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  • 1.
    Allan, Rachel
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Walker, Terry
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Data-driven learning: tools, approaches, and next steps2023In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 2.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    'To my surprise, i don’t particularly like my own opinions': exploring adaptations of the 'open-guise' technique to raise sociolinguistic language awareness2023In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following study describes a data-driven learning scenario aimed at raising sociolinguistic awareness of matters related to gender, language and stereotyping. The design is inspired by the matched-guise technique (MGT), a quantitative data driven experimental method that has been used extensively to investigate language attitudes. In the scenario, differences in respondents’ response patterns to two gender-manipulated versions (male-female vs. female-male dyads) of the same recorded dialogue were used as a starting point for awareness-raising activities aimed at highlighting how gender stereotypes may affect perceptions of a dialogue. The main focus of the article is a comparison of the learning outcomes of two variants of the setup: a traditional undisclosed MGT-inspired setup, where the design and purpose of the experiment was kept secret until after the response phase, and a so-called open-guise design, where respondents were informed of the design and purpose of the experiment prior to the response phase. Preliminary results suggest that respondents adjust their assessments of a speaker depending on the guise, even when they know it is the same speaker they are listening to. Moreover, the open-guise design seemed to lead to greater pedagogic impact than the scenario based on the undisclosed design. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

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  • 3.
    Glotova, Elena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Johansson Falck, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Metaphors of tinnitus as an acoustic environment2022In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 138-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a qualitative study of metaphors at the levels of lexico-encyclopedic conceptual (LEC) metaphors (Johansson Falck 2018, forthc.) in nineteenth-century medical records of tinnitus and hearing disorders by English-speaking (the UK and the US) practitioners. Metaphor is essential for the linguistic and conceptual expression of illness (Semino 2008: 175) and, as we observe, remains endemic for the description of tinnitus in medical records. Our primary aim is to identify the metaphors used to describe the sounds of tinnitus, the kinds of experiences involved in these metaphorical conceptualizations and the cognitive and affording presence of tinnitus metaphors. The results suggest that metaphor provides a framework for the analogical reasoning about tinnitus and the methods of its treatment. Nineteenth-century accounts of ear diseases reference the sounds of biological and non-biological natural categories, transport and industrial sounds, the sounds of domestic interiors and music. 

    Metaphorical descriptions of tinnitus sounds connect with the affordances of the environment (Gibson 2015) and are inherent to the location and occupation of the patient. As our findings support the historical explorations of tinnitus accounts, they make it possible to contribute to our current understanding of tinnitus by highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach and establishing the significance of metaphor analysis in tinnitus studies. 

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  • 4.
    Gregersdotter, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    More than Murderers, Other than Men.: Views of Masculinity in Modern Crime Fiction2009In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 39-57Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 5.
    Gregersdotter, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    The doctor and the murderess: a discussion of knowledge and ignorance in margaret atwood's alias grace2022In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grace Marks was a convicted double murderer in nineteenth-century Canada. Her case was well known at the time thanks to its sensationally violent and sexual details. The novel Alias Grace (1997) by Margaret Atwood engages in a discussion about the relationship between fact and fiction, scientific objectivity and power. This article analyses the relationship between Atwood’s fictional Grace Marks and Dr Simon Jordan, an American doctor who visits her in prison hoping to find out the truth about Grace and the murders.  Both Grace and Dr Jordan are formed by the existing norms of the time period, norms which govern how men and women of their particular class should act. However, what makes their meetings noteworthy is that Grace Marks possesses knowledge of the norms and expectations and can therefore use them to her advantage, whereas Dr Jordan does not, despite being an educated and professional man. In the end, this leads to Grace’s ability to tell her own story, and Dr Jordan’s failure as a man of science.

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  • 6.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    English Literary Studies in Sweden 1950-2019: Doctoral Research Projects and Disciplinary Renewal2021In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 29-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of doctoral research is of great significance for the development of an academic discipline and the potential for innovation. A significant number of PhD graduates however expect to be employed as university teachers, and the correlation between competence needs as suggested by the undergraduate curriculum and PhD research appears to be weak. Based on library catalogue data and digital archives, this study investigates interrelations between the initial research orientation of individual scholars and the development of English as a university subject in Sweden. Dissertation topics 1950-1999 indicate a gradual shift from a dominance of linguistics in the earlier decades to a dominance of literary studies towards the end of the period. Dissertations in the field of English-language literature between 2000 and 2019 demonstrate a growing interest in literatures outside England and the United States, a predominance of studies of prose and a move towards contextual modes of criticism centred on social or political theories. Studies of modern or contemporary literature dominate greatly whereas there are few dissertations on older literature. Undergraduate course plans and literature lists for 2020 from the major research universities show a strong connection between first-term literature courses and current research, as indicated by the topics of PhD dissertations from the first two decades of the twenty-first century. The teaching of older literature is not supported by new research to the same extent, however, which means that it may become increasingly difficult to ensure the close links between research and study programmes stipulated in the Swedish Higher Education Act (1992:1434).

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  • 7.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Kinship: people and nature in Emily Lawless’s poetry2014In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both her prose writing and her poetry the Irish writer Emily Lawless (1845-1913) considers a number of environmental subjects, from mothing and dredging for shellfish and mollusks to gardening and the decline of the Irish woodland. A recurrent theme in her poetry is the concern for threatened environment, but dystopian images are balanced by portrayals of landscape as a source of spiritual wisdom and healing. Lawless’s focus is often on more insignificant examples of the natural world such as moths, crustaceans or bog-cotton rather than more conventional representations of natural beauty. Lawless was a Darwinist, and several of her poems thematise the interaction between the human and the natural world, frequently reversing the power relationship between humans and natural phenomena. A re-contextualisation of her poetry within the framework of nineteenth-century natural history, Darwinism and early ecological thought brings to the fore her exploration of the connections between nature, self and national belonging

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  • 8.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    'A paradise of invalids': medical tourism and the climate of prejudice in nineteenth-century Madeira2022In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 52-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nineteenth-century Madeira was a popular destination for wealthy British people suffering from consumption and other pulmonary ailments. A rich store of sources from the period provide first-hand accounts of invalids on the island or offer special advice for the invalid traveller. After positioning medical travel within the context of contemporary science about climate, health and acclimatization, this article will provide a brief account of existing sources related to medical travel to Madeira. This article then examines this material for what it reveals about contemporary ideas about the Madeiran climate upon health, as well as cultural interaction between the British and the island. In particular, the article will trace how writing about Madeira conforms or diverges from popularly held views about the southern European climate and southern European people, as well as what resonance such views may have in the present.

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  • 9.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sullivan, Kirk P H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Discipline and Prosper?: A Case Study of Interdisciplinary Environments in English Literature Master’s Level Courses in Sweden2021In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 207-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interdisciplinarity has emerged as a major trend both in Swedish academia and abroad. While the value of interdisciplinary contributions to research has long been acknowledged, others worry about the waning of disciplinary specific training in higher education. Arguments both for and against interdisciplinary teaching environments have been raised. How does an interdisciplinary teaching environment impact the study of English literature? This article studies two online master’s courses at a Swedish university: Narrating Madness in Literature and Culture and Literature and Disability. These two master’s level courses knit English literary studies with other research fields, such as disability studies and medicine. These courses draw students from a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, social work and pedagogy, as well as English and comparative literature backgrounds. In this article, we examine the seminar fora from the two courses. We ask: how does the interdisciplinary environment contribute to knowledge construction and how does the disciplinary background (English literature or non-English literature) of students influence participation and performance in the course? While the courses resulted in ‘epistemic insight’ and knowledge construction, we found that improvements could be made to support students from non-English literature backgrounds. We conclude this article with some suggestions.

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  • 10.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Walker, Terry
    Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    The medical humanities, literature and language2022In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 11.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    “What are you?”: Fear, desire, and disgust in the Southern Vampire Mysteries and True Blood2012In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 36-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how fear, desire and disgust are mapped onto the liminal body of the vampire in the Southern Vampire Mysteries and True Blood. Of particular relevance are Sara Ahmed’s arguments in The Cultural Politics of Emotions that emotions are not biologically unavoidable, but rather evoked in meetings between bodies, and that the body’s surface is formed in the moment of contact, creating boundaries between Self and Other. Fear, desire and disgust thus stem from the tradition with which the vampire has been represented and vampires’ alignment with other marginalised groups enables comparative analyses of differences and similarities between vampire hate on the one hand, and racism, sexism and homophobia on the other.

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    “What are you?” Fear, desire, and disgust in the Southern Vampire Mysteries and True Blood
1 - 11 of 11
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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