Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gantschnig, Brigitte E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Page, Julie
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Fisher, Anne G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Detecting differences in activities of daily living between children with and without mild disabilities2013In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 319-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. We evaluated whether the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measures are valid for detecting differences in activities of daily living (ADL) ability among children with and without mild disabilities.

    METHOD. Retrospective data from the AMPS database were analyzed using many-facet Rasch analyses and forced regression analyses to evaluate for significant group differences.

    RESULTS. Regression analyses of data for 10,998 children ages 4-15 who met the inclusion criteria revealed significant Age x Group interaction effects (B >= 0.23, T >= 6.20, p <= .001). Post hoc t tests revealed significant group differences in ADL ability at all ages beyond age 4. ADL process ability effect sizes were moderate to large at all ages, and ADL motor ability was mostly moderate to large at ages 6 or older.

    CONCLUSION. These findings support the validity of the AMPS measures when used to identify ADL problems, among children with mild disabilities.

  • 2. Kaelin, Vera C.
    et al.
    Bosak, Dianna L.
    Villegas, Vivian C.
    Imms, Christine
    Khetani, Mary A.
    Participation-focused strategy use among caregivers of children receiving early intervention2021In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, no 1, article id 7501205090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Evidence on common types of participation-focused caregiver strategies can help occupational therapy practitioners to take an evidence-based approach to designing participation-focused practice.

    Objective: To identify and explore types of caregiver strategies to support young children’s participation in valued occupations in the home and community.

    Design: Qualitative study using a subset of data collected online with the Young Children’s Participation and Environment Measure (YC–PEM). Narrative responses about strategy use were content coded to the family of Participation-Related Constructs (fPRC) framework using a deductive analytic approach to identify relevant types of participation-focused strategies used in the home and community. Responses were further analyzed within each relevant fPRC construct using an inductive analytic approach to identify the scope of strategies used for each construct.

    Setting: Early intervention.

    Participants: Caregivers (N = 106) of young children receiving early intervention.

    Outcomes and Measures: Caregivers’ strategies to support their child’s home and community participation, provided by the YC–PEM.

    Results: Caregivers most commonly adapted the child’s environment or context to support their child’s home and community participation (45.06%). The least common focus of caregiver strategies was the child’s activity competencies (11.16%). Three or more types of caregiver strategies were identified for each participation-related construct.

    Conclusion and Relevance: Results indicated that caregivers used a range of strategies related to each of the participationrelated constructs to support their child’s participation in home and community occupations, most commonly targeting the environment. Occupational therapy practitioners can select from this range of strategies when planning participation-focused early intervention with families.

    What This Article Adds: This study yields new evidence on the scope of caregiver strategy use to support young children’s participation in home and community occupations. Occupational therapy practitioners can apply this evidence to anticipate common areas of caregiver strategy use in participation-focused practice with families in early intervention.

  • 3. Kaelin, Vera C.
    et al.
    Wallace, Erin R.
    Werler, Martha M.
    Collett, Brent R.
    Rosenberg, Janine
    Khetani, Mary A.
    Caregiver perspectives on school participation among students with craniofacial microsomia2021In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, no 2, article id 7502205100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Knowledge of unmet school participation needs for students with craniofacial microsomia (CFM) can inform decisions regarding intervention support.

    Objective: To compare students with and without CFM on school participation (i.e., frequency, involvement, desire for participation to change) and caregivers’ perceptions of environmental support for participation in occupations.

    Design: Cross-sectional design using secondary analyses of a subset of data.

    Setting: Multisite cohort study.

    Participants: Caregivers of students with CFM (n = 120) and of students without CFM (n = 315), stratified by history of educationand health-related service use.

    Outcomes and Measures: School participation and environmental support, obtained with the Participation and Environment Measure–Children and Youth.

    Results: Significant group differences were found in frequency of school participation (effect size [ES] = −0.38, 95% confidence interval [−0.64, −0.12], p = .005), level of involvement (ES = −0.14, p = .029), and desired change (p = .001), with students with CFM exhibiting greater participation restriction than students without CFM and no history of service use. No statistically significant group differences were found in environmental support for participation in the school setting. Item-level findings showed statistically significant higher desire for participation to change in three of five school occupations (odds ratio = 1.77–2.39, p = .003–.045) for students with CFM compared with students without CFM and no history of service use.

    Conclusions and Relevance: The results suggest that students with CFM experience restriction in participation at school.

    What This Article Adds: Students with CFM may benefit from targeted school-based interventions to optimize their inclusion.

  • 4.
    Nygård, L
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Fisher, A G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Winblad, B
    Karolinska institutet.
    Comparing motor and process ability of persons with suspected dementia in home and clinic settings1994In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 689-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluating functional level of persons with diagnosed or suspected dementia is an important part of occupational therapy. The importance of the environment is often highlighted. We investigated the ability of clients with suspected dementia to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) in the clinic versus in their homes.

    METHOD: We used the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) to measure the motor and process skill ability of 19 clients with suspected dementia.

    RESULTS: Using two-tailed paired t-tests, we found no overall difference in IADL motor or process performance between the clinic and home setting. However, of the 19 clients, 6 had motor ability measures, whereas 5 had process ability measures that differed significantly between the two settings.

    CONCLUSION: The results suggest that if we want to know how a person with suspected dementia performs in IADLs in a specific environment we should test him or her in that environment.

  • 5.
    Söndergaard, Mette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Fisher, Anne G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Sensitivity of the evaluation of social interaction measures among people with and without neurologic or psychiatric disorders2012In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 356-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. To determine whether the Evaluation of Social Interaction (ESI) is sensitive enough to differentiate between people without identified diagnoses and those with neurologic or psychiatric disorders in terms of their observed quality of social interaction. METHOD. Participants were age 16-69 and were without identified diagnoses (n = 304) or had neurologic (n = 77) or psychiatric (n = 104) disorders. They were evaluated using the ESI. RESULTS. Nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that the group without identified diagnoses had significantly better quality of social interaction than did either group with disabilities (Us = 3,172 and 3,189, respectively; p <= .001). CONCLUSION. The ESI is sensitive with regard to detecting differences in quality of social interaction among groups expected to differ, suggesting that it is valid for use when the desired purpose is to identify people with diminished quality of social interaction.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf