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  • 1. Bang, Casper N.
    et al.
    Gerdts, Eva
    Aurigemma, Gerard P.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Dahlof, Bjoern
    Roman, Mary J.
    Kober, Lars
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients: the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension study2013Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, nr 10, s. 2060-2068Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatation [high left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) index and concentricity (LVM/EDV(2/3))] in hypertensive patients.Methods and results:Nine hundred thirty-nine participants in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) echocardiography substudy had measurable LVM at enrolment. Patients with LVH (LVM/body surface area 116g/m(2) in men and 96g/m(2) in women) were divided into four groups; eccentric nondilated' (normal LVM/EDV and EDV), eccentric dilated' (increased EDV, normal LVM/EDV), concentric nondilated' (increased LVM/EDV with normal EDV), and concentric dilated' (increased LVM/EDV and EDV) and compared to patients with normal LVM. At baseline, 12% had eccentric nondilated, 20% eccentric dilated, 29% concentric nondilated, and 14% concentric dilated LVH, with normal LVM in 25%. Compared with the concentric nondilated LVH group, those with concentric dilated LVH had significantly lower pulse pressure/stroke index and ejection fraction; higher LVM index, stroke volume, cardiac output, left ventricular midwall shortening, left atrial volume and isovolumic relaxation time; and more had segmental wall motion abnormalities (all P<0.05). Similar differences existed between patients with eccentric dilated and those with eccentric nondilated LVH (all P<0.05). Compared with patients with normal LVM, the eccentric nondilated had higher LV stroke volume, pulse pressure/stroke index, Cornell voltage product and SBP, and lower heart rate and fewer were African-American (all P<0.05).Conclusion:The new four-group classification of LVH identifies dilated subgroups with reduced left ventricular function among patients currently classified with eccentric or concentric LVH.

  • 2. Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora
    et al.
    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra
    Wright, James M
    Schron, Eleanor B
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Fagard, Robert
    Staessen, Jan A
    Gueyffier, François
    Treatment of hypertension in patients 80 years and older: the lower the better? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.2010Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, nr 7, s. 1366-1372Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Results of randomized controlled trials are consistent in showing reduced rates of stroke, heart failure and cardiovascular events in very old patients treated with antihypertensive drugs. However, inconsistencies exist with regard to the effect of these drugs on total mortality.

    Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of available data on hypertensive patients 80 years and older by selecting total mortality as the main outcome. Secondary outcomes were coronary events, stroke, cardiovascular events, heart failure and cause-specific mortality. The common relative risk (RR) of active treatment versus placebo or no treatment was assessed using a random-effect model. Linear meta-regression was performed to explore the relationship between intensity of antihypertensive therapy and blood pressure (BP) reduction and the log-transformed value of total mortality odds ratios (ORs).

    Results: The overall RR for total mortality was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.89–1.25), with significant heterogeneity between hypertension in the very elderly trial (HYVET) and the other trials. This heterogeneity was not explained by differences in the follow-up duration between trials. The meta-regression suggested that a reduction in mortality was achieved in trials with the least BP reductions and the lowest intensity of therapy. Antihypertensive therapy significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the risk of stroke (35%), cardiovascular events (27%) and heart failure (50%). Cause-specific mortality was not different between treated and untreated patients.

    Conclusion: Treating hypertension in very old patients reduces stroke and heart failure with no effect on total mortality. The most reasonable strategy is the one associated with significant mortality reduction; thiazides as first-line drugs with a maximum of two drugs.

  • 3.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Response to 'SPRINTin context: meta-analysis of trials with baseline normotension and lowlevels of previous cardiovascular disease' Reply2018Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 36, nr 7, s. 1603-1604Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    SPRINT in context: meta-analysis of trials with baseline normotension and low levels of previous cardiovascular disease2018Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 979-986Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the effect of antihypertensive treatment in trials with baseline normotension and low levels of previous cardiovascular disease. To test if the results from SPRINT are compatible with those from other trials, and test the impact of SPRINT results on overall effect estimates. Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials with at least 1000 patient-years of follow-up, comparing antihypertensive treatment versus placebo, or different blood pressure goals against each other. Trials with at least 50% previous cardiovascular disease were excluded. Results: Sixteen trials, including 66816 participants, were included in the meta-analyses. Mean baseline SBP was 138mmHg, and mean difference between treatment arms was 5.5mmHg. Antihypertensive treatment was associated with a neutral effect on all-cause mortality [relative risk 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.05] and major cardiovascular events (0.97, 0.91-1.03). Results from SPRINT differed significantly from those of other trials (P=0.012 for all-cause mortality; P=0.016 for major cardiovascular events), but overall effect estimates were similar when SPRINT was excluded (1.01, 0.95-1.06 for all-cause mortality; 0.98, 0.93-1.03 for major cardiovascular events). Treatment was associated with reduced risk of secondary outcomes stroke (0.84, 0.71-1.00) and heart failure (0.88, 0.78-0.98), although heterogeneity was high in the stroke analysis (I-2=54%). Conclusion: SPRINT results are not representative for trials with baseline normotension and low levels of previous cardiovascular disease. Antihypertensive treatment does not protect against death or major cardiovascular events in this setting.

  • 5.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Standardization according to blood pressure lowering in meta-analyses of antihypertensive trials: comparison of three methodological approaches2018Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 4-15Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Assess how standardization of relative risks (RRs) and standard errors (SEs), according to blood pressure differences within trials, affects heterogeneity, overall effect estimates and study weights in meta-analyses of antihypertensive treatment.

    METHOD: Data from a previous systematic review were used. Three sets of analyses were performed, using both random-effects and fixed-effects model for meta-analyses. First, we used raw data from the included trials. Second, we standardized RRs as if SBP was reduced by 10 mmHg in all trials. Third, we standardized both RRs and SEs.

    RESULTS: When RRs were standardized according to blood pressure lowering, heterogeneity between trials increased (I = 36 vs. 93% for mortality). This conferred large differences in treatment effect estimates using random-effects and fixed-effects model (RR 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.89, respectively, 0.97, 0.94-0.99). When SEs were standardized, confidence intervals for individual trials widened, resulting in lower power to detect heterogeneity across trials. Study weights were dissociated from number of events in trials (P < 0.0001, R = 0.99 before standardization vs. P = 0.063, R = 0.05 after standardization). This induced a secondary shift in weight from trials with lower baseline SBP to trials with higher baseline SBP, resulting in exaggerated overall effect estimates.

    CONCLUSION: Standardization of RRs exaggerates differences between trials and makes meta-analyses highly sensitive to choice of statistical method. Standardization of SEs masks heterogeneity and results in biased effect estimates.

  • 6.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Blood pressure treatment levels and choice of antihypertensive agent in people with diabetes mellitus: an overview of systematic reviews2017Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 35, s. 435-462Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Multiple systematic reviews address the effect of antihypertensive treatment in people with diabetes. Here, we summarize current systematic reviews concerning antihypertensive treatment effect at different blood pressure (BP) levels, and relative treatment effect of different antihypertensive agents.

    METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, BIOSIS, DARE and CDSR during years 2005-2016. Eligibility criteria, number of trials and participants, outcomes analysed, statistical methods used for data synthesis, and principal results were extracted for each review. Review quality was assessed using the assessment of multiple systematic reviews tool.

    RESULTS: We found four reviews concerning BP treatment level. These consistently showed that the effect of antihypertensive treatment on mortality, cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease was attenuated at lower BP levels. If SBP was more than 140 mmHg, treatment reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and heart failure. If SBP was less than 140 mmHg, treatment increased the risk of cardiovascular death. We found eight reviews concerning choice of agent. We found no difference between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics in preventing all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, combined cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and end-stage renal disease. Minor differences exist for stroke and heart failure. Data were limited on people with type 1 diabetes and very elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. None of the reviews concerning choice of agent included all relevant trials.

    CONCLUSION: The available evidence supports treatment in people with type 2 diabetes and SBP more than 140 mmHg, using any of the major antihypertensive drug classes.

  • 7.
    Burger, Dylan
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Veerabhadrappa, Praveen
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Charchar, Fadi
    University of Ballarat, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
    Harrap, Stephen
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Touyz, Rhian M.
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Report of the first International Society of Hypertension (ISH) Trainee/New Investigator Symposium: A Global Hypertension Initiative2012Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 631-632Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Is lower really better?: Issue of the J curve hypothesis in hypertension2016Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 34, s. e196-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The J curve hypothesis propose that the relation between blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular events is non-linear. Instead of a decreased risk with lower blood pressure, the risk increases at lower blood pressures. This issue has been discussed for many years, and is still a hot topic. The debates have most often had its origin in the question about how far blood pressure should be lowered with antihypertensive drugs.One one hand, we know that many patients with hypertension is not treated to targets according to guidelines and that this contributes to the high risk for cardiovascular diseases in patients with hypertension. On the other hand, overtreatment could be one reason for the subobtimal effect of antihypertensive drugs on cardiovascular diseases.The issue about a J curve in the effect of antihypertensive drugs is complicated.The relation between blood pressure and cardiovascular risk is different for different cardiovascular outcomes. For example, the risk for intracerebral hemorrhage seem to increase steeper at higher blood pressure than for most other outcomes. On the other hand, the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm increases only modestly with higher blood pressure. In addition, end stage renal disease and cognitive decline could have other relations between blood pressure and risk. Age, cardiovascular disease and diabetes have also been found to modify the relation between risk and outcome.Earlier this year, we published a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials with antihypertensive drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus (ref). Included trials had to compare treatment with an antihypertensive drug against placebo, two antihypertensive agents against one or one blood pressure target against another target. The studies were stratified according to blood pressure at randomization (baseline blood pressure), mimicking the situation you as a clinician meet when you decide to recommend a patients additional antihypertensive therapy or not. We contacted authors to receive data from diabetic subgroups in large studies. Thus, we were able to include more studies than in previous systematic reviews in this field. All together, we included data from 49 randomized controlled trials, including 73 738 patients.The systematic review showed that the effect of antihypertensive drugs on cardiovascular outcomes is different at different blood pressure levels. For most outcomes, adding antihypertensive drugs were beneficial in patients with diabetes mellitus and high blood pressure. However, this benefit decreased with decreasing blood pressure. The risk for cardiovascular death increased when therapy was added in patents with diabetes and systolic blood pressure below 140 mmHg. The benefits of adding antihypertensive treatment at different blood pressure levels are summarized in the figure below.Thus, in patients with diabetes, the relations between treatment effect of antihypertensive drugs are different at different blood pressure levels. Treatment effects differ for different cardiovascular outcomes. These data question previous guidelines that recommend a systolic blood pressure target below 130 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus.In a very recent systematic review, we have reexamined the relation between randomization blood pressure and cardiovascular stratified for different baseline blood pressures. The meta-analyses include patients with and without diabetes, with and without previous cardiovascular disease etc. Altogether, 58 trials with 290 000 patients were included. The study shows that the effect of blood pressure lowering on cardiovascular outcomes is dependent on baseline systolic blood pressure but also differ between different subsets of patients. This study is under review and the results will be presented during the lecture.

  • 9.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Proteinuria early in the development of hypertension2014Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 32, nr 12, s. 2351-2352Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    The challenge of preventing dementia by antihypertensive treatment2013Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, nr 9, s. 1780-1781Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    What do we know about the risks of stopping antihypertensive treatment?2014Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 32, nr 7, s. 1400-1401Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Charchar, Fadi J.
    et al.
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia; Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Prestes, Priscilla R.
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia.
    Mills, Charlotte
    Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom.
    Ching, Siew Mooi
    Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang; Department of Medical Sciences, School of Medical and Live Sciences, Sunway University, Bandar Sunway, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Neupane, Dinesh
    Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States.
    Marques, Francine Z.
    Hypertension Research Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University; Heart Failure Research Group, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, United Kingdom.
    Sharman, James E.
    Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
    Vogt, Liffert
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section Nephrology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Burrell, Louise M.
    Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila
    Department of Hypertension, Almazov National Medical Research Centre, St Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Zec, Manja
    School of Nutritional Sciences and Wellness, University of Arizona, Tucson, United States; Colorado Program for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, United States.
    Patil, Mansi
    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Asha Kiran JHC Hospital, Chinchwad; Hypertension and Nutrition, Core Group of IAPEN India, India.
    Schultz, Martin G.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section Nephrology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wallen, Matthew P.
    Caring Futures Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.
    Renna, Nicolás F
    Unit of Hypertension, Hospital Español de Mendoza, School of Medicine, National University of Cuyo, IMBECU-CONICET, Mendoza, Argentina.
    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful
    Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.
    Hiremath, Swapnil
    Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa and the Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada.
    Gyeltshen, Tshewang
    Graduate School of Public Health, St. Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Chia, Yook-Chin
    Department of Medical Sciences, School of Medical and Life Sciences, Sunway University, Selangor, Malaysia; Department of Primary Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Gupta, Abhinav
    Department of Medicine, Acharya Shri Chander College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Jammu, India.
    Schutte, Aletta E.
    School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, George Institute for Global Health, NSW, Sydney, Australia; Hypertension in Africa Research Team, SAMRC Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University; SAMRC Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Klein, Britt
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia.
    Borghi, Claudio
    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Browning, Colette J.
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia.
    Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, Marta
    School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing-Dental School, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom; Department of Periodontology, Prophylaxis and Oral Medicine; Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Lee, Hae-Young
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.
    Itoh, Hiroshi
    Department of Internal Medicine (Nephrology, Endocrinology and Metabolism), Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Miura, Katsuyuki
    NCD Epidemiology Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Campbell, Norm R. C.
    Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
    Akinnibossun, Olutope Arinola
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia.
    Veerabhadrappa, Praveen
    Kinesiology, Division of Science, Pennsylvania State University, PA, Reading, United States.
    Wainford, Richard D.
    Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, United States; Division of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, United States.
    Kruger, Ruan
    Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), North-West University, Potchefstroom; MRC Research Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
    Thomas, Shane A.
    Health Innovation and Transformation Centre, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia.
    Komori, Takahiro
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan.
    Ralapanawa, Udaya
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    Cornelissen, Véronique A.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kapil, Vikas
    William Harvey Research Institute, Centre for Cardiovascular Medicine and Devices, NIHR Barts Biomedical Research Centre, BRC, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University London; Barts BP Centre of Excellence, Barts Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Li, Yan
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
    Zhang, Yuqing
    Department of Cardiology, Fu Wai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Chinese Hypertension League, Beijing, China.
    Jafar, Tazeen H.
    Program in Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore; Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, NC, Durham, United States.
    Khan, Nadia
    Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Williams, Bryan
    University College London (UCL), Institute of Cardiovascular Science, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), UCL Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, United Kingdom.
    Stergiou, George
    Hypertension Centre STRIDE-7, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Biology and Health, University of Manchester; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Lifestyle management of hypertension: International Society of Hypertension position paper endorsed by the World Hypertension League and European Society of Hypertension2024Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 42, nr 1, s. 23-49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension, defined as persistently elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at least 90 mmHg (International Society of Hypertension guidelines), affects over 1.5 billion people worldwide. Hypertension is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (e.g. coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and death. An international panel of experts convened by the International Society of Hypertension College of Experts compiled lifestyle management recommendations as first-line strategy to prevent and control hypertension in adulthood. We also recommend that lifestyle changes be continued even when blood pressure-lowering medications are prescribed. Specific recommendations based on literature evidence are summarized with advice to start these measures early in life, including maintaining a healthy body weight, increased levels of different types of physical activity, healthy eating and drinking, avoidance and cessation of smoking and alcohol use, management of stress and sleep levels. We also discuss the relevance of specific approaches including consumption of sodium, potassium, sugar, fibre, coffee, tea, intermittent fasting as well as integrated strategies to implement these recommendations using, for example, behaviour change-related technologies and digital tools.

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  • 13. Chinali, Marcello
    et al.
    de Simone, Giovanni
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Gerdts, Eva
    Gardin, Julius M
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Nieminen, Markku S
    Papademetriou, Vasilios
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Devereux, Richard B
    Left atrial systolic force in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study.2008Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 26, nr 7, s. 1472-6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In hypertensive patients without prevalent cardiovascular disease, enhanced left atrial systolic force is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and increased preload. It also predicts cardiovascular events in a population with high prevalence of obesity. Relations between left atrial systolic force and left ventricular geometry and function have not been investigated in high-risk hypertrophic hypertensive patients. Participants in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension echocardiography substudy without prevalent cardiovascular disease or atrial fibrillation (n = 567) underwent standard Doppler echocardiography. Left atrial systolic force was obtained from the mitral orifice area and Doppler mitral peak A velocity. Patients were divided into groups with normal or increased left atrial systolic force (>14.33 kdyn). Left atrial systolic force was high in 297 patients (52.3%), who were older and had higher body mass index and heart rate (all P < 0.01) but similar systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in comparison with patients with normal left atrial systolic force. After controlling for confounders, increased left atrial systolic force was associated with larger left ventricular diameter and higher left ventricular mass index (both P < 0.01). Prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was greater (84 vs. 64%; P < 0.001). Participants with increased left atrial systolic force exhibited normal ejection fraction; higher stroke volume, cardiac output, transmitral peak E velocities and peak A velocities; and lower E/A ratio (all P < 0.01). Enhanced left atrial systolic force identifies hypertensive patients with greater left ventricular mass and prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy, but normal left ventricular chamber systolic function with increased transmitral flow gradient occurring during early filling, consistent with increased preload.

  • 14. Cicala, Silvana
    et al.
    de Simone, Giovanni
    Gerdts, Eva
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E
    Devereux, Richard B
    Are coronary revascularization and myocardial infarction a homogeneous combined endpoint in hypertension trials? The Losartan intervention for endpoint reduction in hypertension study2010Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 1134-1140Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Construction of prognostically relevant endpoints for clinical trials in hypertension has increasingly included coronary revascularization with myocardial infarction (MI) as manifestations of coronary artery disease. However, whether coronary revascularization and MI predict other cardiovascular events similarly is unknown.

     

    Methods: We examined risks of cardiovascular death, all-cause death, and stroke following MI or coronary revascularization in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) enrolled in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension study (LIFE). We studied 9113 patients after excluding those who died within 7 days after MI or underwent coronary revascularization within 24 h after MI.

     

    Results: In multivariate Cox regression adjusting for participating countries, time-varying systolic blood pressure, and Framingham risk score, hazard ratios for cardiovascular death, all-cause death, and stroke were, respectively, 4.5 (P < 0.0001), 2.9 (P < 0.0001), and 1.9 (P = 0.003) in 321 patients with MI as first event. In similar models, coronary revascularization as first event (n = 202) was not associated with increased risks of cardiovascular death, all-cause death, and stroke (P = 0.06–0.86).

     

    Conclusion: During follow-up of hypertensive patients with LVH, occurrence of MI but not coronary revascularization as first cardiovascular event significantly increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular death, all-cause death, and stroke. In view of differences in prognostic implications, when the goal is to have a prognostically relevant composite endpoint for trials in hypertensive patients, caution should be used in combining coronary revascularization with MI.

  • 15. Cicala, Silvana
    et al.
    de Simone, Giovanni
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Gerdts, Eva
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Nieminen, Markku S
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Devereux, Richard B
    Clinical impact of 'in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study2008Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 806-812Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular systolic wall motion abnormalities have prognostic value. Whether wall motion detected by serial echocardiographic examinations predicts prognosis in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without clinically recognized atherosclerotic disease has, however, never been investigated. We examined whether 'in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities predicted outcome in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint (LIFE) reduction in hypertension echocardiographic substudy.

    METHODS: We studied 749 patients without coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke history. Echocardiographic segmental wall motion abnormalities at baseline and annual re-evaluations ('as time-varying covariate') were examined in relation to endpoints (cardiovascular mortality, MI, stroke, and hospitalized heart failure). Adjusted Cox regression was used to analyze the primary composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke and, separately, for fatal and nonfatal MI and hospitalized heart failure.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, an event was recorded in 67 (9%) patients. In Cox models after adjusting for age, gender, treatment, blood pressure lowering, and serial change of left ventricular mass index, 'in-treatment' segmental wall motion abnormalities were associated with subsequent composite endpoint [hazard ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.8; P = 0.019] and MI [hazard ratio = 3.7 (1.5-8.9); P = 0.004].

    CONCLUSION: In hypertensive patients with LVH and no history of cardiovascular disease, 'in-treatment' left ventricular wall motion abnormalities are associated with increased likelihood of subsequent cardiovascular events independent of age, gender, blood pressure lowering, treatment modality, and in-treatment left ventricular mass index.

  • 16.
    Du Toit, Jacques D.
    et al.
    MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Kapaon, David
    Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States.
    Crowther, Nigel J.
    Department of Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand; Department of Chemical Pathology, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika
    Center for Health Decision Science, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston Massachusetts, United States.
    Fabian, June
    MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W.
    MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Wade, Alisha N.
    MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Tollman, Stephen M.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Gaziano, Thomas A.
    Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Estimating population level 24-h sodium excretion using spot urine samples in older adults in rural South Africa2023Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 41, nr 2, s. 280-287Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: South Africa has introduced regulations to reduce sodium in processed foods. Assessing salt consumption with 24-h urine collection is logistically challenging and expensive. We assess the accuracy of using spot urine samples to estimate 24-h urine sodium (24hrUNa) excretion at the population level in a cohort of older adults in rural South Africa.

    METHODS: 24hrUNa excretion was measured and compared to that estimated from matched spot urine samples in 399 individuals, aged 40-75 years, from rural Mpumalanga, South Africa. We used the Tanaka, Kawasaki, International Study of Sodium, Potassium, and Blood Pressure (INTERSALT), and Population Mean Volume (PMV) method to predict 24hrUNa at the individual and population level.

    RESULTS: The population median 24hrUNa excretion from our samples collected in 2017 was 2.6 g (interquartile range: 1.53-4.21) equal to an average daily salt intake of 6.6 g, whereas 65.4% of participants had a salt excretion above the WHO recommended 5 g/day. Estimated population median 24hrUNa derived from the INTERSALT, both with and without potassium, showed a nonsignificant difference of 0.25 g (P = 0.59) and 0.21 g (P = 0.67), respectively. In contrast, the Tanaka, Kawasaki, and PMV formulas were markedly higher than the measured 24hrUNa, with a median difference of 0.51 g (P = 0.004), 0.99 g (P = 0.00), and 1.05 g (P = 0.00) respectively. All formulas however performed poorly when predicting an individual's 24hrUNa.

    CONCLUSION: In this population, the INTERSALT formulas are a well suited and cost-effective alternative to 24-h urine collection for the evaluation of population median 24hrUNa excretion. This could play an important role for governments and public health agencies in evaluating local salt regulations and identifying at-risk populations.

  • 17. Edlinger, Michael
    et al.
    Strohmaier, Susanne
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Bjørge, Tone
    Manjer, Jonas
    Borena, Wegene T
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi.
    Engeland, Anders
    Tretli, Steinar
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Selmer, Randi
    Johansen, Dorthe
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study2012Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 30, nr 2, s. 290-296Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:: Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults. METHODS:: In the Me-Can project, 580 000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error. RESULTS:: During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n = 348) and high-grade glioma (n = 436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio = 1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio = 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP. CONCLUSION:: Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.

  • 18.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Self-rated ill-health strengthens the effect of biomedical risk factors in predicting stroke especially for men: An incident case referent study2003Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 21, nr 5, s. 887-896Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine how self-rated ill-health interacts with biomedical stroke risk factors in predicting stroke and to explore differences between men and women and educational groups. DESIGN: An incident case-referent study where the study subjects had participated in a prior health survey. SETTING: Nested within the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) and the Northern Sweden MONICA cohorts. SUBJECTS: The 473 stroke cases had two referents per case, matched for age, sex and residence, from the same study cohorts. RESULTS: Self-rated ill-health independently increased the risk of stroke, specifically for men. The interaction effect between self-rated health and biomedical risk factor load was greater for men than for women. The attributable proportion due to interaction between having a risk factor load of 2+ and self-rated ill-health was 42% for men and 15% for women. Better-educated individuals with self-rated ill-health and two or more of the biomedical risk factors had a higher risk of stroke than the less educated. Calculations of the respective contribution to the stroke cases of self-rated health, hypertension and smoking showed that self-rated ill-health had a role in 20% of the cases and could alone explain more than one-third of the cases among those who rated their health as bad, more so for men than for women. CONCLUSIONS: The results underscore the importance of including both a gender and a social perspective in discussing the role of self-rated health as a predictor of disease outcome. Physicians must be more gender sensitive when discussing their patient's own evaluation of health in relation to biomedical risk factors.

  • 19. Fagard, R H
    et al.
    Grassi, G
    Hall, J
    Harrap, S
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Schiffrin, E
    Heagerty, T
    International Society of Hypertension Low and Middle Income Countries Committee Review of the Goals of the Committee and of 5 years of ISH activities in Low and Middle Income Countries2010Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 635-636Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 20. Gueyffier, Francois
    et al.
    Marchant, Ivanny
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Modeling the impact of cardiovascular prevention strategies: toward better information for public health decisions2012Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 30, nr 1, s. 51-52Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Hedblad, B
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden .
    Melander, H
    Med Prod Agcy, Uppsala, Sweden .
    de Faire, U
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Kahan, T
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Beta blockers reduce left ventricular mass less than other antihypertensive drugs: a systematic review and meta analysis2009Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 27, nr Suppl. 4, s. s319-s319Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 22.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    Weidung, Bodil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Geriatrik.
    High blood pressure as a risk factor for incident stroke among very old people: a population-based cohort study2016Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 34, nr 10, s. 2059-2065Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: High blood pressure (BP) increases the risk of stroke, but there is limited evidence from studies including very old people. The aim was to investigate risk factors for incident stroke among very old people.

    METHODS: A prospective population-based cohort study was performed among participants aged at least 85 years in northern Sweden. The 955 participants were tested at their homes. BP was measured manually after 5-min supine rest. Incident stroke data were collected from medical charts guided by hospital registry, death records, and 5-year reassessments. Cox proportional hazards models were used.

    RESULTS: The stroke incidence was 33.8/1000 person-years (94 stroke events) during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years. In a comprehensive multivariate model, atrial fibrillation [hazard ratio 1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-3.19] and higher SBP (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.30 per 10-mmHg increase) were associated with incident stroke overall. However, higher SBP was not associated with incident stroke in participants with SBP less than 140 mmHg (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.53-1.53 per 10-mmHg increase). In additional multivariate models, DBP at least 90 mmHg (hazard ratio 2.45, 95% CI 1.47-4.08) and SBP at least 160 mmHg (vs. <140 mmHg; hazard ratio 2.80, 95% CI 1.53-5.14) were associated with incident stroke. The association between BP and incident stroke was not affected by interactions related to sex, dependence in activities of daily living, or cognitive impairment.

    CONCLUSION: High SBP (≥160 mmHg) and DBP (≥90 mmHg) and atrial fibrillation appeared to be risk factors for incident stroke among very old people.

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  • 23. Jardim, Thiago Veiga
    et al.
    Reiger, Sheridan
    Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika
    Gomez-Olive, F. Xavier
    Wagner, Ryan G.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Medical Research Council/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana; Africa Wits-INDEPTH Genomic Studies of Cardiovascular Disease, University of the Witwatersrand; Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Wade, Alisha
    Bärnighausen, Till W.
    Salomon, Joshua
    Tollman, Stephen
    Gaziano, Thomas A.
    Hypertension management in a population of older adults in rural South Africa2017Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 35, nr 6, s. 1283-1289Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Assess awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension, as an indication of its management, in rural South Africa, especially regarding modifiers of these variables. Methods: A population-representative sample of adults aged at least 40 years residing in the rural Agincourt subdistrict (Mpumalanga Province) covered by a long-term health and sociodemographic surveillance system was recruited. In-person interviews, physical exams, and dried blood spots were collected. Hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates were assessed. A regression model was built to identify predictors of those outcomes. Results: The mean age of the 2884 hypertensive participants was 64.1 +/- 12.7 years. Hypertension awareness rate was 64.4%, treatment among those aware was 89.3 and 45.8% of those treated were controlled. Considering aware and unaware hypertensives, treatment rate was 49.7% and control 22.8%. In the multivariable regression model, awareness was predicted by female sex, age at least 60 years, higher social economic status, prior cardiovascular disease (CVD), nonimmigrant status, literacy, and physical limitation. Improved control among those treated was predicted by age at least 60 years. Blood pressure control among all hypertensive study participants was predicted by female sex, being HIV-negative, age at least 60 years, nonimmigrant status, and prior CVD. Conclusion: High rates of awareness and treatment of hypertension as well as good levels of control were found in this population, probably explained by the long-term surveillance program conducted in the area. Considering the predictors of hypertension management, particular attention should be given to men, residents younger than 60 years, immigrants, and study participants without CVD as these characteristics were predictors of poor outcome.

  • 24.
    Kreutz, Reinhold
    et al.
    Charité - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Berlin, Germany.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Thomopoulos, Costas
    Department of Cardiology, Helena Venizelou Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Do recent meta-analyses truly prove that treatment with blood pressure-lowering drugs is beneficial at any blood pressure value, no matter how low?: A critical review2022Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 40, nr 5, s. 839-846Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Current European guidelines for the management of hypertension and on cardiovascular disease prevention place the threshold for pharmacological treatment at a SBP level of 140 mmHg or above, with the exception of patients at very high risk (mainly because of coronary heart disease). This is in agreement with the current definition of hypertension, that is, the level of blood pressure at which the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks of treatment, as documented by clinical trials. This rationale and definition was recently challenged by meta-analyses using individual participant-level data from 48 randomized trials by the Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Trialists' Collaboration (BPLTTC). The authors calculated for a fixed 5 mmHg pharmacological reduction of SBP an overall 10% risk reduction for major cardiovascular events. It was concluded that there was no reliable evidence of heterogeneity of treatment effects by baseline SBP categories; that the effect was independent from the presence of cardiovascular disease; applied also to old and very old individuals up to 84 years or beyond; and that BP-lowering was also beneficial in individuals with normal or high-normal SBP down to a baseline SBP less than 120 mmHg. In this report, we identify and discuss a number of shortcomings of the BPLTTC meta-analyses. In our view, the conclusions by the BPLTTC must be -together with accompanying suggestions to abandon the definition of hypertension - strongly rejected as they are not justified and may be harmful for cardiovascular health in individuals without hypertension.

  • 25.
    Kreutz, Reinhold
    et al.
    Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Thomopoulos, Costas
    Department of Cardiology, Helena Venizelou Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Prescribing blood pressure lowering drugs irrespective of blood pressure?2022Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 40, nr 5, s. 1050-1051Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26. Kruger, Ruan
    et al.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Burger, Dylan
    Charchar, Fadi
    Climie, Rachel
    Mirabito Colafella, Katrina M.
    Kempny, Pablo
    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila
    Marques, Francine Z.
    Picone, Dean
    Romero, Cesar
    Steckelings, Ulrike M.
    Velkoska, Elena
    Wainford, Richard
    Wynne, Brandi M.
    Zanuzzi, Matias G.
    Highlights from the International Society of Hypertension's new investigators network during 20192020Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 38, nr 5, s. 968-973Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The New Investigators Committee (NIC) of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH) is a dynamic group of junior doctors and scientists, actively involved in various society activities. This report highlights the events (scientific meetings and summer schools) and activities (social media, mentorship and networking) during 2019 including May Measurement Month and collaborative efforts with the ISH Women in Hypertension Research Committee (WiHRC). The ISH NIC is proud to sponsor awards for outstanding work by junior and emerging researchers at hypertension conferences and also provides opportunities to showcase their work on our social media features such as 'Our Fellows Work' and the New Investigator Spotlight of the month. In 2020, the ISH NIC aims to promote women in leadership roles and to foster strong collaborations with and between society committees and other scientific organizations.

  • 27. Le, Hai-Ha
    et al.
    Subtil, Fabien
    Cerou, Marc
    Marchant, Ivanny
    Al-Gobari, Muaamar
    Fall, Mor
    Mimouni, Yanis
    Kassai, Behrouz
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    Gueyffier, Francois
    A sudden death risk score specifically for hypertension: based on 25648 individual patient data from six randomized controlled trials2017Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 35, nr 11, s. 2178-2184Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To construct a sudden death risk score specifically for hypertension (HYSUD) patients with or without cardiovascular history. Methods: Data were collected from six randomized controlled trials of antihypertensive treatments with 8044 women and 17 604 men differing in age ranges and blood pressure eligibility criteria. In total, 345 sudden deaths (1.35%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 5.16 years. Risk factors of sudden death were examined using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model adjusted on trials. The model was transformed to an integer system, with points added for each factor according to its association with sudden death risk. Results: Antihypertensive treatment was not associated with a reduction of the sudden death risk and had no interaction with other factors, allowing model development on both treatment and placebo groups. A risk score of sudden death in 5 years was built with seven significant risk factors: age, sex, SBP, serum total cholesterol, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and history of myocardial infarction. In terms of discrimination performance, HYSUD model was adequate with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 77.74% (confidence interval 95%, 74.13-81.35) for the derivation set, of 77.46% (74.09-80.83) for the validation set, and of 79.17% (75.94-82.40) for the whole population. Conclusion: Our work provides a simple risk-scoring system for sudden death prediction in hypertension, using individual data from six randomized controlled trials of antihypertensive treatments. HYSUD score could help assessing a hypertensive individual's risk of sudden death and optimizing preventive therapeutic strategies for these patients.

  • 28. Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Larsson, Anders
    Johansson, Lars
    Kullberg, Joel
    Ahlstrom, Hakan
    Sundstrom, Johan
    On the association between body fat and left ventricular mass2019Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 37, nr 8, s. 1699-1704Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: As intervention studies have shown a reduction in body weight to be paralleled with a reduction in left ventricular mass (LVM), we quantified a hypothesized causal relationship between fat mass and LVM, and how much of these effects that was mediated by blood pressure (BP), diabetes and adipokines. Also visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT) were explored in the same fashion.

    Methods: In the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study (n = 1016, 50% women, all aged 70 years), LVM was measured by echocardiography (indexed for lean mass, LVMI), fat and lean mass by dual-energy X-ray. VAT and SAT were measured by abdominal MRI (in n = 275).

    Results: In a structural equation model adjusting for sex, the total effect of fat mass on LVMI was large (standardized coefficient 0.280, P = 3.2 × 10−15, 95% confidence interval 0.210–0.349). Out of the total effect of fat mass on LVMI, 29.0% was mediated by BP and glucose (P = 2.4 × 10−12). The BP pathway was most important, mediating 24.4% of the total effect of fat mass on LVMI (P = 4.6 × 10−7), while the glucose pathway accounted for 4.6% (P = 0.033). The association of VAT with LVMI (0.202, P = 2.4 × 10−4) was slightly weaker than that of SAT with LVMI (0.283, P = 1.0 × 10−6). Of several measured adipokines, leptin was a significant mediator of the effect of fat mass on LVMI (P = 3.0 × 10−3).

    Conclusion: One-third of the hypothesized association between body fat and LVMI was mediated by BP and glucose in this population-based cohort. Leptin was also an important mediator. Visceral adipose tissue was not more closely related to LVMI than subcutaneous abdominal fat.

  • 29.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Black, HR
    NYU, Sch Med, New York, NY USA .
    Bakris, GL
    Univ Chicago, Dept Med, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Linas, SL
    Univ Colorado, Hlth Sci Ctr, Denver, CO USA .
    Krum, H
    Monash Ctr Cardiovasc Res & Educ, Melbourne, Vic Australia.
    Weiss, R
    Androscoggin Cardiol Associates, Auburn, AL USA .
    Linseman, JV
    Gilead Colorado Inc, Boulder, CO USA .
    Wiens, BL
    Gilead Colorado Inc, Boulder, CO USA .
    Warren, MS
    Gilead Colorado Inc, Boulder, CO USA .
    Weber, M
    Suny Downstate Med Ctr, Brooklyn, NY 11203 USA .
    Darusentan lowers blood pressure significant on top of multi-drug treatment in patients with resistant hypertension2009Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 27, nr Suppl. 4, s. s167-s168Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 30. Lindholm, Lars H
    et al.
    Persson, Mats
    Alaupovic, Petar
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Svensson, Anders
    Samuelsson, Ola
    Metabolic outcome during 1 year in newly detected hypertensives: results of the Antihypertensive Treatment and Lipid Profile in a North of Sweden Efficacy Evaluation (ALPINE study).2003Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 21, nr 8, s. 1563-74Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the Antihypertensive Treatment and Lipid Profile in a North of Sweden Efficacy Evaluation study was to compare the long-term effect of the commonly used inexpensive medication with a low-dose diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide), alone or in combination with a beta-adrenoceptor (atenolol), with that of more modern but also more expensive antihypertensive treatment with an angiotensin-II-receptor blocker (candesartan), alone or in combination with a calcium antagonist (felodipine), and to do so in newly diagnosed patients with primary hypertension. The objectives included comparisons of the effects on the glucose metabolism, lipoprotein metabolism, electrolytes, blood pressure, and subjective symptoms.

    DESIGN: A 1-year, prospective randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    SUBJECTS: In an investigator-initiated study, we included 392 patients (mean age 55 years, 48% men); 370 patients (94%) had never been treated with antihypertensive drugs before the study. No patient was lost to follow-up.

    RESULTS: Both treatment regimens lowered blood pressure well (23/13 mmHg in the hydrochlorothiazide group and 21/13 mmHg in the candesartan group), with a majority of patients needing two drugs. Fasting levels of both serum insulin and plasma glucose increased in the hydrochlorothiazide group in contrast to unaffected levels in the candesartan group. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in nine patients during follow-up, in eight patients in the hydrochlorothiazide group (4.1%) and in one patient (0.5%) in the candesartan group (P = 0.030). Triglycerides increased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased more in the hydrochlorothiazide group than in the candesartan group. Both the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein and the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratios increased in the hydrochlorothiazide group. At 12 months, 18 patients in the hydrochlorothiazide group versus five in the candesartan group had a 'metabolic syndrome', as defined by the World Health Organization (P = 0.007) despite 1 year of active blood pressure-lowering therapy. There were less (P = 0.020) adverse events in the candesartan group, but no major differences in the subjective symptoms assessment profile. One subject in each group had a myocardial infarction.

    CONCLUSION: Antihypertensive treatment with a diuretic, if needed combined with a beta-adrenoceptor blocker, was associated with an aggravated metabolic profile; this was not so for patients treated with an angiotensin-II-receptor blocker, if needed combined with a calcium antagonist. An antihypertensive treatment strategy that costs more in the short run but has no metabolic adverse effects may have a health economic impact in the long term.

  • 31. Lonnebakken, Mai T.
    et al.
    Gerdts, Eva
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Dahlof, Bjorn
    Devereux, Richard B.
    In-treatment stroke volume predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertension2011Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 29, nr 8, s. 1508-1514Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate whether lower stroke volume during antihypertensive treatment is a predictor of cardiovascular events independent of left ventricular geometric pattern. Methods The association between left ventricular stroke volume and combined cardiovascular death, stroke and myocardial infarction, the prespecified primary study endpoint, was assessed in Cox regression analysis using data from baseline and annual follow-up visits in 855 patients during 4.8 years of randomized losartan-based or atenolol-based treatment in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) echocardiography substudy. Results During follow-up, a total of 91 primary endpoints occurred. At baseline, lower left ventricular stroke volume was associated with smaller body size, female sex, lower left ventricular mass and stress-corrected midwall shortening, higher relative wall thickness and total peripheral resistance, more concentric left ventricular geometry and impaired diastolic relaxation (all P<0.01). Baseline stroke volume did not predict outcome. However, in time-varying multivariable Cox regression analysis, lower in-treatment left ventricular stroke volume indexed for height(2.04) was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events {hazard ratio 1.69 per 1 SD (6 ml/m(2.04)) lower stroke volume [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-2.11], P<0.001} independent of in-treatment left ventricular mass and concentric geometry and in a secondary model also independent of stress-corrected midwall shortening, impaired diastolic relaxation, heart rate, new-onset atrial fibrillation and study treatment [hazard ratio 1.46 per 1 SD (6 ml/m(2.04)) lower stroke volume (95% CI 1.13-1.88)]. Conclusion Assessment of in-treatment left ventricular stroke volume may reflect cardiac and vascular remodeling and impairment and, hence, adds information on cardiovascular risk in treated hypertensive patients beyond assessment of left ventricular structure alone. 

  • 32. Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    De Backer, Guy
    Dominiczak, Anna
    Cifkova, Renata
    Fagard, Robert
    Germano, Giuseppe
    Grassi, Guido
    Heagerty, Anthony M
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E
    Laurent, Stephane
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Ruilope, Luis
    Rynkiewicz, Andrzej
    Schmieder, Roland E
    Boudier, Harry A J Struijker
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    Vahanian, Alec
    Camm, John
    De Caterina, Raffaele
    Dean, Veronica
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Funck-Brentano, Christian
    Hellemans, Irene
    Kristensen, Steen Dalby
    McGregor, Keith
    Sechtem, Udo
    Silber, Sigmund
    Tendera, Michal
    Widimsky, Petr
    Zamorano, José Luis
    Erdine, Serap
    Kiowski, Wolfgang
    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico
    Ambrosioni, Ettore
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico
    Ambrosioni, Ettore
    Bertomeu, Vicente
    Clement, Denis
    Erdine, Serap
    Farsang, Csaba
    Gaita, Dan
    Lip, Gregory
    Mallion, Jean-Michel
    Manolis, Athanasios J
    Nilsson, Peter M
    O'Brien, Eoin
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Redon, Josep
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Tamargo, Juan
    van Zwieten, Pieter
    Waeber, Bernard
    Williams, Bryan
    2007 Guidelines for the Management of Arterial Hypertension: The Task Force for the Management of Arterial Hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).2007Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 25, nr 6, s. 1105-87Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 33.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Kreutz, Reinhold
    Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Berlin, Germany.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Burnier, Michel
    Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Grassi, Guido
    Clinica Medica, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Department of Hypertension, National Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland.
    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza
    ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Tsioufis, Konstantinos
    First Department of Cardiology, Medical School, University of Athens, Hippokration Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Italy.
    Algharably, Engi Abd Elhady
    Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Berlin, Germany.
    Azizi, Michel
    Université Paris Cité, Paris, France; AP-HP Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, Hypertension Department and DMU CARTE; INSERM, Paris, United States.
    Benetos, Athanase
    CHRU-Nancy, Department of Geriatric Medicine and INSERM DCAC, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France.
    Borghi, Claudio
    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences-IRCCS AOU S. Orsola di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Hitij, Jana Brguljan
    University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Hypertension, Medical University Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cifkova, Renata
    Center for Cardiovascular Prevention, Thomayer University Hospital; Department of Medicine II, Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Coca, Antonio
    Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Cornelissen, Veronique
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Cruickshank, J Kennedy
    King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Cunha, Pedro G.
    Center for the Research and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Senhora da Oliveira, Guimarães/Minho University; Life and Health Science Research Institute (ICVS), School of Medicine, University of Minho; ICVS/3B's - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal.
    Danser, A H Jan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Pinho, Rosa Maria de
    Family and general practitioner, São João da Madeira, Portugal.
    Delles, Christian
    School of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Dominiczak, Anna F.
    Regius Professor of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Dorobantu, Maria
    University of Medicine and Pharmacy 'Carol Davila', Romanian Academy, Romania.
    Doumas, Michalis
    2nd Prop Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Fernández-Alfonso, María S
    Instituto Pluridisciplinar and Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain.
    Halimi, Jean-Michel
    Service de Néphrologie-Hypertension, Transplantation Rénale, CHRU Tours; Equipe d'Accueil EA4245, Université de Tours; INI-CRCT, Tours, France.
    Járai, Zoltán
    South-Buda Center Hospital St. Imre University Hospital, Budapest & Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Jelaković, Bojan
    Dept for Nephrology, Hypertension, Dialysis and Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Jordan, Jens
    Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center; Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Kuznetsova, Tatiana
    Research Unit Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, KU Leuven, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Laurent, Stephane
    Paris-Cité University, Paris, France.
    Lovic, Dragan
    Singidunum University, Clinic for internal Disease Intermedica Cardiology Department, Hypertension Centre, Nis, Serbia.
    Lurbe, Empar
    Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Valencia, Spain; Biomedical Research Networking Center for Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain; University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
    Mahfoud, Felix
    Cardiology, Angiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Saarland University Hospital and Saarland University, Homburg, Germany; Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, Cambridge, United States.
    Manolis, Athanasios
    Metropolitan Hospital, Greece.
    Miglinas, Marius
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University; Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Klinikos, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Narkiewicz, Krzystof
    Department of Hypertension and Diabetology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Niiranen, Teemu
    Department of Internal Medicine, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Palatini, Paolo
    Studium Patavinum, Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Parati, Gianfranco
    IRCCS, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Ospedale San Luca; Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Pathak, Atul
    Princess Grace Hospital Monaco (Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco.
    Persu, Alexandre
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc and Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
    Polonia, Jorge
    CINTESIS; Faculty of Medicine of Porto, Portugal.
    Redon, Josep
    Biomedical Research Networking Center for Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain; Incliva Research Institute, University of Valencia; CIBEROBN, Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
    Sarafidis, Pantelis
    1st Department of Nephrology, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Schmieder, Roland
    University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen/Nürnberg, Germany.
    Spronck, Bart
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Stabouli, Stella
    First Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Hippokratio Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Stergiou, George
    Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Taddei, Stefano
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Thomopoulos, Costas
    Department of Cardiology, Helena Venizelou Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Biology and Health, University of Manchester; Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Van de Borne, Philippe
    Department of Cardiology, Brussels, Belgium.
    Wanner, Christoph
    Division of Nephrology, Wuerzburg University Clinic, Wuerzburg, Germany.
    Weber, Thomas
    Cardiology Department, Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen, Wels, Austria.
    Williams, Bryan
    Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London (UCL); National Institute for Health Research UCL Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
    Zhang, Zhen-Yu
    Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Departments of Cardiology and Nephrology, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    2023 ESH guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension the task force for the management of arterial hypertension of the European society of hypertension: endorsed by the international society of hypertension (ISH) and the European renal association (ERA)2023Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 41, nr 12, s. 1874-2071Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 34. Mendis, Shanthi
    et al.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    Whitworth, Judith
    Alderman, Michael
    Lim, Stephen
    Heagerty, Tony
    World Health Organization (WHO) and International Society of Hypertension (ISH) risk prediction charts: assessment of cardiovascular risk for prevention and control of cardiovascular disease in low and middle-income countries.2007Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 25, nr 8, s. 1578-82Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Möllsten, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Genetic polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin system confer increased risk of stroke independently of blood pressure: a nested case-control study.2008Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 26, nr 7, s. 1367-1372Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The renin-angiotensin system has a pathophysiological role in cardiovascular disease through a variety of processes. Polymorphisms in involved genes have been described and implicated in stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate two polymorphisms in two genes in the renin-angiotensin system and the risk of stroke. DESIGN: A nested case-control study using baseline data obtained from population-based surveys in northern Sweden was performed. There were 275 individuals without major concomitant disease who suffered a first ever stroke during follow-up and 549 controls matched for age, sex and domicile. METHODS: Blood samples obtained at baseline were analyzed for potential risk factors including the A1166C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) gene and the functional insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene. RESULTS: Individuals with the AA genotype of the AT1R gene were at increased risk of ischemic stroke (odds ratio = 1.60; P = 0.005) compared with those with the AC and CC genotypes. The D allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism was associated with a higher risk of stroke (odds ratio = 1.58; P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: In this prospective study, there was an association between A1166C polymorphism in the angiotensin II receptor gene and ischemic stroke. We also replicated previous observations that the D allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism was associated with increased risk of stroke. The observed elevated stroke risks conferred by these two polymorphisms are independent of each other and common risk factors such as blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and high cholesterol levels.

  • 36. Nyamdorj, Regzedmaa
    et al.
    Qiao, Qing
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Kardiologi.
    Pitkäniemi, Janne
    Zimmet, Paul
    Shaw, Jonathan
    Alberti, George
    Nan, Hairong
    Uusitalo, Ulla
    Pauvaday, Vassen
    Chitson, Pierrot
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Comparison of body mass index with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist-to-stature ratio as a predictor of hypertension incidence in Mauritius.2008Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 26, nr 5, s. 866-870Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 37. Okin, Peter M.
    et al.
    Hille, Darcy A.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Digoxin use and risk of mortality in hypertensive patients with atrial fibrillation2015Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 33, nr 7, s. 1480-1486Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Digoxin is widely used for rate control of atrial fibrillation. However, recent studies have reported conflicting results on the association of digoxin with mortality when used in patients with atrial fibrillation. Moreover, the relationship of digoxin use to mortality in hypertensive patients with atrial fibrillation has not been examined.

    Methods and results: All-cause mortality was examined in relation to in-treatment digoxin use in 937 hypertensive patients with ECG left ventricular hypertrophy in atrial fibrillation at baseline (n = 134) or who developed atrial fibrillation during follow-up (n = 803), randomly assigned to losartan or atenolol-based treatment, in post-hoc analysis of a substudy of the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint Reduction in hypertension (LIFE) trial. During 4.7 ± 1.1 years of mean follow-up, 167 patients died (17.8%) and 372 (39.7%) were treated with digoxin. In univariate Cox analyses, in-treatment digoxin use, entered as a time-varying covariate, was associated with a 61% higher risk of dying (hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.19, P = 0.003). After adjusting for other univariate predictors of death in this population, including age, diabetes, history of ischemic heart disease, stroke, or heart failure, baseline Cornell product, QRS duration, heart rate, serum glucose, creatinine and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a propensity score for digoxin use entered as standard covariates, and for in-treatment heart rate, pulse pressure, and Sokolow–Lyon voltage treated as time-varying covariates, digoxin use was no longer a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.73–1.48, P = 0.839).

    Conclusion: In hypertensive patients with ECG left ventricular hypertrophy with existing or new atrial fibrillation, digoxin use is not associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for other independent predictors of death and for the factors associated with the propensity to use digoxin in this population. These findings suggest that factors other than digoxin use may account for the increased mortality found with digoxin use in some studies.

  • 38. Olsen, Michael H.
    et al.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Ibsen, Hans
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Omvik, Per
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Dahlof, Bjorn
    Okin, Peter M.
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Changes in subclinical organ damage vs. in Framingham risk score for assessing cardiovascular risk reduction during continued antihypertensive treatment: a LIFE substudy2011Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 29, nr 5, s. 997-1004Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate whether in-treatment measurements of subclinical organ damage (SOD) assessed by elevated urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) or electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy improved the prediction of the composite cardiovascular endpoint of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke beyond in-treatment Framingham risk score (FRS).

    Methods: Excluding patients with a composite cardiovascular endpoint within the first year of treatment, 598 endpoints occurred in 6460 patients from the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study with baseline and 1 year values for UACR, left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiography and FRS available.

    Results: Using Cox-regression analyses, FRS1year [hazard ratio = 1.006 (0.98-1.04)] did not predict the endpoint independently of history of cardiovascular disease [hazard ratio = 1.76 (1.49-2.08)], FRSbaseline [hazard ratio = 1.07 (1.04-1.11)], UACR(baseline) [hazard ratio = 1.15 (1.07-1.23), all three P < 0.001], Sokolow-Lyon(baseline) [hazard ratio = 1.01 (1.006-1.02), P < 0.01] and treatment allocation, whereas Cornell product(1yea)r [hazard ratio = 1.01 (1.006-1.02), P < 0.001] and to some degree UACR(1year) [hazard ratio = 1.05 (0.99-1.10), P = 0.09] predicted the endpoint independently of history of cardiovascular disease [hazard ratio = 1.71 (1.44-2.02)], FRSbaseline [hazard ratio = 1.08 (1.06-1.10)], Sokolow-Lyon(baseline) [hazard ratio = 1.01 (1.007-1.02), both P < 0.001], UACR(baseline) [hazard ratio = 1.11 (1.03-1.20), P < 0.01] and treatment allocation decreasing -2 Log likelihood significantly (P < 0.01).Presence of left ventricular hypertrophy by Cornell product1year or UACR(1year) at least 1 mmol/l [hazard ratio = 1.40 (1.15-1.70), P = 0.001] but not FRS1year above the median baseline value of 20 [hazard ratio = 1.22 (0.94-1.57), not significant] was associated with higher risk of subsequent endpoint after adjustment for history of cardiovascular disease [hazard ratio = 1.82 (1.54-2.15)], FRSbaseline at least 20 [hazard ratio = 1.67 (1.30-2.16)], left ventricular hypertrophy by Sokolow-Lyonbaseline or UACR(baseline) at least 1 mmol/l [hazard ratio = 1.61 (1.33-1.94), all P < 0.001] and treatment allocation [hazard ratio = 0.93 (0.79-1.09), not significant]. In contrast to FRS1year at least 20 decreased, SOD1year decreased -2Log likelihood significantly (P < 0.01).

    Conclusion: Cornell product(1year) and UACR(1year) improved in contrast to FRS1year risk prediction based on FRSbaseline, Sokolow-Lyon(baseline) and UACR(baseline) significantly in LIFE patients during antihypertensive treatment.

  • 39.
    Olsen, Michael Hecht
    et al.
    Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Beevers, Gareth
    City Hospital, Birmingham, UK.
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden.
    de Simone, Giovanni
    Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Devereux, Richard B
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City, New York, USA.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fyhrquist, Frej
    Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ibsen, Hans
    Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E
    Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Lederballe-Pedersen, Ole
    Viborg Hospital, Viborg, Denmark.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Lyle, Paulette A
    Merck Research Laboratories, North Wales, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Nieminen, Markku S
    Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Omvik, Per
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Oparil, Suzanne
    University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.
    Wedel, Hans
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of losartan compared with atenolol on lipids in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy: the losartan intervention for endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study2009Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 567-574Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Beta-blockers and angiotensin II receptor blockers have different effects on lipids.

    Methods: We examined lipid levels in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension study and their impact on the primary composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. We measured total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at baseline and annually during 4.8 years of losartan-based compared with atenolol-based treatment in 8611 patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Results: Patients randomized to losartan-based or atenolol-based treatment had similar baseline total (6.04 ± 1.12 vs. 6.05 ± 1.13 mmol/l, NS) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (1.50 ± 0.44 vs. 1.49 ± 0.44 mmol/l, NS). Total cholesterol decreased significantly but equally (-0.37 ± 1.05 vs. -0.34 ± 1.09 mmol/l, NS), whereas HDL cholesterol decreased less during the first 2 years in patients randomized to losartan compared with atenolol (-0.13 ± 0.24 vs. -0.19 ± 0.25 mmol/l) and remained higher each year (1.38, 1.37, 1.42, 1.47, and 1.48 mmol/l vs. 1.32, 1.30, 1.36, 1.40, and 1.42 mmol/l, all P < 0.001) independent of hydrochlorothiazide or statin treatment. In Cox regression analysis, baseline total cholesterol [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.08 (1.02–1.14) per mmol/l, P < 0.01], HDL cholesterol [HR = 0.56 (0.48–0.66) per mmol/l, P < 0.001], and treatment allocation [HR = 0.86 (0.76–0.98), P < 0.05] predicted composite endpoint independently. Using time-varying analyses, the predictive strength of HDL cholesterol was increased [HR = 0.36 (0.30–0.44) per mmol/l, P < 0.001], whereas that of total cholesterol [HR = 1.03 (0.97–1.09) per mmol/l, NS] and treatment allocation [HR = 0.91 (0.80–1.03), NS] were reduced.

    Conclusion: Losartan blunted the decrease in HDL cholesterol during antihypertensive treatment in the LIFE study. Higher intreatment HDL cholesterol was associated with fewer composite endpoints and may partly explain the better outcome of losartan-based treatment.

  • 40.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Mjörndal, Tom
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Klinisk farmakologi.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Bohlin, Jens
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för datavetenskap.
    Lindholm, Lars Hjalmar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    1999 WHO/ISH Guidelines applied to a 1999 MONICA sample from northern Sweden2002Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 20, s. 29-35Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background : Treating hypertension with drugs is so far the most cost-effective way to reduce this important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is, however, important to determine absolute risk, and thereby estimate indication for drug treatment, in order to maintain a cost-effective drug treatment. WHO/ISH Hypertension Guidelines from 1999 propose a risk stratification for estimating absolute risk for CVD based on blood pressure and additional risk factors, target organ damage (TOD) and CVD. Objectives : We studied the consequences of applying the recent WHO/ISH risk stratification scheme to a MONICA sample of 6000 subjects from a geographically defined population in northern Sweden, regarding indications for treatment, target blood pressure and risk distribution. Methods : We have risk-classified each of these patients using a computer program, according to the WHO/ISH scheme. Data on TOD were not available. Results : In all, 917 (15%) had drug-treated hypertension. Three-quarters (n = 737) were inadequately treated, with blood pressure levels at or above 140 or 90 mmHg. 1773 (30% of 5997) untreated subjects had a blood pressure of 140/90 or above; 16% in the low-, 62% in the medium-, 8% in the high-, and 14% in the very-high-risk group. The corresponding risk-group pattern for the inadequately treated hypertensives (n = 737) was 5.5, 48.3, 11.1 and 35.2%, respectively. If we shifted the target blood pressure from below 140/90 to below 130/85 for drug-treated subjects under 60 (n = 278) the number of inadequately treated subjects increased by 34 (12.2% of 278); 14 in the low-risk group, 15 in the medium-risk group, and only five in the high- or very-high-risk groups. Conclusions : Only one-fifth of the drug-treated hypertensives were well controlled. Moreover, the incidence of newly detected blood pressure elevation was high. The majority of younger subjects with high blood pressure had low risk, but in those aged 45-54 this had already risen to a medium risk. Changing the target blood pressure to below 130/85, for subjects aged below 60, as recommended by WHO/ISH, affects predominantly low- and medium-risk groups.

  • 41.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Doctors' estimation of cardiovascular risk and willingness to give drug treatment in hypertension: fair risk assessment but defensive treatment policy2004Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 65-71Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 42.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Nilsson, Leif
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematik och matematisk statistik.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Lindholm, Lars Hjalmar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Risk stratification by guidelines compared to tisk assessment by risk equations applied to a MONICA sample2003Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 21, nr 6, s. 1089-1095Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) Hypertension Guidelines from 1999 propose a risk stratification scheme for estimating absolute risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Risk equations estimated by statistical methods are another way of predicting cardiovascular risk. Objective: We studied the differences between these two approaches when applied to the same set of individuals with high blood pressure. Design and methods: The two northernmost counties in Sweden (NSW) constitute one of the centres in the WHO MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) Project. Three population surveys have been carried out in 1986, 1990 and 1994, and were used to estimate a risk equation for predicting the 10-year risk of fatal/non-fatal stroke and myocardial infarction. Another MONICA sample from 1999, a total of 5997 subjects, was classified according to the recent WHO/ISH risk stratification scheme. A risk assessment was also performed, by using the risk equations from the NSW MONICA sample and Framingham risk equations. Results: The agreement between the two methods was good when the values obtained from the risk equation were averaged for each risk group obtained from the risk classification by guidelines. However, if the predicted risk for each individual was considered, the agreement was poor for the medium and high-risk groups. Although the average risk for all individuals is the same, many subjects have a higher risk or a lower risk than predicted by guidelines. Conclusions: Risk classification by the 1999 WHO/ISH Hypertension Guidelines is not accurate and detailed enough for medium- and high-risk patients, which could be of clinical importance in the medium risk group.

  • 43. Ruwald, Anne Christine H.
    et al.
    Westergaard, Bo
    Sehestedt, Thomas
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Lindholm, Lars H.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Ibsen, Hans
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Dahlof, Bjorn
    Olsen, Michael H.
    Losartan versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment reduces cardiovascular events especially well in elderly patients: the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study2012Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 30, nr 6, s. 1252-1259Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study has previously demonstrated a beneficial effect of losartan compared to atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment in patients with essential hypertension and left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). However, patient age often influences the choice of antihypertensive drugs. Therefore, we investigated the influence of age on the effects of losartan versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment. Methods: A total of 9193 hypertensive patients with LVH aged 45-83 years were followed for a mean of 4.8 years. Blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), Sokolow-Lyon voltage, Cornell voltage-duration product and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) were measured yearly throughout the study. Patients were divided into two age groups according to the median age of 67 years and the effects of losartan versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment on the primary composite endpoint (CEP) consisting of cardiovascular death, nonfatal stroke or nonfatal myocardial infarction were investigated. Results: The beneficial effect of losartan versus atenolol-based treatment was greater in the group of patients older than 67 years [hazard ratio 0.79 (0.69-0.91), P=0.001] compared to the group of patients younger than 67 years [hazard ratio 1.03 (0.82-1.28), P=0809], P=0.045 for interaction. The beneficial effects of losartan versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment on pulse pressure, HDL-C, UACR, and Cornell and Sokolow-Lyon voltage were not more pronounced in patients older than 67 years compared to patients younger than 67 years. All five risk factors considered as time-varying covariates predicted CEP independently (P<0.01) with the exception of pulse pressure (P=0.37) and the interaction between age and treatment on outcome remained significant (P=0.042). Conclusions: We showed a greater beneficial effect of losartan versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment in the group of patients older than 67 years compared to the group of patients younger than 67 years. This difference was not explained by a more pronounced effect of losartan-based treatment on any of the cardiovascular risk factors demonstrated to have independent prognostic importance.

  • 44.
    Stergiou, George
    et al.
    Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    MacDonald, Thomas
    Director of MEMO Research, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, University of Dundee, United Kingdom.
    Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos G.
    Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Bursztyn, Michael
    Hypertension Clinic, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine D, Beilinson Hospital, Israel.
    Khan, Nadia
    Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Center for Health Evaluation and Outcomes Sciences, Vancouver, Canada.
    Bakris, George
    Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medicine, IL, Chicago, United States.
    Kollias, Anastasios
    Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Menti, Ariadni
    Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Muntner, Paul
    School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, Birmingham, United States.
    Orias, Marcelo
    Yale University, CT, New Haven, United States.
    Poulter, Neil
    Imperial Clinical Trials Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Stadium House, London, United Kingdom.
    Shimbo, Daichi
    Columbia Hypertension Center and Lab, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, NY, United States.
    Williams, Bryan
    Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Adeoye, Abiodun Moshood
    Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomic Research Unit, Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Damasceno, Albertino
    Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique.
    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila
    Almazov National Medical Research Centre, St Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Li, Yan
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai Key Lab of Hypertension, National Research Centre for Translational Medicine, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
    Muxfeldt, Elizabeth
    , Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Zhang, Yuqing
    Department of Cardiology, Fu Wai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Kreutz, Reinhold
    Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Berlin, Germany.
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Biology and Health, University of Manchester; Manchester Heart Centre and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Bedtime dosing of antihypertensive medications: systematic review and consensus statement: International Society of Hypertension position paper endorsed by World Hypertension League and European Society of Hypertension2022Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 40, nr 10, s. 1847-1858Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Antihypertensive drug therapy is one of the most efficient medical interventions for preventing disability and death globally. Most of the evidence supporting its benefits has been derived from outcome trials with morning dosing of medications. Accumulating evidence suggests an adverse prognosis associated with night-time hypertension, nondipping blood pressure (BP) profile and morning BP surge, with increased incidence of cardiovascular events during the first few morning hours. These observations provide justification for complete 24-h BP control as being the primary goal of antihypertensive treatment. Bedtime administration of antihypertensive drugs has also been proposed as a potentially more effective treatment strategy than morning administration. This Position Paper by the International Society of Hypertension reviewed the published evidence on the clinical relevance of the diurnal variation in BP and the timing of antihypertensive drug treatment, aiming to provide consensus recommendations for clinical practice. Eight published outcome hypertension studies involved bedtime dosing of antihypertensive drugs, and all had major methodological and/or other flaws and a high risk of bias in testing the impact of bedtime compared to morning treatment. Three ongoing, well designed, prospective, randomized controlled outcome trials are expected to provide high-quality data on the efficacy and safety of evening or bedtime versus morning drug dosing. Until that information is available, preferred use of bedtime drug dosing of antihypertensive drugs should not be routinely recommended in clinical practice. Complete 24-h control of BP should be targeted using readily available, long-acting antihypertensive medications as monotherapy or combinations administered in a single morning dose.

  • 45. Sundström, Johan
    et al.
    Lind, Lars
    Lampa, Erik
    Angerås, Oskar
    Bachus, Erasmus
    Bergström, Göran
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Engvall, Jan E.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Gigante, Bruna
    Hagström, Emil
    Hjelmgren, Ola
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Mannila, Maria
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Persson, Margaretha
    Sandström, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Swahn, Eva
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Torén, Kjell
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Rosengren, Annika
    Weight gain and blood pressure2020Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 38, nr 3, s. 387-394Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Although the causality of the obesity–hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.

    METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.

    RESULTS: On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) kg/year for men and women. Both weight at age 20 years and weight at the mid-life examination were associated with mid-life blood pressures. On average, a 10 kg weight increase between age 20 years and mid-life was associated with 2.2 (95% CI 0.9-3.5) mmHg higher systolic and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in men, and 3.2 (2.5-4.0) mmHg higher systolic and 2.4 (1.9-2.9) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in women. Mid-life weight was more closely associated than weight at age 20 years with mid-life blood pressure. For a given mid-life weight, blood pressure was higher in persons with higher weight gain from age 20 years.

    CONCLUSION: In sum, weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life was associated with higher mid-life blood pressure. The magnitude of the association indicates a potentially great public health impact of strategies to prevent weight gain throughout adulthood.

  • 46. Teo, Koon K.
    et al.
    Sleight, Peter
    Gao, Peggy
    Yusuf, Salim
    Connolly, Stuart
    Swedberg, Karl
    Pfeffer, Marc A.
    Granger, Christopher B.
    McMurray, John J. V.
    Sjoelie, Anne K.
    Massie, Barry M.
    Carson, Peter
    Lewis, Julia B.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Dahlof, Bjorn
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Julius, Stevo
    Ibsen, Hans
    Lindholm, Lars H.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Olsen, Michael H.
    Okin, Peter M.
    Califf, Robert
    Holman, Rury R.
    Haffner, Steven M.
    Dagenais, Gilles
    Probstfield, Jeffrey
    Anderson, Craig
    Diaz, Rafael
    Dans, Antonio
    Levine, Mark
    Unger, Thomas
    Fagard, Robert
    Diener, Hans-Christoph
    Sacco, Ralph L.
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    Cohn, Jay N.
    Weber, Michael
    Effects of telmisartan, irbesartan, valsartan, candesartan, and losartan on cancers in 15 trials enrolling 138 769 individuals The ARB Trialists Collaboration2011Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 623-635Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, but a recent meta-analysis of selected studies suggested that ARBs may increase cancer risks.

    Objective Candesartan, irbesartan, telmisartan, valsartan, and losartan were assessed for incident cancers in 15 large parallel long-term multicenter double-blind clinical trials of these agents involving 138 769 participants.

    Patients and methods Individuals at high CVD risk were randomized to telmisartan (three trials, n=51 878), irbesartan (three trials, n=14 859), valsartan (four trials, n=44 264), candesartan (four trials, n=18 566), and losartan (one trial, n=9193) and followed for 23-60 months. Incident cancer cases were compared in patients randomized to ARBs versus controls. In five trials (n=42 403), the ARBs were compared to ACEi and in 11 trials (n=63 313) to controls without ACEi. In addition, in seven trials (n=47 020), the effect of ARBs with ACEi was compared to ACEi alone and in two trials ARBs with ACEi versus ARB alone (n=25 712).

    Results Overall, there was no excess of cancer incidence with ARB therapy compared to controls in the 15 trials [ 4549 (6.16%) cases of 73 808 allocated to ARB versus 3856 (6.31%) of 61 106 assigned to non-ARB controls; odds ratio (OR) 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.04] overall or when individual ARBs were examined. ORs comparing combination therapy with ARB along with ACEi versus ACEi was 1.01 (95% CI 0.94-1.10), combination versus ARB alone 1.02 (95% CI 0.91-1.13), ARB alone versus ACEi alone 1.06 (95% CI 0.97-1.16) and ARB versus placebo/control without ACEi 0.97 (95% CI 0.91-1.04). There was no excess of lung, prostate or breast cancer, or overall cancer deaths associated with ARB treatment.

    Conclusion There was no significant increase in the overall or site-specific cancer risk from ARBs compared to controls.

  • 47. Veerabhadrappa, Praveen
    et al.
    Burger, Dylan
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Charchar, Fadi
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    Harrap, Stephen
    ISH Hypertension Future Leaders Group: a network for new investigators run by new investigator2011Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 29, nr 8, s. 1664-1665Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 48. Veerabhadrappa, Praveen
    et al.
    Charchar, Fadi
    Burger, Dylan
    Tomaszewski, Maciej
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Leading the change: Second International Society of Hypertension New Investigators' Symposium2013Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, nr 2, s. 429-430Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 49. Vishram, Julie K. K.
    et al.
    Borglykke, Anders
    Andreasen, Anne H.
    Jeppesen, Jorgen
    Ibsen, Hans
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Broda, Grazyna
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Giampaoli, Simona
    Donfrancesco, Chiara
    Kee, Frank
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    Cesana, Giancarlo
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Sans, Susana
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Tamosiunas, Abdonas
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Kardiologi.
    Mcelduff, Patrick
    Arveiler, Dominique
    Pajak, Andrzej
    Olsen, Michael H.
    Do other cardiovascular risk factors influence the impact of age on the association between blood pressure and mortality?: The MORGAM Project2014Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 32, nr 5, s. 1025-1033Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate age-related shifts in the relative importance of SBP and DBP as predictors of cardiovascular mortality and all-cause mortality and whether these relations are influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: Using 42 cohorts from the MORGAM Project with baseline between 1982 and 1997, 85 772 apparently healthy Europeans and Australians aged 19-78 years were included. During 13.3 years of follow-up, 9.2% died (of whom 7.2% died due to stroke and 21.1% due to coronary heart disease, CHD). Results: Mortality risk was analyzed using hazard ratios per 10-mmHg/5-mmHg increase in SBP/DBP by multivariate-adjusted Cox regressions, including SBP and DBP simultaneously. Because of nonlinearity, SBP and DBP were analyzed separately for blood pressure (BP) values above and below a cut-point wherein mortality risk was the lowest. For the total population, significantly positive associations were found between stroke mortality and SBP [hazard ratio = 1.19 (1.13-1.25)] and DBP at least 78 mmHg [hazard ratio = 1.08 (1.02-1.14)], CHD mortality and SBP at least 116 mmHg [1.20 (1.16-1.24)], and all-cause mortality and SBP at least 120 mmHg [1.09 (1.08-1.11)] and DBP at least 82 mmHg [1.03 (1.02-1.05)]. BP values below the cut-points were inversely related to mortality risk. Taking into account the age x BP interaction, there was a gradual shift from DBP (19-26 years) to both DBP and SBP (27-62 years) and to SBP (63-78 years) as risk factors for stroke mortality and all-cause mortality, but not CHD mortality. The age at which the importance of SBP exceeded DBP was for stroke mortality influenced by sex, cholesterol, and country risk. Conclusion: Age-related shifts to the superiority of SBP exist for stroke mortality and all-cause mortality, and for stroke mortality was this shift influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors.

  • 50.
    Vishram, Julie K.K.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Internal Medicine, Næstved Hospital, Næstved, Denmark.
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Sahlgren-Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gotenburg, Sweden.
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NY, New York, United States.
    Ibsen, Hans
    Division of Cardiology, Holbæk University Hospital, Holbæk, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Lindholm, Lars H.
    Umeå University Hopsital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    University of Milano-Bicocca, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy.
    Okin, Peter M.
    Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NY, New York, United States.
    Rothwell, Peter M.
    Stroke Prevention Research Unit, University Department of Clinical Neurology, John Radcliffe Hospital, West Wing, Headington, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Department of Internal Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark.
    Olsen, Michael H.
    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Preventive Clinic, Department of Endocrinology, Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), North-West University, Mahikeng, South Africa.
    Blood pressure variability predicts cardiovascular events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage: a LIFE substudy2015Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 33, nr 12, s. 2422-2430Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assessment of antihypertensive treatment is normally based on the mean value of a number of blood pressure (BP) measurements. However, it is uncertain whether high in-treatment visit-to-visit BP variability may be harmful in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).

    Methods: In 8505 patients randomized to losartan vs. atenolol-based treatment in the LIFE study, we tested whether BP variability assessed as SD and range for BP6-24months measured at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of treatment was associated with target organ damage (TOD) defined by LVH on ECG and urine albumin/creatinine ratio at 24 months, and predicted the composite endpoint (CEP) of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke occurring after 24 months (CEP=630 events).

    Results: In multiple regression models adjusted for mean BP6-24months and treatment allocation, neither high BP6-24months SD nor wide range were related to TOD at 24 months, except for a weak association between Sokolow-Lyon voltage and DBP6-24months SD and range (both b=0.04, P<0.01). Independently of mean BP6-24months, treatment allocation, TOD and baseline characteristics in Cox regression models, CEP after 24 months was associated with DBP6-24months SD [hazard ratio per 1mmHg increase1.04, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-1.06, P=0.005], range (hazard ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, P=0.004), SBP6-24months SD (hazard ratio 1.01, 95% CI 0.99-1.02, P=0.07) and range (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% CI 1.001-1.01, P=0.04). Adjusted for the same factors, stroke was associated with DBP6-24months SD (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10, P=0.001), range (hazard ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.04, P=0.001), SBP6-24months SD (hazard ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.002-1.04, P=0.04) and range (hazard ratio 1.008, 95% CI 1.001-1.02, P=0.05), but MI was not.

    Conclusion: In LIFE patients, higher in-treatment BP6-24months variability was independently of mean BP6-24months associated with later CEP and stroke, but not with MI or TOD after 24 months.

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