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  • 1.
    Björn, Norlin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sjögren, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Educational history in the age of apology: The Church of Sweden's "White book" on historical relations to the Sami, the significance of education and scientific complexities in reconciling the past2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 69-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reconciliation processes – wherein governments and other organizations examine their past institutional practices to understand contemporary problems in relation to minorities or indigenous groups – have become a widespread international phenomenon in recent decades. In Sweden, such an ongoing process is the reconciliation work between the Church of Sweden and the Sami. In this process, which recently resulted in the publication of a scholarly anthology (or a “white book”), educational history has come to play a vital part. The present article uses the Church of Sweden’s White Book as an empirical object of study to examine in more detail the role and significance of knowledge of educational history for this specific reconciliation process. By focusing on various scientific complexities and epistemological tensions that tend to arise in these kinds of undertakings, this paper also aims to problematize the white book genre itself as a path to historical knowledge. By doing this, this article’s overall ambition is to contribute to future scholarly work in reconciliation activities, white papers and truth commissions. This study applies a qualitative content analysis and connects theoretically to the growing field of transitional justice research.

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  • 2.
    Hansson, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Ett enande band bland Nordens alla samer: Slöjd på Samernas folkhögskola/Sámij álmmukallaskåvllå2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From its establishment in 1942, the Sami folk high school included crafts as an important part of its education program. The Swedish Mission Society, who founded the school, not only wanted to educate Sami youth to better their chances on the labour market but also to give them the opportunity to get acquainted with their Sami culture. Thus Sami crafts had a crucial role in educational activities at the folk high school. With the help of Gert Biesta’s concepts, the article shows that crafts had a socializing function. The teaching strengthened the students’ collective identity and provided them with traditional skills and knowledge. However, Lennart Wallmark, the school principal (1942-1972), stressed the importance of learning crafts for other purposes. Influenced by religious thinkers, he stated that the students would also be strengthened as individuals: a process of subjectification. Moreover, the crafts lessons had a third function: qualification. Though the studies were not vocational as such, they could simplify the process of procuring the quality label bestowed by the Sami organization Same Ätnam to crafts of especially high quality. Wallmark and the teachers in crafts were important for the development of craft education at the folk high school. However, Same Ätnam’s ideas of Sami handicraft and government regulations were also influential. These inner and outer forces contributed to the teaching so that it, on one hand, did not change much but, on the other hand, was congruous with the rest of the society.

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  • 3.
    Hermansson, Carina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Saar, Tomas
    Olin-Scheller, Christina
    Rethinking 'Method' in Early Childhood Writing Education2014In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, Vol. 2, p. 121-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how the process of writing a fictional narrative, “My Story”, transforms and emerges over a period of five days in a Swedish early childhood classroom. Our purpose is to explore and describe how this method-driven writing project emerge in relation to material and discursive conditions, and to provide an empirically based understanding of the forces, flows and processes at work. This entails understanding processes of writing as an effect of complex relationships between the individual (the teacher and the student), the learning outcome, the affect, the talk, the motion, the body and the material. The results show how the writing project on some occasions come to a stop, sometimes take new directions or activate unforeseen affects and open for new becomings. The article also discusses how methods on the one hand has an explicit and formalized side, possible to articulate and predict. But on the other hand, is embedded in and driven by affects that changes both the method, the text production and the writing-learning subject. The article ends with a discussion of implications and possibilities understanding teaching methods of writing as dynamic processes that continually open for a variety of assemblages, flows and forces.

  • 4.
    Lind, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Interactive sound art and animated notation as an ensemble performance platform in primary level music education2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 53-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article showcases excerpts of my artistic research in progress. In particular, I demonstrate how an interdisciplinary approach combining knowledge from the fields of artistic research, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and game studies mayinspire primary level music education of today. I highlight examples of novel digital music technology and present an innovate approach to using these for group performance exercises in the music classroom. In particular, I report from a study where my interactive sound art exhibition LINES, in combination with animated music notation, was used as a digital ensemble music platform. The data of the study comprises five workshop sessions with pre-schoolers using this platform. An autoethnographic method and analysis of video documentation of the workshop sessions were used as methods for the study. The results showed that LINES was both engaging and easily accessed. Moreover, it allowed the majority of the target group to perform musical exercises as an ensemble. I argue that the use of traditional instruments and traditional notation creates a democratic issue in primary level music education. Furthermore, with support from the study and related research, I argue that platforms such as this may democratize music education involving pupils aged 5-15 years.

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  • 5.
    Lindvall-Östling, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.(Soris).
    Deutschmann, Mats
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.(Soris).
    Steinvall, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Strömberg, Satish
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    "That’s not Proper English!": Using Cross-cultural Matched-guise Experiments to Raise Teacher/Teacher-trainees' Awareness of Attitudes Surrounding Inner and Outer Circle English Accents2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, Vol. 3, p. 109-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a structural perspective, some English accents (be they native or foreign) carry higher status than others, which in turn may decide whether you get a job or not, for example. So how do language teachers approach this enigma, and how does this approach differ depending on the cultural context you are operating in? These are some of the questions addressed in this article. The study is based on a matched-guise experiment conducted in Sweden and the Seychelles, a small island nation outside the east coast of Africa, where respondents (active teachers and teacher trainees) were asked to evaluate the same oral presentations on various criteria such as grammar, pronunciation, structure etc. Half of the respondents listened to a version that was presented in Received Pronunciation (RP), while the other half evaluated the same monologue presented by the same person, but in an Indian English (IE) accent. Note, that careful attention was paid to aspects such as pacing, pauses etc. using ‘Karaoke technique”. Our results indicate that the responses from the two respondent groups differ significantly, with the Seychelles group being far more negative towards IE than the Swedish group. We try to explain these results in the light of subsequent debriefing discussions with the respondent groups, and we also reflect over the benefits and drawbacks of this type of exercise for raising sociolinguistic awareness among teacher trainees and active teachers. The study is part of a larger project (funded by the Wallenberg foundation) that approaches the challenge of increasing sociolinguistic awareness regarding language and stereotyping, and highlighting cross-cultural aspects of this phenomenon.

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  • 6.
    Lundgren, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Enspråkig undervisning i flerspråkig kontext2017In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 9-26Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore teaching within symmetrical and asymmetrical classrooms and how teaching creates meaning for the learners in a multilingual school. The study, described in this article, has a socio-cultural theoretical standpoint with focus on language and literacy teaching. The study has been conducted in Grade 5 in a school with 50% of immigrant learners. The result shows that the discourse in the symmetrical and asymmetrical classrooms is monolingual with no translanguaging except from one classroom where teaching prepare for translanguaging and multilingual use. But the conclusion from the study is a monolingual school discourse in a multilingual context.

  • 7.
    Norberg, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Dahlström, Helene
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Student teachers as co-creators when elaborating on a model for multimodal text analysis2023In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. 87-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aimed to examine and describe how a model for analysing multimodal texts is tested andelaborated on with students as co-creators during a teacher education course focusing on scientificawareness. The research questions used to achieve the aim were: How did the students as co-creatorscontribute to the development of the analytical model? What changes were made during the process, andhow was the model adjusted accordingly? How can the process and the adjustments in the model be furtherinterpreted in relation to the concept of student agency? Using a multimodal social semiotic framework forcommunication, we investigated three different groups of students using focus group discussions, videorecordings, and participatory observations. The results revealed the development of the model through adesign process in three design cycles into the current version and how students contributed to this process.The findings showed that students are offered agency while creating an opportunity for joint explorationbetween students and teachers, which is a rewarding experience that contributes to the development of allparticipants.

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  • 8.
    Pettersson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Specialpedagogisk verksamhet i svenska fristående glesbygdsskolor: en flexibel verksamhet med avseende på elevers behov2018In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, Vol. 2, p. 28-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is focused on special needs education in schools owned by independent school authorities in sparsely populated areas. The ten schools investigated are situated in seven municipalities in the four northernmost counties in Sweden. The aim is to investigate the solutions for the special needs education in these schools. The empirical data is constituted by a) the schools background gathered through a web inquiry, and b) the answers generated through a series of open questions that the same informants answered via e-mail. One informant per school has been selected for the study. The focus on special needs education is grounded in a relational view that is visualised when the informants, on one hand, described the pupils’ different needs and, on the other, on the importance of the entire learning environment for the pupil’s learning and development. The informants report the use of various pedagogical teaching methods, the flexible organisation of teaching, and the use of different tools for the purpose of reaching all pupils and supporting them in reaching set learning goals. Moreover, the headmasters in nine out of ten schools are both headmasters and active teachers themselves, which is seen as a sign for the quality of education in these schools.

  • 9.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    University of Borås.
    Programarbetslag som stöd för nyutexaminerade kärnämneslärares etablering som gymnasielärare?2014In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 56-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been many attempts to reform the Swedish education system inorder to reduce the size of the gaps between different upper secondaryschool programmes. These have included changes in teachers’ responsibilitiesand teacher education. Within an individual school, teachers of Swedish lan-­‐guage, English and mathematics may teach students of both vocational andfurther study preparation programmes. However, an analysis of new teach-­‐ers’ experiences and the organization of teacher teams at one school, ApelSchool, suggests that despite these reforms, some traditional preferenceshave persisted. Notably, teachers of the subjects listed above had clear hier-­‐archical preferences regarding the school’s various teacher teams. Very fewteachers were keen to join teams that were involved with a vocational pro-­‐gramme. This arguably put both newer teachers and vocational programmestudents into particularly vulnerable situations because the new teacherswere assigned to the less-­‐preferred vocational programme teams but notprovided with adequate support from more experienced teachers. Vocationalstudents were more likely to have their teachers replaced as their old teach-­‐ers advanced within the hierarchy. It is concluded that head teachers need todistribute new and experienced teachers in teacher teams more evenly eventhough experienced teachers express resistance.

  • 10.
    Spjut, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    En läroplansanalys om samstämmighet inom Lgr11: Direktiv rörande undervisning om nationella minoriteter2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 102-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates in what way the Swedish compulsory school curriculum (Lgr11) addresses knowledge regarding Swedish national minorities. The aim is to study alignment within Lgr11 through a case of the theme national minorities. Research questions target alignment within syllabi and alignment between syllabi and the aim and guidelines in the curricula. Theories of alignment and curriculum theory formed the theory and methodology for the analysis, foregrounding similarities and differences in how Swedish national minorities are addressed in Lgr11. Results show numerous inconsistencies. Learning goals in curriculum and syllabus content are, for instance, not aligned, and differences exist within the syllabus between aim (syfte), central content (centralt innehåll) and the lower set measurable demands (kunskapskrav). This is problematic since earlier research demonstrated that measurable demands have out-conquered teaching content. These challenges for teacher’s interpretation of curricula and syllabus can affect the teaching content.

     

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