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  • 1.
    Bostian, Moriah B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för miljö- och naturresursekonomi (CERE). Department of Economics, Lewis & Clark College, USA.
    Barnhart, Bradley L.
    Department of Applied Economics, Oregon State University, United States.
    Kurkalova, Lyubov A.
    Department of Economics, North Carolina A&T State University, United States.
    Jha, Manoj K.
    Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina A&T State University, United States.
    Whittaker, Gerald W.
    Department of Applied Economics, Oregon State University, United States.
    Bilevel optimization of conservation practices for agricultural production2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 300, artikel-id 126874Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty surrounding the sources of nonpoint pollution and producer response to prospective policy incentives complicates the nonpoint policy problem. To explain, neither policy-makers nor producers know the exact effect of current and alternative farming practices on the contributions of specific cropped fields to nutrient pollution. Spatial heterogeneity of the production technology and environmental damage of runoff also precludes the formulation of an analytic solution, so that producer response to prospective policies is unknown a priori to the policy maker. To address the complexity arising from point source uncertainty and spatial heterogeneity, we draw on recent computational advances to reformulate the classic nonpoint source pollution problem as a multi-objective bilevel optimization problem, employing genetic algorithm (GA) solution methods. This computational framework explicitly accounts for the nested nature of farm-level management decisions in response to prospective agri-environmental policy incentives, and spatial heterogeneity of both production and pollution effects. Our application considers the optimal spatial targeting of multiple management practices in the Iowa Raccoon River Watershed, an intensive corn and soybean production region of the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB). Consistent with theory and previous empirical results, we find that combining multiple management practices, versus relying on single or one-size policies, lowers the total cost for a given level of nitrogen reduction. But we also find overall limited potential nitrogen reduction via implementing these practices on working land, suggesting the continued need for land retirement in meeting current nonpoint policy goals for the UMRB. We believe that the main contribution of this study lies in the novelty of the bilevel approach, which explicitly accounts for feedbacks between policy makers and agricultural producers, while the associated GA computational methods allow for better handling of large scale and complex spatial heterogeneity over the agricultural watershed.

  • 2. Buss, Wolfram
    et al.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Mašek, Ondřej
    Unexplored potential of novel biochar-ash composites for use as organo-mineral fertilizers2019Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 208, s. 960-967Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Application of wood ash on forest and agricultural soils can provide nutrients and increase soil pH, however, it changes the soil chemistry rapidly and temporarily, often resulting in reduced plant growth and potassium leaching. Biochar from woody materials are nutrient poor and need nutrient enhancement prior to soil application. In this study, spruce residues were mixed with spruce/pine ash in different ratios (0–50%) to produce biochar-ash composites at 450 °C. The biochar yield (ash-free basis) increased by 80–90% with the addition of 50% ash due to catalytic biochar formation. Consequently, nearly half the amount of wood is needed to produce the same amount of (ash-free) biochar. Mineral release was moderated in the composites compared to pure ash, demonstrated by a lower electric conductivity and % available K content (a factor of 2.5–4.4 lower than in wood ash). Furthermore, the % available chromium content, which is a key potentially toxic element in wood ash, decreased by a factor of 50–160. Soil application of biochar-ash composites decreases the risk of Cr toxicity, salinity stress and leaching of K in soil substantially compared to ash application. Biochar-ash composites are a novel product with vast unexplored potential for use in forestry and agriculture.

  • 3. Chen, Feng
    et al.
    Xiong, Shaojun
    Sundelin, Jonatan
    Martin, Carlos
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Hultberg, Malin
    Potential for combined production of food and biofuel: Cultivation of Pleurotus pulmonarius on soft- and hardwood sawdusts2020Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 266, artikel-id 122011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at developing an integrated process of production of edible summer oyster mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius) and preprocessing of the substrate lignocellulose for producing 2nd-generation biofuels based on softwood. Sawdust-based mushroom substrates of softwood spruce (Picea abies) versus hardwood alder (Alnus glutinosa) as a reference were used for production of summer oyster mushrooms. The substrates had been either hot-air pasteurised or steam sterilised before growing the mushroom. The potential of using spent substrate (SMS) after harvest for biofuel production was evaluated by examining the lignocellulosic composition and enzymatic convertibility. The biological efficiency of the substrates ranged 14.0-33.8% and no significant difference was observed between the treatments. The fruiting bodies had similar total protein concentrations ranging between 26.0 and 28.5% regardless of differences in treatments. The average mass degradation of Klason lignin and acid soluble lignin in the substrates after mushroom production were 35.0 and 22.6%, respectively. Glucan, the major carbohydrate component, was initially present in concentrations ranging from 24 to 29% of total dry matter and with similar concentrations observed in both alder-based and spruce-based substrates. After mushroom production, a significant difference was observed between the substrates with the lowest consumption of glucan, 3.9% of the initial mass, in the spruce-based substrate. The selective degradation ability of P. pulmonarius on the lignin fraction, rather than the cellulose component of softwood, is suggested in the present study. Between 84 and 126 g glucose was yielded per kg of dry SMS, spruce based substrates resulted a higher yield than alder substrate from enzymatic saccharification of the spent substrates. The heat treatment of the mushroom's substrate had in general a minor impact on the mushroom production and fungal pretreatment of the substrates; hot-air pasteurisation is apparently more energy efficient method than steam sterilisation. 

  • 4.
    Figge, Frank
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet. ESCP Business School, Paris, France.
    Dimitrov, Stanko
    Schlosser, Rainer
    Chenavaz, Régis
    Does the circular economy fuel the throwaway society? The role of opportunity costs for products that lose value over time2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 368, artikel-id 133207Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficient use of natural resources is considered a necessary condition for their sustainable use. Extending the lifetime of products and using resources circularly are two popular strategies to increase the efficiency of resource use. Both strategies are usually assumed to contribute to the eco-efficiency of resource use independently. We argue that a move to a circular economy creates opportunity costs for consumers holding on to their products, due to the resource embedded in the product. Assuming rational consumers, we develop a model that determines optimal replacement times for products subject to minimizing average costs over time. We find that in a perfectly circular economy, consumers are incentivized to discard their products more quickly than in a perfectly linear economy. A direct consequence of our finding is that extending product use is in direct conflict with closing resource loops in the circular economy. We identify the salvage value of discarded products and technical progress as two factors that determine the impact that closing resource loops has on the duration of product use. The article highlights the risk that closing resource loops and moving to a more circular economy incentivizes more unsustainable behavior.

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  • 5.
    Figge, Frank
    et al.
    Kedge Business School, Domaine de Luminy, France.
    Young, William
    Barkemeyer, Ralf
    Sufficiency or efficiency to achieve lower resource consumption and emissions?: The role of the rebound effect2014Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 69, s. 216-224Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A frequent criticism of eco-efficiency strategies is that an increase in efficiency can be offset by the rebound effect. Sufficiency is discussed as a new strategy involving self-imposed restriction of consumption but can also be subject to the rebound effect. We show that the range of possible secondary effects of efficiency and sufficiency strategies goes beyond the rebound effect. The rebound effect can indeed also be linked to eco-sufficiency strategies but there are further secondary effects of both eco-efficiency and eco-sufficiency strategies, such as double dividend effects. We develop an ‘Eco-efficiency-sufficiency matrix’ to logically order eco-efficiency and sufficiency measures to attain lower resource consumption and emissions.

  • 6. Franklin-Johnson, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Figge, Frank
    Kedge Business School, Marseille, France.
    Canning, Louise
    Resource duration as a managerial indicator for Circular Economy performance2016Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 133, s. 589-598Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a new indicator for environmental assessment performance linked to Circular Economy. Almost all existing techniques evaluate resource use based on their burden relative to value, while the central point of Circular Economy is to create value through material retention. The existing burden-orientated techniques are therefore unsuitable for guiding managers in relation to Circular Economy objectives. This paper presents a new performance metric, the longevity indicator, which measures contribution to material retention based on the amount of time a resource is kept in use. The measure is composed of three generic components: initial lifetime, earned refurbished lifetime and earned recycled lifetime. Management of these components can be used for decision making and performance assessment in the Circular Economy. The example of precious metals in mobile phone handsets is used to illustrate the general application and suitability of this indicator. Findings show that for materials to be retained, managers should encourage longer lifetime use, increase product return levels for initial use and refurbished phones, and select the most effective recycling processes available. This paper advances performance indicators for Circular Economy, and provides a tool which can be applied at managerial and organizational levels to measure the impact of business decisions on the longevity of precious materials.

  • 7.
    González-Hourcade, María
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Simões dos Reis, Glaydson
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dinh, Van Minh
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Lima, Eder Claudio
    Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, RS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gentili, Francesco G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Microalgae biomass as a sustainable precursor to produce nitrogen-doped biochar for efficient removal of emerging pollutants from aqueous media2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 348, artikel-id 131280Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparing sustainable and highly efficient biochars as adsorbents remains a challenge for organic pollutant management. Herein, a novel nitrogen-doped carbon material has been synthesized via a facile and sustainable single-step pyrolysis method using a wild mixture of microalgae as novel carbon precursor. Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) was employed as activation agent to generate pores in the carbon material. In addition, the effect of melamine (nitrogen source) was evaluated over the biochar properties by the N-doping process. The results showed that the biochar's specific surface area (SSA) increased from 324 to 433 m2 g−1 with the N-doping process. The N-doping process increased the percentage of micropores in the biochar structure. Chemical characterization of the biochars indicated that the N-doping process helped to increase the graphitization process of the biochar and the contents of oxygen and nitrogen groups on the carbon surface. The biochars were successfully tested to adsorb acetaminophen and treat two synthetic effluents, and the N-doped biochar presented the highest efficiency. The kinetics and equilibrium data were well represented by the General-order model and the Liu isotherm model, respectively. The maximum sorption capacities attained were 101.4 and 120.7 mg g−1 for the non-doped and doped biochars, respectively. The acetaminophen adsorption mechanism suggests that the pore-filling was the dominant mechanism for acetaminophen uptake. The biochars could efficiently remove up to 74% of the contaminants in synthetic effluents.

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  • 8.
    Goswami, Rahul Kumar
    et al.
    Bioprocess and Bioenergy Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Rajasthan, Rajasthan, India.
    Mehariya, Sanjeet
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba
    Department of Engineering Technology, College of Technology, University of Houston, TX, Houston, United States; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, SD, Rapid City, United States; Institute of Bioresource and Agriculture, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Gupta, Vijai Kumar
    Center for Safe and Improved Food, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Biorefining and Advanced Materials Research Center, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Verma, Pradeep
    Bioprocess and Bioenergy Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Rajasthan, Rajasthan, India.
    Multifaceted application of microalgal biomass integrated with carbon dioxide reduction and wastewater remediation: A flexible concept for sustainable environment2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 339, artikel-id 130654Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Microalgae are ubiquitous, diverse, and photosynthetic organisms in nature and have prominent applications in carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation and wastewater remediation. This review has compiled the recent trends in the potential application of microalgae for wastewater treatment and combating CO2 emissions and multifaceted use of its biomass for the co-production of bioenergy and human health products. In specific, this review critically addressed; (a) global scenario of carbon footprint and wastewater remediation and concept of circular bioeconomy, (b) approaches of sterile and non-sterile cultivation of microalgae, (c) state-of-art biorefinery especially for harvesting of algal biomass, d) details of microalgal high-value compounds (HVAC) such as lipids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, carotenoids, sterols, and polyphenolic compounds, (e) recent biomass to biofuel strategies, and (f) market analysis, recent challenges and future progress. The review establishes that the microalgae can simultaneously treat different types of wastewater, recover nutrients/metals, and mitigate CO2 from flue gas via its biofixation ability. The flocculation method is found to be best for harvesting the algal biomass. The non-sterile cultivated biomass can be utilized for biofuels production, and sterile biomass can be used to produce HVAC compounds that have significant application in human health.

  • 9.
    Haskell, Lucas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Stål, Herman I.
    School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg University.
    Social innovation related to ecological crises: A systematic literature review and a research agenda for strong sustainability2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 325, artikel-id 129316Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    New technologies, market-based solutions, and regulation have proven inadequate in remedying today's human caused ecological crises. This suggests that detrimental social practices need to be fundamentally changed. While social innovation is one possible approach for such change, a comprehensive picture of research on social innovation in relation to ecological challenges is missing. Therefore, with an emphasis on so-called strong sustainability, this article's purpose was to investigate social innovation's potential in relation to ecological crises, to identify important gaps, and advance research implications. A systematic literature review of social innovation research that address environmental issues was carried out, and the resulting literature was analyzed according to sustainability and five dimensions of social innovation. To reap more of social innovation's potential in our time of ecological crises, we suggest a move in social innovation research towards strong sustainability and propose such research avenues within each of the five dimensions of social innovation: conceptualization, environmental needs and challenges, key resources, capabilities, and constraints, types of governance, networks and actors, and, finally, process dynamics for strongly sustainable social innovation.

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  • 10.
    He, Yingnan
    et al.
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Chen, Jianbing
    Research Academy of Non-metallic Mining Industry Development, Materials and Environmental Engineering College, Chizhou University, Chizhou, China.
    Lv, Jiapei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Huang, Yimin
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Zhou, Shuxing
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Hubei University of Arts and Science, Xiangyang, China.
    Li, Wenyan
    Joint Institute for Environmental Research and Education, College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.
    Li, Yongtao
    Joint Institute for Environmental Research and Education, College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.
    Chang, Fengqin
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Zhang, Hucai
    Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysik.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysik. Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Separable amino-functionalized biochar/alginate beads for efficient removal of Cr(VI) from original electroplating wastewater at room temperature2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 373, artikel-id 133790Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An alginate gel bead composite adsorbent with polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a surface modifier and Eichhornia crassipes (EC) biochar, known as EC-alg/PEI-3, was added internally to the adsorb Cr(VI) from an aqueous environment. The functionalized gel beads were characterized using SEM, XPS, FTIR, and other techniques. The maximum adsorption capacities of EC-alg/PEI-3 were 714.3 mg g−1 at 10 °C and 769.2 mg g−1 at 25 °C. In the treatment of highly concentrated electroplating wastewater, EC-alg/PEI-3 can be dosed at 1.4 g L−1 to reduce the concentration of Cr(VI) to below 0.05 ppm. EC-alg/PEI-3 maintained a competitive adsorption capacity after six cycles. This spherical adsorbent material is easy to prepare, has a very high adsorption capacity, is environmentally friendly, and can be easily recycled. The EC-alg/PEI-3 gel beads are promising for the treatment of industrial wastewater.

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  • 11.
    Heikkurinen, Pasi
    et al.
    MTT Agrifood Research Finland; Aalto Univ, Sch Business Org & Management, Espoo, Finland.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Corporate responsibility for sustainable development: A review and conceptual comparison of market- and stakeholder-oriented strategies2013Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 43, s. 191-198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews and compares two mainstream business theories, namely market and stakeholder orientations, as contending strategies of corporate responsibility for sustainable development. We argue that even though stakeholder orientation offers a broader inclusion of values and expectations than market orientation , they share considerable similarities in terms of sustainability assumptions and how the role of the corporation becomes perceived in the quest for sustainable development. Both strategies leave responsibility outside the firm by emphasising the role of either customers or stakeholders as the basis of strategizing. Both strategies are also based on assumptions consistent with weak sustainability (at best), which is argued to be insufficient in order to achieve sustainability over time and space. Therefore, this article suggests that a new orientation is needed if corporations are to contribute to sustainable development, namely sustainable development orientation. We call for further research in outlining a business strategy that admits corporations’ responsibility for sustainable development and departs from the strong sustainability assumption.

  • 12.
    Helin, Sven
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Babri, Maira
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Travelling with a Code of Ethics: A Contextual Study of a Swedish MNC Auditing a Chinese Supplier2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, s. 41-53Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate codes of ethics are integrated into supplier-auditing processes in the hope of ensuring sustainability throughout the supply chain. But little is known about what actually happens when one standardized code of ethics is disseminated and applied in audits on suppliers across the globe. This study builds on the literature on the ‘translation of management ideas’ and examines what happens when a corporate code of ethics travels in a global context. The specific case reports on a Swedish Multinational Corporation (MNC) with a standardized code of ethics applied in the practice of auditing a supplier in Eastern China. The study shows that the code can be translated in different ways in different organizational and geographical contexts. Observations of and interviews about how the code is translated in practice indicate that the code's ethics are negotiable. It is argued that sustainability and ethics are in danger of being negotiated or completely undermined when efficiency and contractual agreements set the agenda for audits, and that the relative buyer–supplier power relation can play a vital role in setting standards and demanding supplier compliance.

  • 13.
    Hermassi, Mehrez
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik. Chemical Engineering Department, East Barcelona Engineering School, Barcelona TECHUPC, Sant Adrià de Besòs, Spain.
    Granados, M.
    Valderrama, C.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik.
    Ayora, C.
    Cortina, J.L.
    Impact of functional group types in ion exchange resins on rare earth element recovery from treated acid mine waters2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 379, nr Part 2, artikel-id 134742Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion-exchange (IX) resins incorporating single functional groups (sulfonic or amino-phosphonic) and two functional groups (sulfonic and phosphonic) were evaluated for selective recovery of Rare Earth Elements (REEs) from acidic mine waters (AMW). The composition of AMW solution, complexing properties of the functional group, and acidity were investigated as key parameters for concentration and separation of REEs from transition elements (TEs). Fe has to be removed from AMW to enable REE recovery and here the AMW was treated with NaOH solutions to reach pH 3.9 where Fe(III) was selectively removed (≤99%) by precipitation of schwertmannite. Single functional IX resin containing a sulfonic group displayed a higher REE recovery efficiency and separation ratio than observed for the bi-functional resin (sulfonic/phosphonic). Concentration factors for REEs between 30 and 40 were achieved using regeneration cycles with H2SO4. The performance of the aminophosphonic resin showed lower separation factors for REEs from TEs than the two resins containing sulfonic groups. IX resins performance was improved by tuning the acidity to match the functional group reactivity, where pH adjustment to the range of 0.5–2.0 provided the highest REE/TE separation factor for the single sulfonic resin followed by the bifunctional resin. The integration of an elution cycle using Na2-EDTA/NH4Cl mixtures strongly increases the concentration factors of REE and Light REE (LREE) concentration factors of up to 260 were achieved for the single functional sulfonic resin.

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  • 14.
    Hervé, Corvellec
    et al.
    Department of Service Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    Stål, Herman
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Evidencing the waste effect of Product-Service Systems (PSSs)2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 145, s. 14-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper adopts a waste-centric analysis of Product-Service Systems (PSSs) to demonstrate that they do not automatically contribute to a dematerialization of the economy, a decoupling of production from material and energy consumption, and thus a transition toward sustainability. A qualitative analysis of various Nordic fashion PSSs that uses a combination of Tukker’s (2004) classification of PSSs and the European waste hierarchy model demonstrates that the waste effect of a PSS is independent of its being product-oriented, use-oriented, or result-oriented. Rather, the effect depends on how the business model of the PSS organizes material flows at production, distribution, use, and post-consumption stages in relationship to prevailing waste regimes where the PSS operates.We suggest that if a PSS is to reduce its waste effect and contribute to dematerialization, its business model should design material flows that fit with the prevailing waste regimes within the area it operates and prioritize waste prevention before considering reuse, recycling, energy recovery, and landfilling.

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  • 15.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi, Transportforskningsenheten (TRUM). School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi, Transportforskningsenheten (TRUM).
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi, Transportforskningsenheten (TRUM).
    Examining drivers of sustainable consumption: the influence of norms and opinion leadership on electric vehicle adoption in Sweden2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 154, s. 176-187Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation accounts for a large and growing part of carbon dioxide emissions. With an increasing vehicle fleet worldwide private car use is becoming an acute problem in need of urgent attention and action. Policy interference and cleaner cars are not enough; alternative fuel vehicles such as electric vehicles need to be adopted by consumers as well. Previous research on pro-environmental consumer behavior and sustainable consumption has proven the importance of norms and pro-environmental attitudes. However, little research has focused on understanding interpersonal influence found influential in consumer behavior research relating to innovation adoption. Consumer opinion leading and opinion seeking are two such interpersonal influence attitudinal constructs that have not been empirically analyzed in relation to sustainable consumption and alternative fuel vehicles. The main aim of this study is thus to analyze the influence of a set of attitudinal constructs on electric and flexfuel vehicle adoption: personal norms, social norms, ecological attitudes, opinion leading, and opinion seeking. Data from a questionnaire survey on three groups of electric vehicle adopters and non-adopters is used (N=1,192). The results confirm the importance of personal norms, opinion leading and opinion seeking in the three groups also when controlling for socio-demographic factors. The main contribution of this study is that it shows the importance of both interpersonal influence and attitudinal factors as drivers for eco-innovation adoption. The study also contributes in showing that electric vehicle and flexfuel vehicle adopters differ in relation to non-adopters on several factors.

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  • 16. Kocík, Jaroslav
    et al.
    Samikannu, Ajaikumar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bourajoini, Hasna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Pham, Tung Ngoc
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Faculty of Science and Engineering, Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Hájek, Martin
    Čapek, Libor
    Screening of active solid catalysts for esterification of tall oil fatty acids with methanol2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 155, nr 1, s. 34-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is focused on the description of the activity/selectivity of mesoporous silica based materials loaded with various types of active species in the esterification of tall oil free fatty acids. The metals such as aluminium, molybdenum, gallium and zinc, including their combinations were impregnated on the mesoporous silica, which was tested in esterification reaction. All these catalysts preserved its tall oil free fatty conversion in the first and the second catalytic cycles. However, while only insignificant amount of gallium or molybdenum was lost from the solid catalyst into the liquid phases, zinc leached from every studied solid catalyst. In contrast to impregnated gallium on mesoporous silica, which exhibited higher acidity and higher tall oil free fatty acids conversion in the first catalytic cycle, but its value was not preserved in the second catalytic test.

  • 17.
    Kohtala, Cindy
    Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
    Addressing sustainability in research on distributed production: An integrated literature review2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, s. 654-668Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an integrated literature review on how the environmental sustainability of distributed production is studied in a variety of disciplinary sources. The notion of distributed production suggests an alternative to mass production that differs in scale, location and consumer–producer relationship. Understanding its environmental implications (and thereby dematerialization potential) is regarded pertinent and timely. Key themes in the review included how distributed production can promote product longevity and closed material loops, as well as localizing production. New and closer ties between producer and consumer seemed central discussions but were underdeveloped with regard to sustainability potential. Empirical work was seen especially in research on Additive Manufacturing Processes, while the bulk of the studies were conceptual explorations with little testing in the real world as yet. This affirms the emerging nature of the topic and points to a clear need for more (and more diverse) empirical research. The review summarizes the opportunities for greater environmental sustainability as well as potential threats that could serve to guide and improve these novel practices today. It sets the stage for ‘distributed production’ to be examined as its own phenomenon by proposing how it can be characterized and suggests that a research agenda could build upon the work initiated here.

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  • 18.
    Kohtala, Cindy
    et al.
    Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
    Hyysalo, Sampsa
    Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
    Anticipated environmental sustainability of personal fabrication2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 99, s. 333-344Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributed manufacturing is rapidly proliferating to citizen level via the use of digital fabrication equipment, especially in dedicated “makerspaces”. The sustainability benefits of citizens' personal fabrication are commonly endorsed. However, to assess how these maker practitioners actually deal with environmental issues, these practitioners and their practices need to be studied. Moreover research on the environmental issues in personal fabrication is nascent despite the common perception that the digital technologies can become disruptive. The present paper is the first to report on how practitioners assess the environmental sustainability of future practices in this rapidly changing field. It does so through an envisioning workshop with leading-edge makers. The findings show that these makers are well able to envision the future of their field. Roughly 25% of the issues covered had clear environmental implications. Within these, issues of energy use, recycling, reusing and reducing materials were covered widely by environmentally-oriented participants. In contrast, issues related to emerging technologies, materials and practices were covered by other participants, but their environmental implications remained unaddressed. The authors concluded there is a gap between different maker subcultures in their sustainability orientations and competences. Further research on the environmental aspects of real-life maker practices and personal fabrication technologies now could help avert negative impacts later, as the maker phenomenon spreads. This knowledge should also be directed to developing targeted environmental guidelines and solutions for personal fabrication users, which are currently lacking. Potential also lies in seeking to enhance dialogue between pro-environmental and new-technology-oriented practitioners through shared spaces, workshops and conferences.

  • 19.
    Lam-González, Yen E.
    et al.
    University Institute for Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development (TiDES), University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain.
    León, Carmelo J.
    University Institute for Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development (TiDES), University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain.
    de León, Javier
    University Institute for Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development (TiDES), University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Suárez-Rojas, Chaitanya
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för miljö- och naturresursekonomi (CERE). University Institute for Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development (TiDES), University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Mooring in the green room: Sailors’ preferences and willingness to pay for green policies in marinas2023Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 419, artikel-id 138227Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    'Going green' is still challenging in the yachting industry partly due to the lack of consumer-centric approaches. This study assesses sailors' preferences and willingness to pay for green policies in marinas, in the context of other measures to increase health security and digital transformation. To do so, a choice experiment was designed through the lens of stakeholders and supported by the Delphi technique. The study is based on the marinas of the Canary Islands in the Atlantic crossing and involved European sailors as potential users. Data confirm that sailors' utility and intention to visit marinas increase the most when ambitious green programs are in place, thereby confirming a high environmental sensitivity among them. More specifically, solar energy use, single-use plastic eradication, and waste recycling are the programs with the greatest positive impact on sailors' willingness to pay. This indicates a potential profitability and market opportunities derived from more environmental friendly practices in marinas. The study opens a new perspective to improve incentive and funding schemes and close implementation gaps in recreational ports.

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  • 20. Lappeman, James
    et al.
    Orpwood, Tessa
    Russell, Meghan
    Zeller, Tatiana
    Jansson, Johan
    School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Personal values and willingness to pay for fair trade coffee in Cape Town, South Africa2019Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 239, artikel-id 118012Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding ethical buying behaviour is an important component in the study of sustainability. Multiple studies on fair trade have been conducted in established markets in Europe, with limited but increasing research in emerging markets. This study used a questionnaire survey to investigate South African consumers’ ethical buying behaviour, using conjoint analysis to imitate the multi-attribute decision consumers face when buying coffee. Based on previous research, factors concerning consumers’ personal values, willingness to pay, and knowledge are combined. In the results, participants were segmented based on their willingness to pay for fair trade labelled coffee and these segments were then compared in terms of their fair trade knowledge and personal values. The study profiled four different segments and concluded that conventionalism, rationalism, sincerity, and personal satisfaction did not differ significantly across segments. The segment ‘Fair Trade Lovers’, however, exhibited higher levels of humanitarianism than the segment ‘Brand Likers’, and were willing to pay a higher fair trade premium. While knowledge of fair trade did not differ significantly between segments, the total sample displayed above average fair trade knowledge and 63% were willing to pay a 10% premium. Insights from this study suggest that marketing managers promoting fair trade in emerging markets can design more effective targeting and promotional strategies by highlighting the psychological determinants affecting the willingness to pay for fair trade products.

  • 21.
    Manzhynski, Siarhei
    et al.
    Belarussian State Technological University.
    Figge, Frank
    Kedge Business School.
    Hassel, Lars G
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Sustainable value creation of nine countries of the Baltic region: value, changes and drivers2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 108, s. 637-646Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic region comprises countries of great diversity. They have in common that they all face the challenge to combine a sound economic development with the stewardship for their environmental, social and economic resources. Using the Sustainable Value approach we first analyse their overall sustainability performance. We then further develop the value drivers of Sustainable Value to enhance the explanatory power of our analysis. We find that there are significant differences between countries. We show both conceptually and using our examples that there is no unambiguous link between economic growth, environmental and social stewardship and the efficient use of resources.

  • 22.
    Nesterova, Iana
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Addressing the obscurity of change in values in degrowth business2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 315, artikel-id 128152Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes the recent degrowth business framework as a starting point and looks deeper into one particular part of it, the change in values. It has been claimed that the agential level (i.e., that of individuals) and associated with it change in values is what underpins the remaining elements of the degrowth business framework, i.e., that change in values gives rise to degrowth compatible practices, principles, and operations. This is because, according to critical realism, individual humans are where agency resides. Considering that an immense hope is placed into the agents, the change in values needs to receive substantially more attention. As it stands, currently this category is underexplored and remains obscure on its own and in relation to degrowth business specifically. This paper attempts to address this obscurity and shed light on change in values of agents, while adopting the same philosophy of critical realism which underlaboured the construction of the degrowth business framework itself and supplementing it with the insights from the philosophy of existentialism which allows us to structure human existence and change in values specifically around three defined aspects of our being in the world.

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  • 23.
    Nesterova, Iana
    University of Derby, Derby, UK.
    Degrowth business framework: Implications for sustainable development2020Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 262, artikel-id 121382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a revival in growth scepticism, yet degrowth in relation to the macroeconomiclevel has received almost exclusive attention. This resulted in a lack of literature on how post-growth andspecifically degrowth visions of economy could be implemented, including from the perspective offirmsand other organisations. This paper focuses on degrowth literature andfields of knowledge which share asimilar or sympathetic perspective regarding the undesirability of economic growth and desirability ofliving within planetary boundaries while pursuing wellbeing. It then applies degrowth vision tofirmsand identifies potential elements of a business for a degrowth economy, here referred to as a degrowthbusiness. These elements comprise a degrowth business framework. The framework is centred aroundthe following groups: (1) environment, (2) people and non-humans, and (3) deviation from profitmaximisation imperative. It aims to contribute to an emerging discussion on whatfirms should be likefor a degrowth economy and society to be possible.

  • 24.
    Oesterle, Pierre
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Gallampois, Christine
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Fate of trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and caffeine after hydrothermal regeneration of activated carbon2023Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 421, artikel-id 139477Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging contaminants are found in all parts of our environment. Adsorption of these contaminants by activated carbon in water treatment plants is well-known; however, a problem resides in the handling of the spent adsorbents. As current regenerative technologies are expensive, the adsorbents are often destructed or landfilled. Here, we examine a novel regeneration method for the used adsorbents with subcritical water – i.e., hydrothermal treatment. The degradation of three well-known emerging contaminants – caffeine, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole – was studied with regard to processing temperature (160–280 °C), concentration (2 and 20 mg/L), and the impact of adsorbents. In addition to trimethoprim in the mix at 20 mg/L, the other contaminants were entirely degraded at 280 °C. To obtain insight into transformation products formed during hydrothermal regeneration, we performed non-target and targeted analyses with LC-MS-QTOF using two types of columns, C18 and ZIC-HILIC. This approach ensured a wide range of hydrophilicities. Results showed more transformation products for trimethoprim (20) compared to sulfamethoxazole and caffeine (4). To assess the regeneration efficiencies of the activated carbons, we conducted three cycles of regeneration at 280 °C and between 61 and 120 % degradation was achieved. Moreover, only two transformation products were detected and readsorbed on the adsorbent after regeneration. Hydrothermal regeneration efficiently degraded the target emerging contaminants, suggesting a potential approach for enabling alternative, sequential uses for regenerated activated carbon.

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  • 25.
    Pakrooh, Parisa
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för miljö- och naturresursekonomi (CERE). University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Nematian, Javad
    Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering at the University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Pishbahar, Esmaeil
    Associate Professor in Agricultural Economics at the University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Hayati, Babollah
    Professor in Agricultural Economics at the University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Reforming energy prices to achieve sustainable energy consumption in the agriculture sector of Iran's provinces: Using game approach2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 293, artikel-id 126146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The agriculture sector of Iran's provinces, as one of the main factors of Iran's total CO2 emissions, has an increasing trend in fossil energy consumption due to lacking a specific energy market and irrational pricing by the government. Hence, it is necessary to focus on approaches that can determine optimum prices for controlling both energy consumption and CO2 emissions. In this regard, the study aims to find an optimum price and sustainable amount of fossil energy consumption (including gasoline, natural gas, and electricity) in the agriculture sector of Iran's provinces during 2001–16. We proposed both cooperative and non-cooperative game models based on competitive and seller monopoly markets to find an equilibrium price and demand with Nash equilibrium. Cost and demand-supply function coefficients estimated after the formulation of the problems in the markets, and then game-based models optimized to find reformed prices and demands. Empirical results highlight that both proposed game-based models can modify different types of energy consumption, as well as energy prices. Also, it seems that the cooperative game model can provide optimum prices for different groups of energy users, smooth the inequality in energy consumption, and prevent a sharp reduction in both GDP and agricultural production. On the contrary, the non-cooperative game model was appropriate for the next years.

  • 26. Reckien, Diana
    et al.
    Salvia, Monica
    Heidrich, Oliver
    Church, Jon Marco
    Pietrapertosa, Filomena
    De Gregorio-Hurtado, Sonia
    D'Alonzo, Valentina
    Foley, Aoife
    Simoes, Sofia G.
    Lorencova, Eliska Krkoska
    Orru, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin. Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, 51007 Tartu, Estonia.
    Orru, Kati
    Wejs, Anja
    Flacke, Johannes
    Olazabal, Marta
    Geneletti, Davide
    Feliu, Efren
    Vasilie, Sergiu
    Nador, Cristiana
    Krook-Riekkola, Anna
    Matosovic, Marko
    Fokaides, Paris A.
    Ioannou, Byron I.
    Flamos, Alexandros
    Spyridaki, Niki-Artemis
    Balzan, Mario V.
    Fulop, Orsolya
    Paspaldzhiev, Ivan
    Grafakos, Stelios
    Dawson, Richard
    How are cities planning to respond to climate change?: Assessment of local climate plans from 885 cities in the EU-282018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 191, s. 207-219Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paris Agreement aims to limit global mean temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. This target has wide-ranging implications for Europe and its cities, which are the source of substantial greenhouse gas emissions. This paper reports the state of local planning for climate change by collecting and analysing information about local climate mitigation and adaptation plans across 885 urban areas of the EU-28. A typology and framework for analysis was developed that classifies local climate plans in terms of their alignment with spatial (local, national and international) and other climate related policies. Out of eight types of local climate plans identified in total we document three types of stand-alone local climate plans classified as type Al (autonomously produced plans), A2 (plans produced to comply with national regulations) or A3 (plans developed for international climate networks). There is wide variation among countries in the prevalence of local climate plans, with generally more plans developed by central and northern European cities. Approximately 66% of EU cities have a type Al, A2, or A3 mitigation plan, 26% an adaptation plan, and 17% a joint adaptation and mitigation plan, while about 33% lack any form of stand-alone local climate plan (i.e. what we classify as Al, A2, A3 plans). Mitigation plans are more numerous than adaptation plans, but planning for mitigation does not always precede planning for adaptation. Our analysis reveals that city size, national legislation, and international networks can influence the development of local climate plans. We found that size does matter as about 80% of the cities with above 500,000 inhabitants have a comprehensive and stand-alone mitigation and/or an adaptation plan (Al). Cities in four countries with national climate legislation (A2), i.e. Denmark, France, Slovakia and the United Kingdom, are nearly twice as likely to produce local mitigation plans, and five times more likely to produce local adaptation plans, compared to cities in countries without such legislation. Al and A2 mitigation plans are particularly numerous in Denmark, Poland, Germany, and Finland: while Al and A2 adaptation plans are prevalent in Denmark, Finland, UK and France. The integration of adaptation and mitigation is country-specific and can mainly be observed in two countries where local climate plans are compulsory, i.e. France and the UK. Finally, local climate plans produced for international climate networks (A3) are mostly found in the many countries where autonomous (type Al) plans are less common. This is the most comprehensive analysis of local climate planning to date. The findings are of international importance as they will inform and support decision making towards climate planning and policy development at national, EU and global level being based on the most comprehensive and up-to-date knowledge of local climate planning available to date. 

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  • 27.
    Røyne, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Department of Energy Technology, Eklandagatan 86, SE-412 61 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berlin, Johanna
    Ringström, Emma
    Life cycle perspective in environmental strategy development on the industry cluster level: a case study of five chemical companies2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 86, s. 125-131Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The scale of industry clusters and their significant environmental impact make addressing environmental strategies on the cluster level an intriguing task. Although several studies indicate that upstream processes contribute significantly to the total environmental impact of the system, few studies assess how environmental strategy development can be approached from a life cycle perspective. The aim of this paper was to investigate the practical significance of life cycle-based environmental strategy development using a chemical industry cluster in Sweden as the case study. To assess the environmental impact, a cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment (LCA) was chosen as the method, with the total annual production of the cluster in 2011 as the functional unit. To cover the whole value chain, the global warming potential for downstream processes was also estimated. The findings were linked to the cluster vision, which aims to reduce environmental impact by 2030. The results indicate that the cluster must focus on the whole value chain when pursuing the aim of producing sustainable products as environmental impact both upstream and downstream of the cluster accounts for a larger share than on-site processes. The assessment also enables distribution of environmental impact among incoming material streams, thus providing the cluster with decision support when introducing renewable and recycled materials. Additionally, the assessment supports strategy comparison and serves as a base case against which strategy opportunities can be evaluated. This study demonstrates that the life cycle approach has interesting potential to support industry cluster companies in their mutual effort to improve environmental performance.

  • 28.
    Røyne, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Department of Energy and Bioeconomy, Eklandagatan 86, SE-412 61 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Penaloza, Diego
    Sandin, Gustav
    Berlin, Johanna
    Svanström, Magdalena
    Climate impact assessment in life cycle assessments of forest products: implications of method choice for results and decision making2016Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 116, s. 90-99Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As life cycle assessments are often conducted to provide decision support, it is important that impact assessment methodology is consistent with the intended decision context. The currently most used climate impact assessment metric, the global warming potential, and how it is applied in life cycle assessments, has for example been criticised for insufficiently accounting for carbon sequestration, carbon stored in long-lived products and timing of emission. The aim of this study is to evaluate how practitioners assess the climate impact of forest products and the implications of method choice for results and decision-making. To identify current common practices, we reviewed climate impact assessment practices in 101 life cycle assessments of forest products. We then applied identified common practices in case studies comparing the climate impact of a forest-based and a non-forest-based fuel and building, respectively, and compared the outcomes with outcomes of applying alternative, non-established practices. Results indicate that current common practices exclude most of the dynamic features of carbon uptake and storage as well as the climate impact from indirect land use change, aerosols and changed albedo. The case studies demonstrate that the inclusion of such aspects could influence results considerably, both positively and negatively. Ignoring aspects could thus have important implications for the decision support. The product life cycle stages with greatest climate impact reduction potential might not be identified, product comparisons might favour the less preferable product and policy instruments might support the development and use of inefficient climate impact reduction strategies.

  • 29. Sandin, Gustav
    et al.
    Røyne, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Brinellgatan 4, Box 857, SE-50105 Borås, Sweden.
    Berlin, Johanna
    Peters, Greg M.
    Svanström, Magdalena
    Allocation in LCAs of biorefinery products: implications for results and decision-making2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 93, s. 213-221Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract In Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs) of biorefinery products, a common challenge is the choice of method for allocating environmental burdens of multifunctional processes (feedstock cultivation and biorefinery processes), a choice which can substantially influence LCA results and hence decision-making. The aim of this paper is to explore how this choice influences results and in which decision contexts the choice is particularly important. To do this, we tested six allocation methods in a case study of a biorefinery using pulpwood as feedstock. Tested methods included: main product bears all burden, substitution, traditional partitioning methods (based on economic value and exergy), a hybrid method combining elements of substitution and partitioning, and an alternative hybrid method developed by us, which allocates less environmental burden to co-products with a high potential to mitigate environmental burdens. The methods were tested in relation to decision contexts and LCA questions of relevance for biorefineries. The results indicate that the choice of allocation method deserves careful attention, particularly in consequential studies and in studies focussed on co-products representing relatively small flows. Furthermore, the alternative hybrid allocation method is based on a logical rationale – favouring products with higher substitution potential – and has some other potential benefits. However, in cases where the scales of co-product flows are of different orders of magnitude, the method yields extreme results that could be difficult to interpret. Results also show that it can be important with consistent allocation for both cultivation and biorefinery processes, particularly when substitution is applied.

  • 30.
    Shanmugam, Kavitha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Sustainable Consumption and Production Unit, Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE), Umeå, Sweden.
    Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bhattacharyya, Debraj
    Upadhyayula, Venkata Krishna Kumar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Department of Energy Economy and Sustainability, Scania Technical Center, Södertalje, Sweden.
    A sustainable performance assessment framework for circular management of municipal wastewater treatment plants2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 339, artikel-id 130657Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) could become valuable contributors to a circular economy by implementing the 3R principles (reduce, reuse, and recycle). While reducing the pollution load of sewage is the primary objective of a WWTP, this process generates several potentially valuable byproducts including treated effluent, biogas, and sludge. The effluent can be reused in various end use applications and biogas can be reused as a fuel (for electricity generation, transportation, and cooking) or a chemical feedstock. The sludge can either be directly recycled as soil conditioner or via thermochemical/biochemical processing routes to recover material (e.g., hydrochar), energy (e.g., heat, and syngas), and resource value (phosphorus). This work presents a five-layered assessment framework for quantitatively evaluating the sustainable value of municipal WWTPs by using life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing assessment (LCCA) tools. In addition, indicators reflecting potential benefits to stakeholders and society arising from investments into municipal WWTPs such as the private return on investment (PROI) and the environmental externality costs to investment ratio (EECIR). The framework is validated in a hypothetical case study where the sustainable value of a circularly managed municipal WWTP is evaluated in situations involving multiple byproduct utilization pathways. Four future circular options (FCOs) are examined for a 50,000 m3/d capacity WWTP treating sewage up to tertiary standards. The FCOs mainly differ in terms of how biogas is reused (to meet the WWTP's internal energy demands, as cooking fuel, or as fuel for city buses after upgrading) and how sludge is recycled (as soil conditioner or by producing hydrochar pellets for electricity generation). The FCO in which treated effluent is reused in industry, biogas is used as cooking fuel, and sludge is used as a soil conditioner provides the greatest sustainable value (i.e., the lowest private costs and environmental externality costs (EEC) together with high revenues), the highest PROI, and the lowest EECIR. The strengths and limitations of the proposed assessment framework are also discussed.

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  • 31.
    Stål, Herman
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Inertia and change related to sustainability: an institutional approach2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 99, s. 354-365Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increased awareness of environmental crisis and social inequity the world is becoming more, not less, unsustainable. Obviously there is great inertia, a disinclination to enact change, in for instance environmentally detrimental practices. While there is much in the literature to explain inertia at the individual, organizational and societal level, there is a gap concerning approaches that focus upon the industrial level. This paper addresses this gap by developing an analytical approach based upon insti- tutional theory brought together with the ontological principles of strong sustainability. Two interrelated case studies, concerning greenhouse gas reduction in the Swedish agrifield, are used to develop the approach. The empirical results show that greenhouse gas reduction is used in support for convergent changes within the industry, for instance to motivate increased efficiency and yields. Hence, the paper contributes to the sustainable development-literature by providing an analytical approach that can be utilized to increase the understanding of change processes at the industrial level. This approach is then discussed and further developed to accommodate for the case results.

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  • 32.
    Stål, Herman
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Babri, Maira
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Educational interventions for sustainable innovation in small and medium sized enterprises2020Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 243, artikel-id 118554Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability innovation research suggests that when the managers of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) perceive sustainability as strategic, they undertake sustainable innovation. Educational interventions are, in turn, suggested to foster such views among these managers. But in the interaction between educators and managers, power matters for how knowledge is conveyed and educational interventions are understudied, especially when they are university-led. This article examines how actors' power affects the translation of knowledge between educators and SME managers. A conceptual framework combining translation and power-dependency theory is introduced and applied to the case study of a University-led competence development program offered to construction company managers in Sweden. The analysis reveals how imbalanced dependencies and power within interactions accumulated over time and came to interfere with the program's learning objectives. The study contributes practically by suggesting how mutual goals, time management, and relationship building can create a better context for educator-SME interactions and SME sustainability. The scientific contribution lies in introducing a new perspective on educational interventions for SMEs and providing a conceptual framework for future studies thereof. 

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  • 33.
    Stål, Herman
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Hervé, Corvellec
    Lunds Universitet.
    A decoupling perspective on circular business model implementation: illustrations from Swedish apparel2018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 171, s. 630-643Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the concept of decoupling, from institutional theory in organizational studies, this paperexplains how organizations mitigate demands for circularity. Seven Swedish apparel companies thathave started collecting used clothes as a form of engagement with circular business models serve as casestudies. The paper shows how outsourcing and internal separation allow these companies to buffer theirbusiness model and core way of creating value from emerging demands. It also shows how companiespro-actively work at influencing institutional demands for circularity by making these demandscompatible with their own interests. The concept of decoupling thereby provides key insights into thedevelopment and implementation, or absence thereof, of circular business models.

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  • 34.
    Stål, Herman I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Bonnedahl, Karl J.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Eriksson, Jessica
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Företagsekonomi.
    Micro-level translation of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction – policy meets industry in the Swedish agricultural sector2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 103, s. 629-639Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is an urgent challenge for mankind. However, as aggregate emissions continue to rise, necessary changes in industrial practices are lagging behind. The article addresses this discrepancy by exploring how the issue of GHG reduction is channeled from policy to industry, in one of the more GHG intensive sectors, agriculture. We adopt the translation perspective to analyze and discuss how the climate issue travels between contexts. Our study explores the activities involved as advisors, functioning as translating agents within Swedish agri-policy, inform producers about the issue of GHG reduction. The study sheds new light on the effectiveness of mitigation policy in promoting practice change and illustrates how translation is an analytical framework suitable for studying this within different industries.

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  • 35. Söderholm, Kristina
    et al.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    The transition to chlorine free pulp revisited: Nordic heterogeneity in environmental regulation and R&D collaboration2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 165, s. 1328-1339Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the development paths leading to the transition to cleaner bleaching technologies in the pulp industry. It devotes particular attention to the key features of the Swedish transition, but also compares this to the Finnish experiences. The empirical investigation builds on an analytical framework highlighting the conditions under which pollution regulations can provide efficient incentives for deep emission reductions at industrial plants. Existing and new archive material, including not least comprehensive license trial acts for Swedish pulp mills over an extended time period, are studied. Based on this historical analysis our findings contradict previous literature, the latter emphasizing that pressures from consumers and the public were the most significant driving forces behind the adoption ofeand innovation inealternative bleaching technologies during the late 1980s. Instead, this paper asserts, the green pulp transition was characterized by regulation-induced technological change and was made possible by long history of industry-wide cooperation in environmental R&D. Furthermore, while previous research has emphasized the leading role of the Nordic countries in green pulp innovation, we identify a number of profound differences between Finland and Sweden. These emerge from various national contexts in terms of, for instance, industry structures and strategies, political cultures, and regulatory styles. Finally, at a more general level the paper provides a few policy implications for supporting the ongoing transition towards a forest-based bioeconomy.

  • 36.
    Upadhyayula, Venkata K.K.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Parvatker, Abhijeet G.
    Baroth, Anju
    Shanmugam, Kavitha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Lightweighting and electrification strategies for improving environmental performante of passenger cars in India by 2030: A critical perspective based on life cycle assessment2019Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 209, s. 1604-1613Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indian automotive industry is faced with an unenviable challenge of achieving a sustainable growth in one of the largest markets. Adapting to increasingly strict environmental norms by the government committed to reducing the national greenhouse gas emissions, growing concerns amongst the citizens over the deteriorating air quality in the cities are the major environmental sustainability challenges for the auto industry in next decade. In this study, we analyze the potential benefits of vehicle light weighting and introduction of electric vehicles through a cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) of a standard sedan passenger vehicle. Based on the LCA results, five different scenarios are envisioned with different composition of the passenger vehicle fleet in 2030. These scenarios are used to analyze three key enviro-economical goals for India; (1) dependency on crude oil imports, (2) GHG emission reduction targets and (3) improvement in urban air quality. The results indicate that global warming potential (GWP) and fossil depletion impacts of ICEs can be reduced by 17%, while metal depletion reduces by 34% per vehicle with lightweighting. However, increase in freshwater ecotoxicity impact by 57% is one of the trade-offs. The GWP of a compact BEV powered with current (2014) and 2030 electricity grid mixes is 36% and 16% higher than petrol car. The GWP of a sub-compact BEV powered with current grid mix is 9% higher with current grid mix but 14% lower than petrol cars when powered with 2030 electricity grid mix. Crude oil consumption and GHG emissions are reduced by 20% with lightweight ICE fleet. Whereas, up to 45% reduction in crude oil consumption and 65% improvement in urban air quality can be achieved with BEV penetration scenarios. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Vezzoli, Carlo
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Ceschin, Fabrizio
    Brunel University London.
    Diehl, Jan Carel
    Delft University of Technology.
    Kohtala, Cindy
    Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
    New design challenges to widely implement ‘Sustainable Product–Service Systems’2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 97, s. 1-12Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable Product–Service Systems (S.PSS) carry great potential to deliver social well-being and economic prosperity while operating within the limits of our planet. They can however be complex to design, test, implement and bring to the mainstream. To increase our understanding of the potential benefits, drivers and barriers in S.PSS design, the research community has been inspired to collect and analyse an extensive number of cases in diverse sectors and to develop and test several design methods and tools. This Special Volume on “New Design Challenges to Widely Implement ‘Sustainable Product–Service Systems’” presents results of key studies in the following areas: user satisfaction and acceptance of S.PSS solutions, how industrial partnerships and stakeholder interactions can be designed for environmental and socio-ethical benefits, how knowledge of socio-technical change and transition management feeds S.PSS design processes, and the role of policy instruments to foster their implementation and scale-up. This Introduction reviews the current state of research and summarises the articles presented. The articles demonstrate increasing confidence in integrating approaches and theoretical frameworks from other arenas. These approaches include sociological practice theory, to shed new light on consumer practices in S.PSS configurations, and strategic niche management, to foster a suitable design and experimentation milieu. Experimentation, iteration and cyclical design processes were also seen by many authors as crucial to implementing and stabilising S.PSS solutions, but also their continuous sustainability evaluation. Several articles highlight the importance of local authorities, in developing S.PSS-enabling policies as well as supporting novel networks of stakeholders in the co-production of value. Finally this Introduction highlights key issues for a design research agenda, including but not limited to the development of new knowledge to support S.PSS designers (such as S.PSS design in low and middle-income contexts) and the role of Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) in the diffusion of knowledge and know-how to companies. Together, the papers in this special volume provide insight into the promise of the S.PSS concept for understanding, advancing and accelerating sustainability.

  • 38. Yadav, Pooja
    et al.
    Athanassiadis, Dimitris
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Rova, Ulrika
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Environmental impact and cost assessment of a novel lignin production method2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 279, artikel-id 123515Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The oil scarcity and the rise in earth temperature have elevated the interest in lignocellulosic biorefineries. Lignin has high potential to be used in various applications including the production of biomaterials and transportation fuels. Among the different sources of lignin, organosolv lignin has the advantage of being sulphur-free and of low ash content compared to other types of industrial lignin. The present study focuses on cradle-to-gate life cycle and cost assessment of a novel organosolv lignin production process from spruce bark. The system boundary included production of tannin, lignin from spruce bark and handling of waste including all the inputs (material and energy) and outputs (emissions) in the process. Baseline scenario and scenarios S1 and S2 were compared to identify the most environmentally and economically suitable scenario. The baseline scenario is lignin production with co-production of tannin and tannin free bark (TFB) from spruce bark; scenario S1 is lignin production from TFB; and scenario S2 is lignin production from TFB with mass allocation. The functional unit was 1 kg lignin produced and ReCiPe 2016 Midpoint (H) method was used for the environmental impact assessment. The results showed that the baseline scenario had higher global warming potential (GWP) (2.14 kg CO(2)eq.) and total cost (1.959 (sic)/kg) than S1 (1.39 kg CO2 eq. and 1.377 (sic)/kg respectively) and S2 (0.23 kg CO(2)eq. and 0.998 (sic)/kg respectively) scenarios. The results of sensitivity analysis showed that the use of bioethanol instead of ethanol reduced the burden on GWP but increased the burden on the land use impact category.

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