Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gil-Lespinard, Mercedes
    et al.
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Castañeda, Jazmín
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Almanza-Aguilera, Enrique
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Gómez, Jesús Humberto
    Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Section of Environmental Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Overvad, Kim
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Katzke, Verena
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Masala, Giovanna
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network—ISPRO, Florence, Italy.
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Department of Research, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori Via Venezian, Milan, Italy.
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Hyblean Association for Epidemiological Research (AIRE-ONLUS), Ragusa, Italy.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital, Turin, Italy.
    Skeie, Guri
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lasheras, Cristina
    Department of Functional Biology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus of Cartuja, Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INYTA) ‘José Mataix’, Biomedical Research Centre, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Huerta, José María
    Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub-Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain; Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    da Silva, Marisa
    Register-Based Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    May, Anne M.
    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Freisling, Heinz
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Scalbert, Augustin
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Dietary intake of 91 individual polyphenols and 5-year body weight change in the EPIC-PANACEA cohort2022In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 2425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyphenols are bioactive compounds from plants with antioxidant properties that may have a protective role against body weight gain, with adipose tissue and systemic oxidative stress as potential targets. We aimed to investigate the dietary intake of individual polyphenols and their association with 5-year body weight change in a sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). This study included 349,165 adult participants from nine European countries. Polyphenol intake was estimated through country-specific validated dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. Body weight was obtained at recruitment and after a mean follow-up time of 5 years. Associations were estimated using multilevel mixed linear regression models. From 91 polyphenols included, the majority (n = 67) were inversely associated with 5-year body weight change after FDR-correction (q < 0.05). The greatest inverse associations were observed for quercetin 3-O-rhamnoside (change in weight for doubling in intake: −0.071 (95% CI: −0.085; −0.056) kg/5 years). Only 13 polyphenols showed positive associations with body weight gain, mainly from the subclass hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) with coffee as the main dietary source, such as 4-caffeoylquinic acid (0.029 (95% CI: 0.021; 0.038) kg/5 years). Individual polyphenols with fruit, tea, cocoa and whole grain cereals as the main dietary sources may contribute to body weight maintenance in adults. Individual HCAs may have different roles in body weight change depending on their dietary source.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. Centro de Química da Madeira, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Campus Universitário da Penteada, piso 0, Funchal 9000-390, Portugal.
    Gouveia, Carla A.
    Carvalho, Maria J.
    Rodrigues, Ana I.
    Nording, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Castilho, Paula C.
    Antioxidant Capacity, Cytotoxicity and Antimycobacterial Activity of Madeira Archipelago Endemic Helichrysum Dietary and Medicinal Plants2014In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 713-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential bioactivity of dietary and medicinal endemic Helichrysum plants from Madeira Archipelago was explored, for the first time, in order to supply new information for the general consumer. In vitro antioxidant properties were investigated using DPPH, ABTS(+), FRAP and beta-Carotene assays, and the total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were also determined. Although the results generally showed a large variation among the three analyzed plants, the methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Exception is made for H. devium n-hexane extract that showed good radical scavenger capacity associated to compounds with good reducing properties. In the Artemia salina toxicity assay and antimycobaterial activity, H. devium was the most potent plant with the lowest LD50 at 216.7 ± 10.4 and MIC ≤ 50mug·mL(-1). Chemometric evaluation (Principal Component Analysis-PCA) showed close interdependence between the ABTS, TPC and TFC methods and allowed to group H. devium samples.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Londoño, Catalina
    et al.
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary, University of the Republic, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Quantitative Methods, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Republic, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    de Villasante, Izar
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Crous-Bou, Marta
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Scalbert, Augustin
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olsen, Anja
    Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Overvad, Kim
    Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Katzke, Verena
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Palli, Domenico
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network-ISPRO, Florence, Italy.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, “Civic M.P. Arezzo” Hospital ASP, Ragusa, Italy.
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; Unit of Epidemiology, Regional Health Service ASL TO3, Grugliasco, Italy.
    Gram, Inger T.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Rylander, Charlotta
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Skeie, Guri
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub-Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain; Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Huerta, José María
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
    Sartor, Hanna
    Diagnostic Radiology Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Idahl, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya
    Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Exposome and Heredity Team, CESP, Paris-Saclay University, UVSQ, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Laouali, Nasser
    Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Exposome and Heredity Team, CESP, Paris-Saclay University, UVSQ, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Kvaskoff, Marina
    Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Exposome and Heredity Team, CESP, Paris-Saclay University, UVSQ, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Turzanski-Fortner, Renée
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Polyphenol intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (Epic) study2021In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite some epidemiological evidence on the protective effects of polyphenol intake on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk from case-control studies, the evidence is scarce from prospective studies and non-existent for several polyphenol classes. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the intake of total, classes and subclasses of polyphenols and EOC risk in a large prospective study. The study was conducted in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, which included 309,129 adult women recruited mostly from the general population. Polyphenol intake was assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 1469 first incident EOC cases (including 806 serous, 129 endometrioid, 102 mucinous, and 67 clear cell tumours) were identified. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile of total polyphenol intake compared with the lowest quartile (HRQ4vsQ1 ) was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94–1.39; p-trend = 0.11). Similarly, the intake of most classes and subclasses of polyphenols were not related to either overall EOC risk or any EOC subtype. A borderline statistically significant positive association was observed between phenolic acid intake (HRQ4vsQ1 = 1.20, 95% CI 1.01–1.43; p-trend = 0.02) and EOC risk, especially for the serous subtype and in women with obesity, although these associations did not exceed the Bonferroni correction threshold. The current results do not support any association between polyphenol intake and EOC in our large European prospective study. Results regarding phenolic acid intake need further investigation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Mikac, Sara
    et al.
    International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, Gdansk, Poland.
    Rychłowski, Michał
    Laboratory of Virus Molecular Biology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Gdansk, Abrahama 58, Gdansk, Poland.
    Dziadosz, Alicja
    International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, Gdansk, Poland.
    Szabelska-Beresewicz, Alicja
    Department of Mathematical and Statistical Methods, Poznań University of Life Sciences, 28 Wojska Polskiego St, Poznań, Poland.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, Gdansk, Poland; Inserm UMRS1131, Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, Hôpital St. Louis, Paris, France; RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Zluty kopec 7, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hupp, Theodore
    International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, Gdansk, Poland; Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre at the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Sznarkowska, Alicja
    International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, Gdansk, Poland.
    Identification of a stable, non-canonically regulated nrf2 form in lung cancer cells2021In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2) transcription factor is recognized for its pro-survival and cell protective role upon exposure to oxidative, chemical, or metabolic stresses. Nrf2 controls a number of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, autophagy, lipid synthesis, and metabolism and glucose metabolism and is a target of activation in chronic diseases like diabetes, neurodegenerative, and inflammatory diseases. The dark side of Nrf2 is revealed when its regulation is imbalanced (e.g., via oncogene activation or mutations) and under such conditions constitutively active Nrf2 promotes cancerogenesis, metastasis, and radio-and chemoresistance. When there is no stress, Nrf2 is instantly degraded via Keap1-Cullin 3 (Cul3) pathway but despite this, cells exhibit a basal activation of Nrf2 target genes. It is yet not clear how Nrf2 maintains the expression of its targets under homeostatic conditions. Here, we found a stable 105 kDa Nrf2 form that is resistant to Keap1-Cul3-mediated degradation and translocates to the nucleus of lung cancer cells. RNA-Seq analysis indicate that it might originate from the exon 2 or exon 3-truncated transcripts. This stable 105 kDa Nrf2 form might help explain the constitutive activity of Nrf2 under normal cellular conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5. Sipari, Nina
    et al.
    Lihavainen, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Keinänen, Markku
    Metabolite Profiling of Paraquat Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Radical-induced Cell Death1 (rcd1): A Mediator of Antioxidant Defence Mechanisms2022In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 2034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) is an Arabidopsis thaliana nuclear protein that is disrupted during oxidative stress. RCD1 is considered an important integrative node in development and stress responses, and the rcd1 plants have several phenotypes and altered resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic stresses. One of the phenotypes of rcd1 is resistance to the herbicide paraquat, but the mechanisms behind it are unknown. Paraquat causes a rapid burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initially in the chloroplast. We performed multi-platform metabolomic analyses in wild type Col-0 and paraquat resistant rcd1 plants to identify pathways conveying resistance and the function of RCD1 in this respect. Wild type and rcd1 plants were clearly distinguished by their abundance of antioxidants and specialized metabolites and their responses to paraquat. The lack of response in rcd1 suggested constitutively active defense against ROS via elevated flavonoid, glutathione, β-carotene, and tocopherol levels, whereas its ascorbic acid levels were compromised under non-stressed control conditions when compared to Col-0. We propose that RCD1 acts as a hub that maintains basal antioxidant system, and its inactivation induces defense responses by enhancing the biosynthesis and redox cycling of low molecular weight antioxidants and specialized metabolites with profound antioxidant activities alleviating oxidative stress.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Zannini, Flavien
    et al.
    Roret, Thomas
    Przybyla-Toscano, Jonathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Université de Lorraine, Inra, IAM, F-54000 Nancy, France; flavien.zannini@univ-lorraine.fr (F.Z.); thomas.roret@sb-roscoff.fr (T.R.); przybylajonathan@orange.fr (J.P.-T.); tiphaine.dhalleine@univ-lorraine.fr (T.D.); nicolas.rouhier@univ-lorraine.fr (N.R.).
    Dhalleine, Tiphaine
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    Couturier, Jeremy
    Mitochondrial arabidopsis thaliana TRXo isoforms bind an iron-sulfur cluster and reduce NFU proteins In Vitro2018In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 7, no 10, article id 142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In plants, the mitochondrial thioredoxin (TRX) system generally comprises only one or two isoforms belonging to the TRX h or o classes, being less well developed compared to the numerous isoforms found in chloroplasts. Unlike most other plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana possesses two TRXo isoforms whose physiological functions remain unclear. Here, we performed a structure-function analysis to unravel the respective properties of the duplicated TRXo1 and TRXo2 isoforms. Surprisingly, when expressed in Escherichia coli, both recombinant proteins existed in an apo-monomeric form and in a homodimeric iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster-bridged form. In TRXo2, the [4Fe-4S] cluster is likely ligated in by the usual catalytic cysteines present in the conserved Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys signature. Solving the three-dimensional structure of both TRXo apo-forms pointed to marked differences in the surface charge distribution, notably in some area usually participating to protein-protein interactions with partners. However, we could not detect a difference in their capacity to reduce nitrogen-fixation-subunit-U (NFU)-like proteins, NFU4 or NFU5, two proteins participating in the maturation of certain mitochondrial Fe-S proteins and previously isolated as putative TRXo1 partners. Altogether, these results suggest that a novel regulation mechanism may prevail for mitochondrial TRXs o, possibly existing as a redox-inactive Fe-S cluster-bound form that could be rapidly converted in a redox-active form upon cluster degradation in specific physiological conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf