrogen matrix (denoted as SACoN/BCN), which can improve the utilization of Co catalytic sites. SACoN/BCN effectively activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS), with the ratio and mineralization rate of sulfamethazine (SMT) removed by degradation within 40 min reached 95.2 % and 70.0 %, respectively. Radical inhibition experiments and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tests showed that 1O2 generated from SACoN/BCN-activated PMS was the key reactive oxygen species that promoted HTOP degradation. Density functional theory calculations revealed that, following the introduction of electron-deficient B heteroatoms, electrons in PMS will be injected into SACoN/BCN, thereby realizing strong adsorption and further activation of PMS. The cytotoxicity of SACoN/BCN is almost negligible because of the chemical bonding (or entrapment) of Co atoms in the inorganic boron–carbon-nitrogen matrix, thereby preventing Co from forming mobile CoII ions in the aqueous system. This research provides information for advanced catalysts for the removal of HTOPs and experimental and theoretical inspiration for the preparation of single-atom catalysts for advanced oxidation processes and the mechanism of PMS activation.

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  • 23.
    Zhao, Xue
    et al.
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China; College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhu, Zhu
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    He, Yingnan
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Zhang, Haibo
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhou, Xiaohai
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Hu, Wanbiao
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Li, Meng
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
    Zhang, Shusheng
    College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
    Dong, Yemin
    State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
    Hu, Xun
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan, China.
    Kuklin, Artem V.
    International Research Center of Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry (IRC SQC), Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Glib V.
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, ITN, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ågren, Hans
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Simultaneous anchoring of Ni nanoparticles and single-atom Ni on BCN matrix promotes efficient conversion of nitrate in water into high-value-added ammonia2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 433, no Part 2, article id 133190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical synthesis of ammonia driven by clean energy is expected to realize the supply of ammonia for distributed production of industry and agriculture. Here, nickel nanoparticles and nickel in the form of single atoms were simultaneously anchored on the electrochemically active carrier BCN matrix through a structured domain strategy, which realized a high-efficiency, high-value-added, conversion of nitrate in sewage. Specifically, the electrochemical nitrate reduction reaction (NIRR) driven by BCN@Ni in alkaline media achieves an ammonia yield rate as high as 2320.2 μg h−1 cm−2 (at −0.5 V vs RHE), and Faraday efficiency as high as 91.15% (at −0.3 V vs RHE). Even in neutral and acidic media, the ammonia yield rates of NIRR driven by BCN@Ni are as high as 1904.2 μg h−1 cm−2 and 2057.4 μg h−1 cm−2, respectively (at −0.4 V vs RHE). The 15NO3- isotope labeling experiment verified that the recorded ammonia all came from the electrochemical reduction of NO3– on BCN@Ni. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that both nano-Ni and single-atom Ni in BCN@Ni have the ability to electrochemically convert NO3– into NH3, and that the addition of BCN can further promote the NIRR on Ni.

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