Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Chronic Achilles tendinosis: recommendations for treatment and prevention.2000In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a condition with an unknown aetiology and pathogenesis that is often, but not always, associated with pain during loading of the Achilles tendon. Histologically, there are no inflammatory cells, but increased amounts of interfibrillar glycosaminoglycans and changes in the collagen fibre structure and arrangement are seen. In situ microdialysis has confirmed the absence of inflammation. It is a condition that is most often seen among recreational male runners aged between 35 and 45 years, and it is most often considered to be associated with overuse. However, this condition is also seen in patients with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronic Achilles tendinosis is considered a troublesome injury to treat. Nonsurgical treatment most often includes a combination of rest, NSAIDs, correction of malalignments, and stretching and strengthening exercises, but there is sparse scientific evidence supporting the use of most proposed treatment regimens. It has been stated that, in general, nonsurgical treatment is not successful and surgical treatment is required in about 25% of patients. However, in a recent prospective study, treatment with heavy load eccentric calf muscle training showed very promising results and may possibly reduce the need for surgical treatment of tendinosis located in the midportion of the Achilles tendon. The short term results after surgical treatment are frequently very good, but in the few studies with long term follow-up there are signs of a possible deterioration with time. Calf muscle strength takes a long time to recover and, furthermore, a prolonged progressive calcaneal bone loss has been shown on the operated side up to 1 year after surgical treatment.

  • 2.
    Ballin, Marcel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Associations of Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time with the Risk of Stroke, Myocardial Infarction or All‑Cause Mortality in 70‑Year‑Old Men and Women: A Prospective Cohort Study2020In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 339-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the associations of objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) with the combined outcome of incident stroke, myocardial infarction (MI) or all-cause mortality in older adults.

    Methods: N = 3343 men and women aged 70 who participated in a health survey between 2012 and 2017 were included. Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers were used to measure light-intensity PA (LPA), moderate-intensity PA (MPA) and ST for 1 week. Incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in terms of stroke or MI, and all-cause mortality were identified using national registers. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable-adjusted Cox regressions.

    Results: During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (0.1–5.6), there were 124 events of CVD or all-cause mortality. After adjusting for potential confounders and mediators, every 30-min/day increment in LPA was associated with 11% lower risk of CVD or all-cause mortality (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.97), and every 30-min/day increment in MPA was associated with 36% lower risk (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48–0.84). Every 1-h/day increment in ST increased the risk of the outcomes by 33% (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14–1.56), although there was no significant association among participants who performed ≥ 30 min/day MPA (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.82–1.50, P = 0.034 for interaction). None of the associations were modified by sex (P > 0.4 for all).

    Conclusion: Objectively measured LPA and MPA are each associated with lower risk of stroke, MI or all-cause mortality in 70-year-old individuals, while ST is associated with increased risk. The greatest risk reduction is observed for MPA, which also appears to attenuate some of the increased risks associated with ST.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Cronström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Response to comment on: “return to sports: a risky business? a systematic review with meta-analysis of risk factors for graft rupture following acl reconstruction”2024In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 54, p. 779-780Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cronström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Return to sports: a risky business? a systematic review with meta-analysis of risk factors for graft rupture following acl reconstruction2023In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 91-110Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of sustaining a graft rupture after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is high. Contributing risk factors are, however, still not clearly identified.

    Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to identify and quantify risk factors for graft rupture after ACLR.

    Methods: A systematic review with meta-analysis (PROSPERO CRD42020140129) based on PRISMA guidelines was performed. MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched from inception to September 2021. Prospective and retrospective studies addressing risk factors for graft rupture after ACLR in males/females of all ages were considered. Meta-analyses using a random effect model (effect measure: odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [CI]) were performed. The GRADE tool was used to assess evidence quality.

    Results: Following full-text screening of 310 relevant papers, 117 were eventually included, incorporating up to 133,000 individuals in each meta-analysis. Higher Tegner activity level (≥ 7 vs < 7) at primary injury (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.69–9.04), increased tibial slope (degrees) (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.26–3.86), lower psychological readiness to return to sport (RTS) (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.32–3.61), early surgery (< 12 vs ≥ 12 months) (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.58–2.22), RTS (pre-injury level) (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.21–2.91) and family history of ACL injury (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.34–2.31) were all associated with increased odds of graft rupture. Higher age (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.39–0.59), female sex (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79–0.98), fewer self-reported knee symptoms pre-reconstruction (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.69–0.95) and concomitant cartilage injuries (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.62–0.79) instead decreased the odds. Meta-analysis revealed no association between body mass index, smoking, joint laxity, RTS time, knee kinematics, muscle strength or hop performance and graft rupture.

    Conclusion: Conspicuous risk factors for graft rupture were mainly sports and hereditary related. Few studies investigated function-related modifiable factors or included sports exposure data.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Cronström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Häger, Charlotte K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Risk Factors for Contra-Lateral Secondary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis2021In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 1419-1438Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of sustaining a contra-lateral anterior cruciate ligament (C-ACL) injury after primary unilateral ACL injury is high. C-ACL injury often contributes to a further decline in function and quality of life, including failure to return to sport. There is, however, very limited knowledge about which risk factors that contribute to C-ACL injury.

    Objective: To systematically review instrinsic risk factors for sustaining a C-ACL injury.

    Methods: A systematic review with meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Sport Discus) were searched from inception to January 2020. Inclusion criteria were prospective or retrospective studies investigating any intrinsic risk factor for future C-ACL injury. Meta-analysis was performed and expressed as odds ratios (OR) if two or more articles assessed the same risk factor.

    Results: 44 moderate-to-high quality studies were eventually included in this review, whereof 35 studies were eligible for meta-analysis, including up to 59 000 individuals. We identified seven factors independently increasing the odds of sustaining a C-ACL injury (in order of highest to lowest OR): (1) returning to a high activity level (OR 3.26, 95% CI 2.10–5.06); (2) Body Mass Index < 25 (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.73–4.36); (3) age ≤ 18 years (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.51–3.88); (4) family history of ACL injury (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.54–2.80); (5) primary ACL reconstruction performed ≤ 3 months post injury (OR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.32–2.06); (6) female sex (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14–1.61); and (7) concomitant meniscal injury (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.03–1.42). The following two factors were associated with decreased odds of a subsequent C-ACL injury: 1) decreased intercondylar notch width/width of the distal femur ratio (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25–0.69) and 2) concomitant cartilage injury (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–1.00). There were no associations between the odds of sustaining a C-ACL injury and smoking status, pre-injury activity level, playing soccer compared to other sports or timing of return to sport. No studies of neuromuscular function in relation to risk of C-ACL injury were eligible for meta-analysis according to our criteria.

    Conclusion: his review provides evidence that demographic factors such as female sex, young age (≤ 18 years) and family history of ACL injury, as well as early reconstruction and returning to a high activity level increase the risk of C-ACL injury. Given the lack of studies related to neuromuscular factors that may be modifiable by training, future studies are warranted that investigate the possible role of factors such as dynamic knee stability and alignment, muscle activation and/or strength and proprioception as well as sport-specific training prior to return-to-sport for C-ACL injuries.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Grävare Silbernagel, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, United States.
    Malliaras, Peter
    Physiotherapy Department, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine Nursing and Health Science, Monash University, VIC, Melbourne, Australia.
    de Vos, Robert-Jan
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Centre, Zuid-Holland, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hanlon, Shawn
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, 540 South College Avenue, DE, Newark, United States.
    Molenaar, Mitchel
    Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge
    Department of Orthopedics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Antflick, Jarrod
    Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
    van Ark, Mathijs
    Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Care Studies, Hanze University of Applied Sciences and Peescentrum, Centre of Expertise Primary Care Groningen (ECEZG), Groningen, Netherlands.
    Färnqvist, Kenneth
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haleem, Zubair
    Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; Arsenal Football Club, London, United Kingdom.
    Kaux, Jean-Francois
    Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and Sports Traumatology, University and University Hospital of Liège, Liège, Belgium.
    Kirwan, Paul
    School of Physiotherapy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
    Kumar, Bhavesh
    Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH), University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Lewis, Trevor
    Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Mallows, Adrian
    School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom.
    Masci, Lorenzo
    Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH), University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Morrissey, Dylan
    Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Murphy, Myles
    National School of Nursing, Midwifery, Health Sciences and Physiotherapy, The University of Notre Dame Australia, WA, Fremantle, Australia; School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, WA, Joondalup, Australia.
    Newsham-West, Richard
    School of Allied Health, Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, VIC, Melbourne, Australia.
    Norris, Richard
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, WA, Joondalup, Australia; Liverpool University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    O’Neill, Seth
    School of Allied Health, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Peers, Koen
    Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sancho, Igor
    Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; Physiotherapy Department, University of Deusto, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Seymore, Kayla
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, 540 South College Avenue, DE, Newark, United States.
    Vallance, Patrick
    Physiotherapy Department, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine Nursing and Health Science, Monash University, VIC, Clayton, Australia.
    van der Vlist, Arco
    Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Vicenzino, Bill
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland, QLD, Brisbane, Australia.
    ICON 2020 - International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus: A Systematic Review of Outcome Measures Reported in Clinical Trials of Achilles Tendinopathy2022In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 52, p. 613-641Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nine core domains for tendinopathy have been identified. For Achilles tendinopathy there is large variation in outcome measures used, and how these fit into the core domains has not been investigated.

    Objective: To identify all available outcome measures outcome measures used to assess the clinical phenotype of Achilles tendinopathy in prospective studies and to map the outcomes measures into predefined health-related core domains.

    Design: Systematic review.

    Data Sources: Embase, MEDLINE (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, SPORTDiscus and Google Scholar.

    Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies: Clinical diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy, sample size ≥ ten participants, age ≥ 16 years, and the study design was a randomized or non-randomized clinical trial, observational cohort, single-arm intervention, or case series.

    Results: 9376 studies were initially screened and 307 studies were finally included, totaling 13,248 participants. There were 233 (177 core domain) different outcome measures identified across all domains. For each core domain outcome measures were identified, with a range between 8 and 35 unique outcome measures utilized for each domain. The proportion of studies that included outcomes for predefined core domains ranged from 4% for the psychological factors domain to 72% for the disability domain.

    Conclusion: 233 unique outcome measures for Achilles tendinopathy were identified. Most frequently, outcome measures were used within the disability domain. Outcome measures assessing psychological factors were scarcely used. The next step in developing a core outcome set for Achilles tendinopathy is to engage patients, clinicians and researchers to reach consensus on key outcomes measures.

    Prospero Registration: CRD42020156763.

  • 7. Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Johnson, Urban
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention2017In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Several studies have suggested that psychosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation. Objectives The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interventions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention). Methods Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention. Results The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups. Conclusion The results support the model's suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf