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  • 1. Adams, Mike
    et al.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Liselotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Veprauskaite, Elena
    Managing policy lapse risk in Sweden's life insurance market between 1915 and 19472020In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 222-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the challenges that Swedish life insurers faced in managing the lapse risk of policies written on the lives of the industrial urban working class between 1915 and 1947. We observe that with the threat of State socialisation of insurance in the 1930s, industrial life insurers modified their business practices to better control policy lapses. Using firm-level data, we also analyse the effect of socio-economic changes, such as rising real wages, interest rate fluctuations and unemployment on life insurance policy lapses. Our results support contemporary tests of the emergency fund and interest rate explanations for the voluntary premature termination of life insurance policies.

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  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Johansson, Eva E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    The meanings given to gender in studies on multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a literature review2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 23, p. 2255-2270Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess and describe the meanings given to "gender" in scientific publications that evaluate multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Method: A systematic literature search for papers evaluating multimodal rehabilitation was conducted. The PubMed and EBSCO databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Two or three researchers independently read each paper, performed a quality assessment and coded meanings of gender using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Twenty-seven papers were included in the review. Gender was used very differently in the MMR studies investigated but primarily it referred to factual differences between men and women. Only one paper provided a definition of the concept of gender and how it had been used in that study. In the content analysis, the meaning of gender formed three categories: "Gender as a factual difference", "The man is the ideal" and "Gender as a result of social role expectations".

    Conclusions: The meaning of the concept of gender in multimodal rehabilitation is undefined and needs to be developed further. The way the concept is used should be defined in the design and evaluation of multimodal rehabilitation in future studies.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    Healthcare professionals should reflect on gender relations in encounters with patients, selection of patients into rehabilitation programs and design of programs. In rehabilitation for chronic pain the patients' social circumstances and cultural context should be given the same consideration as biological sex and pain symptoms.

  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Sandberg, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention.

    METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles.

    RESULTS: A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase".

    CONCLUSION: We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

  • 4.
    Ahlström, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Principal Development.
    Keisu, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Schmauch, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Normaliserande processer av ojämlika villkor2020In: Att arbeta för lika villkor: ett genus- och maktperspektivpå arbete och organisation / [ed] Britt-Inger Keisu, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020, 1, p. 213-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahlström, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Principal Development.
    Leo, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Principal Development.
    Norqvist, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Principal Development.
    Poromaa Isling, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Principal Development. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    School Leadership as (Un)usual: Insights from Principals in Sweden during a Pandemic2020In: International Studies in Educational Administration, ISSN 1324-1702, E-ISSN 1839-2768, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers insights into educational leadership in relation to the example of Sweden exceptionalism that kept most of its schools open during the COVID-19 pandemic. Informed discussions based on reports from conversations with principals, media and a survey highlight three themes identified as challenges for the principals: dealing with pupils, staff members and parents’ anxiety, a constant state of uncertainty and the ones left behind. These themes ignite discussions of implications for educational leadership in which the elements of trust, the formation of stable organizations and equity are leadership strategies in what we consider leadership as (un)usual. 

  • 6.
    Ahnlund, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dufåker, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    På träningsläger inför C-uppsatsen2010In: Undervisning på tvären: student- och lärarerfarenheter : den nionde universitetspedagogiska konferensen 25-26 februari 2009 : konferensrapport / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Universitetspedagogiskt centrum, Umeå universitet , 2010, p. 29-46Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alm, Erika
    et al.
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Parenting the nation: state violence and reproduction in Nicaragua and Sweden2023In: Struggles for reproductive justice in the era of anti-genderism and religious fundamentalism / [ed] Diana Mulinari; Marta Kolankiewicz; Rebecca Selberg, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023, p. 213-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reproduction is a core question for the state, a site of struggle between the reproduction of the nation and the reproduction of liveable lives, especially for those citizens whose rights are rarely recognized in the first place. What role does the exceptionalisation of reproductive rights play in the reproduction of the nation-state? Nicaragua and Sweden are countries where debates about reproductive justice highlight tensions in the projection of a state that cares for its citizens. Nicaragua, the second-poorest country in the Western hemisphere with one of the most repressive and punitive legislations on abortion in the world. Sweden with its reputation as a pioneering nation in matters of gender equality and reproductive justice. This chapter draws on a particular formulation of the centrality of the state in theories and practices of reproductive justice: the notion of the state as a parent with a particular responsibility to protect and foster, but also discipline and subjugate, its citizens. Political leaders, Fathers and Mothers of the Nation, form the discourse within which the state regulates its imagined children’s, the citizens, reproductive rights. As such the governance of reproduction is a vital aspect of the political fantasy about the nation-state and its futuriority.

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  • 8.
    Alm, Erika
    et al.
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Lundahl Hero, Mikela
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anna
    Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Laskar, Pia
    Department of Research and Collections, National Historical Museums of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Lena
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mulinari, Diana
    Department of Gender Studies, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Wasshede, Cathrin
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Västra Götalands Län, Sweden.
    An epilogue2021In: Pluralistic struggles in gender, sexuality and coloniality: challenging Swedish exceptionalism / [ed] Erika Alm; Linda Berg; Mikela Lundahl Hero; Anna Johansson; Pia Laskar; Lena Martinsson; Diana Mulinari; Cathrin Wasshede, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 299-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I den bästa av världar [In the best of worlds]

    Den bästa av dagar [The best of days]

    Vi slapp ju nazister [We did not have Nazis]

    Så vad ska vi klaga? [So what should we complain about?]

    In the above poem, trans* activist and spoken word poet Yolanda Aurora Bohm Ramirez (2018) both names the ways the lives of specific groups of people in Sweden are threatened by the increasing neo-Nazi violence and illuminates the response of the majoritarian population to these threats: their demands of silence where protest and criticism is made nearly impossible.

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  • 9.
    Alm, Erika
    et al.
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Lundahl Hero, Mikela
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anna
    Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Laskar, Pia
    Department of Research and Collections, National Historical Museums of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Lena
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mulinari, Diana
    Department of Gender Studies, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Wasshede, Cathrin
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Västra Götalands Län, Sweden.
    Introduction2020In: Pluralistic struggles in gender, sexuality and coloniality: challenging Swedish exceptionalism / [ed] Erika Alm; Linda Berg; Mikela Lundahl Hero; Anna Johansson; Pia Laskar; Lena Martinsson; Diana Mulinari; Cathrin Wasshede, London, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 10.
    Alm, Erika
    et al.
    Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, LindaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).Lundahl Hero, MikelaSchool of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.Johansson, AnnaDivision of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.Laskar, PiaDepartment of Research and Collections, National Historical Museums of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.Martinsson, LenaDepartment of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.Mulinari, DianaDepartment of Gender Studies, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.Wasshede, CathrinDepartment of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pluralistic struggles in gender, sexuality and coloniality: challenging Swedish exceptionalism2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This open access book seeks to understand how politics is being made in a pluralistic sense, and explores how these political struggles are challenging and transforming gender, sexuality, and colonial norms. As researchers located in Sweden, a nation often cited as one of the most gender-equal and LGBTQ-tolerant nations, the contributions investigate political processes, decolonial struggles, and events beyond, nearby, and in between organizations, states, and national territories. The collection represents a variety of disciplines, and different theoretical conceptualizations of politics, feminist theory, and postcolonial and queer studies. Students and researchers with an interest of queer studies, gender studies, critical whiteness studies, and civil society studies will find this book an invaluable resource.

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  • 11.
    Almqvist-Ingersoll, Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Conceptually androgynous: The production and commodification of gender in Korean pop music2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stemming from a recent surge in articles related to Korean masculinities, and based in afeminist and queer Marxist theoretical framework, this paper asks how gender, with a specificfocus on what is referred to as soft masculinity, is constructed through K-pop performances, aswell as what power structures are in play. By reading studies on pan-Asian masculinities andgender performativity - taking into account such factors as talnori and kkonminam, andinvestigating conceptual terms flower boy, aegyo, and girl crush - it forms a baseline for aqualitative research project. By conducting qualitative interviews with Swedish K-pop fans andperforming semiotic analysis of K-pop music videos, the thesis finds that although K-popmasculinities are perceived as feminine to a foreign audience, they are still heavily rooted in aheteronormative framework. Furthermore, in investigating the production of genderperformativity in K-pop, it finds that neoliberal commercialism holds an assertive grip overthese productions and are thus able to dictate ‘conceptualizations’ of gender and projectidentities that are specifically tailored to attract certain audiences. Lastly, the study shows thatthese practices are sold under an umbrella of ‘loyalty’ in which fans are incentivized toconsume in order to show support for their idols – in which the concept of desire plays asignificant role.

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  • 12.
    Alnebratt, Kerstin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Feminism som byråkrati: jämställdhetsintegrering som strategi2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Feminism som byråkrati beskriver utvecklingen av svensk jämställdhetspolitik. Främst behandlas idén om jämställdhetsintegrering. En historieskrivning, men också en analys. Från början av 1990-talet fram till idag. Vilka frågor och krav har kunnat ställas inom ramen för denna politik? Och inte minst, vad har gjorts omöjligt?

  • 13.
    Alvarez Pascual, Cristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    How joyful militancy takes shape in feminist movements in Spain: A discourse analysis of Territorio Doméstico2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to analyse how joyful militancy, characterized by care, joy and affection in the struggle, is embedded in the discourse created by Territorio Doméstico, a feminist movement formed by domestic workers in Spain. Through discourse analysis of songs and images of Territorio Doméstico, this study shows how meanings constructed through discourses build collective identities and challenge hegemonic discourses on domestic and care work and on migrants.

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  • 14.
    Aléx, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Reflections of men and women in advanced old age on being the other sex2010In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 193-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study reported in this paper is part of the Umeå 85+ project in Sweden. The aim was to investigate gender perspectives among ‘the oldest old’, by asking men and women in advanced old age living in a sparsely populated area of northern Sweden to reflect on how life might have been if they had been born the other sex. Thematic narratives from nine men and seven women were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The content of these narratives was resolved into eight categories in two domains, respectively men's and women's reflections about being born the opposite sex. The narratives of both the men and women indicated that they were satisfied with their actual birth sex. The men were aware that if they had been born female, they would probably have experienced more hard work and had a more restricted life, and they were conscious of both women's relative powerlessness and their greater ability to manage and organise work within the home. The women's narratives described a femininity characterised by longing for a state of being unconcerned when young, and their narratives also displayed awareness of women's physical strength and that men's lives had also been hard.

  • 15.
    Ambjörnsson, Fanny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Jönsson, MariaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Livslinjer: Berättelser om ålder, genus och sexualitet2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Genusgörande och läkarblivande: attityder, föreställningar och förväntningar bland läkarstudenter i Sverige2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The inclusion of a gender perspective in medicine has shown that gender is an essential factor in health and disease, in medical encounters and also in medical students’ educational environment. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes, preconceptions and norms regarding gender within medical education and processes of gender bias. First, we explored medical students gendered beliefs about patients. Second, we examined the medical students ideas about their future careers. Third, we compared awareness on gender issues among medical students in Sweden and the Netherlands.

    Method and material

    The analyses were based on data from two different sources: one experimental study based on authentic patient narratives about being diagnosed with cancer and one extensive questionaire exploring different aspects of gender issues in medical education. Both studies had a design which enabled both qualitative and quantitative research and mixed methods was used.

    Study I (Paper I and II): Eighty-one anonymous letters from patients were read by 130 students of medicine and psychology. For each letter the students were asked to state the patient’s sex and explain their choice. In paper I the students’ success rates were analysed statistically and the explanations to four letters were used to illustrate the students’ reasoning. Paper II examined the 87 medical students’ explanations closer to examine gender beliefs about patients.

    Study II (Paper III and IV): The questionaire started with an open question where medical students were asked to describe their ideal future, it also included a validated scale designed to estimate gender awareness. Paper III examined 507 swedish medical students descriptions about their ideal future and compared answers from male and female students in the beginning and at the end of medical school. Paper IV compared gender awareness among 1096 Swedish and Dutch medical students in first term.

    Findings with reflections

    Paper I showed that the patient’s sex was correctly identified in 62% of the cases. There were no difference between the results of male and female students. However, large differences between letters were observed, i.e. there were some letters were almost all students correctly identified the patient´s sex, others were almost all students were incorrect and most letters were found somewhere in the middle. Another significant finding was that the same expressions were interpreted differently depending on which initial guess the medical student had made regarding the sex of the patient.

    Paper II identified 21 categories of justifications within the students’ explanations, twelve of which were significantly associated with an assumption of either a male or female patient. Only three categories led to more correct identifications of the patients’ sex and two were more often associated with incorrect assignments. The results illustrate how beliefs about gender difference, even though they might be recognizable on a group level, are not applicable on individuals. Furthermore, the results show that medical students enter the education with beliefs about male and female patients, which could have consequenses and cause bias in their future work as doctors.

    Paper III found that almost all students, both male and female, were work-oriented. However, the female students even more so than their male counterparts. This result is particularly interesting in regards to the debate about the “feminization of medicine” in which the increasing number of female students has been adressed as a problem. When reflecting on their own lifes and their future its obvious that medical students nowadays, male and female, expect more to life than work, especially those who are on the doorstep to their professional life.

    Paper IV found that the national and cultural setting was the most crucial impact factor in relation to the medical students preconceptions and awareness about gender. The Swedish students expressed less stereotypic thinking about patients and doctors, while the Dutch students were more sensitive to gender difference. In both countries, the students’ sex mattered for gender stereotyping, with male students agreeing more to stereotypes.

    Conclusions

    A gender perspective is important in medical education. Our studies show that such initiatives needs to take cultural aspects, gender attitudes and students’ gender into account. Moreover, reflections on assumptions about men and women, patients as well as doctors, need to be included in medical curricula and the impact of implicit gender beliefs needs to be included in discussions on gender bias in health care. Also, the next generation of doctors want more to life than work. Future Swedish doctors, both female and male, intend to balance work not only with a family but also with leisure. This attitudinal change towards their future work as doctors will provide the health care system with a challenge to establish more adaptive and flexible work conditions.

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  • 17.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brandstetter-Hiltunen, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Knutsson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Is it possible to identify patient´s sex when reading blinded illness narratives? An experimental study about gender bias2008In: International Journal for Equity in Health, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In many diseases men and women, for no apparent medical reason, are not offered the same investigations and treatment in health care. This may be due to staff's stereotypical preconceptions about men and women, i.e., gender bias. In the clinical situation it is difficult to know whether gender differences in management reflect physicians' gender bias or male and female patients' different needs or different ways of expressing their needs. To shed some light on these possibilities this study investigated to what extent it was possible to identify patients' sex when reading their blinded illness narratives, i.e., do male and female patients express themselves differently enough to be recognised as men and women without being categorised on beforehand?

    Methods: Eighty-one authentic letters about being diseased by cancer were blinded regarding sex and read by 130 students of medicine and psychology. For each letter the participants were asked to give the author's sex and to explain their choice. The success rates were analysed statistically. To illuminate the participants' reasoning the explanations of four letters were analysed qualitatively.

    Results: The patient's sex was correctly identified in 62% of the cases, with significantly higher rates in male narratives. There were no differences between male and female participants. In the qualitative analysis the choice of a male writer was explained by: a short letter; formal language; a focus on facts and a lack of emotions. In contrast the reasons for the choice of a woman were: a long letter; vivid language; mention of emotions and interpersonal relationships. Furthermore, the same expressions were interpreted differently depending on whether the participant believed the writer to be male or female.

    Conclusion: It was possible to detect gender differences in the blinded illness narratives. The students' explanations for their choice of sex agreed with common gender stereotypes implying that such stereotypes correspond, at least on a group level, to differences in male and female patients' illness descriptions. However, it was also obvious that preconceptions about gender obstructed and biased the interpretations, a finding with implications for the understanding of gender bias in clinical practice.

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  • 18.
    Andersson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Freedom of choice in Swedish public care of the elderly: a care-worker perspective on the challanges of care and care work2013In: Tracing the women-friendly welfare state: gendered politics of everyday life in Sweden / [ed] Åsa Gunnarsson, Göteborg: Makadam , 2013, 1, p. 170-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Röster från hemtjänsten2010In: Omsorg och mångfald / [ed] Stina Johansson, Malmö: Gleerups , 2010, p. 164-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Valfrihet och mångfald: ett dilemma för hemtjänsten2010In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 17, no 3-4, p. 308-325Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Johansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Valfrihet som dilemma2010In: Omsorg och mångfald / [ed] Stina Johansson, Malmö: Gleerups , 2010, p. 116-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Methodological challenges in the implementation and evaluation of social welfare policies2012In: International Journal of Social Research Methodology, ISSN 1364-5579, E-ISSN 1464-5300, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 69-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As social reality is quite elusive, even regarding seemingly well-recognized everyday concepts and objects, there are always methodological challenges underlying assessments and evaluations of implementation policies. The present article addresses this area of concern by presenting the results of a rereading of an empirical study of elderly home care services. Our results reveal the emergence of a dissolution of common and professional key concepts and objects in these welfare services to a degree that challenges both the implementation policy and the evaluation of policy. We claim that this has methodological implications for evaluation of implementation policies in general.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kvist, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The neoliberal turn and the marketization of care: the transformation of eldercare in Sweden2015In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 274-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The care for older and disabled people has been described as a core area of the Nordic model. The Nordic countries’ welfare model has also been described as women friendly, as women are not forced to make harder choices than men between work and family. The Swedish eldercare system has, during the last several decades, undergone significant changes. Previously, eldercare could be described as universal, meaning a publicly provided, comprehensive, high-quality service available to all citizens according to need and not based on the ability to pay. In later years transformation of eldercare has been influenced by neoliberal politics, which emphasize economic efficiency and cost reduction through competition. Eldercare has become a more diverse multidimensional system, and a private market for home-based eldercare has been created. The numbers of eldercare providers have increased considerably, and new ways of organizing eldercare have been established. In January 2009, the Act on System of Choice in the Public Sector was introduced (in Swedish: Lagen om valfrihetssystem [LOV]). The Act was supposed to provide an opportunity for interested municipalities and county councils to expose their publicly provided services to market competition, and to enable users to choose their providers. This article aims to illustrate how neoliberal reasoning dominated the policy process leading to adoption of the Act on System of Choice in the Public Sector. With the use of a discursive policy analysis the authors specifically explore how neoliberal logic dominated, and also how choice and equality were understood and interpreted in the policy process. They conclude that the neoliberal turn in eldercare claiming to centre on the individual choice of persons in need of care runs the risk of creating unequal care that decentres the eldercare worker and creates precarious work situations.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Household risk strategies during a pandemic – experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic2023In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 36-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2020, The COVID-19 crisis has put great pressure on the economy worldwide. Only time can tell whether the COVID-19 crisis will have permanent effects on corporate and household behaviour and how it will affect society at large. This article examines historical experiences of how households managed the financial consequences of rising mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic. We find that the previous pandemic led to an immediate and major increase in primarily small-sum industrial life insurance policies designed for blue-collar workers. The increase in new policies did not, however, have a lasting effect. By the time the pandemic had faded, the number of policies had dropped to below pre-pandemic conditions. This historical experience underlines the fact that there are limits to the extent to which even a major shock, such as a pandemic, can lead to behavioural change among households as currently being predicted in relation to COVID-19.

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  • 25.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Household risk strategies during a pandemic: Experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The corona crisis has during the year 2020 put large pressure on the economy. Only time can tell whether the corona crisis will have permanent effects on corporate and household behaviour and how it will affect society at large. This article examines historical experiences of how households managed the financial consequences of the rising mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic. We find that the pandemic led to an immediate and major increase in primarily industrial life insurance policies on small sums designed for blue-collar workers. The increase in new policies did however not have a lasting effect. When the pandemic had faded over, the number of policies had dropped to bellow pre-pandemic conditions. This historical experience underlines that there are limits to the extent to which even a major shock, such as a pandemic, can lead to the kinds of behavioural change on which recent policies have been predicated.

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  • 26.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hushållens riskstrategier under en pandemi – erfarenheter från spanska sjukan2020In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 73-78Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi befinner oss i en pandemi som befaras få stora konsekvenser för samhällsekonomin. I denna artikel undersöker vi historiska erfarenheter av hur hushåll hanterade finansiella risker orsakade av influensa-epidemin spanska sjukan, 1918–20. Spanska sjukan ökade livförsäkringstagandet under de år som sjukdomen härjade, men fick inga bestående effekter på hushållens riskstrategier.  Erfarenheterna från spanska sjukan inger begränsade förhoppningar för den ökade invididualiseringen av krisansvaret vi sett under senare år, exempelvis har ansvaret för beredskapslager delvis lyfts över mot hushållen. För att vi ska vara rustade för nya pandemier krävs politisk konsensus kring att pandemiberedskap bör vara ett långsiktigt, samhälleligt åtagande. 

  • 27.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Sickness absence in compulsory and voluntary health insurance: the case of Sweden at the turn of the twentieth century2017In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 6-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the turn of the twentieth century, Swedish health insurance was organised according to the Western European models of both voluntary, `fraternal´ principles and compulsory, `factory scheme´ principles. In this paper, we trace the characteristics of both organisational forms, and compare the sickness absence by considering the role of risk selection and mitigation across a large panel of voluntary and compulsory health insurance societies operating in Sweden between 1900 and 1910. We find that voluntary societies used a wide set of rules and practices in order to select and monitor members in order to keep down the number of sick cases. Compulsory societies applied shorter waiting periods and offered more medical treatment, leading to more frequent but shorter sickness absences.

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  • 28.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Harris, Bernard
    Social Work and Social Policy, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Did statutory insurance improve the welfare of Swedish workers?: The statutory workplace accident insurance act of 19162022In: Labor history, ISSN 0023-656X, E-ISSN 1469-9702, Vol. 63, p. 210-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welfare researchers have regarded statutory accident insurance in 1916 as a starting point for the exceptional expansion of the Swedish welfare state. However, rather less attention has been paid to the roles played by mutual insurance societies and employer compensation schemes in offering voluntary welfare protection. We argue that voluntary welfare protection was an integral part of the early-twentieth century welfare system and played a crucial role in protecting workers in the case of sickness and accident. We also examine the limitations of these arrangements and explore the ways in which the design of the statutory scheme ensured that there was a continuing role for voluntary provision after the new Act came into operation. We also explore the impact of the scheme on wage levels, and show how its introduction eroded the wage premiums which had previously been earned by workers in high-risk industries.

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  • 29.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Harris, Bernard
    Social Work and Social Policy, University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Morbidity among working class men and women in early twentieth century Sweden2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates gendered morbidity patterns by employing micro data derived from sickness records and membership ledgers on working class men and women in the early 20th century Sweden. We find that the main reason for gendered morbidity differences - that woman faced fewer, but longer sickness episodes than men – reflects gendered productive and reproductive activities. Men suffered from the large number of work-place accidents as workers in the production sector, while women faced major risks due to pregnancy, childbearing and related sickness. Women also suffered more from for diseases of the blood, diseases of the digestive & metabolic system and diseases the genitourinary than men. Both men and women faced shorter, but longer, sickness episodes in urban areas attributed to the underlying differences in morbidity causes during the epidemiological transition.

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  • 30.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Lilljegren, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Adverse selection in mutual benefit societies: an longitudinal approach2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for illness, accident and burialinsurance in the late 19 th and early 20 th century in the Western world. One of themajor problems facing the insurers was the risk for adverse selection; that unhealthyindividuals had more incentive then healthy to insure when priced for the averagerisk. By empirically examine if the longevity among insured in mutual benefit societieswas different from uninsured, we seek to identify the presence of adverse section. Wefind no compelling evidence that unhealthy individuals was more likely to insure, orreasons to believe that adverse selection was behind the decline of mutual benefitsocieties in the twentieth century.

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  • 31.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Lilljegren, Josef
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Groningen University, the Netherland.
    Pre-welfare state provision and adverse selection: enrolment in a Swedish nationwide health insurance society2023In: Financial History Review, ISSN 0968-5650, E-ISSN 1474-0052, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 74-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for sickness, accident and life insurance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on both sides of the Atlantic. One of the major problems facing insurers was the risk of adverse selection, i.e. that unhealthy individuals had more incentives than healthy individuals to insure when priced for the average risk. By empirically examining whether longevity among insured individuals in a nationwide mutual health society was different from a matched sample of uninsured individuals, we seek to identify the presence of adverse selection. We find no compelling evidence showing that unhealthy individuals were more likely to insure, or reasons to believe that problems related to adverse selection would have been a major reason for government intervention in the health insurance market in Sweden.

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  • 32.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Liselotte, Eriksson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Nystedt, Paul
    Dept. of Economics, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University.
    Workplace accidents and workers solidarity: mutual health insurance in early twentieth-century Sweden2022In: Economic history review, ISSN 0013-0117, E-ISSN 1468-0289, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 203-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the industrialization period, the rate of workplace-related accidents increased. Because of the lack of public insurance, mutual health insurance societies became the main providers of workplace accident insurance among workers. Due to large differences in accident risk, health insurance societies were potentially exposed to the risk of adverse selection, since they employed equal pricing for all members regardless of risk profile. This article investigates the impact of workplace accident risk on health insurance selection and outcomes. We employ household budget surveys encompassing urban workers in Sweden during the early twentieth century. We find evidence for a redistribution from low- to high-risk-exposed workers, as workplace accident risk had a significant and positive impact on receiving health insurance benefits, also when controlling for a variety of factors. Workers exposed to greater risks in the workplace were more likely to have health insurance but did not pay higher premiums. The redistribution from low- to high-risk-exposed workers was largely accepted and viewed as an act of solidarity between workers. Given that health insurance societies were aware of this redistribution, we argue for the presence of informed, rather than adverse, selection.

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  • 33.
    Andersson, Lars-Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic history.
    Eriksson, Liselotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Exclusion of women and organizational characteristics: Swedish mutual health insurance 1901-19102019In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 1352-1378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutual societies have been recognised for their ability to mitigate information asymmetry. Although successful in reducing sickness claims, the exclusion of women was common. Health insurance societies argued the exclusion was a means to reduce adverse selection and moral hazard since women were regarded as higher risk. In this paper, we explore differences in organisational characteristics between societies that excluded and societies that did not exclude women as members between 1901 to 1910. Based on panel data, the study shows that societies that excluded women were less successful in keeping down sickness claims, in relation to benefits, than gendermixed societies

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  • 34.
    Andersson, Lars-Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Liselotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    The compulsory public pension and the demand for life insurance: the case of Sweden, 1884–191412015In: Economic history review, ISSN 0013-0117, E-ISSN 1468-0289, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 244-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We employ cost-of-living surveys, business archives, and firm data to examine the impact of the compulsory pension on the demand for life insurance in Sweden from 1884 to 1914—a period that covers the implementation of the first public compulsory old-age pension reform and the take-off of industry life insurance. As predicted on the basis of the contemporary literature on crowding-out effects, we find that the compulsory pension reduced the demand for life insurance. Our panel-data analysis of lapse rates on insurance policies shows a significant crowding-out effect of pension payments. We conclude that the introduction of the general compulsory pension had a crowding-out effect on households’ holdings of insurance policies.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Tamara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Fears in hybridic fiction: when reality negates the pleasures of terror2016In: Cultural experiences of fear, horror and terror, Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 27-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literary subgenre of Female Gothic primarily explores the specific fear and suffering of women trapped, oppressed and disciplined by patriarchy. As long as the text is identifiable as fiction, the reader may remain at a safe distance from the terrors described, but by using her imagination and empathy, she can experience the feelings of the frightened heroine by proxy. In addition, the Gothic novel provides the female reader with an opportunity to recognize the perilous position of being a woman in any society permeated by gender inequality, and thus experience a fear closely linked to her own particular circumstances. One can consequently argue that the Female Gothic is able to induce two kinds of fear - one with an indirect and potentially pleasurable impact and one with a direct, unpleasant impact on the female reader. In this chapter I explore how certain recurring themes in the Female Gothic, such as the repetition compulsion described by Michelle A. Massé, are employed in the autobiographical fiction (autofiction) by Swedish author Carina Rydberg. By using Rydberg as a case study, and by juxtaposing her works to more traditional Gothic novels, I will argue that the combination of autofictional and Gothic elements fundamentally changes how and why the female reader experiences fear. As the autobiographic details peel away the protection fiction provides, the reader is forced to either face the reality of female oppression, or use the singularity of autobiography to distance herself from the terrifying collective trauma of gender inequality. In either case, the hybrid of autofiction and the Gothic precludes the pleasurable experience of sublime terror specifically associated with classic Gothic fiction. Instead, the reader is forced to choose between denying all feelings of fear or acknowledging her own situation as a woman in a gender divided culture.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    "Kan man göra så i ditt ämne?"2010In: Undervisning på tvären: student- och lärarerfarenheter : den nionde universitetspedagogiska konferensen 25-26 februari 2009 : konferensrapport / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Universitetspedagogiskt centrum (UPC), Umeå universitet , 2010, p. 47-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I artikeln diskuteras de pedagogiska utmaningar som följer av att undervisa i tvärvetenskapliga sammanhang. Följande frågor ställs: på vilka sätt kan olika ämnesbakgrunder vara till hinder eller till hjälp i lärandesituationer?; vilka pedagogiska utmaningar ställs man inför som lärare?; vad sker med förståelsen av det egna ämnet efter möten med nya och annorlunda ämnestraditioner?; vilken roll spelar förmågan att kunna läsa texter från olika ämnen och traditioner än det egna, för att kunna uppnå en gynnsam lärandeprocess?

  • 37.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Resenären som aldrig kom fram: hemlöshetstema i klassresenärens berättelse2007In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2, p. 2-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Annuswer, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Fantastiska feminister: En genusvetenskaplig studie av medial feministisk historieskrivning2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of women in historical writing has long been discussed in Sweden and could be understood as an expression of a bigger discourse of Swedish gender equality. With two existing women’s history museums and media debates about women’s representation in history books, it seems to be part of both a Swedish and a feminist discourse. With a starting point that feminism exist within a popular feminist discourse, this essay asks the question what happens when feminist history is made to be popular. By analysing the two tv-shows ‘Den fantastiska historien med Berg & Meltzer’ and ‘Drottningarna’ as well as debates about them, this thesis examines how feminism, and the female subject is created within Swedish historical media. By using a poststructuralist discourse analysis and the theories popularfeminism, postfeminism and fantasy echo, this study analyses how the media as a cultural product creates feminist values, and how ideas about the feminine and the masculine affects the way we understand history. This study shows how the fantasy of a static female identity creates the historical female subject as someone ‘we’ can identify with. Further it shows how feminist historical writing within a popular science discourse seems to leave out important critique about gender roles and structures. The study also argues how a medial feminist history tends to rely on postfeminist and neoliberal assumptions of individual success in order to become more palatable for a broader audience.

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  • 39.
    Anticona, Cynthia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Easier said than done: applying the Ecohealth principles to a study of heavy metals exposure among indigenous communities of the Peruvian Amazon2013In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, article id 437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The renewed interest in community participation in health research is linked to its potential for bridging gaps between research and practice. Its main attributes are the generation of knowledge that can lead to socially robust, long-lasting solutions and the creation of a colearner relationship between researchers and research users. Following this philosophy, Ecohealth has evolved into a specialized framework for participatory research on the impact of pollution on ecosystems and human health. However, its principles pose considerable challenges. Its outcomes are strongly influenced by contextual factors that are impossible to control for ahead of time.

    This paper describes how the Ecohealth principles were applied to an epidemiological study of heavy metals exposure among indigenous communities of the Peruvian Amazon. It illustrates how knowledge generated from participatory research does not necessarily imply solving a public health problem. This study aimed to contribute to the understanding of the benefits and barriers of following the basic principles of the Ecohealth approach, and assist researchers working in similar contexts.

    Research process Based upon their personal experience as participant observers, the authors describe the research process; then, they discuss the most important challenges faced, their implications, and the attempted strategies for resolution.

    Challenges Challenges were grouped into four themes: (1) building trust; (2) one partnership, many stakeholders, multiple agendas; (3) being a researcher; and (4) communicating complex and unexpected findings.

    Conclusions Integrating the principles of transdisciplinarity and participation posed a series of challenges to the research process that were difficult, and sometimes impossible to overcome. However, positive outcomes from this experience were the lessons learned by the different actors. Despite the lack of immediate action, it is expected that useful interventions to prevent and control lead exposure in the Corrientes population will be implemented in the medium term.

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  • 40.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Children and teachers exploring physical phenomena and chemical processes through everyday verbs2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim with this project is to facilitate inquiry-based science learning in preschool (school form for children aged 1-5 years). The project is conducted in a design-based form, where researcher and practitioners share the problem formulation. Models for teaching are developed in close relation to practice, through several action research cycles. This study ties to Sikder and Fleer’s (2014) research on young children’s developing knowledge in science through everyday concepts. Further, it draws on Lenz Taguchi and Hultman’s (2010) emphasis on children’s powerful relations to places and things. Data is collected through recorded project meetings as well as photos, movies and accounts from practice, and group interviews with teachers. This is analysed in relation to the research question: ''what are the characteristics of a model for teaching that facilitates inquiry-based science learning in preschool?''. We have informed the caretakers about the project and they have given their written consent to our recording children’s activities. Our main finding is the vast range of exploring phenomena in science that teachers have come up with by working with everyday verbs. Starting from verbs appear to help teachers in recognising the scientific phenomena involved in children's interplay with the physical world. Further, the verbs help in formulating questions that can be answered by scientific inquiry, such as: ''what factors are important for how something melts/rolls/blends/glides/sticks?''. Due to these results we aim to further develop the model of verb-based inquiry for the benefit of preservice and in-service teachers.

  • 41.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    How does matter matter in preschool science?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the implications, for science education, of acknowledging matter as an agentic factor in preschool (Swedish educational setting for children aged 1 to 5 years). Reading empirical data from preschool settings together with Karen Barad’s agential realism, five examples are brought forward to address different aspects of how matter matters to science learning and teaching. These examples include how the ground and time of year matter to the scope of science learning possibilities, how friction and balance emerges in intra-action of a wooden bridge and children, and how modes of expression other than verbal language can be used to extend children’s experiences of rolling. The implications for science teaching are discussed based on the assumption that teacher power matters to what parts of the material world that children have real access to, and what type of intra-actions that are meaningful in preschool settings.

  • 42.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Relocalisations and renegotiations: framing a project about science in preschool2016In: Narratives of doctoral studies in science education: making the transition from educational practitioner to researcher / [ed] Shirley Simon, Christina Ottander, and Ilka Parchmann, Routledge, 2016, p. 19-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter covers my first year of doctoral studies. I reflect on how my experience as a school science teacher comes into play when researching science practice in preschool (children aged 1-5 years). The chapter exposes how literature, a pilot study, and my participation in a larger research project and two graduate schools, have been woven into each other in the framing of my doctoral project. Further it shows why I have refined my research project in order to include the physical environment as an important aspect of science practice in preschool.

  • 43.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Toddlers exploring natural phenomena with teachers as co-researchers2015In: 25th conference of EECERA (European Early Childhood Education Research Association), Barcelona, Spain, 7th-11th September, 2015: abstract book, 2015, p. 329-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe and examine the teachers' strategies when it comes to science education for the youngest children (aged 1-2 years).The study relates to Klaar’s and Öhman’s (2012) research on toddler’s physical, non-verbal, experiences of phenomena in science. Further the study draws on the concept “emergent science” that has been promoted by Siraj-Blatchford (2001) to frame a science education for the youngest that includes providing children with a range of experiences, with phenomena and material. Siraj-Blatchford argues that these experiences are essential to later understanding of scientific explanations. The analysis is based on observations of preschool practice, video recordings, field notes, individual interviews with teachers and a video-stimulated focus group interview with all teachers working in the preschool unit. We have informed the caretakers about the project and they have given their written consent to our recording children’s activities. The main finding of this study is the teachers’ “co-researching” strategies: their holding on to children’s discoveries, their helping children to draw attention to finite parts of the world (such as focusing on the sound of walking on snow), their making way for comparisons (such as the difference between blowing dry and wet autumn leaves away from the palm of your hand), and their ways of interpreting children’s non-oral actions in terms of reasoning and drawing conclusions about relationships in nature. Thereby, the results give important contributions to the field of science education for the youngest children and to what non-verbal science learning could be.

    Klaar, Susanne, & Öhman, Johan. (2012). Action with Friction: A Transactional Approach to Toddlers' Physical Meaning Making of Natural Phenomena and Processes in Preschool. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 20(3), 439-454. doi: 10.1080/1350293X.2012.704765

    Siraj-Blatchford, J. (2001). Emergent Science and Technology in the Early Years. Paper presented at the XXIII World Congress of OMEP, Santiago, Chile.

  • 44.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Utanför experimentlådan: kunskapsproduktion, tid och materia i förskolans naturvetenskapsundervisning2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute knowledge on conditions for science teaching in preschool. While Swedish preschool practices commonly build on children’s subjective experiences, scientific knowledge production is often associated with objectivity and detachedness. Seen from that perspective, tensions may occur when the knowledge cultures of preschool and science meet, as when science teaching is implemented in preschool. This thesis seeks to explore issues that are crucial for teachers to negotiate when they implement science teaching in preschool.

    The thesis includes five articles that build on empirical data in the form of teachers’ talk (interviews, focus group discussion, project meetings) and observation data from preschool practice. The data analyses draw on various theoretical perspectives, including communities of practice and feminist critique of science as well as theoretical concepts connected to framing and agential realism.

    The main result is that it is crucial, to teachers’ implementation of science teaching in preschool, that science content is open to children’s contributions. Further, the results show that teachers integrate several different forms of knowledge production when working with science content in practice. For example, observations and systematic investigations are combined with imagination and children’s bodily experiences. This goes against the presumed tensions between the knowledge cultures of preschool and science. However, tensions between the knowledge cultures are indicated by teachers’ unwillingness to interfere with children’s investigative processes or ideas about science content by relating children’s ideas to scientific explanatory models. Seen from a teacher’s perspective, it appears to be unproblematic to leave children’s ideas about science content unresolved, compared to leaving children’s ideas about social relations and other content unresolved.

    Drawing on the results, I discuss teaching beyond the limited material and temporal dimensions of the science box, which emerges as a metaphor when teachers describe a way of teaching that they are not comfortable with. Further, I suggest that the concept working theories, which addresses children’s tentative ideas about relations in their surrounding world, be introduced in preschool science teaching, to ease the perceived conflict between children’s ideas about science and scientific explanatory models.

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  • 45.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Why do teachers adopt or resist a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool?2019In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 238-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous initiatives are carried out across the world to support science teaching in early childhood education. However, professional development research shows that in order for teaching interventions to bring about successful changes in practice, it is key that teacher’s beliefs, confidence and knowledge change. As a complement to studies showing how teachers change, this article examines why teachers adopt a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool. Drawing on Clarke and Hollingsworth’s model for teacher professional growth, the article analyses interviews with teachers that have implemented and developed a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool. The results indicate that teachers adopt the pedagogical idea because it helps them to discern and build on science content in everyday practice, which they prefer to their previous way of teaching science through occasional experiments. Further the results show that teachers balance several external influences on what is good preschool pedagogy. The particular pedagogical idea eases that balancing act since it aligns with, and helps teachers to make meaning of, many of these influences.

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  • 46.
    Areljung, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. UmSER.
    Due, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Skoog, Marianne
    Örebro universitet.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Örebro universitet.
    The role of children’s drawings in science teaching: A comparison across preschool, preschool class and early primary school2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Particularly since many children in early childhood education (ECE) (education for children from birth to 8 years) do not yet write, teachers and researchers tend to use children’s drawings to assess their developing science learning. Previous studies show that children’s choices on what to include in their drawings are affected by local cultures of what constitutes a good representation. However, there is a lack of studies that focus on the teacher perspective, in terms of why and how they include drawing activities in their science teaching. Further, there are currently no studies that compare the role of drawings in science teaching across ECE sectors. The study is part of a larger study which aims to to advance our understanding of how to bridge science teaching across ECE sectors (preschool, preschool class, early primary school). Here, our specific aim is to examine how educational cultures of different ECE sectors interact with teacher’s objectives for using children’s drawings in science activities. We use Activity Theory to analyse field data (notes, photos, videos) from science activities that include children’s drawings, as well as recordings from group discussions with teachers. First, we focus on the relation between the purpose of the activity, the tools used, the local educational culture, and the outcome of each activity. Second, we compare our results across ECE sectors. Our preliminary results indicate that the purpose of drawing activities vary across sectors. In preschool, children’s drawings may serve to tell stories, while in early primary school, drawings may serve as a part of observation practice or to display children’s understandings of science concepts. The results are discussed in relation to children’s transitions between educational cultures, and whether teachers should explicitly scaffold scientific drawing in ECE.

  • 47.
    Areljung, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Kelly-Ware, Janette
    Faculty of Education, Te Oranga School of Human Development and Movement Studies, University of Waikato, New Zealand.
    Navigating the risky terrain of children's working theories2017In: Early years, ISSN 0957-5146, E-ISSN 1472-4421, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 370-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Working theories' encompass children's theorising about the social and material worlds. This article looks explicitly at power relations involved in pedagogy around children's working theories by focusing on the teacher's control of what and whose working theories get unpacked and extended. From an analysis of four cases from early childhood education (ECE) settings, it is concluded that teaching strategies are related to possible risks of unpacking and extending children's working theories. From a teacher's perspective such risks include: undermining the ECE setting's rules; exposing one's own lack of knowledge or skills; or risking the relations and atmosphere in the group or setting. These risks affect how working theories are dealt with in terms of time – right away, later or never – and voicing, as teachers regulate children's ideas for example through making concrete, reconstructing or silencing them.

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  • 48.
    Areljung, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Due, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    "Drawing the leaves anyway": teachers embracing children's different ways of knowing in preschool science practice2017In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1173-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores if and how teachers combine practices of science and of preschool (children 1–5 years old) into preschool science practice. Views of knowing may differ between science practices, traditionally associated with masculinity and rationality, and preschool practices, traditionally associated with femininity and caring. Recognising this, wehave chosen to focus on how teachers’ talk constructs and relates to possible ways of gaining knowledge and reaching explanations of phenomena in preschool science. The analysis buildson two concept pairs often associated with gender as well as knowing: objective-subjective and logical-intuitive. The analysed material consists of 11 group interviews where preschool teachers talk about activities concerning science content. Our results show that several ways of knowing are possible in work with science content in preschool. These include ways of knowing more associated with subjectivity, such as ‘individual liking’ and ‘whole-body perception’, as well as more associated with objectivity, such as ‘noticing differences and similarities’. Furthermore, the results show that the teachers’ talk moves readily between possibilities associated with femininity (subjective and intuitive) and masculinity (objective and logical). This indicates that the teachers in this study have found ways to handle science in preschool that goes against presumed tensions between science and preschool practices. The results contribute to more nuanced ways of describing and thinking about science in preschool and pave the way for further development of science education in early childhood education.

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  • 49.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    The (Dys)Functionality of Girls' and Young Women's Violence2017In: Affilia, ISSN 0886-1099, E-ISSN 1552-3020, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 543-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how professionals talk about girls' and young women's use of violence; more specifically, how violence is constructed and conceptualized and its effects on social work practice. The data analyzed consist of focus group sessions with 11 professionals within social and youth work. The findings revealed that violence is conceptualized through interpretative repertoires as social functionality, psychological functionality, or dysfunctionality, which affect the professionals' conceptualizations of violence and social work practice. Accordingly, a multifaceted understanding of violence is needed, otherwise girls' and young women's violent acts risk being diminished and made into an individual problem to solved.

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  • 50.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Tjejers våld. Våldets tjejer.: en diskursanalytisk studie om våld, kön och femininitet2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How is girls’ violence constructed and given meaning? In what ways are girls who use violence positioned? This thesis explores how girls’ violence is given meaning within different contexts, with a specific focus on the significance given to notions of gender and femininity. It is based on two studies. The first is based on interviews and creative word-based methods with seven girls/young women aged between 18 and 23. These girls all have personal experiences of acting out and/or using violence. The second study is based on focus group interviews with eleven professionals, three men and eight women. These professionals have various experiences of meeting and working with girls and/or violence. The data from both studies is analysed from a discourse psychological perspective, that is based on interwoven ideas from discourse analysis and social psychology.

    When the girls and the professionals are talking about girls’ violence the results show that girls’ violence concern more than the issue of violence as a problematic social action. It also concern notions of gender, femininity and girlhood. In most cases girls’ violence is constructed as deviant and different, as an anomaly, which needs to be explained in ways that make it possible to include within understandings of femininity and girlhood. The results also show how notions of gender and femininity are interwoven with class, ethnicity, functionality and ideas about being human. Although a position as a violent girl sometimes appears to be useful or desirable, the girls’ and the professionals’ talk shows that there is a risk that girls who use violence are constructed not only as different and deviant but as so incomprehensible that they will be constructed as “crazy”, or in other words less human, and therefore not possible to help or save. For this reason, it is important to reconsider and deconstruct the current discourses of violence. A wider perspective on girls’ violence would make it possible to understand girls who use violence, those who are exposed to girls’ violence and the help and support that is available from the welfare system in new ways.

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