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  • 1.
    Bakırlıoğlu, Yekta
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Kohtala, Cindy
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Framing Open Design through Theoretical Concepts and Practical Applications: A Systematic Literature Review2019In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 389-432Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports on the results of a systematic literature review on ‘open design’ in academic fields including and beyond design and HCI. The review investigates how studies are framed as open design and open-source design (including ‘open hardware’): how researchers contribute to conceptual theorizing about open design or study its practical operationalization, in do-it-yourself ‘making,’ manufacturing and practices in-between these domains. Most of the papers reviewed were empirical studies from diverse fields. Open design was analyzed not only as contributions and solutions, but also as open-to-participate processes, openly shared processes, and open, closed, and modular (open and closed) outcomes. Various research fields presented an open design framing as an alternative to the status quo: new ways to do business and/or to foster socio-environmental sustainability. On the manufacturing side, open design was sought especially to accelerate innovation cycles; on the making side, it was espoused to foster democratization. However, the studies reviewed indicated that companies do not appear to develop much beyond business-as-usual. From the research perspective, the conceptual potential of open design to promote sustainability saw little practical exploration. Additionally, issues around open design community governance and ownership, safety and reliability of open outcomes require further investigation.

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  • 2.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    et al.
    Department of Design, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Nicenboim, Iohanna
    Department of Human-Centered Design, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    The making(s) of more-than-human design: introduction to the special issue on more-than-human design and HCI2024In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities have drastically altered the planet, with design playing a significant role. While design may intend to do good, its consequences are not always positive: from climate change to resource depletion to unforeseen social dynamics. These transformations also include ourselves, as our relationships with new technologies blur and complicate previous human and machine agency distinctions. Increasingly, design has become a matter of defining what it means to be human. This special issue explores the proposition that conventional human-centered design approaches may not adequately address the complex challenges we face, and that there is instead a need to ground design in more-than-human perspectives. This introduction outlines the evolving landscape of more-than-human design in the context of HCI. Articulating a series of emerging research trajectories, we aim to illuminate the transformative potential of more-than-human orientations to design, including how they both extend and depart from familiar lines of inquiry in HCI–for example, how designers are redefining data, interfaces, and responsibility, and reshaping posthuman knowledge through design. Ultimately, this special issue aims to explore new pathways for designing in the era of the more-than-human, challenging the perceived divide between practice and theory to imagine alternative futures for HCI.

  • 3.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington.
    Faceless Interaction - A Conceptual Examination of the Notion of Interface: past, present and future2015In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 507-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the present struggle to keep interaction complexity in check as artifact complexity continues to rise and the technical possibilities to interact multiply, the notion of interface is scrutinized. First, a limited number of previous interpretations or thought styles of the notion are identified and discussed. This serves as a framework for an analysis of the current situation with regard to complexity, control, and interaction, leading to a realization of the crucial role of surface in contemporary understanding of interaction. The potential of faceless interaction, interaction that transcends traditional reliance on surfaces, is then examined and discussed, liberating possibilities as well as complicating effects and dangers are pointed out, ending with a sketch of a possibly emerging new thought style.

  • 4.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    The Meaning of Interactivity: Some Proposals for Definitions and Measure2017In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 103-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New interactive applications, artifacts, and systems are constantly being added to our environments, and there are some concerns in the human-computer interaction research community that increasing interactivity might not be just to the good. But what is it that is supposed to be increasing, and how could we determine whether it is? To approach these issues in a systematic and analytical fashion, relying less on common intuitions and more on clearly defined concepts and when possible quantifiable properties, we take a renewed look at the notion of interactivity and related concepts. The main contribution of this article is a number of definitions and terms, and the beginning of an attempt to frame the conditions of interaction and interactivity. Based on this framing, we also propose some possible approaches for how interactivity can be measured.

  • 5.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The social production of technological autonomy2022In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 256-258Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Bannon, Liam J.
    Interaction Design Beyond the Product: Creating Technology-Enhanced Activity Spaces2012In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 277-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of interaction design to date has been predominantly concerned with designing products, that is, devices, systems, and more recently services. A growing body of theoretical and empirical analyses suggests that the scope of interaction design needs to be expanded: An explicit concern of the field should include not only helping designers create better products but also helping people themselves create better environments for their work, learning, and leisure activities. In this article we argue that expanding the scope of interaction design beyond products requires a revision of some of the most central concepts in interaction design, including the notion of "the object of design" and our understanding of the impact of technologies on human practices. The aim of the article is to explore some of these conceptual challenges and discuss possible ways of dealing with them. We differentiate between intrinsic and extrinsic technology-enabled practice transformation, and foreground the need for interaction design research and practice to more directly deal with analysis and construction of technology-enhanced activity spaces. The implications of these notions for the research agenda of interaction design are discussed.

  • 7.
    Robles, Erica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Nass, Clifford
    Stanford University.
    Kahn, Adam
    University of Southern California.
    The social life of information displays: on the psychology of screens2009In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 24, no 1-2, p. 48-78Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of two experimental laboratory studies that establish relationships between displays and people's attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors toward self, others, and social situations. Experiment I investigates how participants (N = 40) engaging in a trivia game respond when their answers and performance feedback evaluations are made public via either a large shared display or each person's laptop display. Using a 2 (answer display: shared vs. personal) × 2 (feedback display: shared vs. personal) between-participants, nested design, we find that participants exhibit differential levels of social anxiety, enjoyment, willingness to change answers, and attributions of coparticipant competence. Participants whose answers are shown on the shared display exhibit greater social anxiety but are attributed with greater competence by their peers. Viewing information on the shared display induces a greater degree of change in answers. Precisely because all information is public throughout the experiment, we are able to isolate the effects of sharing screens as opposed to sharing information. Experiment II (N = 40) builds from Experiment I by employing similar display configurations within an explicitly persuasive context. In a 2 (display: shared vs. personal) × 2 (context: common vs. personal) × 2 (content presentation style: common vs. interpersonal), mixed experimental design we produce systematic differences in the persuasiveness of information, people's engagement with content, and sense of social distance from each other. Through both experiments strong consistency effects are evident: enjoyment, engagement, and persuasiveness are all diminished where incongruencies are part of the experimental conditions. So too these mismatches increase the sense of social distance from others in the setting. We discuss the implications for future research and design of display ecologies and situated media.

  • 8.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Concept-driven interaction design research2010In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 95-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore a concept-driven approach to interaction design research with a specific focus on theoretical advancements. We introduce this approach as a complementary approach to more traditional, and well-known, user-centered interaction design approaches. A concept-driven approach aims at manifesting theoretical concepts in concrete designs. A good concept design is both conceptually and historically grounded, bearing signs of the intended theoretical considerations. In the area of human–computer interaction and interaction design research, this approach has been quite popular but not necessarily explicitly recognized and developed as a proper research methodology. In this article, we demonstrate how a concept-driven approach can coexist, and be integrated with, common user-centered approaches to interaction design through the development of a model that makes explicit the existing cycle of prototyping, theory development, and user studies. We also present a set of basic principles that could constitute a foundation for concept driven interaction research, and we have considered and described the methodological implications given these principles. For the field of interaction design research we find this as an important point of departure for taking the next step toward the construction and verification of theoretical constructs that can help inform and guide future design research projects on novel interaction technologies.

  • 9.
    Özçetin, Seda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Terms of entanglement: a posthumanist reading of Terms of Service2023In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary connected things entail ongoing relations between producers, end users, and other actors characterized by ongoing updates and production of data about and through use. These relations are currently governed by Terms of Service (ToS) and related policy documents, which are known to be mostly ignored beyond the required interaction of ticking a box to indicate consent. This seems to be a symptom of failure to design for effectively mediating ongoing relations among multiple stakeholders involving multiple forms of value generation. In this paper, we use ToS as an entrance point to explore design practices for democratic data governance. Drawing on posthuman perspectives, we make three posthuman design moves exploring entanglements, decentering, and co-performance in relation to Terms of Service. Through these explorations we begin to sketch a space for design to engage with democratic data governance through a practice of what we call revealing design that is aimed at meaningfully making visible these complex networked relations in actionable ways. This approach is meant to open alternative possible trajectories that could be explored for design to enable genuine democratic data governance.

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