Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina
    et al.
    Gawlik, Aneta
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Mazzanti, Laura
    Ruijgrok, Elisabeth J.
    Sas, Theo C. J.
    Estradiol matrix patches for pubertal induction: stability of cut pieces at different temperatures2019In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 360-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Transdermal estradiol patches are primarily designed for adult women. No low-dose patches are licensed for pubertal induction in hypogonadal girls. Low doses can be achieved by cutting a matrix patch into smaller pieces. However, the manufacturers do not guarantee stability or utility of cut estradiol patches. The aim of the study was to assess 1-month stability of cut estradiol patches from four different manufacturers in the laboratory at room temperature (+21 degrees C) and at an elevated temperature (+35 degrees C).

    Design and methods: Estraderm MX 50 mu g, Systen 50 mu g and Oesclim 25 mu g matrix patches were cut into eight pieces while Estradot 50 mu g small patches were cut in half. The cut patches were stored in their respective pouches at +21 degrees C or at +35 degrees C for up to 1 month. The estradiol drug was extracted from the patch by ethyl acetate n-hexane and determined by radioimmunoassay.

    Results: Storage at +21 degrees C or +35 degrees C up to 1 month did not reduce the estradiol concentration in Estraderm MX, Systen and Oesclim patches. However, although the estradiol in Estradot patches was not affected by storage at +21 degrees C, at +35 degrees C, estradiol decreased by 57% (+/- 1%) in cut pieces.

    Conclusions: Unused Estraderm MX, Systen and Oesclim patch pieces may be stored for at least 1 month at <=+35 degrees C. Where estradiol patches for children are not available, cut pieces of these or similar patches can be used for pubertal induction. The Estradot patch was too small to properly cut into low doses and not stable in elevated temperatures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Beun, Johan G.
    et al.
    AdrenalNET, The Netherlands.
    Burman, Pia
    Department of Endocrinology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
    Kampe, Olle
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Centre for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Hahner, Stephanie
    Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Germany.
    Kristensen, Jette
    Addison Foreningen i Danmark, Denmark.
    Noordzij, Alida
    AdrenalNET, The Netherlands.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Doctors, teach your adrenal insufficiency patients well: provide them with a European Emergency Card!2022In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e220345Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition requiring chronic glucocorticoid replacement therapy, as well as stress adaptation to prevent adrenal crises. To increase patients' self-sustainability, education on how to tackle an adrenal crisis is crucial. All patients should carry the European Emergency Card.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony C.
    et al.
    Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Council, Tygerberg, South Africa.
    Mendham, Amy E.
    Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Council, Tygerberg, South Africa.
    Hauksson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Alhamud, Ali
    Department of Human Biology, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; The Modern Pioneer Center and ArSMRM for MRI Training and Development, Tripoli, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Stefanovski, Darko
    Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Centre, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, PA, Kennett Square, United States.
    Hakim, Olah
    Department of Diabetes, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, School of Life Course Sciences, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Swart, Jeroen
    Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Goff, Louise M.
    Department of Diabetes, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, School of Life Course Sciences, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Kahn, Steven E.
    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, University of Washington, WA, Seattle, United States.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Goedecke, Julia H.
    Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Council, Tygerberg, South Africa.
    β-cell function in black South African women: Exploratory associations with insulin clearance, visceral and ectopic fat2021In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 550-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of ectopic fat, insulin secretion and clearance in the preservation of β-cell function in black African women with obesity who typically present with hyperinsulinaemia is not clear. We aim to examine the associations between disposition index (DI, an estimate of β-cell function), insulin secretion and clearance and ectopic fat deposition. This is a cross-sectional study of 43 black South African women (age 20–35 years) with obesity (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) and without type 2 diabetes that measured the following: DI, insulin sensitivity (SI), acute insulin response (AIRg), insulin secretion rate (ISR), hepatic insulin extraction and peripheral insulin clearance (frequently sampled i.v. glucose tolerance test); pancreatic and hepatic fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and abdominal s.c. adipose tissue (aSAT) volume (MRI), intra-myocellular (IMCL) and extra-myocellular fat content (EMCL) (magnetic resonance spectroscopy). DI correlated positively with peripheral insulin clearance (β 55.80, P = 0.002). Higher DI was associated with lower VAT, pancreatic fat and soleus fat, but VAT explained most of the variance in DI (32%). Additionally, higher first phase ISR (P = 0.033) and lower hepatic insulin extraction (P = 0.022) were associated with lower VAT, independent from SI, rather than with ectopic fat. In conclusion, peripheral insulin clearance emerged as an important correlate of DI. However, VAT was the main determinant of a lower DI above ectopic fat depots. Importantly, VAT, but not ectopic fat, is associated with both lower insulin secretion and higher hepatic insulin extraction. Prevention of VAT accumulation in young black African women should, therefore, be an important target for beta cell preservation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Imamovic, Marcus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bäcklund, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundstedt, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brattsand, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Aardal, Elisabeth
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Confounding effects of liquorice, hydrocortisone, and blood contamination on salivary cortisol but not cortisone2023In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e220324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the effects of liquorice consumption, topical hydrocortisone, and blood contamination on salivary cortisol and cortisone concentrations.

    Design and methods: Thirty healthy volunteers were randomized to a low, medium, or high dose of liquorice. Late-night saliva samples were collected using a Salivette® collection device at baseline, during 1 week of daily liquorice consumption, and during 4 weeks' washout. Saliva sampling was also performed before and after the application of topical hydrocortisone on the skin. Furthermore, in a subgroup (n  = 16), saliva and venous blood were collected from each individual and mixed to achieve graded blood contamination in saliva. Salivary cortisol and cortisone were analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Results: Significant increases in salivary cortisol concentrations were observed during medium- (+49%) and high-dose (+97%) liquorice intake, which returned to baseline 4 days after liquorice withdrawal. Topical hydrocortisone on fingers holding the collection swab increased salivary cortisol concentrations >1000-fold with concomitant pronounced elevation of the cortisol:cortisone ratio. Salivary cortisol increased significantly after contamination with blood ≥0.5%. Visual examination could safely detect these samples. Salivary cortisone concentrations were unaffected by liquorice consumption and blood contamination, and only marginally affected by topical hydrocortisone.

    Conclusion: Liquorice, topical hydrocortisone, and blood contamination may all cause elevated salivary cortisol concentrations. Improved sampling instructions and visual examination of the sample may minimize these risks. Salivary cortisone is essentially unaffected by the different preanalytical confounders and may be used as a first-line screening test for Cushing's syndrome.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Jernberg, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Clinical relevance of androgen receptor alterations in prostate cancer2017In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 6, no 8, p. R146-R161Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer (PC) remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men worldwide, despite continuously improved treatment strategies. Patients with metastatic disease are treated by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) that with time results in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) usually established as metastases within bone tissue. The androgen receptor (AR) transcription factor is the main driver of CRPC development and of acquired resistance to drugs given for treatment of CRPC, while a minority of patients have CRPC that is non-AR driven. Molecular mechanisms behind epithelial AR reactivation in CRPC include AR gene amplification and overexpression, AR mutations, expression of constitutively active AR variants, intra-tumoural and adrenal androgen synthesis and promiscuous AR activation by other factors. This review will summarize AR alterations of clinical relevance for patients with CRPC, with focus on constitutively active AR variants, their possible association with AR amplification and structural rearrangements as well as their ability to predict patient resistance to AR targeting drugs. The review will also discuss AR signalling in the tumour microenvironment and its possible relevance for metastatic growth and therapy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Lewis, Trevor
    et al.
    Zeisig, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gaida, Jamie E.
    Does glucocorticoid exposure explain the association between metabolic dysfunction and tendinopathy?2020In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 9, no 3, p. R36-R46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While metabolic health is acknowledged to affect connective tissue structure and function, the mechanisms are unclear. Glucocorticoids are present in almost every cell type throughout the body and control key physiological processes such as energy homeostasis, stress response, inflammatory and immune processes, and cardiovascular function. Glucocorticoid excess manifests as visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. As these metabolic states are also associated with tendinopathy and tendon rupture, it may be that glucocorticoids excess is the link between metabolic health and tendinopathy. Objective: To synthesise current knowledge linking glucocorticoid exposure to tendon structure and function. Methods: Narrative literature review. Results: We provide an overview of endogenous glucocorticoid production, regulation, and signalling. Next we review the impact that oral glucocorticoid has on risk of tendon rupture and the effect that injected glucocorticoid has on resolution of symptoms. Then we highlight the clinical and mechanistic overlap between tendinopathy and glucocorticoid excess in the areas of visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In these areas, we highlight the role of glucocorticoids and how these hormones might underpin the connection between metabolic health and tendon dysfunction. Conclusions: There are several plausible pathways through which glucocorticoids might mediate the connection between metabolic health and tendinopathy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7. Lundin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmborg, Agota
    Slezak, Julia
    Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Bengtsdotter, Hanna
    Marions, Lena
    Lindh, Ingela
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Hammar, Mats
    Sundstrom-Poromaa, Inger
    Sexual function and combined oral contraceptives: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial2018In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 1208-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The effect of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) on female sexuality has long been a matter of discussion, but placebo-controlled studies are lacking. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate if an oestradiol-containing COC influences sexual function.

    Design: Investigator-initiated, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial where 202 healthy women were randomised to a combined oral contraceptive (1.5 mg oestradiol and 2.5 mg nomegestrol acetate) or placebo for three treatment cycles.

    Methods: Sexual function at baseline and during the last week of the final treatment cycle was evaluated by the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire. Serum and hair testosterone levels were assessed at the same time points.

    Results: Compared to placebo, COC use was associated with a small decrease in sexual interest (COC median change score: -2.0; interquartile range (IQR): -5.0 to 0.5 vs placebo: -1.0; IQR: -3.0 to 2.0, P=0.019), which remained following adjustment for change in self-rated depressive symptoms (B= -0.80 +/- 0.30, Wald =7.08, P=0.008). However, the proportion of women who reported a clinically relevant deterioration in sexual interest did not differ between COC or placebo users (COC 18 (22.2%) vs placebo 16 (17.8%), P=0.47). Change in other measured aspects of sexual function as well as total score of sexual function did not differ between the two treatments.

    Conclusions: This study suggests that use of oestradiol-based COCs is associated with reduced sexual interest. However, the changes are minute, and probably not of clinical relevance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Lundqvist, Anette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sandström, Herbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    The relationship between weight gain during pregnancy and allopregnanolone levels: a longitudinal study2017In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Large weight gain during pregnancy is a risk factor for complications for mother and fetus. Hunger and satiety are regulated in the hypothalamus, where the gamma-amino-butyric acid system (GABA) has an important role. Allopregnanolone, a progesterone metabolite, increases during pregnancy and is a potent GABA-A receptor modulating steroid. Allopregnanolone has been shown to induce overeating in rodents. The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between weight gain and allopregnanolone concentrations during pregnancy in humans. Design: A longitudinal, cohort study. Methods: Pregnant women (n = 56) were recruited in primary care in northern Sweden. Allopregnanolone concentrations in plasma were measured using radioimmunoassay and weight was measured in gestational weeks 12 and 35. Results: Weight increase correlated significantly to allopregnanolone in late pregnancy increase (r(s) = 0.320; P = 0.016), indicating a positive relationship between weight increase and allopregnanolone increase. A positive relationship was also noted between allopregnanolone in the 35th gestational week and weight increase. Women who gained = 11 kg during pregnancy showed higher allopregnanolone concentrations in week 35 and higher increase compared to women who increased < 11 kg (P = 0.006 and P = 0.009 resp.). There was no difference in weight or allopregnanolone concentrations at the onset of pregnancy. Conclusions: The results show a relationship between weight gain during pregnancy and increase in allopregnanolone concentrations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Otten, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Stomby, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Chorell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Svensson, Michael B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Sports Medicine.
    Holst, Jens Juul
    NNF Center for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    The liver-alpha-cell axis after a mixed meal and during weight loss in type 2 diabetes2021In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 1101-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Glucagon and amino acids may be regulated in a feedback loop called the liver-alpha-cell axis with alanine or glutamine as suggested signal molecules. We assessed this concept in individuals with type 2 diabetes in the fasting state, after ingestion of a protein-rich meal, and during weight loss. Moreover, we investigated if postprandial glucagon secretion and hepatic insulin sensitivity were related.

    Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a 12-week weight-loss trial (Paleolithic diet ± exercise) in 29 individuals with type 2 diabetes. Before and after the intervention, plasma glucagon and amino acids were measured in the fasting state and during 180 min after a protein-rich mixed meal. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was measured using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with [6,6-2H2]glucose as a tracer.

    Results: The postprandial increase of plasma glucagon was associated with the postprandial increase of alanine and several other amino acids but not glutamine. In the fasted state and after the meal, glucagon levels were negatively correlated with hepatic insulin sensitivity (rS = −0.51/r = −0.58, respectively; both P < 0.05). Improved hepatic insulin sensitivity with weight loss was correlated with decreased postprandial glucagon response (r = −0.78; P < 0.001).

    Conclusions: Several amino acids, notably alanine, but not glutamine could be key signals to the alpha cell to increase glucagon secretion. Amino acids may be part of a feedback mechanism as glucagon increases endogenous glucose production and ureagenesis in the liver. Moreover, postprandial glucagon secretion seems to be tightly related to hepatic insulin sensitivity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Vogt, Elinor Chelsom
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Autoimmune Disorders, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Real, Francisco Gómez
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Husebye, Eystein Sverre
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Autoimmune Disorders, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Björnsdottir, Sigridur
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Medical Faculty, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Sleep, Landspitali University Hospital Reykjavík, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Demoly, Pascal
    University Hospital of Montpellier, IDESP, Univ Montpellier-Inserm, Montpellier, France.
    Franklin, Karl Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Gallastegui, Leire Sainz de Aja
    Unit of Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Health, Basque Government, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
    González, Francisco Javier Callejas
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Albacete University Hospital, Albacete, Spain.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Institute and Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany; Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, VIC, Melbourne, Australia.
    Holm, Mathias
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jogi, Nils Oscar
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Leynaert, Benedicte
    Université Paris-Saclay, Inserm U1018, Center for Epidemiology and Population Health, Integrative Respiratory Epidemiology Team, Villejuif, France.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Martínez-Moratalla, Jesús
    Pneumology Service of the General University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, Spain; Albacete Faculty of Medicine, Castilla-La Mancha University, Albacete, Spain.
    Mayoral, Raúl Godoy
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Albacete University Hospital, Albacete, Spain.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Pereira-Vega, Antonio
    Juan Ramón Jiménez University Hospital in Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
    Semjen, Chantal Raherison
    INSERM, EpiCene Team U1219, University of Bordeaux, Talence, France.
    Schlünssen, Vivi
    Department of Public Health, Environment, Work and Health, Danish Ramazzini Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; The National Research Center for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Triebner, Kai
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Øksnes, Marianne
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Autoimmune Disorders, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Premature menopause and autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency in two international multi-center cohorts2022In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e220024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate markers of premature menopause (<40 years) and specifically the prevalence of autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in European women.

    Design: Postmenopausal women were categorized according to age at menopause and self-reported reason for menopause in a cross-sectional analysis of 6870 women.

    Methods: Variables associated with the timing of menopause and hormone measurements of 17β-estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were explored using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Specific immunoprecipitating assays of steroidogenic autoantibodies against 21-hydroxylase (21-OH), side-chain cleavage enzyme (anti-SCC) and 17alpha-hydroxylase (17 OH), as well as NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 were used to identify women with likely autoimmune POI.

    Results: Premature menopause was identified in 2.8% of women, and these women had higher frequencies of nulliparity (37.4% vs 19.7%), obesity (28.7% vs 21.4%), osteoporosis (17.1% vs 11.6%), hormone replacement therapy (59.1% vs 36.9%) and never smokers (60.1% vs 50.9%) (P < 0.05), compared to women with menopause ≥40 years. Iatrogenic causes were found in 91 (47%) and non-ovarian causes in 27 (14%) women, while 77 (39%) women were classified as POI of unknown cause, resulting in a 1.1% prevalence of idiopathic POI. After adjustments nulliparity was the only variable significantly associated with POI (odds ratio 2.46; 95% CI 1.63–3.42). Based on the presence of autoantibodies against 21 OH and SCC, 4.5% of POI cases were of likely autoimmune origin.

    Conclusion: Idiopathic POI affects 1.1% of all women and almost half of the women with premature menopause. Autoimmunity explains 4.5% of these cases judged by positive steroidogenic autoantibodies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf