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  • 1. Blass , Alex
    et al.
    Bigler, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Grosjean, Martin
    Sturm, Michael
    Decadal-scale autumn temperature reconstruction back to AD 1580 inferred from the varved sediments of Lake Silvaplana (southeastern Swiss Alps)2007In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 184-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative high-resolution autumn (September-November) temperature reconstruction for the southeastern Swiss Alps back to AD 1580 is presented here. We used the annually resolved biogenic silica (diatoms) flux derived from the accurately dated and annually sampled sediments of Lake Silvaplana (46°27'N, 9°48'E, 1800 m a.s.1.). The biogenic silica flux smoothed by means of a 9-yr running mean was calibrated (r=0.70, p<0.01) against local instrumental temperature data (AD 1864-1949). The resulting reconstruction (±2 standard errors=±0.7 °C) indicates that autumns during the late Little Ice Age were generally cooler than they were during the 20th century. During the cold anomaly around AD 1600 and during the Maunder Minimum, however, the reconstructed autumn temperatures did not experience strong negative departures from the 20th-century mean. The warmest autumns prior to 1900 occurred around AD 1770 and 1820 (0.75 °C above the 20th-century mean). Our data agree closely with two other autumn temperature reconstructions for the Alps and for Europe that are based on documentary evidence and are completely unrelated to our data, revealing a very consistent picture over the centuries.

  • 2. Kylander, Malin E.
    et al.
    Plikk, Anna
    Rydberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lowemark, Ludvig
    Salonen, J. Sakari
    Fernandez-Fernandez, Maria
    Helmens, Karin
    New insights from XRF core scanning data into boreal lake ontogeny during the Eemian (Marine Isotope Stage 5e) at Sokli, northeast Finland2018In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological proxies from the Sokli Eemian (Marine Isotope Stage 5e) paleolake sequence from northeast Finland have previously shown that, unlike many postglacial records from boreal sites, the lake becomes increasingly eutrophic over time. Here, principal components (PC) were extracted from a high resolution multi-element XRF core scanning dataset to describe minerogenic input from the wider catchment (PC1), the input of S, Fe, Mn, and Ca-rich detrital material from the surrounding Sokli Carbonatite Massif (PC2), and chemical weathering (PC3). Minerogenic inputs to the lake were elevated early in the record and during two abrupt cooling events when soils and vegetation in the catchment were poor. Chemical weathering in the catchment generally increased over time, coinciding with higher air temperatures, catchment productivity, and the presence of acidic conifer species. Abiotic edaphic processes play a key role in lake ontogeny at this site stemming from the base cation- and nutrient-rich bedrock, which supports lake alkalinity and productivity. The climate history at this site, and its integrated effects on the lake system, appear to override development processes and alters its long-term trajectory.

  • 3. Williams, John W.
    et al.
    Grimm, Eric C.
    Blois, Jessica L.
    Charles, Donald F.
    Davis, Edward B.
    Goring, Simon J.
    Graham, Russell W.
    Smith, Alison J.
    Anderson, Michael
    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin
    Ashworth, Allan C.
    Betancourt, Julio L.
    Bills, Brian W.
    Booth, Robert K.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Curry, B. Brandon
    Giesecke, Thomas
    Jackson, Stephen T.
    Latorre, Claudio
    Nichols, Jonathan
    Purdum, Timshel
    Roth, Robert E.
    Stryker, Michael
    Takahara, Hikaru
    The neotoma paleoecology database, a multiproxy, international, community-curated data resource2018In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 156-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database is a community-curated data resource that supports interdisciplinary global change research by enabling broad-scale studies of taxon and community diversity, distributions, and dynamics during the large environmental changes of the past. By consolidating many kinds of data into a common repository, Neotoma lowers costs of paleodata management, makes paleoecological data openly available, and offers a high-quality, curated resource. Neotoma’s distributed scientific governance model is flexible and scalable, with many open pathways for participation by new members, data contributors, stewards, and research communities. The Neotoma data model supports, or can be extended to support, any kind of paleoecological or paleoenvironmental data from sedimentary archives. Data additions to Neotoma are growing and now include >3.8 million observations, >17,000 datasets, and >9200 sites. Dataset types currently include fossil pollen, vertebrates, diatoms, ostracodes, macroinvertebrates, plant macrofossils, insects, testate amoebae, geochronological data, and the recently added organic biomarkers, stable isotopes, and specimen-level data. Multiple avenues exist to obtain Neotoma data, including the Explorer map-based interface, an application programming interface, the neotoma R package, and digital object identifiers. As the volume and variety of scientific data grow, community-curated data resources such as Neotoma have become foundational infrastructure for big data science.

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