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  • 1.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Transitions from Unemployment to Education in Europe: The Role of Educational Policies2019In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 699-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate cross-country variability in transition rates from unemployment to further education among young adults, as well as how barriers in educational systems affect these transition rates. Previous research on adult further education has largely neglected the role of policies, and has not taken unemployed people into account.

    Two dimensions of educational policies are investigated. (1) Barriers facing prospective students with regard to previous academic achievements (e.g. second chance opportunities); and (2) financial barriers (e.g. high costs). It is hypothesized that low barriers are associated with higher transition rates into education, especially for unemployed young adults with lower levels of education.

    The aim is approached by investigating how differences in transition rates across countries are linked to the design of educational policies. Cross-country standardised individual-level panel data from 29 European countries are taken from EU-SILC. Multilevel multinomial models are fitted.

    Results show that lower barriers in the education system are associated with higher probabilities that unemployed young adults leave unemployment to re-enter further education, although only partial support is found for the hypothesis that unemployed young adults with lower levels of education gain relatively more from low barriers. Low barriers are sometimes associated with lower transition rates into employment.

  • 2.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    State intervention and mental well-being among the unemployed2001In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 30, p. 57-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    State intervention and mental well-being among the unemployed2001In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 30, p. 57-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Strandh, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Nordlund, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Active Labour market policy and unemployment scarring: A ten-year Swedish panel study2008In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 357-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown mixed results concerning the effects of participation in active labour market policy programmes (ALMPs) on the longer term scars in the form of poor income development and low job stability following the end of an unemployment spell. Most previous studies, however, have been limited both in the time frame used and to particular programmes. We argue that human capital investments are long-term investments and should therefore also be investigated from a long-term perspective. ALMP training and ALMPs as subsidized employment also represent different types of human capital investments that may produce effects that are differently distributed over time. In order to handle these issues, this article uses a longitudinal register-based dataset in which all long-term (more than six months) unemployed Swedes in 1993, who had no labour market problems in 1992, are followed for ten years. We found positive effects of ALMP participation concerning both the probability of reaching pre-unemployment incomes and a reduction in the hazard of exiting the labour market, while the effect on the probability of having an unemployment-free year was mixed. The effects of the two forms of ALMPs were differently distributed over time, with ALMP employment having an immediate effect that decreased relatively quickly and ALMP training having a longer-term effect.

  • 5.
    Svallfors, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The withering of the Welfare State: Regression2013In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 42, p. 424-425Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Zetterberg, Liv
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Translating coercion policy into inter-organisational collaboration: the implementation of compulsory community care for people with mental illness2016In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 655-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, compulsory community care (CCC) for people with severe mental illness was introduced in Sweden. CCC requires co-operation between psychiatric and social services, thus further complicating the longstanding difficulties with service coordination in the mental health field.

    This article investigates what happens when a new policy is introduced that assumes complex co-operation of two organisations bestowed with high degrees of discretion. The process of institutionalisation will be analysed in terms of how an idea is translated and materialised on local levels. This has been investigated by interviewing key informants within psychiatric and social services at three different locations.

    The implementation was perceived as relatively successful and occurred without major conflict. The main effect of the new legislation was improvement in the coordination of services, where designing a template form for a coordinated care plan was central. The inter-organisational discussions about service coordination that arose had a spill-over effect on services for other patient groups.

    In essence, respondents describe CCC as a pedagogical reform to promote the coordination of services, rather than a reform to increase coercive powers over patients. This raises concerns about the legitimacy of the reform.

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