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  • 1.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The environmental risks of incomplete globalization2017In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 550-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the liberal optimism of the long 1990s has faded into a world of growing inequality and resurging nationalism, there is less certainty about the prospects of economic convergence and global integration. Beyond the formidable human cost of maintaining a divided world, the possibility of incomplete globalisation also gives rise to a number of environmental risks. While environmental political theory generally sees strength in localism, history rather shows that a robust world trade system is crucial to offset local resource scarcities and that cosmopolitan norms of solidarity are essential for helping communities to rebuild after environmental catastrophe. In relation to climate change, statist thinking has led to a focus on non-scalable technologies and a silent acceptance of chronic poverty abroad as a way of avoiding a climate emergency. Contrary to such views, this paper argues that accelerating the transition to a fully integrated high-energy planet may more effectively mitigate Anthropocene risks.

  • 2.
    Lundström, Ragnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Greening transport in Sweden: the role of the organic intellectual in changing union climate change policy2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 536-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with the role of the individual in transforming union organizations by discussing the experiences of Ulf Jarnefjord and his efforts to introduce climate change policies into the Swedish Transport Workers’ Union [Transportarbetareförbundet]. Research investigating the integration of climate change policies into the agenda of Swedish trade unions has identified a disconnect between policy development among leaders on the one hand, and engagement among members on the other. Employing the life-history interview method, and the analytical concept of ‘organic intellectual’, this article focusses on the ways in which Ulf, as a regional health and safety officer, has experienced engaging with climate change issues in relation to both members and the leadership of his union. His experiences point to the importance of learning about how climate change and production impact on the everyday lives of members for developing and mobilizing support for climate change policies in unions.

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  • 3.
    Räthzel, Nora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cock, Jacklyn
    Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Uzzell, David
    School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Beyond the nature–labour divide: trade union responses to climate change in South Africa2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 504-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the life histories of two environmentally engaged unionists in South Africa, who were decisive for formulating the environmental programmes of their respective trade unions. Their experiences of participating in the resistance against apartheid in universities and factories taught them the necessity to connect different struggles and equipped them with the knowledge and ability to connect the fight for workers’ rights with the fight against environmental degradation. Both activists experienced the difficulty of integrating ‘the environment’ politically and practically into a trade union agenda. The labour movement has traditionally experienced nature as a place outside of work to be enjoyed for recreation. While nature constitutes an indispensable condition for labour, it has been privately appropriated by Capital. For environmental policies to form an integral part of union agendas, nature needs to be wrestled away from its appropriation by Capital and understood as an inseparable ally of labour.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Stevis, Dimitris
    et al.
    Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
    Uzzell, David
    University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Räthzel, Nora
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The labour–nature relationship: varieties of labour environmentalism2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 439-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue is a contribution to environmental labour studies, which aims to investigate the practices and theories that integrate labour and nature, by focusing on labour environmentalism. While nature is privately appropriated and exploited by Capital, workers’ organizations tend to construct nature as labour’s other, a place to enjoy or a place to be protected from destruction at best. In the following introductory article to this special issue, we present our view of what environmental labour studies are investigating and might investigate in the future and the place of labour environmentalism within this broader agenda. We also suggest an analytical framework to evaluate the depth, breadth, and level of the agency of the variations of labour environmentalism. We suggest that environmental labour studies can be a way of studying not only the intersections between social and environmental justice, climate change and working conditions but can also contribute to building a bridge between environmental theory and practice.

  • 5.
    Örestig, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Local moral economies: the space, place, and locality of social media mobilisation2017In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 884-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a case study of a locally rooted environmental campaign on the Swedish island of Gotland. We aim to enhance the understanding of how locality is manifested in social movements that emerge in today’s networked world. We analyse how the double goals of speaking to, as well as beyond, the local context came into expression in the movement's social media activities. We draw on data from tweets and Facebook posts and include interactions between activists and critics as well as the resources linked to in the posts. Analysis indicate that the conflict must be seen as spanning across local, national and global levels. In line with earlier research, activists used social media to link their struggle with other struggles. Also, it was used to charge the local struggle with symbolic content by framing it as one of many struggles between local communities, authorities and multinational corporations. Beyond this, posts from the island signalled dedication to the history and long-term interests of the community. We argue that future studies should recognise the crucial role that reciprocity norms in the local community can play for outcomes of conflicts and that the notion of a 'local moral economy' can be used to reach a deeper understanding of this.

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