Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Britta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Janson, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Behnam Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Induction of apoptosis by intracellular potassium ion depletion: using the fluorescent dye PBFI in a 96-well plate method in cultured lung cancer cells.2006In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro
    et al.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Österlund, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Andersson, Britt M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Bucht, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Wingfors, Håkan
    Oxidative stress and cytokine expression in respiratory epithelial cells exposed to well-characterized aerosols from Kabul, Afghanistan2013In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study aerosol samples collected in an Asian mega-city (Kabul, Afghanistan) were compared to PM samples collected in a European location with traffic (Umea, Sweden) and a reference urban dust material (SRM 1649b). The toxicity of each sample towards normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) was tested along with their ability to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and inflammatory responses. The extracts' morphology and elemental composition was studied by SEM-EDXRF, and filter samples were analyzed for metals and organic compounds. The PM from Kabul contained a larger fraction of fine particles, 19 times more polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and 37 times more oxygenated PAH (oxy-PAH) compared to samples from timed. The PM-samples from Kabul and the reference material (SRM 1649b) induced significantly stronger oxidative stress responses than the samples from Umea. Furthermore, samples collected in Kabul induced significantly higher secretion of the cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF while SRM1649b induced a cytokine pattern more similar to samples collected in Umea. Several properties of the particles could potentially explain these differences, including differences in their size distribution and contents of PAH and oxy-PAH, possibly in combination with their relative transition metal contents. 

  • 3.
    Popova, Dina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Jacobsson, Stig O. P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    A fluorescence microplate screen assay for the detection of neurite outgrowth and neurotoxicity using an antibody against βIII-tubulin2014In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 411-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of environmental and commercial chemicals have not been evaluated for their potential to cause neurotoxicity. We have investigated if neuron specific anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies are useful in a microplate assay of neurite outgrowth of retinoic acid-induced neurons from mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. By incubating the P19-derived neurons with the primary anti-βIII-tubulin antibody and a secondary Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated antibody, followed by measuring the fluorescence in a microplate reader, a time-dependent increase in anti-βIII-tubulin immunofluorescence was observed. The relative fluorescence units increased by 4.3-fold from 2 to 10 days in culture. The results corresponded well with those obtained by semi-automatic tracing of neurites in fluorescence microscopy images of βIII-tubulin-labeled neurons. The sensitivity of the neurite outgrowth assay using a microplate reader to detect neurotoxicity produced by nocodazole, methyl mercury chloride and okadaic acid was significantly higher than for a cell viability assay measuring intracellular fluorescence of calcein-AM. The microplate-based method to measure toxicity targeting neurites using anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies is however less sensitive than the extracellular lactate dehydrogenase activity assay to detect general cytotoxicity produced by high concentrations of clomipramine, or glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In conclusion, the fluorescence microplate assay for the detection of neurite outgrowth by measuring changes in βIII-tubulin immunoreactivity is a rapid and sensitive method to assess chemical- or toxin-induced neurite toxicity.

  • 4. Thors, L.
    et al.
    Koch, B.
    Koch, M.
    Hägglund, L.
    Bucht, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine. Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Umeå, Sweden b Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University.
    In vitro human skin penetration model for organophosphorus compounds with different physicochemical properties2016In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 32, p. 198-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A flow-through diffusion cell was validated for in vitro human epidermal penetration studies of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) applied by infinite dosing. By testing OPCs with similar molecular weight but different physicochemical properties, it was shown that hydrophilic and lipophilic properties are major determinants for the penetration rate. Lipophilic OPCs displayed maximum cumulative penetration in the 20-75% agent concentration range whereas the hydrophilic OPCs displayed maximum cumulative penetration at 10 or 20% agent concentration. Low penetration was observed for all agents at 1% agent concentration or when applied as neat agents. The impact of the receptor solution composition was evaluated by comparing the penetration using receptor solutions of different ratios of ethanol and water. For diluted OPCs, a high concentration of ethanol in the receptor solution significantly increased the penetration compared to lower concentrations. When OPCs were applied as neat agents, the composition of the receptor solution only affected the penetration for one of four tested compounds. In conclusion, the flow-through diffusion cell was useful for examining the penetration of OPCs through the epidermal membrane. It was also demonstrated that the penetration rates of OPCs are strongly influenced by dilution in water and the receptor fluid composition.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf