Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Digital Health and the Embodying of Professionalism: Avatars as Health Professionals in Sweden2019In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 9, no 1, article id e2847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores virtual health professionals (VHPs), digital health technology software, in Swedish health care. The aim is to analyze how health professionalismis (re)negotiated through avatar embodiments of VHPs and to explore the informants’ notions of what a health professional is, behaves and looks like. The paper builds on ethnographic fieldwork with informants working directly or indirectly with questions of digital health technology and professionalism. Discourse theory is used to analyze the material. Subjectification, authenticity, and diversity were found to be crucial for informants to articulate health professionalism when discussing human avatars, professional attire, gendered and ethnified embodiments. The informants attempted to make the VHPs credibly professional but inauthentcally human. A discursive struggle over health professionalism between patient choice and diversity within health care was identified where the patient’s choice of avatars—if based on prejudices—might threaten healthcare professionalism and healthcare professionals by (re)producing racism and sexism.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Jansson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    School counsellors’ professional practice in health promotion, prevention and remedial work in Swedish schools2024In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 14, no 1, article id e5645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Swedish Education Act, schools in Sweden must provide comprehensive student health services to foster an inclusive and conducive learning environment, promoting students’ well-being and knowledge development. As part of a multi-professional team, school counsellors are essential in achieving these goals. However, national guidance lacks details on the role of school counsellors in health promotion, prevention and remedial efforts. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining aspects of school counsellors’ professional work using theories of professions. Open-ended answers in a survey distributed to school counsellors in Sweden were analysed through content analysis. Findings show that remedial work primarily focuses on individual students’ social issues through conversation-based interventions. Preventive work targets groups and the broader school environment, often involving tasks like policy development. Health promotion work stands out with its educational component, where school counsellors are involved in Life Competence Education, often in collaboration with other school professionals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Rantatalo, Oscar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The enactment of professional boundary work: a case study of crime investigation2023In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e5345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional boundary takes place as actors negotiate occupational boundaries and division of labour. In this article, we examine the conditions of defensive, accommodating, and configurational boundary work in the context of crime investigation. We analyse how professional boundaries are negotiated as civilian investigators become involved with policing. The article is based on 71 interviews with civilian and police crime investigators from a variety of investigation units in Sweden. Findings show how policing as a professional field is shifted as civilians from a wide variety of backgrounds and with varying motivations enter the occupation. Defensive boundary work that devalued civilians was widely occurring. However, boundary work that focused on learning, collaboration, and training was also occurring in high-status units. The discussion focuses on how power asymmetries impact boundary work when professions are undergoing change. This study exemplifies how organizational actors navigate, defend, and challenge their positions as professional boundaries are negotiated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Rexvid, Devin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Blom, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evertsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Forssén, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Risk reduction technologies in general practice and social work2012In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed in that GPs were sceptical whilst SWs took a more pragmatic view. Furthermore the results suggest that SWs might experience professional benefits by adopting an adherent approach to the increased dis-semination of risk reduction technologies (RRT). GPs, however, did not seem to experience such benefits.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Rexvid, Devin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evertsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Non-problematic Situations in Social Workers’ and GPs’ Practice2016In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to describe and analyze written accounts of non-problem- atic situations by 28 social workers and 24 general practitioners (GPs). The results show that non-problematic situations were connected to professionals’ control of the intervention process. Non-problematic situations were described by social workers as situations where they had control of the relationship with the client either by the use of coercive means or by the client’s active cooperation. GPs referred to non- problematic situations as situations where they had control of the intervention pro- cess mainly by the use of professional knowledge. One main conclusion is that the ability to control the intervention process through control of the relationship with the client may be of significance to those professions where a central part of the profes- sional jurisdiction involves changing clients’ behaviors. This conclusion means that professional knowledge is not the only way to control the professional intervention process. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Wolanik Boström, Katarzyna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Complex Professional Learning: Physicians Working for Aid Organisations2018In: Professions & Professionalism, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the issue of professional learning of Swedish physicians returning from their work for international aid organisations in the global South. It is a qualitative case study based on 16 in-depth interviews,whichuses a thematic narrative analysis, a typology of knowledge, and the concept of symbolic capital. The doctors’ assignments in settings radically different from the welfare state context meant professional challenges, including an initial feeling of de-skilling, but also enhanced reflexivity andintensiveand complex learning. The doctors acquired new medical and organisational knowledge, improved diagnostic skills, new perspectives on different health care systems, cultural contexts, global power relations, and postcolonial hierarchies. Since their return to Sweden, they have encountered a friendly but rather shallow interest in their experiences. Their new insights and ideas for change have not been easy to validate assymbolic capital, and their intensive individual learning is seldom utilised for organisational learning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf