Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Brandenburg-Prussia, 1466-1806: Karin Friedrich2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 171-172Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Makt och människor. Europeisk statsbildning från medeltiden till franska revolutionen: Harald Gustafsson2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 140-141Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    [Recension] Arja Rantanen, Pennförare i periferin: Österbottniska sockenskrivare 1721–18682017In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 124-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tidigmodern statsformering2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 145-146Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    War, Money and the English State, 1688-1783: John Brewer2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 150-151Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson-Skog, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Det sammanflätade intresset: Staten, affärsbankerna och småföretagen i ATP-systemet 1958-1962: [The Intertwined Interest: the State, the Commercial Banks and Small Business Finance during the Supplementary Pension Reform, 1958–1962]2021In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 38-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the interaction between the state and Swedish banks during the establishment of two institutes for small business credit, AB Industrikredit and AB Företagskredit, between 1958 and 1962. These institutes were established as intermediaries between the supplementary pension system and the credit market. We have been able to elucidate this process by the Swedish Bankers’ Association granting us privileged access to archival material on these negotiations.

    It is demonstrated that the strong ideological conflict characterizing the parliamentary debate on the supplementary pensions system did not spill over into the system being implemented within the financial sector as this was organized through the examined credit institutes. Instead, the banks and the state were able to negotiate through established channels and arenas for business-government relations in the financial sector. Even if the parties initially exhibited mistrust based on different historical interpretations of the market for small business credit, they also recognized the degree of change that would be brought on by the supplementary pension system with regard to the financial markets and capital formation as a whole. Hence, they downplayed ideological differences and strived to reach an outcomethat was mutually beneficial in its final form. A crucial indication of this consensus is that fifty percent of each institute was owned by the state while the other fifty percent was owned by the banks.

  • 7.
    Bergner, Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Recension av Rysk spegel: svenska berättelser om Sovjetunionen - och om Sverige2009In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 104-106Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bohman, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Medlemsorganisation mellan majestät och medborgare? Representation och makt genom hushållningssällskapen under det tidiga 1800-talets samhällsomvandling: Membership organization between majesty and citizens? Representation and power through agricultural societies during the early 19th-century societal transformation2023In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 177-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the functioning of organizations in the grey zone between the private and public sectors during a period of rapid societal change. The focus is on the first half of the nineteenth century, a formative period in Swedish history when an old order was challenged by demands regarding decentralization and democratization. The establishment of new organizations may be linked to these demands, and this article investigates hushållningssällskapen as a characteristic example of these. The paramount aim of hushållningssällskapen was to promote agriculture, while they actually covered many aspects of social and economic life. Hushållningssällskapen constituted, and still constitute, a nationwide organization with strong regional and local roots. They were linked to the government but relied on membership and election procedures. Thus, a new arena emerged for interactions between actors interested in rural spaces and activities.

    This article presents a new theoretical and empirical approach with the aim of filling a knowledge gap regarding the importance and functioning of hushållningssällskapen in the process of societal change. Drawing on research concerning rural governance, hushållningssällskapen may be considered an example of a governance arrangement. The membership composition is investigated in relation to the activities of the organization with regard to geographical differences and changes over time. Two regional branches of the organization are compared: Malmöhus county and Västerbotten county.

    The results show that the composition of members and activities varied geographically and changed over time in tandem with regional economic characteristics and societal transformation. The representation of old elites such as the nobility and clergy decreased in favour of the relative elites of a new societal order, namely bureaucrats, professionals, and wealthy farmers. Furthermore, the vitality of hushållningssällskapen appears to have benefitted from strong ties to the county administrative board, especially when hushållningssällskapen provided opportunities for having an impact on the implementation of state policies. In summary, hushållningssällskapen could play an important role as a governance arrangement. They bridged a gap during a period when a modern bureaucracy and democratic institutions did not exist or were in the making.

  • 9. Dahlkvist, Rebecka
    et al.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Folkhemmets prosekulära aktörer: Förbundet för religionsfrihet och bruket av borgerliga begravningar2019In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 59-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The secularization of Sweden gained momentum during the second half of the 20th century. Today, Sweden is regarded as one of the most secularized countries in the world, suggesting that the influence of religious institutions in society is relatively limited and that individuals are not engaged or interested in systems of religious belief. Objective and so-called “traditional” values are less prevalent, in favour of subjectivity and authenticity. Research on the secularization of Sweden has, on the one hand, focused on large, structural processes, such as industrialization, and, on the other hand, on more actor-oriented approaches involving certain historical figures, such as the philosopher Ingemar Hedenius. There has been less focus on the ten pro-secular organizations that existed during the period actively working towards increased religious freedom or the separation of civil and religious institutions. This article examines The Association for Religious Freedom (Förbundet för religionsfrihet), led by author Per Anders Fogelström and politician Ture Nerman.

    This association was active between 1952 and 1972 in the context of the “golden age” of the social democratic and social liberal welfare state. We focus in particular on its endeavours to create and spread civil (i.e., non-religious) funeral rituals. The association represented a secular humanism and held that the unreflective use of the Christian funeral ritual of the state church contributed to maintaining the church’s cultural monopoly as well as a passive, routine-like conception of life and society. The civil funeral rituals promoted by the association were intended to be manifestations of equality, dignity, freedom of choice and authenticity, while at the same time intended to serve as cultural levers toward a more enlightened, free-thinking and dynamic Swedish citizen in a modern secular society. According to the association, it should be the duty of the government to ensure that the individual could live and die without being forced to rely on religious institutions. The government should be the guarantor of spiritual progress. Hence, as the association saw it, the role of the secular Swedish welfare state – sometimes called “ folkhemmet” (the people’s home) – should be to embed the citizen from the cradle to, literally, the grave.

  • 10.
    Dahlkvist, Rebecka
    et al.
    , Kris-tinehöjdsgatan 12b, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The pro-secular actors of the people's home - The association for religious freedom and civil funerals: [Folkhemmets prosekulära aktörer: förbundet för religionsfrihet och bruket av borgerliga begravningar]2019In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 59-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The secularization of Sweden gained momentum during the second half of the 20th century. Today, Sweden is regarded as one of the most secularized countries in the world, suggesting that the influence of religious institutions in society is relatively limited and that individuals are not engaged or interested in systems of religious belief. Objective and so-called "traditional" values are less prevalent, in favour of subjectivity and authenticity. Research on the secularization of Sweden has, on the one hand, focused on large, structural processes, such as industrialization, and, on the other hand, on more actor-oriented approaches involving certain historical figures, such as the philosopher Ingemar Hedenius. There has been less focus on the ten pro-secular organizations that existed during the period actively working towards increased religious freedom or the separation of civil and religious institutions. This article examines The Association for Religious Freedom (Förbundet far religionsfrihet), led by author Per Anders Fogelström and politician Ture Nerman. This association was active between 1952 and 1972 in the context of the "golden age" of the social democratic and social liberal welfare state. We focus in particular on its endeavours to create and spread civil (i.e., non-religious) funeral rituals. The association represented a secular humanism and held that the unreflective use of the Christian funeral ritual of the state church contributed to maintaining the church's cultural monopoly as well as a passive, routine-like conception of life and society. The civil funeral rituals promoted by the association were intended to be manifestations of equality, dignity, freedom of choice and authenticity, while at the same time intended to serve as cultural levers toward a more enlightened, free-thinking and dynamic Swedish citizen in a modern secular society. According to the association, it should be the duty of the government to ensure that the individual could live and die without being forced to rely on religious institutions. The government should be the guarantor of spiritual progress. Hence, as the association saw it, the role of the secular Swedish welfare state - sometimes called "folkhemmet" (thepeoples home) - should be to embed the citizen from the cradle to, literally, the grave.

  • 11.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Absolutism and Society in Seventeenth-Century France: State Power and Provincial Aristocracy in Languedoc2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 149-150Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Att komma till Scott: teorins roll inom svensk genushistoria2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, Supplement, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author discusses the specific contribution of theory to the field of Swedish gender history, and especially in relation to one dominant paradigm coined by the historian Yvonne Hirdman in the early 1990s. Scholars working in this field frequently refer to the American historian Joan Scott, but almost exclusively as the author of the article "Gender: a useful category for historical analysis". It is suggested that this limited reading of Scott is symptomatic of a tendency towards protectionism and stagnation. In order to effect a change, the suggestion is that more recent works by Scott be included in the general reading, not only for historians of gender, but for historians in general, and likewise that the field of history should be more alert to critical theory.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Den kulturella förevändningen: om historieämnet, poststrukturalismen och konflikten som inte får finnas2009In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 75, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Den odödliga historien: narrationen, händelsen och det förflutna2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 11-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a reading of Karen Blixen's short story 'The immortal Story', the author explores the limits of historiography and the risks of confusing narrative with lived life. By critically examining the work of the philosopher Adriana Cavarero and the historian Frank Ankersmitt, the idea that narrative constitutes subjecthood is questioned. Instead, negativity and the death drive, as elaborated on in the work of literary scholar Lee Edelman, are used to demonstrate how the life of Mr Clay, the main character in the novel, is positioned as completely meaningless because of his lack of a narrative. While Cavarero shares Blixen's contempt for Mr Clay, rejecting his attempt to re-enact an old sailor's tale, this article suggests another approach based on a constitutive excess of the presented (positions, events) rather than an excess of representations (stories, narratives, etc.), where Mr Clay can be seen as struggling to demonstrate this ontological fact. It is argued that the inability to acknowledge the de-radicalizing limits of representation is symptomatic of a hermeneutic understanding of life and history, where meaning and comprehension are only acknowledged when neatly packaged as narration and continuity. To propose another view of the past, the author introduces the philosopher Quentin Meillassoux's critique of phenomenology and Alain Badiou's concept of the event, where the historians' main methodology - that of historicizing -not only becomes superfluous as a method, but is also revealed as the main culprit in the de-radicalization of both the past and the present. It behoves historians to scrutinize the foundations on which they build their research and to contemplate other methods and theories hitherto thought inapplicable where segmented or anachronistic history based on a strong affiliation ('fidelity') with ideology may be one example.

  • 15.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Därför är vi historiker2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Recension av Joan W. Scott ; The fantasy of feminist history2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 137-138Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Recension av Peter Aronsson (red.); Platser för en bättre värld. Auschwitz, Ruhr och röda stugor2010In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 187-189Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Edoff, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    ”Må de herrskande klasserna darra”. Radikal retorik och reaktion i Stockholms press, 1848-1851: John Björkman, Gidlunds förlag, 2020, 376 s2021In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 123-125Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ett nationellt drivmedel: etanol i svensk politik 1924-1934: [Fuelling the nation: Ethanol in Swedish politics, 1924-1934]2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 63-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the political efforts to establish ethanol as a national fuel in Sweden in 1924 - 1934. Drawing on official records - the transcripts of parliamentary debates, governmental commission reports, and government bills and legislation - ethanol is considered as a technological and political artefact, with a particular focus on a strongly ideological fuel policy intended to bring about technological change.

    At the time, considerable political effort went into finding and establishing a national fuel, efficient and abundant enough to support the nation's requirements for essential products. This was by no means a uniquely Swedish undertaking. Nation-states all over the industrialized world sought domestic fuel alternatives, prompted by the expected depletion of oil reserves and the fear of renewed international conflict. In that period, Swedish ethanol was distilled from fermented sulphite lye, a waste product from paper and pulp production. It was therefore presented as a lucrative solution for a waste problem, and, as it was produced within the nation-state's borders, a promising wartime surrogate. However, ethanol was more expensive than petrol, which made it less marketable during peacetime. To cover losses, the ethanol industry requested state support in the form of tax exemptions and legislation to force petrol importers to blend ethanol into all marketed petrol.

    Those who argued in favour of the ethanol industry's requests were mainly right-wing politicians, who based their arguments on a nationalist ideology that national collective benefit justified state intervention in the free market. Opposition was mainly mounted by a faction in the Social Democrat party. For them, any measure that made products more expensive for consumers was unthinkable. They also argued that the ethanol industry had reached the end of the line; any production without the means and capacity to support itself should make way for its competitors. Concerns about the anticipated international conflict, however, led the Social Democrat minister for finance, Ernst Wigforss, to concede to the demands of the ethanol industry. In 1934, he thus proposed legislation that largely corresponded to claims made by right-wing politicians and the influential forestry industry, of which ethanol production was a part.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Forsberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Den svårsmälta svälten: forskningen om 1860-talets hungersnöd i Sverige: [A famine difficult for historians to digest: research on the 1860s famine in Sweden]2023In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 99-114Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last famine in Sweden was not a national famine, but a regional one. It mainly affected the sparsely populated northern parts of the country (Norrland) in 1867–1869. It occurred simultaneously with the last great famine in Finland and was largely caused by the same disruptive weather event, an unusually cold spring delaying the sowing season that subsequently resulted in extremely high mortality in 1868. Yet, even if the death toll doubled in Västerbotten in 1868 (compared to 1866), it never reached the magnitude of the fourfold increase in mortality seen in Finland. On a national level, Sweden's mortality increase was very modest, although the rise in emigration was more substantial and would have a more long-term demographic impact. However, this emigration did not originate from the north, which experienced an almost total crop failure, but from the southern regions. Understandably, this has led Swedish economic historians to ignore the famine aspect in their analyses of the industrializing and formative period during the later part of the nineteenth century. After all, it was only a regional and modest famine in the national periphery that did not change the ultimate economic trajectory of the country as a whole, unless the push and exit of some hundred thousand workers in the country's labor force in the following decades may qualify as a distinctive outcome. 

    Meanwhile, Swedish popular historians have successfully capitalized on the historiographical vacuum left by academics on this topic, portraying the 1867–1869 famine as a "national famine" with little evidence to substantiate their claims. Interestingly, the small amount of available research points out that if there actually were a famine, its epicenter would have been Västerbotten county, with its comparatively worst harvest failure in 1867 and its highest mortality increase in 1868. 

    Fortunately, a new research project Famine in Norden: Contacts and contrasts between Västerbotten and Ostrobothnia during the 1860s' decade of misery concerns studying a new interest in this period, region and event in Swedish history, which is important for several reasons. The primary reason is to produce new information to give us a better understanding of Swedish social and economic developments and their counterforces. Second, as Sweden possesses ample demographic and qualitative sources for famine studies, it would be a shame not to use them, especially as most historical famines have occurred in circumstances where similar sources are often lacking. Sweden's history of famines may contribute to and advance research in other areas of famine studies, not least in previously mentioned demographic studies, assessments of effective relief measures, administrative coordination mechanisms, the interplay between markets and public actors, the role of the free press and so on. Third, there are also comparative benefits associated with understanding famine in Sweden as a whole, but also in Västerbotten in particular. This not least concerns famine scholarship in Finland and Estonia, where both countries suffered from the same weather-related crop failures as northern Sweden but had a much higher death toll. Why was that the case? By improving our understanding of the famine event and process in Sweden, we may make new and hopefully better comparative assessments of what went wrong in the regions suffering from severe famines.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Temarecension: Svenska kyrkan och samerna - en mörk historia2020In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 99-108Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I en ny antologi och ett vitboksprojekt lyftas fram utbytet som samerna har haft med Svenska kyrkan - på gott och ont.

  • 22.
    Hällgren, Anna-Maria
    Institutionen för kultur och estetik, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Storstadens dagbok. Boulevardpressen och mediesystemet i det sena 1800-talets Stockholm: Erik Edoff2017In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 132-134Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Telegrafen på distans: ett digitalt metodexperiment2018In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 9-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitization of historical records not only creates new research opportunities but also challenges. Documents may be searched online and digital tools may be used for finding patterns in large datasets. Yet, the quality of digitized material is often low and it may be difficult for researchers to evaluate this material when hidden behind interfaces. My aim in this article is to explore a digitized newspaper and the associated problems and opportunities. My exploration is guided by the following question: What was written about the electrical telegraph in Aftonbladet in the 1830s, 1840s and 1850s? The files of the digitized Aftonbladet for the years 1830-1862 contain massive amounts of corrupted words generated by the OCR engine. Another problem is that the tool used for auto-segmentation has merged separate text items into single text blocks and split long texts into smaller parts. The digitization process is not a neutral text transfer from one medium to another, it is a process generating new texts never printed in the original newspaper. In order to find as many (corrupted) versions of the words "electrical" and "telegraph" as possible, the text files were searched with a Levhinstein distance of two (allowing for two letters to be added, replaced or missing). The words that were found were used as search words to identify texts blocks reporting on the electrical telegraph. To find themes in the texts, a co-occurrence search was carried out, identifying clusters of words frequently co-occurring. Previous research has focused on utopian ideas associated with this technology and the telegraph as an immaterial form of communication obliterating physical space. The clusters identified in the digital analysis suggest that more mundane topics dominated the newspaper: the electrical telegraph was described as a material form of communication controlled by bureaucracy, depending on and emphasizing geographical conditions. Digital databases make new research possible, but the low quality of digitized texts results in uncertainties concerning the results. Researchers using these databases need to be aware of the digital forms and interfaces regulating research practices.

  • 24. Jarlbrink, Johan
    et al.
    Nyblom, Andreas
    Aviatik och journalistik: Flygbaronen och medierna kring 19102012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 13-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first years of the twentieth century, numerous attempts were made at powered flight. What is commonly labelled 'the pioneer era' (1900-1914) covers the unsteady beginnings of the motorized airplane as well as its large-scale introduction in warfare and for the transportation of goods and passengers. Initially regarded as a foolish toy for hazardous adventure, the airplane rapidly became a favoured symbol of modernity, and the engineers, pilots, and entrepreneurs involved were celebrated as the heroes of progress. However, the quick change in opinion regarding the use and benefit of airplanes was not only prompted by the technical skill of the inventors or the bravery of the flyers. The aim of this paper is to shed light on the media history of early aviation, including the celebrity pilot as an important means by which aviation was publicly experienced and popularized. Through a case study of the mediatization of the first Swedish aviator, Carl Cederstrom (1867-1918), the article explores the interplay of the press, other kinds of media, and advertising in the introduction of the motorized airplane in Sweden in around 1910. At this time, air shows and competitions were being arranged all over the world. The media coverage was massive, and the aviators were frequently interviewed and celebrated. The press, however, did not only report on the events. By offering prizes and arranging competitions, individual newspapers played an active role in the introduction of powered flight. When the Stockholm Air Show was held in 1910 and 1911, one of the Stockholm dailies, Dagens Nyheter, was among the main organizers. The relation between the air show and the press coverage can be interpreted in terms of a feedback loop: the reporting drew attention to the show; the show became a mass attraction; and the papers reported it even more. At the centre of attention was always the aviator Cederstrom himself, popularly known as 'The Flying Baron'. The status of this persona and the participation of the press, the cinema, and postcard publishers also made the air shows attractive for sponsors such as champagne houses, patent medicine companies, and manufacturers of fire equipment. It was this joint attention that quickly transformed a limited concern into national awareness. When the Swedish armed forces in 1912 sought funding for its first aircraft, the politicians were easily convinced of the benefits of aviation.

  • 25.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Från giftermål till vigsel - från ett till två kött?: Om äktenskapet och förståelsen av kön, ca. 1650-18002003In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 35-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sunt förnuft och skattebetalarens kön: Skattebetalarnas förening i 1960-talets sambeskattningsdebatt2016In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 70-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the Swedish Taxpayers' Association acted and reacted with regard to the political question of joint or individual taxation in Sweden during the 1960s, addressing how expressions of the taxpayer transformed, how the taxpayer was gendered and how the relationship between state, households and individuals changed. The theoretical and methodological approach is based on Carol Lee Bacchi's use of discourse theory on political issues, focusing on perceptions of gender and taxpaying. Individual taxation was introduced in Sweden in 1971. Through other reforms, such as social security and child care, the Nordic countries laid the foundation for changing the relationships between state and individuals, as well as between the sexes. Previous research has studied different actors who worked for and against the tax reform; however, right-wing organizations are not studied to the same extent as liberal or social democratic organizations. The Swedish Taxpayers' Association is characterized as non-socialist, whose goal was to cut taxes and scrutinize how taxpayers' money was used by state and local governments. In the early 1960s, there was an obvious norm of the taxpayer as male. If married, he was the breadwinner and his wife was not seen an economic subject. If she worked, both the joint taxation and other costs, such as for maids, were put on top of her income. Despite the male norm, the family or the mother were connected to children. When the issue appeared on the political agenda, the information changed and women were now conceivable as both taxpayers and wage earners. However, the male breadwinner norm was still dominant. From now on, the critique focused on the progressive elements in the tax system. The information material had to be revised in 1965, as a reform of voluntary individual taxation was introduced. Especially for families with high double incomes, it now became beneficial to use individual taxation, and thereby the idea of the woman as an individual economic unit developed further. The association accepted the reform of 1970, also due to the needs of the business sector. Conservative arguments concerning family faded away during these years, whereas the norm of the taxpayer was still male.

  • 27.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rum för röstande: om kön, klass och valdeltagande vid stadsfullmäktigevalen i Gävle 1910 och 19122011In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 36-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to apply gender perspective to a wide-ranging study of different actors’ dealings during the Gavle City Council elections of 1910 and 1912 in order to analyse local political culture in the wake of the 1909 reforms to the Local Government Act. Taking as the starting-point the idea of political culture and the actions of various key figures at the time of the election, the focus is on the gendering of Swedish politics once women’s suffrage had been introduced. The results are based on an intersectional analysis of the electorate’s behaviour, using electoral rolls, population registers, and press reports. The study includes local women’s organization’s strategies to increase women’s political participation, as well as the part played by the local branches of the political parties. Seen in the national context, Gavle was unusual - three women won seats on the City Council in 1910, in the run-up to which the local Society for Women’s Suffrage had run a spirited campaign to ensure that the women candidates got to stand in safe seats. All the newspapers in 1910 carried exhortations to voters of both sex to exercise their votes, and several newspapers reported an enthusiastic election turn-out amongst women.

    Two years later the Society for Women’s Suffrage had split, losing some of its influence in the process. Before the 1912 election, moreover, no women were selected to stand for a safe seats, and the newspapers’ reporting of the election tended to render the female electorate invisible, which in itself gave a somewhat misleading picture of the situation, bearing in mind that in the event similar numbers of women would vote in this election as had done in the previous one. Otherwise, in terms of the actual turn-out, it is noticeable that the male and female electorate adhered to the same social pattern - the rich, as always, voted in far greater numbers than those with few votes (municipal suffrage was income-based in such a way as an individual could have two or more votes in the same election). Yet there were also some noticeable differences between the sexes. The majority of the female electorate were unmarried women with few votes; a majority of the men who turned out to vote were married and well established. Since all the political parties without exception put up male candidates in the 1912 election, and chose to address their propaganda to a gender-neutral electorate, they tapped a fundamental characteristic of political culture that had deep historical roots. We would therefore argue that the actions of the local branch of the Society for Women’s Suffrage prior to the 1910 election were crucial in establishing the fact of women as political citizens.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Manlighetens flytande gränser. Om manlighet som analytisk kategori i historiska analyser.2008In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 83-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Exactly what does masculinity refer to in historical analyses? And how is it to be separated from other analytical categories like class and ethnicity? The aim of this article is to discuss how the concept masculinity – ”manlighet” – has been applied in some recent historical studies by Swedish historians. Masculinity plays a central role in Christopher Collstedts doctoral thesis Justice and the duellist: Crimes of duelling and Perceptions of Masculinity in the Final Phases of Sweden’s Period as a Great power (2007). One central point in Collstedt’s study is that indicted duellists were not afraid to base their narratives of defence on behaviours, emotions and physical states of helplessness and despair which were traditionally associated with unmanliness, but on the contrary often referred to themselves as peaceful, meek and in need of protection. Collstedt links this to an early modern fluidity of masculinity and the repertoire of a Christian virtuous lifestyle, which was prescribed for both men and women. Christian virtues permitted men to be meek without giving up on their masculinity. But Collstedt also goes one step further and argues that Christian virtues like meekness were attributed to masculinity in relation to crimes of duels. How this was done is however not demonstrated by the author. The question of the historian’s criteria for labelling descriptions of attitudes and behaviour as expressions of masculinity is brought to a head. This becomes even more obvious in Kekke Stadin’s Gender and estate in Sweden’s Age of Greatness (2004). After describing several different ”masculinities” in early modern Swedish society, the author states that in the eyes of the 17th century, only ”warriors” could be manly, referring to the contemporary usage of the Swedish term ”manlig” as synonymous with brave. In the absence of a clear definition of masculinity as an analytical category, the risk is that the historian in this way will limit the analysis either to what is expressively labelled ”manly” in the source material, or expand the concept to descriptions of whatever men do and say which could be taken as normative or prestigious. A more precise definition of masculinity should start from an understanding of gender as the continuous establishment of cultural meanings for (what is recognized as) the fundamental bodily differences between the sexes in a given historical culture. Exactly what is brought forth as the essential differences and how these have been understood has varied over time, but the fact that such differences are recognized and ascribed specific qualities as masculine and feminine respectively, comprise the elementary logic of gender and thus also of masculinity. This means that the historian must be able to show that a connection (immediate or metaphorical) was made by contemporaries between a described ideal, attitude or behaviour and (what was held as) specific qualities, physical attributes and abilities of male bodies, before labelling the phenomenon as an historical expression of masculinity. The article ends with some suggestions for a rhetorical perspective on masculinity and an alternative interpretation of possible connections between excessive violence and unmanliness.

  • 29.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sexuella anspelningar som politiskt vapen: Ericus Olais skildring av Magnus Erikssons "vederstyggliga" leverne: [Sexual Slander as Political Weapon: Ericus Olai’s Representation of King Magnus Eriksson’s “Abominable” Way of Life]2021In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 148-176Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the use of allusions to scandalous sexual practices and desires as a political weapon has thus far only been carried out on a limited scale in Swedish Medieval and Early Modern political and cultural history. One exception is the 14th-century political campaign against King Magnus Eriksson (1316–1374). In a recent study, Swedish historian Henric Bagerius analyses the allegations afresh in light of the sodomite as a cultural stereotype and “figure of thought”, which according to Bagerius inspired and structuredthe accusations against Birgitta Birgersdotter (1303–1373) presented to the aristocrats in the council. In passing, Bagerius also mentions Ericus Olai’s († 1486) account of Magnus in Chronica Regnum Gothorum written a century later, which, however, has not been studied more thoroughly. The latter is the very aim of the present study as a follow up of Bagerius’s new perspective. As a result, it will be argued that Olai was guided not by a figure of the sodomite but by a more general cultural stereotype of pride and excessive lust as the prime mover of the king’s tyranny, treason, and escalating sins ending up in a most “abominable” vice. Furthermore, it will be argued that this figure of thought could be valid for the allegations concerning Birgitta as well, with sodomy serving as the possible culmination rather than implied starting point in her chain of allusions. The article ends with a contribution to the recent discussion on the status of Ericus Olai as mainly a compilator or chronicler with a more independent and inventive attitude toward his sources, followed by some remarks on the value of comparative studies across time and culture in this field of research. 

  • 30.
    Norrhem, Svante
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Nyström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Arkiv och perspektiv: Finns det en motsättning mellan populärhistoria och genushistoria?2011In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 144-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the history books and articles that address a broader readership tend to focus on 'great men'. Popular history publications often offer a form of history that is problematic in its gendering, and that often bears no relation to cutting-edge historical research and/or the historical canon. In view of this, it behoves the writers of popular history to be more aware of their choice of perspective and to adopt a more robust approach to source criticism. Designating the issue outlined here as a type of 'methodological gender-blindness' points to the fact that it is one aspect of a wider structural problem. Since historians have in the past been at the forefront of the development and dissemination of gender theories, it is argued here that it is of the greatest importance for the continued social relevance of the discipline as a whole that historians engage the public by means of popular history. Academic historians should face the challenge of writing works of popular history and of bringing their critical skills to bear on popular history products.

  • 31.
    Norén, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Propaganda. En antologi om påverkan2022In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 181-183Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Norén, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Statens informationslogik och den audiovisuella upplysningen 1945—1960: [The swedish state's media logic and audiovisual information, 1945-1960]2014In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 66-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The period 1945–1960 was characterized in Swedish history by the rapidacceleration of state-led social reform. As part of this, there was a general feeling that film should be pressed into use for educational purposes. This article examines the activities of two public committees, the Committeefor Public Information (Kommittén för social upplysning, 1946–9) and the Committee for Public Information Films (Kommittén för social upplysningsfilm,1950–9). The two committees’ remit was to produce films that focused on social reform. This begs an important question. How did the use of film affect the official audiovisual information put out by the Swedish state in the period 1945–60? To better understand the conflict between official public information and the rules of the commercial film market, two different logics are considered, both defined by three variables: resources (small versus large), content (objective versus entertainment), andorganization (state/corporativism–private versus the market). The conceptof mediatization is used to understand how official public information was affected by the rules and rationale of the commercial film industry. The results indicate that there was a clear political agenda that drove the committees to make the film content in an attractive way, and the archival research shows how the committees obeyed these directions. Despite the turn in the popularization of film production, the committees took a clear standagainst trying their hand at pure entertainment. Instead, they preferred theideals of the British documentary tradition. The up shot was a compromise between the two logics. As for resources, the state logic was the determining factor here, and the committees never got much money, certainly not compared to the commercial film market. As for their organization, the committees were never able have their own rules and preferences, since the logic of the market was too strong.The analysis shows that state-controlled audiovisual information is best characterized as finding a middle way between the logic of official public information and the logic of the commercial film market. The committees’ momentum slackened in the second half of the 1950s, yet, even so, the results indicate that this should not be interpreted as a lack of faith in the audiovisual form as a force to be reckoned with in public education. Insteadit merely reflects a shift in preference from film to television.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Norén, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    What is Digital History?2021In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 307-309Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Nyström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Forskarliv. Självporträtt av samtida svenska historiker: Forskarliv. Självporträtt av samtida svenska historiker, Carlsson bokförlag, 2020, 215 s.2021In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 132-133Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Overud, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hem tar plats. Ett feministiskt perspektiv på flyttandets politik i 1970-talets sociala rapportböcker: Monika Edgren, Sekel Bokförlag, 2009, 157 s.2010In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 184-185Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Petersson, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Gunnela Björk, Olof Palme och medierna2006In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 136-137Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Törnqvist, Isak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Trade Union Activism in the Nordic countries since 19002024In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 158-160Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Åström Elmersjö, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Bland stenyxor och tv-spel: om barn, historisk tid och när unga blir delaktiga i historiekulturen2019In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 131-134Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Åström Elmersjö, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Historievetenskap och historieundervisning: Sven Ulric Palme och 1950-talets läroböcker i historia för folkskolan2017In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 10-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1950 and 1958 the Swedish historian Sven Ulric Palme (1912–1977) was engaged in a vivid discussion on historical scholarship and history teaching in schools. This article utilizes these debates in an examination of the relationship between scholarship and teaching, by especially focusing on Palme’s criticism of history textbooks and his own textbook written for ages 10–12 and published in 1956. By focusing on a controversial historian, like Palme, who previously criticized the history textbooks used in Swedish schools, the aim is to shed light on how debates on the relationship between scholarship and teaching emphasizes different dimensions of historical cultures. The results of the study show how scholarship and teaching are dichotomized in the concepts historical science versus pedagogical issues or historical science versus ideological conceptions. In both cases the historical sciences are seen as objective and untouchable. However, the study also shows how this dichotomy is difficult to uphold, as historical scholarship, as well as historical culture in general, is always a matter of negotiation. The results of historical scholarship are part of a negotiation over what history is interesting and important for the cultural community that it is supposed to make sense of. History textbooks are part of the same negotiation and the content of them are not the result of historical scholarship trickling down, instead the negotiation continues as the example of Palme’s textbook shows.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf