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  • 1.
    Bray, Lucy
    et al.
    Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
    Carter, Bernie
    Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
    Kiernan, Joann
    Edge Hill University and Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Horowicz, Ed
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Dixon, Katie
    Expert by Experience, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Ridley, James
    Edge Hill University and National Restraint Reduction Network, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
    Robinson, Carol
    University of Strathclyde, Glasglow, United Kingdom.
    Simmons, Anna
    Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Craske, Jennie
    Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Sinha, Stephanie
    Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Morton, Liza
    University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Nafria, Begonya
    Sant Joan de Déu Children’s Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.
    Forsner, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Rullander, Anna-Clara
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Darcy, Laura
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hubbuck, Cath
    Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Brenner, Maria
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Spencer-Little, Sian
    Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Evans, Kath
    Barts Health NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Rowland, Andrew
    The University of Salford, Salford, United Kingdom.
    Hilliard, Carol
    Children’s Health Ireland (CHI) at Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Preston, Jennifer
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Leroy, Piet L.
    Maastricht University Medical Centre / Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Roland, Damian
    University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust and Leicester University, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Booth, Lisa
    University of Cumbria, Cumbria, United Kingdom.
    Davies, Jean
    Bangor University, Bangor, United Kingdom.
    Saron, Holly
    Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
    Mansson, Marie Edwinson
    Paediatric RN, HSC, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cox, Ann
    Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust & Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom.
    Ford, Karen
    University of Tasmania and the Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmani, Australia.
    Campbell, Steven
    University of Tasmania, TAS, Australia.
    Blamires, Julie
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Dickinson, Annette
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Neufeld, Michael
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Peck, Blake
    Federation University, VIC, Australia.
    de Avila, Marla
    São Paulo State University, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Feeg, Veronica
    Molloy College in Rockville Centre, New York City, United States.
    Mediani, Henny Suzana
    Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung Ciry, Indonesia.
    Atout, Maha
    Philadelphia University, Amman, Jordan.
    Majamanda, Maureen D.
    University of Malawi, Kamuzu College of Nursing, Malawi, South Africa.
    North, Natasha
    The Harry Crossley Children’s Nursing Development Unit, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Chambers, Christine
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
    Robichaud, Fanny
    Ulluriaq, Ungava Tulattavik Health Center and UQAM UQO, QC, Canada.
    Developing rights-based standards for children having tests, treatments, examinations and interventions: using a collaborative, multi-phased, multi-method and multi-stakeholder approach to build consensus2023Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 182, nr 10, s. 4707-4721Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Children continue to experience harm when undergoing clinical procedures despite increased evidence of the need to improve the provision of child-centred care. The international ISupport collaboration aimed to develop standards to outline and explain good procedural practice and the rights of children within the context of a clinical procedure. The rights-based standards for children undergoing tests, treatments, investigations, examinations and interventions were developed using an iterative, multi-phased, multi-method and multi-stakeholder consensus building approach. This consensus approach used a range of online and face to face methods across three phases to ensure ongoing engagement with multiple stakeholders. The views and perspectives of 203 children and young people, 78 parents and 418 multi-disciplinary professionals gathered over a two year period (2020–2022) informed the development of international rights-based standards for the care of children having tests, treatments, examinations and interventions. The standards are the first to reach international multi-stakeholder consensus on definitions of supportive and restraining holds.

    Conclusion: This is the first study of its kind which outlines international rights-based procedural care standards from multi-stakeholder perspectives. The standards offer health professionals and educators clear evidence-based tools to support discussions and practice changes to challenge prevailing assumptions about holding or restraining children and instead encourage a focus on the interests and rights of the child.

    What is Known:

    • Children continue to experience short and long-term harm when undergoing clinical procedures despite increased evidence of the need to improve the provision of child-centred care.
    • Professionals report uncertainty and tensions in applying evidence-based practice to children’s procedural care.

    What is New:

    • This is the first study of its kind which has developed international rights-based procedural care standards from multi-stakeholder perspectives.
    • The standards are the first to reach international multi-stakeholder consensus on definitions of supportive and restraining holds.
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  • 2. Burström, Åsa
    et al.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    Frenckner, Björn
    Nisell, Margret
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Öjmyr-Joelsson, Maria
    Adolescents with congenital heart disease: their opinions about the preparation for transfer to adult care2017Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 176, nr 7, s. 881-889Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore what adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) view as important in the preparation for the transfer to adult care. We performed interviews in four focus groups with adolescents (14-18 years old) at four university hospitals in Sweden. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis revealed one main category; Becoming a manager of the condition and four subcategories; Sufficient knowledge about the health, Be a participant in the care, Parental support, and Communicate with others about the health. The adolescents' ages differentiated the discussion in the groups. The older adolescents seemed to have more interest in transition planning, information and transfer. The younger described more frustrations about communication and handling the disease. Conclusion: To become a manager of the CHD in daily life, the adolescents want disease specific knowledge, which should be communicated in a developmentally appropriate way. Adolescents want to participate and be involved in the transition process. They need support and guidance in how to communicate their CHD. Parental support is fundamental but it change over time. Moreover, peer-support is becoming more significant during the transition process.

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  • 3.
    Domellöf, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Hopkins, Brian
    Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Rönnqvist, Louise
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Glucose effects on stepping and placing responses in newborn infants2003Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 162, s. 545-547Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Junuzovic, Mensura
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Rättsmedicin. Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lind, Kaja Maria Toporska
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Child suicides in Sweden, 2000–20182022Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 181, nr 2, s. 599-607Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although child mortality is decreasing in Sweden, an increase in suicide rates has been previously observed among children and adolescents collectively. To increase knowledge about trends, demographics, and means in child suicides, data including all child (< 18 years) suicides in Sweden in 2000 through 2018 were retrieved from the Swedish National Board of Forensic Medicine. In all, a total of 416 child suicides were found in a 19-year period, accounting for an annual suicide rate of 1.1/100,000 child population. The number of suicides increased with 2.2% by each successive year during the study period (p < 0.001). The mean age in both sexes was 16 years; boys accounted for 55% and girls for 45% of all study cases. The majority of the children who died by suicide (96%) were teenagers (13–17 years old) and suicides in children younger than 10 years were uncommon. Suicide methods were 59% hanging, 20% lying/jumping in front of a moving object, 8% jumping from a height, 7% firearm injury, 4% poisoning, and 2% other methods. Sex differences were significant (p < 0.001) only for firearms being preferably used by boys. The vast majority of firearms used were licensed long-barreled weapons. Conclusion: The number of child suicides in Sweden is relatively low but increasing. Most of the children used a violent and highly lethal method. Prevention of premature mortality is an urgent concern with an emphasis on resolutely reducing the availability of suicide means.

    What is Known:

    • Suicide is a significant cause of death globally among children, bringing tragic consequences for young individuals, their family, and the entire society.

    • Suicide rates and distribution of suicide methods in children differ between countries and settings, but studies of time trends are scarce.

    What is New:

    • Increasing number of minors’ suicides and the predominance of violent methods emphasize the importance of prevention strategies tailored for a child population.

    • Even in a setting of very restrictive firearm laws, firearm suicides in children must not be overlooked.

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  • 5. Knobe, Karin
    et al.
    Tedgard, Ulf
    Ek, Torben
    Sandström, Per-Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Hillarp, Andreas
    Lupus anticoagulants in two children-bleeding due to nonphospholipid-dependent antiprothrombin antibodies2012Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 171, nr 9, s. 1383-1387Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe two children with significant bleeding: one with multiple ecchymoses and the other with scrotal bleeding. In both patients, the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was prolonged, with positivity for lupus anticoagulants (LA). However, the Owren prothrombin time (PT), usually insensitive for LA, was also prolonged. The presence of LA is associated with diverse clinical manifestations, with most patients being asymptomatic while others present venous or arterial thrombosis. Bleeding in conjunction with LA is rare and it is unusual to see prolongation of the Owren PT assay due to LA. An extended laboratory investigation of one of the patient's plasma revealed not only LA but also a specific nonphospholipid-dependent antiprothrombin antibody causing an acquired hypoprothrombinemia. Conclusion: It is likely that the low prothrombin activity and not the LA caused the bleeding. The bleeding signs and symptoms in both patients subsided when the PT was normalized, although the prolonged APTT and the LA remained.

  • 6.
    Lindberg, Josefine
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Norman, M.
    Westrup, B.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Berglund, Staffan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    BLOOD PRESSURE AND METABOLIC MARKERS IN MARGINALLY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT CHILDREN AT 7 YEARS OF AGE2016Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 175, nr 11, s. 1543-1543Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 7.
    Zamir, Itay
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Stoltz Sjöström, Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för kostvetenskap.
    Abrahamsson, T.
    Ahlsson, F.
    Hallberg, B.
    Pupp, I.
    Stjernkvist, K.
    Serenius, F.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Early-life hyperglycemia in extremely preterm infants affects neurodevelopment at 6 years of age2016Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 175, nr 11, s. 1440-1440Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims:

    Hyperglycemia is common during early life in extremely preterm infants. It has been suggested to increase the risk of later neurological problems. This study investigated the relation between early-life hyperglycemia and neurological outcomes at 6 years of age in children born extremely preterm.

    Methods: The study is based on the EXPRESS study cohort, including all 707 infants liveborn before 27 weeks gestational age in Sweden between 2004–2007. Detailed laboratory data was extracted from the hospital records. During a follow-up at 6 years of age, the children performed the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) test.

    Results WISC-IV scores were available for 371 of 494 surviving children. The number of days with severe hyperglycemia (≥1 plasma glucose measurement ≥ 16 mmol/l) during the first 21 days of life was significantly correlated with lower WISC-IV scores, adjusted for gestational age (β=-0.114; p=0.032). Children who had severe hyperglycemia at least one day during the first 21 days of life had significantly lower mean WISC-IV score than children who did not have severe hyperglycemia, adjusted for gestational age (78.9 vs. 85.08, respectively; p=0.02; Figure 1). The results remained significant after adjusting for morbidityrelated variables in those infants without severe neurodevelopmental impairment.

    Conclusions Severe hyperglycemia during the first 3 weeks of life in extremely preterm infants is associated with lower intelligence at 6 years of age. Prevention of severe hyperglycemia in these infants may therefore be important. Further research is needed to explore the effect of hyperglycemia on neurodevelopment as well as its mechanism.

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