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  • 1. Al Azzawi, Tiba Nazar Ibrahim
    et al.
    Khan, Murtaza
    Hussain, Adil
    Shahid, Muhammad
    Imran, Qari Muhammad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Korea.
    Mun, Bong-Gyu
    Lee, Sang-Uk
    Yun, Byung-Wook
    Evaluation of Iraqi Rice Cultivars for Their Tolerance to Drought Stress2020In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 1782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drought stress is a serious problem around the globe and particularly in the Republic of Iraq. Rice is the third most consumed crop for the Iraqi people; however, its cultivation and production is very low due to several challenges including drought. The current study was performed to evaluate five Iraqi rice cultivars along with relevant (drought-tolerant and drought-susceptible) controls under drought stress, either by treatment with 10% PEG (polyethylene glycol) or through water withholding to induce natural drought stress. The phenotypes of all the cultivars were evaluated and the transcriptional responses of key drought-responsive candidate genes, identified through the EST-SSR marker-based approach, were studied. We also studied transcript accumulation of drought-related transcriptional factors, such as OsGRASS23, OsbZIP12, and OsDREB2A. Moreover, the reference cultivars also included a drought-tolerant inter-specific cultivar Nerica 7 (a cross between Oryza sativa ssp. indica X O. glaberrima). Among the cultivars, the more drought-tolerant phenotypic characteristics and higher transcript accumulation of drought-related marker genes OsE647 and OsE1899 and transcriptional factors OsGRASS23, OsbZIP12, and OsDREB2A were observed in four (out of five) significantly drought-tolerant Iraqi cultivars; Mashkab, followed by Furat, Yasmen, and Amber 33. On another note, Amber Barka was found to be significantly drought susceptible. Mashkab and Amber Barka were found to be the most drought-tolerant and-susceptible cultivars, respectively. The identified tolerant cultivars may potentially serve as a genetic source for the incorporation of drought-tolerant phenotypes in rice.

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  • 2.
    Castro, Eulogio
    et al.
    Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering, Centre for Advanced Studies in Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment (CEACTEMA), Universidad de Jaén, Jaén, Spain.
    Strætkvern, Knut Olav
    Department of Biotechnology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Hamar, Norway.
    Romero-García, Juan Miguel
    Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering, Centre for Advanced Studies in Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment (CEACTEMA), Universidad de Jaén, Jaén, Spain.
    Martin, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Biotechnology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Hamar, Norway.
    Pretreatment and bioconversion for valorization of residues of non-edible oilseeds2023In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 2196Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiesel production currently follows a first-generation model using edible oils as raw materials. Such a production model is unsustainable, considering that it is limited by the high cost of edible oils, competes with the food sector, and is linked to deforestation and other environmental threats. Changing the raw material base to non-edible oils provides an opportunity to increase the sustainability of the biodiesel industry and to avoid conflicts with food production. Processing non-edible oilseeds for extracting the oil to be used for producing biodiesel generates large amounts of residues, such as de-oiled cakes, seed husks, and fruit shells and pods as well as plant stems and leaves resulting from pruning and other agronomy practices. Most of those residues are currently disposed of by burning or used in a suboptimal way. Bioconversion following the sugar platform route, anaerobic digestion, or enzyme production provides means for upgrading them to advanced biofuels and high-added value products. Bioconversion of plant biomass, including oilseed residues, requires pretreatment to enhance their susceptibility to enzymes and microorganisms. This review provides an outlook on bioconversion approaches applicable to different residues of oilseed-bearing plant species. Recent reports on the pretreatment of non-edible oilseed residues for enhancing their bioconversion through either the sugar platform route or anaerobic digestion are critically discussed. This review is based on an exhaustive Web of Science search performed in January–May 2023.

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  • 3. Gil-Munoz, Francisco
    et al.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Quinones, Ana
    Naval, Maria del Mar
    Badenes, Maria Luisa
    Garcia-Gil, M. Rosario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Salt Tolerance Mechanisms Present in Date-Plum Persimmon Rootstock (Diospyros lotus L.)2020In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 1703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture needs solutions for adapting crops to increasing salinity globally. Research on physiological and molecular responses activated by salinity is needed to elucidate mechanisms of salinity tolerance. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-Seq) is a powerful tool to study the transcriptomic profile of genotypes under stress conditions. Persimmon species have different levels of tolerance to salinity, this variability may provide knowledge on persimmon species and development of salt--tolerant rootstocks. In this study, we conducted a physiological and transcriptomic profiling of roots and leaves in tolerant and sensitive plants of persimmon rootstock grown under saline and control conditions. Characterization of physiological responses along with gene expression changes in roots and leaves allowed the identification of several salt tolerance mechanisms related to ion transport and thermospermine synthesis. Differences were observed in putative H+/ATPases that allow transmembrane ionic transport and chloride channel protein-like genes. Furthermore, an overexpression of thermospermine synthase found in the roots of tolerant plants may indicate that alterations in root architecture could act as an additional mechanism of response to salt stress. These results indicate that Diospyros lotus L. exhibits genetically-controlled variability for salt tolerance traits which opens potential opportunities for breeding salt-tolerant persimmon rootstocks in a Mediterranean environment challenged by drought and salinity.

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  • 4.
    Ilanidis, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Martin, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Wheat Straw: Effects ofTemperature and Acidity on Byproduct Formation andInhibition of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanolic Fermentation2021In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biochemical conversion of wheat straw was investigated using hydrothermal pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and microbial fermentation. Pretreatment conditions that were compared included autocatalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 160, 175, 190, and 205 °C and sulfuric-acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 160 and 190 °C. The effects of using different pretreatment conditions were investigated with regard to (i) chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of pretreated solids, (ii) carbohydrate composition of pretreatment liquids, (iii) inhibitory byproducts in pretreatment liquids, (iv) furfural in condensates, and (v) fermentability using yeast. The methods used included two-step analytical acid hydrolysis combined with high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), HPLC, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS), and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Lignin recoveries in the range of 108–119% for autocatalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 205 °C and sulfuric-acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment were attributed to pseudolignin formation. Xylose concentration in the pretreatment liquid increased with temperature up to 190 °C and then decreased. Enzymatic digestibility was correlated with the removal of hemicelluloses, which was almost quantitative for the autocatalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 205 °C. Except for the pretreatment liquid from the autocatalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 205 °C, the inhibitory effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were low. The highest combined yield of glucose and xylose was achieved for autocatalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment at 190 °C and the subsequent enzymatic saccharification that resulted in approximately 480 kg/ton (dry weight) raw wheat straw.

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  • 5.
    Imran, Qari Muhammad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
    Falak, Noreen
    School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
    Hussain, Adil
    Department of Agriculture, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, Pakistan.
    Mun, Bong-Gyu
    School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
    Yun, Byung-Wook
    School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
    Abiotic stress in plants, stress perception to molecular response and role of biotechnological tools in stress resistance2021In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants, due to their sessile nature, face several environmental adversities. Abiotic stresses such as heat, cold, drought, heavy metals, and salinity are serious threats to plant production and yield. To cope with these stresses, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to avoid or resist stress conditions. A proper response to abiotic stress depends primarily on how plants perceive the stress signal, which in turn leads to initiation of signaling cascades and induction of resistance genes. New biotechnological tools such as RNA-seq and CRISPR-cas9 are quite useful in identifying target genes on a global scale, manipulating these genes to achieve tolerance, and helping breeders to develop stress-tolerant cultivars. In this review, we will briefly discuss the adverse effects of key abiotic stresses such as cold, heat, drought, and salinity. We will also discuss how plants sense various stresses and the importance of biotechnological tools in the development of stress-tolerant cultivars.

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  • 6.
    Kumar, Umesh
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, MNS Government College, Bhiwani, India.
    Raj, Subhisha
    Algal Biotechnology Lab, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Neelakudy, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Sreenikethanam, Arathi
    Algal Biotechnology Lab, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Neelakudy, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Maddheshiya, Rahul
    Department of Zoology, School of Sciences, IFTM University, Moradabad, India.
    Kumari, Seema
    Department of Zoology, Dronacharya Government College, Gurugram, India.
    Han, Sungsoo
    School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Republic of Korea.
    Kapoor, Krishan K.
    Department of Microbiology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, India; Department of Bio & Nano Technology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, India.
    Bhaskar, Rakesh
    School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Republic of Korea.
    Bajhaiya, Amit K.
    Algal Biotechnology Lab, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Neelakudy, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Kumar Gahlot, Dharmender
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Multi-omics approaches in plant-microbe interactions hold enormous promise for sustainable agriculture2023In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 1804Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants do not grow in isolation; they interact with diverse microorganisms in their habitat.The development of techniques to identify and quantify the microbial diversity associated with plantscontributes to our understanding of the complexity of environmental influences to which plants areexposed. Identifying interactions which are beneficial to plants can enable us to promote healthygrowth with the minimal application of agrochemicals. Beneficial plant–microbial interactionsassist plants in acquiring inaccessible nutrients to promote plant growth and help them to copewith various stresses and pathogens. An increased knowledge of plant–microbial diversity can beapplied to meet the growing demand for biofertilizers for use in organic agriculture. This reviewhighlights the beneficial effects of soil–microbiota and biofertilizers on improving plant health andcrop yields. We propose that a multi–omics approach is appropriate to evaluate viability in thecontext of sustainable agriculture.

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  • 7.
    Martin, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pretreatment of crop residues for bioconversion2021In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 924Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 8.
    Medina, Jorge
    et al.
    Laboratory of Soil Microbial Ecology and Biogeochemistry, Institute of Agri-Food, Animal and Environmental Sciences (ICA3), Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando, Chile.
    Calabi-Floody, Marcela
    Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Center of Plant, Soil Interaction and Natural Resources Biotechnology, Scientific and Biotechnological Bioresource Nucleus, BIOREN UFRO, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Aponte, Humberto
    Laboratory of Soil Microbial Ecology and Biogeochemistry, Institute of Agri-Food, Animal and Environmental Sciences (ICA3), Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando, Chile; Centro de Investigación en Micorrizas y Sustentabilidad Agroambiental (CIMYSA), Scientific and Technological Bioresources Nucleus-BIOREN, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Santander, Christian
    Centro de Investigación en Micorrizas y Sustentabilidad Agroambiental (CIMYSA), Scientific and Technological Bioresources Nucleus-BIOREN, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Paneque, Marina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Meier, Sebastian
    Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA), CRI Carillanca, P.O. Box 58-D, Temuco, Chile.
    Panettieri, Marco
    Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA-CSIC), c/Serrano 115-B, Madrid, Spain.
    Cornejo, Pablo
    Centro de Investigación en Micorrizas y Sustentabilidad Agroambiental (CIMYSA), Scientific and Technological Bioresources Nucleus-BIOREN, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Borie, Fernando
    Facultad de Recursos Naturales, Universidad Católica de Temuco, Temuco, Chile.
    Knicker, Heike
    Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla, (IRNAS-CSIC), Seville, Spain.
    Utilization of inorganic nanoparticles and biochar as additives of agricultural waste composting: Effects of end-products on plant growth, c and nutrient stock in soils from a mediterranean region2021In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of compost produced with agricultural residues and oat-based biochar, iron oxide and halloysite nanoparticles as additives of the process of composting on soil chemical properties, nutrient status and growth of ryegrass Lolium perenne L. For this, a 90-day mesocosm experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions. Bare soil and a basal fertilization treatment were compared to soils amended with nonadditive compost (NA compost), compost supplied with oat-based biochar (Bioch compost), iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe compost), and halloysite nanoparticles (Ha compost). Compost supplied with nanoparticles and biochar combined were also considered. The incorporation of compost with or without additives increased the content of total C and N in soil, with N diminishing (total and mineral forms) and C/N modifications after 90 days. The addition of compost and co-composted treatments also increased the total contents of main nutrients such as Ca, K, P and S. Furthermore, the supply of additives into composting did not increase the concentration of trace toxic elements. At the end of the experiment, plant biomass increased by the addition of the different organic amendments, with the highest shoot biomass in soils amended with compost supplied with nanoparticles. These results suggest that the addition of compost based on agricultural residues with additives such as halloysite or biochar improves chemical properties and nutritional status of soil that favor and increase plant growth of Lollium perenne stablished in soils from the Mediterranean Region.

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  • 9.
    Paneque, Marina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Department of Biochemistry, Plant and Microbial Ecology, Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville (IRNAS-CSIC), Seville, Spain.
    de la Rosa, José María
    Department of Biochemistry, Plant and Microbial Ecology, Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville (IRNAS-CSIC), Seville, Spain.
    Patti, Antonio F.
    School of Chemistry, Monash University, VIC, Clayton, Australia.
    Knicker, Heike
    Department of Biochemistry, Plant and Microbial Ecology, Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville (IRNAS-CSIC), Seville, Spain.
    Changes in the bio-availability of phosphorus in pyrochars and hydrochars derived from sewage sludge after their amendment to soils2021In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected shortage of global phosphate has enforced the search for alternative resources for P fertilizers. Therefore, the present study focuses on the turnover of phosphorus (P) of hydrochars and pyrochars derived from sewage sludge (SS) in soils during plant growth. We designed a pot experiment in which Lolium perenne L. was allowed to grow on a Calcic Cambisol amended with SS-derived chars. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) yielded the SS-hydrochars (200C, 260C; 30 min, 3 h), whereas the SS-pyrochars were obtained after dry pyrolysis (600C, 1 h). Increasing severity of HTC lowered the recovery of total P (PT) from the feedstock to 76%. The Olsen-P diminished from 4% PT in the untreated sludge to 1% PT in the hydrochars, whereas the pyrochars exhibited an Olsen-P between 3 and 6%. At the end of the pot experiment, the soils amended with pyrochars and with hydrochars produced at 200C contained more Olsen-P than the unamended soils, proving that P-rich chars can indeed serve as a P fertilizer. Part of the P sequestered in the chars turned into a mobile form during the experiment. After addition of our chars, the soil pH remained alkaline, allowing the conclusion that P could not have been solubilized through just abiotic processes. We suggest that biological and biochemical processes are involved in this mobilization. This work demonstrates that, in order to evaluate the efficiency of an organic amendment as a P fertilizer, the knowledge of their P availability alone is not sufficient and a better understanding of the biochemical processes involved in the cycling of its immobilized P is certainly required. 

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