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  • 1. Mathias, Kaaren
    et al.
    Pillai, Pooja
    Gaitonde, Rakhal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Shelly, Kakul
    Jain, Sumeet
    Co-production of a pictorial recovery tool for people with psycho-social disability informed by a participatory action research approach: a qualitative study set in India2020In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 486-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health problems are recognized as a leading cause of disability and have seen increased allocations of resources and services globally. There is a growing call for solutions supporting global mental health and recovery to be locally relevant and built on the knowledge and skills of people with mental health problems, particularly in low-income countries. Set in Dehradun district, North India, this study aimed to describe first, the process of co-production of a visual tool to support recovery for people affected by psycho-social disability; second, the key outputs developed and third, critical reflection on the process and outputs. The developmental process consisted of participatory action research and qualitative methods conducted by a team of action researchers and an experts by experience (EBE) group of community members. The team generated eight domains for recovery under three meta-domains of normalcy, belonging and contributing and the ensuing recovery tool developed pictures of activities for each domain. Challenges to using a participatory and emancipatory process were addressed by working with a mentor experienced in participatory methods, and by allocating time to concurrent critical reflection on power relationships. Findings underline the important contribution of an EBE group demonstrating their sophisticated and locally valid constructions of recovery and the need for an honest and critically reflective process in all co-productive initiatives. This study generated local conversations around recovery that helped knowledge flow from bottom-to-top and proposes that the grass-root experiences of participants in a disadvantaged environment are needed for meaningful social and health policy responses.

  • 2.
    Nanyonjo, Agnes
    et al.
    Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health, UnaLincoln International Institute for Rural Health, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UKivearsity of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN6 7TS, UK.
    Nelson, David
    Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Sayers, Emma
    School of Health and Social Care, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Lall, Priya
    Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Vernon-Wilson, Elizabeth
    School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Kitchener, Canada.
    Tetui, Moses
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Kitchener, Canada; School of Public Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada.
    Grindrod, Kelly
    School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Kitchener, Canada.
    Kane, Ros
    School of Health and Social Care, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Gussy, Mark
    Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Siriwardena, Niro
    Community and Health Research Unit, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK.
    Community efforts to promote vaccine uptake in a rural setting: a qualitative interview study2023In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 38, no 4, article id daad088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaccine hesitancy has been identified as one of the top 10 threats to global health. The causes of low vaccine uptake are many and vary at micro and macro levels. However, rural and remote coastal areas in the UK experience unique vaccine inequalities due to high levels of deprivation and their unique and complex access-related problems. This study aimed to explore community efforts to promote vaccine uptake during the COVID-19 pandemic and understand how the COVID-19 vaccination campaign was experienced by the public. We conducted an exploratory descriptive qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with decision-makers, health professionals and community members in Lincolnshire, a predominantly rural county with a long coastline, a large population of white minority ethnicities, and those living in caravan and temporary housing. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Overcoming the various access barriers to vaccination uptake involved working with local media stations, local communities and local community groups, translation of information, bringing vaccines closer to the people through pop-up and mobile clinics and provision of transport and ensuring confidentiality. There is a need to employ inclusive targeted non-conventional care interventions whilst dealing with complex problems as occur in rural and remote coastal regions.

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  • 3.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Blanchard, M
    Wicks, A
    Occupational engagement among community dwelling older people: a time-geographic perspective2015In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 484-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How older people spend their time in different occupations could contribute to our understanding of everyday life in healthy ageing. This study adopted a time-geographic method and occupational perspective to explore the occupational engagement of community dwelling older people. The term occupational engagement encompasses what people do, where and with whom they spend their time and the perceived level of competence and meaningfulness of their time use. Nineteen volunteers born between 1932 and 1933, living alone in an urban area in northern Sweden and receiving no home care services, completed open time-geographic diaries for 5 days in May 2010. The diary data were analyzed using Daily Life software program. The study revealed the complexity and the diversity of the older people's occupational engagement and that most of their time was spent alone in their home. The older people reported they were very good at doing almost half of the occupations in which they engaged and that their occupations were primarily either very meaningful or meaningful. While some methodological limitations were identified, time-geographic studies of community dwelling older people living independently are considered to have potential to contribute to community and social planning for older people as they can provide interesting insights to older persons' time use and occupational needs.

  • 4. Panday, Saadhna
    et al.
    Reddy, S Priscilla
    Ruiter, Robert A C
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    de Vries, Hein
    Determinants of smoking among adolescents in the Southern Cape-Karoo region, South Africa.2007In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 207-17Article in journal (Other academic)
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