Umeå universitets logga

umu.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
12 1 - 50 av 98
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Anne, Ouma
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Intergenerational Learning Processes of Traditional Medicinal Knowledge and Socio-Spatial Transformation Dynamics2022Ingår i: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 7, artikel-id 661992Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The transfer of traditional knowledge to new generations of traditional medicinal practitioners takes place through place-based intergenerational learning processes, which are increasingly challenged by intensified rural–urban migrations and accelerating biodiversity loss. Research on traditional medicinal knowledge (TMK) has mainly focused on the medicinal properties of different plant species while social, economic, and locational aspects of TMK learning processes have received less attention. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the research field by examining how the learning processes of TMK are affected by on-going socio-spatial transformations in rural and urban parts of the Eastern Lake Victoria region. Urbanization and migration are transforming the learning processes of TMK and affect the ways traditional practitioners are able to transfer TMK to a new generation of practitioners. Based on in-depth interviews, participant observations and focus group discussions with male and female traditional practitioners aged between 30 and 95 from rural and urban settings in Mwanza (Tanzania) and Nyanza (Kenya) in the Eastern Lake Victoria Region. The study analyzes the role of socio-spatial and migration dynamics on major intergenerational forms of learning of TMK (learning in place; being sent; ritual places); health knowledge diffusion and interactions between TMK and formal health systems. Despite some major challenges to the continuity of TMK learning due to increased migration identified by the traditional practitioners, many also saw emerging roles for TMK in primary health care for sustainable livelihoods for the younger generations of men and women in this region.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Några trender inom urfolkshälsoforskningen, anno 20182021Ingår i: Psykisk hälsa och välmående på svensk sida av Sápmi: en antologi / [ed] Åsa Össbo & Patrik Lantto, Umeå: Várdduo-Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2021, 1, s. 7-15Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande kapitel belyser internationella trender inom urfolkshälsoforskningen under 2010-talet såsom historiskt trauma. De studier som gjorts med fokus på samisk hälsa har hittills inte involverat diskussioner om historiskt trauma nämnvärt utan framförallt studerat exempelvis psykisk hälsa mot bakgrund av ackulturationsteorier. 

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning (CEDAR). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Storm Mienna, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    The challenge of Indigenous data in Sweden2021Ingår i: Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Policy / [ed] Maggie Walter, Tahu Kukutai, Stephanie Russo Carroll, Desi Rodriguez-Lonebear, New York & Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, s. 99-111Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous Data Sovereignty is increasingly discussed in CANZUS countries but not as much in the Nordic countries, mostly due to Nordic prohibitions of the collection of ethnicity data. This chapter reports the first study on how the Sami people in Sweden perceive Indigenous control and ownership of Sami health research data. Results show that data and data management are important with preference for Sami authorities, preferably the Sami Parliament to take responsibility of data. However, doubts were expressed on the capacity of the Sami Parliament to undertake a data repository role. The study also shows that the legacy of the Nazi regime, of racial biology and of colonization is still present in discussions on Indigenous data and adds to the lack of trust between the Sami and the Swedish nation state.

  • 4. Balabanski, Anna H.
    et al.
    Dos Santos, Angela
    Woods, John A.
    Mutimer, Chloe A.
    Thrift, Amanda G.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M.
    Siri, Susanna Ragnhild A.
    Boden-Albala, Bernadette
    Krishnamurthi, Rita V.
    F.
    Feigin, Valery L.
    Buchwald, Dedra
    Ranta, Annemarei
    Storm Mienna, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Zavaleta-Cortijo, Carol
    Churilov, Leonid
    Burchill, Luke
    Zion, Deborah
    Longstreth, W.T.
    Tirschwell, David L.
    Anand, Sonia S.
    Parsons, Mark W.
    Brown, Alex
    Warne, Donald K.
    Harwood, Matire
    Barber, P. Alan
    Katzenellenbogen, Judith M.
    Incidence of stroke in indigenous populations of countries with a very high human development index: a systematic review2024Ingår i: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 102, nr 5, artikel-id e209138Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease contributes significantly to disease burden among many Indigenous populations. However, data on stroke incidence in Indigenous populations are sparse. We aimed to investigate what is known of stroke incidence in Indigenous populations of countries with a very high Human Development Index (HDI), locating the research in the broader context of Indigenous health.

    Methods: We identified population-based stroke incidence studies published between 1990 and 2022 among Indigenous adult populations of developed countries using PubMed, Embase, and Global Health databases, without language restriction. We excluded non-peer-reviewed sources, studies with fewer than 10 Indigenous people, or not covering a 35- to 64-year minimum age range. Two reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-text articles and extracted data. We assessed quality using "gold standard" criteria for population-based stroke incidence studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for risk of bias, and CONSIDER criteria for reporting of Indigenous health research. An Indigenous Advisory Board provided oversight for the study.

    Results: From 13,041 publications screened, 24 studies (19 full-text articles, 5 abstracts) from 7 countries met the inclusion criteria. Age-standardized stroke incidence rate ratios were greater in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians (1.7-3.2), American Indians (1.2), Sámi of Sweden/Norway (1.08-2.14), and Singaporean Malay (1.7-1.9), compared with respective non-Indigenous populations. Studies had substantial heterogeneity in design and risk of bias. Attack rates, male-female rate ratios, and time trends are reported where available. Few investigators reported Indigenous stakeholder involvement, with few studies meeting any of the CONSIDER criteria for research among Indigenous populations.

    Discussion: In countries with a very high HDI, there are notable, albeit varying, disparities in stroke incidence between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, although there are gaps in data availability and quality. A greater understanding of stroke incidence is imperative for informing effective societal responses to socioeconomic and health disparities in these populations. Future studies into stroke incidence in Indigenous populations should be designed and conducted with Indigenous oversight and governance to facilitate improved outcomes and capacity building.

  • 5.
    Belancic, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Language policy and Sámi education in Sweden: ideological and implementational spaces for Sámi language use2020Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Utgångspunkt i detta avhandlingsarbete är lärares iakttagelse att allt färre elever som går i sameskolan använder samiska i sin vardag. Tidigare forskning har visat att elever kan sakna sammanhang där minoritetsspråken används och i relation till det samiska språket har hemmet och skolan beskrivits som de två viktigaste språkarenorna. I hemmet spelar föräldrar en viktig roll när det gäller att föra språket vidare till sina barn medan det i skolan är lärare som är ansvariga för arbetet med elevers språkutveckling. Sedan 2011 finns en egen läroplan för sameskolan (Skolverket 2019), där vikten av arbete med samiska normer, traditioner och språk lyfts. Samtidigt beskrivs denna läroplan bygga på den svenska läroplanen. Forskning visar att policydokument, som till exempel läroplanen, kan innebära både möjligheter och hinder för användning av minoritetsspråk och urfolksspråk. Å ena sidan möjliggör policydokument flerspråkighet genom att erkänna urfolksspråken och minoritetsspråken. Å andra sidan riskerar flerspråkighet i klassrummet att hämmas då dessa språk inte anges som undervisningsspråk och anses inte lika viktiga som huvudspråket i policydokumentet (Hornberger och Johnson 2007).

    Metoder

    Detta arbete har utformats som fyra delstudier i fyra artiklar, där olika kvalitativa metoder använts för att möta avhandlings syfte och besvara dess forskningsfrågor. Den första artikeln utgår från en analys av 27 enkätsvar kring elevernas språkanvändning och fokuserar med vem elever pratar samiska, i vilka situationer de gör det samt hur de använder media på samiska. Elevernas svar analyserades utifrån begreppen modersmål, identitet och motivation. Den andra artikeln är en analys av kursplanerna i samiska och svenska för att identifiera olika diskurser i kunskapskraven för samiska och svenska. Syftet med artikeln var att undersöka vilka förutsättningar läroplanen ger eleverna att utveckla en funktionell tvåspråkighet i samiska respektive svenska. Den tredje artikeln är en intervjustudie med elva lärare från två sameskolor. Syftet var att utforska lärarnas uppfattningar kring platsens och lekens betydelse för språkanvändning hos elever. Den sista artikeln är också den en intervjustudie, men denna studie fokuserar hur elevernas språkpraktiker och uppfattningar kring språk kan skapa implicit språkpolicy.

    Teori

    Den övergripande teoretiska ramverket som använts för analys är Nancy H. Hornbergers koncept om ideologiska och implementeringsutrymme för flerspråkiga praktiker (ideological and implementational spaces for multilingual practices). Enligt Hornberger handlar ideologiska utrymmen om syn på flerspråkighet som kan öppna eller begränsa flerspråkighet i utbildningspolicydokument. Implementeringsutrymmen informerar om hur lärare implementerar policydokument, t.ex. läroplan, i klassrummet som främjar flerspråkighet och som i sin tur eventuellt förändrar det ideologiska utrymmet. Omvänt kan det också finnas policydokument som inte stödjer flerspråkighet, men där lärare ändå väljer att arbeta utifrån flerspråkighet i klassrummet eftersom de hittar andra policydokument som stödjer flerspråkighet. Det handlar även om att lärare ger minoritetsspråk makt genom att använda minoritetsspråk i sin undervisning. Hornbergers ramverk visar den dynamiska relationen mellan språk, policydokument, lärare och elever, där alla nivåer påverkar och påverkas av varandra.

    Resultat

    Den första artikeln visar att elever använder sig av samiska i olika sammanhang, men framför allt i hemmet och i skolan. Eleverna beskrev att de använder samiska mest med sina äldre släktingar, följt av pappor och vänner. De angav att de främst använder samiska för att skriva, i något mindre utsträckning vid läsning och minst i muntliga samtal. Inom medianvändning uppgav de flesta elever att de möter och använder samiska när de lyssnar på musik, skriver sms och tittar på TV. Denna på något sätt breda samiska användning återspeglades även i elevernas uppfattningar om den egna förmågan i samiska samt motivation att använda språket. De flesta elever beskriver att de främst använder svenska när de talar, men uttrycker samtidigt en stolthet över det samiska språket. De är inte rädda att prata samiska och döljer inte språket. Även elever som uppgav att de inte talade samiska innan de började skolan kunde ange samiska som sitt modersmål. Resultatet i denna artikel visar en bild av elever som identifierar sig med det samiska språket, då språket anses som en viktig kulturbärare. Positiva attityder och viljan att använda språket är en viktig motivationsfaktor för att utveckla språket. Resultatet visar även att elever behöver fler möjligheter att använda och utveckla sitt samiska språk, vilket kräver att såväl det svenska som det samiska samhället ger samiska elever likvärdig tillgång till båda sina språk.

    I den andra artikeln gjordes en diskursanalys av kunskapskraven i kursplanerna för samiska respektive svenska för att identifiera vilka möjligheter styrdokumentens skrivningar ger elever att utveckla en funktionell tvåspråkighet. Funktionell tvåspråkighet är ett av de 18 övergripande kunskapsmål som sameskolan ska ansvara för att elever ges möjlighet att utveckla. Enligt Skolverket (2019) innebär funktionell tvåspråkighet en förmåga som ger elever möjlighet att röra sig i olika sociala och kulturella kontexter som arbetsmarknader och utbildningssammanhang. Resultatet av denna studie visar att kursplanerna inte ger eleverna likvärdiga möjligheter att utveckla sina språk och en funktionell tvåspråkighet. Vidare visar resultatet att svenska beskrivs som ett akademiskt språk medan samiska beskrivs som ett språk som används muntligt och för vardagskommunikation. Att samiska relateras till en vardagsdiskurs medan svenskämnet relateras till en akademisk väcker frågor om olika makt och status de båda språken ges. Denna studie drar slutsatsen att diskurserna om funktionell tvåspråkighet i kursplanerna är motsägelsefulla och inte stödjer eleverna att ska utveckla samiska som ett fullt fungerande språk inom alla samhällsområden.

    Den tredje artikeln har som utgångspunkt lärares uppfattningar kring samiska elevers språkanvändning i relation till plats och lek. Platsens betydelse är viktig i den samiska kontexten då den knyter ihop den samiska kulturen och har betydelse på både individuell och kollektiv nivå. Lek beskrivs ha en positiv påverkan på barns och elevers språkutveckling oavsett om det handlar om sociodramatisk lek, som kan förklaras som samspel mellan två eller flera barn i from av rollek, eller vuxenstyrd lek. I denna studie undersöks språkanvändning utifrån muntlig användning av samiska och svenska och lek relaterar till elevernas sociodramatiska lek där vuxna inte styr leken. Utifrån tematisk analys kunde tre olika kategorier som har betydelse för samisk och svensk språkanvändning identifieras. De tre olika kategorier visar att plats och lek har betydelse (1) för språkinlärning (2) för den kulturella förståelsen och (3) för språkval och språkkunskap. För att påverka den muntliga språkanvändningen behöver dock leken vara socialt interaktiv, skapa glädje och upplevas som meningsfull, vara engagerande samt, viktigast av allt, äga rum utomhus. Vidare indikerar resultaten att utelek är viktig för samiska elevers språkanvändning eftersom den ger dessa elever flexibilitet att förhandla om sina språk. Studien påpekar betydelsen av platsen utanför klassrummet som viktig för språkutveckling och diskuterar hur mindre strukturerade aktiviteter, som sociodramatisk lek, stöder samiska elevers kulturella utveckling och språkinlärning.

    Den fjärde och sista artikeln bygger på intervjuer med elva samiska elever från två sameskolor. Här lyfts elevernas uppfattningar kring sin användning av samiska respektive svenska. Som teoretisk utgångpunkt används i denna artikel teorier om implicit språkpolicy, vilka handlar om individens val att använda sig av ett eller flera språk och som kan strida mot den officiella språkpolicyn. Särskilt fokuserar denna studie på hur elevernas uppfattningar och praktiker kan påverka och skapa implicit språkpolicy. Eleverna berättade att de växlar mellan språk beroende dels på sin egen kompetens i samiska och dels på vänners och lärares språkkompetens. Även i denna studie, i likhet med i första artikeln, rapporterade eleverna att de använder samiska huvudsakligen i hemmet och i skolan. Utöver det använder några samiska även av resandeskäl och vid rengärde. Resultat visar att elevernas språkliga deltagande i de olika sammanhangen ger dem tillgång till den sociokulturella och ekonomiska kontexten. Detta tyder på att de flesta elever identifierar sig med samiska, även om inte alla pratar samiska hemma. Detta resultat diskuteras i relation till dominerade samiska ideologier som existerar i elevernas omgivning.

    Slutsatser

    Hornbergers koncept visar hur språkuppfattningar, språkkunskaper, språkpraktiker och språkanvändning samspelar med varandra för att forma nya policyarenor. Skapandet av sådana nya policyarenor kan stödja lärares och elevers samiska språkanvändning. Artikel 2 visar att det finns utrymme för användning av det samiska språket utifrån kursplanen för samiska, men att detta utrymme samtidigt är begränsat. Det blir då upp till läraren att fylla detta utrymme med aktiviteter och praktiker som har en positiv inverkan på elevernas språkutveckling. Artikel 3, som poängterar platsens och lekens betydelse för språkanvändning, indikerar möjligheter för lärare inkludera utomhusaktiviteter i sin undervisning för att gynna elevernas utveckling av användning av samiska i muntlig kommutation. Likaså har elever möjligheter att påverka språkanvändning som en viktig del av den dynamiska relationen mellan språk, policydokument och lärare. Som artikel 1 lyfter är elevernas positiva attityder gentemot samiska, viljan att använda samiska och att man känner stolthet faktorer som kan påverka elevernas språkanvändning positivt. Dessutom indikerar artikel 4 att elevernas uppfattningar kan påverka deras egna språkpraktiker, men även skapa nya arenor för samisk språkanvändning. Denna språkanvändning kräver dock stöd från det samiska och svenska samhället för att möjliggöra en positiv utveckling av språkanvändningen. Därför är det viktigt att möjligheter öppnas upp för olika aktörer som lärare, elever, myndigheter, men även forskare att diskutera dessa frågor vidare.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
    Ladda ner (pdf)
    spikblad
    Ladda ner (jpg)
    presentationsbild
    Ladda ner (pdf)
    omslag
  • 6.
    Blåhed, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    "Det är ju faktiskt framtiden som tas ifrån en": en hälsokonsekvensbedömning med anledning av den potentiella gruvetableringen i Gállok/Kallak, svenska Sápmi2020Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inledning: Denna rapport avser den potentiella gruvetableringen i Gállok/Kallak, ett område 4 mil utanför Jokkmokk, svenska Sápmi. Markerna kring Gállok/Kallak används till renskötsel året om av samebyn Jåhkågasska tjiellde. En gruvetablering skulle påverka renarnas migrationsrutt avsevärt, och försvåra hållbar renhållning för samebyn. Det skulle också medföra högre utfordrings– och transportkostnader för renskötarna, potentiellt öka konflikterna mellan samebyarna, och för många skulle det innebära slutet på ett traditionellt leverne. Även om miljökonsekvensbeskrivningar (MKB) genomförs enligt lag vid alla typer av utvecklingsprojekt, så bedöms hälsa oftast vagt och ytligt i dessa, och potentiella hälsoeffekter på lokalbefolkningen bedöms sällan. Syftet med denna hälsokonsekvensbedömning (HKB) var således att utröna hälsoeffekter bland medlemmar i Jåhkågasska tjiellde sameby, med anledning av det planerade gruvverksamheten i Gállok/Kallak.

    Metod: Metoden som användes kallas HKB och är ett femstegsverktyg, rekommenderat av bland annat Folkhälsomyndigheten. Stegen inkluderar i) screening ii) tillämpningsområde iii) bedömning iv) presentation av resultat och rekommendationer och v) övervakning och utvärdering, varav alla förutom det sista steget har genomförts. Steg i) –ii) undersökte förutsättningarna för en HKB. Steg iii) bestod av en litteraturöversikt, följt av en kvalitativ studie. Steg iv) bestod i rapportskrivning med rekommendationer. Gällande den kvalitativa delen genomfördes djupintervjuer med sex deltagare från Jåhkågasska tjiellde, för att fånga nuvarande och potentiella framtida hälsoupplevelser med anledning av den tilltänkta gruvan. Tematisk analys användes för att tolka data.

    Resultat: Resultatet av litteraturöversikten visade att få studier har undersökt hälsorisker i förhållande till lokalbefolkningar. Trots att gruvetableringar ofta planeras på mark som har kopplingar till urfolk så finns få hälsobedömningar i relation till urfolk. Ur intervjuerna framkom fem teman, uppdelade i två avsnitt: “Nuvarande hälsoeffekter och dess bakomliggande orsaker” och “Potentiella framtida hälsoeffekter och dess bakomliggande orsaker”. Under nuvarande effekter diskuterades maktobalansen mellan de olika aktörerna under temat “Det är som Davids kamp mot Goliat”. I detta avsnitt presenterades även de specifika hälsoeffekterna som uppkommit som ett resultat av den långa gruvprocessen, under temat “Det är en långsam process som tar mycket kraft och energi”. Det sista temat i det första avsnittet “Det är som ett försvar (…) som för att skydda sig själv” avslöjade de olika strategier som deltagarna utvecklat för att hantera situationen. Två temat uppstod under potentiella framtida effekter: “Om renen dör, dör allt” och “Man skulle känna att man inte har någon makt, [man skulle känna sig] åsidosatt, bortryckt, inte omtyckt”. Det förstnämnda temat skildrade den negativa påverkan av en potentiell gruva på renskötseln, medan den senare presenterade konkreta hälsokonsekvenser utav densamma.

    Slutsats: Resultaten av studien visade att planerna på en gruva i Gállok/Kallak redan har gett upphov till negativa psykosociala hälsoeffekter i Jåhkågasska tjiellde. Detta var oväntat, då HKB betraktas som ett framtidsorienterat verktyg. Nuvarande hälsoeffekter inkluderade ångest, stress och oro, medan potentiella framtida effekter pekade på försämrad psykisk hälsa. Osäkerheten kring beslut, den långa väntan och rädslan för att förlora ens försörjning – inklusive den framtida generationens försörjning – medverkade till nuvarande, och potentiellt försämrad, psykisk hälsa. 5 Fyra rekommendationer presenteras i denna rapport: i) HKB bör regleras i lag och bli praxis i alla utvecklingsprojekt; ii) HKB bör undersöka och övervaka både nuvarande och framtida hälsoeffekter; iii) HKB bör genomföras på ett systematiskt, deltagande och öppet sätt, och ges samma vikt i beslutsfattande som MKB; v) stöd för att förhindra psykisk ohälsa bör erbjudas i början av varje utvecklingsprojekt.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Blåhed, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    “If the reindeer die, everything dies”: The mental health of a Sámi community exposed to a mining project in Swedish Sápmi2021Ingår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 80, nr 1, artikel-id 1935132Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2006, a British mining company started the process of extracting ore from Gállok/Kallak, in Swedish Sápmi. These grounds are used all year round for reindeer herding by the Sámi community Jåhkågasska tjiellde. While environmental impact assessments should be conducted by law in any development project in Sweden, the health component included is usually vague. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences and perceptions of the Sámi community regarding the current and potential health effects of the proposed mine.A qualitative study, including six in-depth interviews with members of the community, was conducted in 2020. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Five themes were identified and organised in current and future impacts. Current impacts included “It’s like David’s battle against Goliath”, “It’s a slow process that takes a lot of power and energy”, “It’s a defense … like, to protect oneself”; with future impacts including: “If the reindeer die, everything dies”, “You would feel that you do not possess any power, [you would feel] overridden, pushed away, not liked”.The fear of losing current and future generations’ livelihoods appeared to be the main mediators of the current and potential worsened mental health experienced by the community.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Blåhed, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    San Sebastián, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Health impact assessment of a mining project in Swedish Sápmi: lessons learned2022Ingår i: Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal, ISSN 1461-5517, E-ISSN 1471-5465, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 38-45Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas assessing health is a mandatory feature of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) in Sweden, health impacts are often vaguely described, making their health preventive role meaningless. In 2006, a mine was planned in the reindeer grazing lands of a Sámi community in northern Sweden. While an EIA was conducted in 2013, health was superficially addressed. The aim of this study was to describe and reflect on the health impact assessment (HIA) process that assessed the potential health risks and/or benefits that the mine establishment could bring to the Sámi community.The classic five steps of an HIA are presented. The literature review showed a scarcity of studies regarding HIA on mining in indigenous territories. Participants in the study were currently experiencing negative psychosocial health effects and described potential adverse social and health effects originating from the loss of their traditional way of life.Despite certain challenges, this study proved that it is possible to conduct a comprehensive HIA in the context of Sámi health research. Given that mining in Sweden occurs mostly in Sámi territory and the adverse health effects found in this study, the lack of comprehensive HIAs on mining projects in Sweden raises serious concerns.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Brännström, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Institute for Arctic Landscape Research (INSARC), Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    The implementation of Sámi land rights in the Swedish forestry act2024Ingår i: The significance of Sámi rights: law, justice, and sustainability for the indigenous sámi in the nordic countries / [ed] Dorothée Cambou; Øyvind Ravna, Routledge, 2024, s. 101-115Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In northern Sweden, large forest areas are used both for timber production and Sámi reindeer herding, and intense forest management practices have had predominantly negative effects on reindeer herding. Through case law, it is elucidated that Sámi land rights are private property rights based on the longtime use of land. At the same time, landowners own the forest areas. Hence, there exists parallel property rights on the same land. This chapter analyses the recognition and protection of Sámi land rights in the Forestry Act, which regulates the landowners’ forest management. The analysis is based on legal mechanisms that are usually used when property rights relations are regulated within Real Estate Law. This type of legal mechanisms is missing in the Forestry Act, and the legislation does not provide an adequate protection of the land rights of the Sámi. Instead, reindeer herding is regarded as a public interest that is balanced in relation to the public interest of timber production. To achieve a just and sustainable development in line with the rights of Indigenous peoples, there is an urgent need for a legislative reform, and the chapter proposes amendments to provide better protection to the land rights of the Sámi.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Bylund, Christine
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Att forska med, inte på: två former av kritisk metod2022Ingår i: Etnologiskt fältarbete: nya fält och former / [ed] Kim Silow Kallenberg; Elin von Unge; Lisa Wiklund Moreira, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, s. 85-103Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta kapitel redogör vi, var för sig, för de specifika forskningsområden där vi är verksamma. Vi beskriver teoretiska ramverk, forskningsprinciper och ger exempel på metodologiska verktg och frågeställningar som kan vägleda studenter som är intresserade av liknande frågor inom en etnologisk ram.

  • 11.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Sweden's Centre for Rural Medicine.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning (CEDAR). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Sköld, Gabriella
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Disruptions and diversions: the demographic consequences of natural disasters in sparsely populated areas2021Ingår i: The demography of disasters: impacts for population and place / [ed] Dávid Karácsonyi, Andrew Taylor & Deanne Bird, Cham: Springer, 2021, s. 81-99Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Eight Ds model (Carson and Carson 2014) explains the unique characteristics of human and economic geography for sparsely populated areas (SPAs) as disconnected, discontinuous, diverse, detailed, dynamic, distant, dependent and delicate. According to the model, SPAs are subject to dramatic changes in demographic characteristics that result from both identifiable black swan events and less apparent tipping points in longer-term processes of demographic change (Carson et al. 2011). The conceptual foundations for this assertion are clear. Populations in SPAs can experience large and long-term impacts on the overall demographic structureas a result of decisions by a relatively small number of people. High levels of migration and mobility cause constant shifts in the demographic profile and prime SPAs to adapt to many different demographic states (Carson and Carson 2014). The Northern Territory of Australia, for example, experienced previously unseen waves of pre-retirement aged migrants in the past decade or so (Martel et al. 2013) as evidence of detailed but important changes to past trends. However, while dramatic demographic changes are conceptually possible and occasionally observable, there have been few attempts to examine the conditions under which such changes are likely to occur or not to occur. This is an important question particularly in relation to black swan events such as natural disasters because effective disaster management policy and planning is at least partially dependent on understanding who is affected and in what ways (Bird et al. 2013). 

    The purpose of this chapter, therefore, is to begin the process of identifying the conditions under which dramatic demographic responses to natural disasters in SPAs might occur. In the process, we introduce two new 'Ds' with which to describe the nature of demographic change. We propose that natural disasters such as cyclones, floods, earthquakes, bushfires, landslides, avalanches and crop failures present the potential to disrupt or to divert demographic development.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Centre for Tourism and Regional Opportunities, Central Queensland University, Cairns, Australia.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    The mining resource cycle and settlement demography in Malå, Northern Sweden2020Ingår i: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 56, artikel-id e10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the demographic impacts of mining in sparsely populated areas has focused primarily on relatively large towns. Less attention has been paid to smaller villages, which may experience different impacts because of their highly concentrated economies and their small populations, making them more vulnerable to demographic “boom and bust” effects. This paper examines demographic change in four small villages in northern Sweden, which are located close to several mining projects but have evolved through different degrees of integration with or separation from mining. Using a longitudinal “resource cycle” perspective, the demographic trajectories of the villages are compared to understand how different types of settlement and engagement with mining have led to different demographic outcomes in the long term. While the four villages experienced similar trajectories in terms of overall population growth and decline, their experiences in relation to more nuanced indicators, including age and gender distributions and population mobilities, were different, and potential reasons for this are discussed. Due to data limitations, however, the long-term demographic consequences of mining for local Sami people remain unclear. The paper problematises this research gap in light of general concerns about mining impacts on traditional Sami livelihoods.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Dresse, Menayit Tamrat
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Stoor, Jon Petter A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Centre for Sámi Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Prevalence and factors associated with healthcare avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic among the Sámi in Sweden: the SámiHET study2023Ingår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 82, nr 1, artikel-id 2213909Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this population-based cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of healthcare avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated factors among the Sámi population in Sweden. Data from the “Sámi Health on Equal Terms” (SámiHET) survey conducted in 2021 were used. Overall, 3,658 individuals constituted the analytical sample. Analysis was framed using the social determinants of health framework. The association between healthcare avoidance and several sociodemographic, material, and cultural factors was explored through log-binomial regression analyses. Sampling weights were applied in all analyses. Thirty percent of the Sámi in Sweden avoided healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sámi women (PR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.36–1.70), young adults (PR: 1.22, 95% CI:1.05–1.47), Sámi living outside Sápmi (PR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.03–1.34), and those having low income (PR: 1.42, 95% CI:1.19–1.68) and experiencing economic stress (PR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.31–1.67) had a higher prevalence of healthcare avoidance. The pattern shown in this study can be useful for planning future pandemic responses, which should address healthcare avoidance, particularly among the identified vulnerable groups, including the active participation of the Sámi themselves.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Eneslätt, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Therese
    Cicely Saunders Institute, King’s College London, United Kingdom.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Health Care Services, Sweden; Vrije University, Brussels, Belgium.
    The DöBra cards: a tool to support death literacy?2024Ingår i: Culture, spirituality and religious literacy in healthcare: nordic perspectives / [ed] Daniel Enstedt; Lisen Dellenborg, Routledge, 2024, s. 163-179Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the relationship between cultural, spiritual, and religious values on a group level, and individual interpretations of these values in one's own life, focusing on end-of-life care issues. The Swedish DöBra cards, an adaption of the original US GoWish cards, provide an example to highlight this relationship. The DöBra cards are designed to be a tool to support conversations about values and preferences for future care at the end-of-life and thereby support "death literacy". Lessons learned from using the cards in research with older community-dwelling adults, in residential elder care, and among Indigenous Sámi are discussed, as well as those resulting from the cards' use by the general public without researcher mediation. DöBra card use thus far suggests that it may be a generic tool that can avoid systematic exclusion of particular cultural and religious groups while remaining flexible enough to allow for heterogeneity within groups, by recognizing individual interpretation of important values. The card deck's combination of flexibility and structure may potentially support encounters characterized by cultural humility, a prerequisite for care that is "culturally safe" for people with a variety of backgrounds and values.

  • 15. Ens, Emilie
    et al.
    Reyes-García, Victoria
    Asselin, Hugo
    Hsu, Minna
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Reihana, Kiri
    Sithole, Bevyline
    Shen, Xiaoli
    Cavanagh, Vanessa
    Adams, Michael
    Recognition of indigenous ecological knowledge systems in conservation and their role to narrow the knowledge-implementation gap2021Ingår i: Closing the knowledge-implementation gap in conservation science: interdisciplinary evidence transfer across sectors and spatiotemporal scales / [ed] Catarina C. Ferreira; Cornelya F. C. Klütsch, Cham: Springer Nature, 2021, s. 109-139Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Over recent decades, Indigenous knowledge (IK) systems, people, and territories have increasingly been recognized in mainstream conservation practice. However, recognition of the value of IK by governing bodies varies and is often a result of colonial and “development” history and the strength of hegemonic attitudes. Through regional case studies, this chapter explores the progress and challenges of integrating IK in conservation action which is key to narrowing the knowledge-implementation gap in this discipline. Key enabling factors allow IK integration into conservation action at national levels including: recognition of Indigenous land ownership; development and acceptance of cross-cultural or Indigenous methods; devolution of power to include Indigenous People in decision-making processes; acknowledgment of Indigenous groups and their rights; and acknowledgment of the benefits of using IK in biodiversity conservation. The regional case studies presented in this chapter suggest that the recognition of IK systems in conservation programs is greatly facilitated by adopting three pillars of Indigenous empowerment (Indigenous land ownership, acknowledgment of Indigenous peoples and their rights, and acknowledgment of the value of Indigenous knowledge systems) with concomitant benefit to narrow the knowledge-implementation gap in conservation science.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Destouni, G.
    Department of Physical Geography, And Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kalantari, Z.
    Department of Physical Geography, And Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept. of Sustainable Devmt., Environ. Sci. and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Albihn, A.
    Department of Chemistry, Environment and Feed Hygiene, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björkman, C.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bylund, H.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jenkins, E.
    Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, SK, Saskatoon, Canada.
    Koch, A.
    Greenland Center for Health Research, Ilisimatusarfik-University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland; Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kukarenko, N.
    Department of Philosophy and Sociology, Northern Arctic Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation.
    Leibovici, D.
    School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Lemmityinen, J.
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Menshakova, M.
    Department of Natural Sciences, Murmansk Arctic State University, Murmansk, Russian Federation.
    Mulvad, G.
    Greenland Center for Health Research, Ilisimatusarfik-University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Omazic, A.
    Department of Chemistry, Environment and Feed Hygiene, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pshenichnaya, N.
    Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Quegan, S.
    School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Rautio, A.
    Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Thule Institute, University of the Arctic, Oulu, Finland.
    Revich, B.
    Institute of Economic Forecasting, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematik och matematisk statistik.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Tokarevich, N.
    Laboratory of Zoonoses, St Petersburg Pasteur Institute, St Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Thierfelder, T.
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Orlov, D.
    Faculty of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Healthy ecosystems for human and animal health: Science diplomacy for responsible development in the Arctic2021Ingår i: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 57, artikel-id e39Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate warming is occurring most rapidly in the Arctic, which is both a sentinel and a driver of further global change. Ecosystems and human societies are already affected by warming. Permafrost thaws and species are on the move, bringing pathogens and vectors to virgin areas. During a five-year project, the CLINF - a Nordic Center of Excellence, funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers, has worked with the One Health concept, integrating environmental data with human and animal disease data in predictive models and creating maps of dynamic processes affecting the spread of infectious diseases. It is shown that tularemia outbreaks can be predicted even at a regional level with a manageable level of uncertainty. To decrease uncertainty, rapid development of new and harmonised technologies and databases is needed from currently highly heterogeneous data sources. A major source of uncertainty for the future of contaminants and infectious diseases in the Arctic, however, is associated with which paths the majority of the globe chooses to follow in the future. Diplomacy is one of the most powerful tools Arctic nations have to influence these choices of other nations, supported by Arctic science and One Health approaches that recognise the interconnection between people, animals, plants and their shared environment at the local, regional, national and global levels as essential for achieving a sustainable development for both the Arctic and the globe.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Grönvall, Agnes
    et al.
    Enheten för miljökommunikation, Institutionen för stad och land, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU).
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Den gränslösa renen, det gränsdragna Sápmi: Om gränsöverskridande renskötsel, statliga regleringar och konsekvenser för Sárevuopmi2020Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Hausner, Vera Helene
    et al.
    Trainor, Sarah F.
    Cook, David
    Fauchald, Per
    Ford, James
    Klokov, Konstantin
    Nikitina, Elena
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Stammler, Florian
    Impacts of climate change and climate extremes on Arctic livelihoods and communities2021Ingår i: Amap arctic climate update 2021: key trends and impacts / [ed] AMAP, Tromsö: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) , 2021, 1, s. 107-143Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Key findings:

    • Climate change is impacting the subsistence harvestbased livelihoods of many small Arctic communities, affecting the quality or supply of traditional food and drinking water, including availability of species to be harvested, and altering transportation access.

    • Rain-on-snow, extreme snowfall, and variable freezethaw cycles have resulted in severe impacts for reindeer herders. In 2020, multiple snowstorms combined with a late spring thaw resulted in high newborn calf mortality and, together with other social stresses related to Covid-19, created severe crises for reindeer herders in Fennoscandia.

    • Commercial fisheries are expanding in Arctic shelf ecosystems with warmer oceans and less sea ice. This could benefit local economies and job creation, but may also challenge traditional livelihoods and culture and impact vulnerable Arctic ecosystems. Large uncertainties are associated with the effects of ocean acidification, which could potentially counteract increased commercial fishing opportunities. Commercial fishing is currently prohibited by international agreement in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    • Warmer water is enabling a northward expansion of salmon farming in the ice-free European Arctic. The aquaculture industry brings employment opportunities and positive ripple effects for local economies, but also has environmental and societal costs that need to be considered in marine spatial planning and regulatory measures.

    • Arctic cruise tourism is increasing and is attracted to the wildlife associated with the marginal ice zone. Although increased cruise tourism brings the potential for local economic development, adverse local impacts have been reported, including impacts on culture, local hunting and fishing, crowding, and revenue largely benefitting foreign-based individuals and corporations.

    • Permafrost thaw, flooding, and coastal erosion are causing damage to buildings, roads, and other infrastructure, and pose serious financial and health risks to Arctic residents.

    • Wildfire occurrence near populated regions in North America and Sweden, and throughout Siberia, in the past five years has resulted in significant economic loss from property damage as well as physical and mental health impacts.

    • Fishing, cruise tourism, and increased oil and gas operations near the marginal ice zone could increase demand on search and rescue operations and may represent a considerable risk for vulnerable ecosystems. The extent of ice cover is important for determining the fate of an Arctic oil spill and research indicates longer term and more severe ecological impacts from oil spills in the Arctic than in other regions.

    • Understanding and studying integrated socio-ecological systems, including cumulative and cascading impacts, is important not only in terms of research, but also in terms of risk mitigation, hazard response, climate adaptation,

  • 19.
    Heith, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Indigenous counter-narratives: Sámi poetry challenging the mastery of nature2023Ingår i: The Routledge companion to ecopoetics / [ed] Julia Fiedorczuk; Mary Newell; Bernard Quetchenbach; Orchid Tierney, New York: Routledge, 2023, 1, s. 382-390Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The essay explores indigenous ecopoetics with a focus on challenges of dualism between reason and nature connected with the “standpoint of mastery”. This involves the activation of traditional spirituality related to a view on reality which implies that there are no sharp borders between various life forms and that everything is alive and interconnected. Nils-Aslak Valkeapää (1943-2001), the most prominent among modern Sámi authors, was awarded the Nordic Council Literature Prize in 1991. In his poetry Valkeapää consciously uses elements from ancient Sámi culture. The poetry books, first published in North Sami, The Sun, My Father, and The Earth My Mother are both permeated with a traditional indigenous view on cosmos as a pluriverse with sentient beings. In the books, Valkeapää contrasts a traditional holistic Sámi and a modern Western worldview. The latter is depicted as connected with colonization, exploitation of natural resources, invasive technologies, and extinction of life forms. Valkeapää‘s ecopoetic approach is reflected in poetry from different parts of Sápmi, the traditional Sámi homeland. The lyrical I of Norwegian Sámi Inga Ravna Eira’s Ii dát leat dat eana (“This is not that earth”) is a goddess who has returned to earth to questions humans about deterioration of the environment and climate change. In Swedish Sámi Linnea Axelsson’s Aednan references are made to the damming of rivers as well as climate change. Both were first published in 2018. Today, intersections between ecopoetics, decolonization, and activism are found in diverse genres on the Sámi cultural scene, and poetry renewing the ancient oral genres of yoik and story-telling remains a central genre.

  • 20.
    Holand, Øystein
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Kumpula, Jouko
    Natural Resources Institute of Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rasmus, Sirpa
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Røed, Knut
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Project ReiGN: reindeer husbandry in a globalizing North: resilience, adaptations and pathways for actions2020Ingår i: ordic perspectives on the responsible development of the Arctic: pathways to action / [ed] Douglas C. Nord, Springer Nature, 2020, , s. 22s. 227-248Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fennoscandian reindeer husbandry represents ecological, social-economical and institutional gradients reflected in different adaptations and management regimes. This provides for an interdisciplinary comparative research approach, between and within countries. By integrating perspectives from natural and social sciences, ReiGN engages in (1) identifying key drivers, (2) their effects on this pastoral system, and (3) how they are linked to ecological, social and political differences. In this chapter we outline the main challenges confronting this diverse and dynamic social-ecological system within a globalization and climate change perspective. This enables us to evaluate its adaptive capacities as well as its potential to stimulate policy decisions, societal responses and management actions for a viable reindeer husbandry. In this chapter we present reindeer husbandry in a historical context and introduce key concepts of Sámi reindeer husbandry to ease the understanding of our findings presented and discussed. We also offer an overview of the main research areas in which the ReiGN NCoE has conducted its work over the past several years.

  • 21.
    Hossain, Kamrul
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Nilsson, Lena MariaUmeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.Herrmann, Thora MartinaUniversité de Montréal Département de géographie, Canada.
    Food security in the High North: contemporary challenges across the circumpolar region2021Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the challenges facing food security, sustainability, sover-eignty, and supply chains in the Arctic, with a specific focus on Indigenous Peoples.

    Offering multidisciplinary insights with a particular focus on populations in the European High North region, the book highlights the importance of accessible and sustainable traditional foods for the dietary needs of local and Indigenous Peoples. It focuses on foods and natural products that are unique to this region and considers how they play a significant role towards food security and sovereignty. The book captures the tremendous com-plexity facing populations here as they strive to maintain sustainable food systems – both subsistent and commercial – and regain sovereignty over tra-ditional food production policies. A range of issues are explored from food contamination risks, due to increasing human activities in the region, such as mining, to changing livelihoods and gender roles in the maintenance of traditional food security and sovereignty. The book also considers process-ing methods that combine indigenous and traditional knowledge to convert the traditional foods, which are harvested or hunted, into local foods.

    This book offers a broader understanding of food security and sovereignty, and will be of interest to academics, scholars, and policy makers working in food studies, geography and environmental studies, agricultural studies, so-ciology, anthropology, political science, health studies, and biology.

  • 22.
    Hossain, Kamrul
    et al.
    Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law (NIEM), Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Finland.
    Nilsson, Lena MariaUmeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.Herrmann, Thora Martina
    Food security in the high north: contemporary challenges across the circumpolar region2021Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the challenges facing food security, sustainability, sovereignty, and supply chains in the Arctic, with a specific focus on Indigenous Peoples. Offering multidisciplinary insights and with a particular focus on populations in the European High North region, the book highlights the importance of accessible and sustainable traditional foods for the dietary needs of local and Indigenous Peoples. It focuses on foods and natural products that are unique to this region and considers how they play a significant role towards food security and sovereignty. The book captures the tremendous complexity facing populations here as they strive to maintain sustainable food systems - both subsistent and commercial - and regain sovereignty over traditional food production policies. A range of issues are explored including food contamination risks, due to increasing human activities in the region, such as mining, to changing livelihoods and gender roles in the maintenance of traditional food security and sovereignty. The book also considers processing methods that combine indigenous and traditional knowledge to convert the traditional foods, that are harvested and hunted, into local foods. This book offers a broader understanding of food security and sovereignty and will be of interest to academics, scholars and policy makers working in food studies; geography and environmental studies; agricultural studies; sociology; anthropology; political science; health studies and biology.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Hossain, Kamrul
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Herrmann, Thora Martina
    Université de Montréal Département de géographie, Canada.
    Introduction: conceptualizing food (in)security in the High North2021Ingår i: Food Security in the High North: contemporary challenges across the circumpolar region / [ed] Kamrul Hossain, Lena Maria Nilsson, and Thora Martina Herrmann, Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, s. 1-12Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book uses various other concepts, such as food resilience and traditional and local knowledge in food practices and in traditional food systems. It defines food resilience as ‘capacity over time of a food system and its units at multiple levels, to provide sufficient, appropriate and accessible food to all, in the face of various and even unforeseen disturbances’. The book analyses issues related to Indigenous Peoples, livelihood practices, and traditional knowledge in the context of food production, consumption, and diversity. It explores the value of stockfish for strengthening the local food system and the role of stockfish in enhancing local food security. The book investigate the potential of Indigenous knowledge-based traditional pasture management and a rotational grazing system. It highlights the food insecurity of reindeer herders after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident.

  • 24.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri.
    Anne, Ouma
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sámi Traditional Healing in Sweden: An Interview Study2021Ingår i: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 98, nr 5 & 6, s. 813-823Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sámi traditional healing has been practiced in the Sápmi region of northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia for millennia. This study focuses on Sámi traditional healing in Sweden. Through interviews with five active healers and 11 key informants, we found that traditional healing is currently alive in Sweden but hidden. Healers treat health problems ranging from the physical to the spiritual, including mental issues and life’s difficult situations. Low-cost methods are used: spiritual healing with prayers and the laying on of hands, consultation, and herbal remedies. Healing takes place either face-to-face or over distance. Healers charge no money but accept small gifts. Being a healer is a calling. A general concern is voiced by informants about the diminishing number of healers in Sweden.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Kroik, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. The Centre for Rural Medicine, Storuman, Sweden.
    Eneslätt, Malin
    LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Health, Education and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Tishelman, Carol
    LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. The Centre for Rural Medicine, Storuman, Sweden; LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Values and preferences for future end-of-life care among the Indigenous Sámi2022Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 504-514Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intoduction: Research with Indigenous peoples internationally indicates the importance of socio-cultural contexts for end-of-life (EoL) preferences. However, knowledge about values and preferences for future EoL care among the Indigenous Sámi is limited.

    Aim: We investigated if and how a Swedish adaptation of the English-language GoWish cards, DöBra cards, supports reflection and discussion of values and preferences for future EoL care among the Sámi.

    Methods: This qualitative study is based on interviews with 31 self-defined Sámi adults who used DöBra cards at four events targeting the Sámi population, between August 2019 and February 2020. Using directed content analysis, we examined aspects of interviews addressing Sámi-specific and Sámi-relevant motivations for choices. Data about individuals’ card rankings were collated and compiled on group level to examine variation in card choices.

    Findings: All 37 pre-formulated card statements were ranked as a top 10 priority by at least one person. The cards most frequently ranked in the top 10 were a wild card used to formulate an individual preference and thus not representing the same statement, and the pre-formulated card ‘to have those I am close to around me’. Reactions to interviews varied, with some participants commenting on the taboo-laden nature of discussing EoL issues, although many commented positively about EoL conversations in general, and the benefit of using the DöBra cards in particular. We categorised reasoning about Sámi-specific and Sámi-relevant values and preferences under the themes: Attributes of contemporary Sámi culture, Spirituality, Setting for death, Maintaining identity, Preferences related to death, Dying and EoL care and After death.

    Conclusions: The DöBra cards were found to be easy-to-use, understandable and a flexible tool for initiating and supporting conversations about EoL values and preferences. The open formulations of cards, with wild cards, enable discussions about individual values and preferences, with potential to reflect life as a Sámi in Sweden.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Kroik, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Linqvist, Olav
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska institutet.
    The past is present: Death systems among the Indigenous Sámi in Northern Scandinavia today2020Ingår i: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 25, nr 4, s. 470-489Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite growing interest in Indigenous health, the lack of end-of-life (EOL) research about the Sámi people led us to explore experience-based knowledge about EoL issues among the Sámi. We aim here to describe Sámi death systems and the extent to which Kastenbaum’s conceptualisation of death systems is appropriate to Sámi culture. Transcribed conversational interviews with 15 individuals, chosen for their varied experiences with EoL issues among Sámi, were first inductively analysed. Kastenbaum’s model of death systems, with functions along a time trajectory from prevention to social consolidation after death, and the components of people, times, places, and symbols/objects, was applied thereafter in an effort to understand the data. The model provides a framework for understanding aspects of the death system that were Sámi-specific, Sámi-relevant as well as what has changed over time. Whereas Kastenbaum differentiated among the components of the death system, our analysis indicated these were often so interrelated as to be nearly inseparable among the Sámi. Seasonal changes and relationships to nature instead of calendar time dominated death systems, linking people, places and times. The extended family’s role in enculturation across generations and EoL support was salient. Numerous markers of Sámi culture, both death-specific and those recruited into the death system, strengthened community identity in the EoL. 

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Kroik, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. Glesbygdsmedicinskt centrum, Storuman.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. Glesbygdsmedicinskt centrum, Storuman; Karolinska Institutet, LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Using narrative analysis to explore traditional Sámi knowledge through storytelling about End-of-Life2020Ingår i: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 65, artikel-id 102424Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this narrative study, we investigate salient Sámi-specific aspects of a death system, inspired by Kastenbaum's model. We explore traditional Sámi knowledge derived through storytelling in go-along group discussions to gravesites at the tree-line with cultural and historical significance for the Indigenous Sámi peoples. Analysis illustrates how important material and immaterial cultural values are transferred across generations through their connection to people, place, and time—nature-bound as opposed to calendar-bound— objects, and symbols in relation to end-of-life issues. We found that the environment both shaped storytelling and became part of the stories themselves.

  • 28.
    Kroik, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. The Center for Rural Medicine, Region Västerbotten, Storuman, Sweden.
    Tishelman, Carol
    LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad. The Center for Rural Medicine, Region Västerbotten, Storuman, Sweden; LIME/Division of Innovative Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A salutogenic perspective on end-of-life care among the Indigenous Sámi of Northern Fennoscandia2021Ingår i: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 9, nr 6, artikel-id 766Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited empirical data about both health and end-of-life (EoL) issues among the Indigenous Sámi of Fennoscandia. We therefore aimed to investigate experiences of EoL care and support among the Sámi, both from the Sámi community itself as well as from more formalized health and social care services in Sweden. Our primary data source is from focus group discussions (FGDs) held at a Sámi event in 2017 with 24 people, complemented with analysis of previously collected data from 15 individual interviews with both Sámi and non-Sámi informants familiar with dying, death and bereavement among Sámi; “go-along” discussions with 12 Sámi, and individual interviews with 31 Sámi about advance care planning. After initial framework analysis, we applied a salutogenic model for interpretation, focusing on a sense of community coherence. We found a range of generalized resistance resources in relation to the Sámi community, which appeared to support EoL care situations, i.e., Social Organization; Familiarity with EoL Care, Collective Cultural Heritage; Expressions of Spirituality; Support from Majority Care Systems; and Brokerage. These positive features appear to support key components of a sense of community coherence, i.e., comprehensibility, meaningfulness and manageability. We also found relatively few, but notable deficits that may diminish the sense of community coherence, i.e., lack of communication in one’s own language; orientation, familiarity and/or agreement in contacts with formal health and social care systems; and/or support from extended family. The results suggest that there is a robust basis among Sámi for well-functioning EoL care; a challenge is in developing supportive interactions with the majority health and social care systems that support and complement these structures, for partnership in developing care that is meaningful, comprehensible and manageable even in potentially difficult EoL situations.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Setting store by sources2022Ingår i: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 31, s. 1-3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Sehlin MacNeil, KristinaUmeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sources (FADC)2022Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 31.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Várdduo – centrum för samisk forskning2023Ingår i: Humaniora: om humanistiska fakulteten vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Alf Arvidsson; Lars-Erik Edlund; Elena Lindholm; Per Melander; Christer Nordlund, Umeå: Umeå University, 2023, 2, s. 161-162Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 32.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Practice-based research policy in the light of indigenous methodologies: the EU and Swedish education2022Ingår i: In education, E-ISSN 1927-6117, Vol. 28, nr 1a, s. 23-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory research methods in education, such as action research, have been around for some time. Recently, not only researchers but also research policy makers have highlighted the importance of participation between society and research. Citizen science, science with and for society, and practice-based educational research are examples of approaches that aim to bring society and research more closely together. In this paper, we explore underlying premises behind practice-based research policies in the EU and in Swedish educational research policy. In order to understand how participation can be understood, we have analysed them closely through a lens of Indigenous methodologies. Results reveal an underlying understanding of participation as nonreciprocal where expertise is a key concept, researchers hold this expertise, and where the main responsibilities for research lie with the researchers. However, the results also indicate a sense of respect for practice and a willingness to form relationships between research and practice.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Lindmark, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    "Välkomna tillbaka!": Återbegravning av samiska mänskliga kvarlevor som försonande praktik2020Ingår i: Rituella rum och heliga platser: historiska, samtida och litterära studier / [ed] Daniel Lindmark och Anders Persson, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2020, s. 97-131Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 34.
    Lindmark, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Persson, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Rituella rum och heliga platser: en inledning2020Ingår i: Rituella rum och heliga platser: historiska, samtida och litterära studier / [ed] Daniel Lindmark och Anders Persson, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2020, s. 7-16Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 35.
    Lindmark, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Persson, AndersUmeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Rituella rum och heliga platser: historiska, samtida och litterära studier2020Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 36.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sámi forced relocation in Sweden during 1920s-30s: history and narratives2022Ingår i: Journal of Arctic studies: V, Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center , 2022, Vol. 5, s. 199-216Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sámi Indigenous population live in the arctic Sápmi area across four countries: Norway,Sweden,Finland and the Kola Peninsulaof Russia. Reindeer husbandry is part of their profession and livelihood for millennia, where reindeers graze in Sápmi land without borders from mountains to the seashore at different seasons. Over the last one century,due to political  development between Sápmi countries,the country borders were closed forr eindeer grazing. Between 1920s and 1930s about 300-400 Sámi people were forced to relocate from northern to southern counties of Sápmi in Sweden. The study aims to introduce the history and consequences of the forced relocation to some of the affected Sámi people based on available information that the author can find, mainly the work of Prof. Patrik Lantto and Author Elin Anna Labba. The study shows that the forced relocations have had and still have an effect on reindeer husbandry in Sweden today. Through narratives of some relocated North Sámi,the stories are told on impact of the forced relocation to those relocatedreindeer herders’ lives. Through analysis of state policies and an example ofone reindeer herding district,Vapsten, one negative consequence of the forced relocation is described as strong intro-Sámi conflicts that are still unresolved even today.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Anne, Ouma
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sámi traditional medicine: practices, usage, benefit, accessibility and relation to conventional medicine, a scoping review study2021Ingår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 80, nr 1, artikel-id 1924993Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sámi Indigenous populations, who live in the arctic Sápmi area across four countries–Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia–have practiced traditional medicine (TM) for millennia. However, today Sámi TM is unknown within the Swedish health care services (HCS). The aim of this study is to describe the nature and scope of research conducted on Sámi TM among the four Sápmi countries. This study covers peer-reviewed research published in the English language up to 8 April 2020. From 15 databases, 240 abstracts were identified, and 19 publications met the inclusion criteria for full review. Seventeen studies were conducted in Norway, one in Finland and one in Sweden, none in Russia. In northern Norway, Sámi TM is actively used by the local communities, and is claimed to be effective, but is not accessible within HCS. Holistic worldviews, including spirituality, prevail in Sámi TM from practitioners’ selection criteria to health care practices to illness responsibilities. An integration of Sámi TM into HCS is clearly the desire of local communities. Comparisons were made between Sámi TM and conventional medicine on worldviews, on perspectives towards each other, and on integration. More studies are needed in Sweden, Finland and Russia.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    瓦尔多的原住民研究—瑞典于默奥大学萨米族人研究中心: [Indigenous Research at Várdduo: Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden]2022Ingår i: Journal of Arctic Studies, Vol. 2, s. 341-351Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Várdduo – The Centre for Sami Research was established in the year 2000 under the Faculty of Arts. Umeå University has expanded its Indigenous research area, from Sami languages ​​and culture at the beginning (1975), to four areas today: Education and Language, Health and Living Conditions, Land and Water, Culture and History. This essay introduces the development of indigenous-related research at Umeå University with a focus on the research from Várdduo in the past 20 years. Today Várdduo serves as a hub for active expansion of research related to Indigenous issues at Umeå university to local, national and international arenas. Indigenous research at Umeå University/Várdduo, although still mainly on Sámi issues, has experienced a development characterized by fast growth, diversity, interdisciplinarity and increasing international commitment

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Fulltext in English
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Fulltext in Chinese
  • 39.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Sedholm, Oscar
    Arnold, Torbjörn
    Ponga, Anita
    Spik, Laila
    Sámi indigenous people’s tradition on uses of plants for healing/health and Sámi relationship with nature: an interview study in northern Sweden2023Ingår i: Journal of Arctic studies: VI, Liaocheng: Arctic Studies Center , 2023, Vol. 6, s. 176-246Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sámi Indigenous population lives in the Arctic Sápmi area across four countries: Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. Wild plants have been gathered and used for food and medicine for millennia in Sámi tradition. This study aims to introduce Sámi tradition on the use of plants for medicine and health in Sweden and the Sámi Indigenous People’s view and relationship with nature and their land. A qualitative interview research method was used with five key informants in Sweden, of whom four are Sámi. The study finds that in Sámi tradition on plant use, medicine, food and spirits are inseparable; the knowledge carriers for medical use are Sámi healers, of whom not many are still living. The young Sámi people know very little about this traditional knowledge. The Sámi Indigenous People have a very close and respectful relationship with their land/nature, based in a view that is holistic, interconnected and long-term. Today the Sámi People have a troubled relationship with their land. Ecological systems theory is used to understand the current situation on plant use and relationships with the land. The Sámi worldview is still relevant for today’s societies that face great challenges from climate change to the pandemic.  

  • 40.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Indigenous research at Várdduo - Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden2022Ingår i: Journal of Arctic studies: V, Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center , 2022, Vol. 5, s. 341-351Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Várdduo – The Centre for Sami Research was established in the year 2000 under the Faculty of Arts. Umeå University has expanded its Indigenous research area, from Sami languages ​​and culture at the beginning (1975), to four areas today: Education and Language, Health and Living Conditions, Land and Water, Culture and History. This essay introduces the development of indigenous-related research at Umeå University with a focus on the research from Várdduo in the past 20 years. Today Várdduo serves as a hub for active expansion of research related to Indigenous issues at Umeå university to local, national and international arenas. Indigenous research at Umeå University/Várdduo, although still mainly on Sámi issues, has experienced a development characterized by fast growth, diversity, interdisciplinarity and increasing international commitment. 

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Skogssamernas historia, ett oskrivet kapitel?2020Ingår i: Skogssamisk vilja: en jubileumsantologi om skriften "Dat läh mijen situd", Karin Stenberg och skogssamisk historia och nutid / [ed] Åsa Össbo, Bertil Marklund, Lena Maria Nilsson & Krister Stoor, Umeå: Várdduo - Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2020, s. 117-143Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 42. Marsh, Jillian
    et al.
    Daniels-Mayes, Sheelagh
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Nursey-Bray, Melissa
    Learning through an undisciplined lens: the centring of indigenous knowledges and philosophies in higher education in Australia and Sweden2023Ingår i: Inclusion, equity, diversity, and social justice in education: a critical exploration of the sustainable development goals / [ed] Sara Weuffen; Jenene Burke; Margaret Plunkett; Anitra Goriss-Hunter; Susan Emmett, Springer, 2023, s. 57-75Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Social justice is part of higher education discourse within university mission statements, graduate qualities and university rhetoric globally (Connell, 2019; Wilson-Strydom, 2015). In Australia, this focus includes re-centring Indigenous Australian epistemologies and ontologies from the subjugated margins in academia (Moreton-Robinson, 2009; Nakata, 2007) and in Sweden, building an understanding of intergenerational traumas of school-based systemic violence against Indigenous Sámi (Atkinson, 2002; Norlin, 2017). This chapter highlights opportunities for upward socio-economic mobility for First Nations peoples through surpassing the deficit thinking still prevalent among invader-coloniser populations. Included in this we reference the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals SDG 4: Quality Education and SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities (United Nations, 2021) and its potential to influence educational discourses in teaching practice and curriculum construction in Australia and Sweden. Indigenous Standpoint Theory (IST) and Critical Race Pedagogy (CRP) are utilised as critical frameworks for unpacking the historical background of racial oppression, understanding the complexities of Indigeneity and post-colonising constructs, and disrupting whiteness embedded in mono-cultural education. As practicing educators, we have sought in this chapter, to critically explore how Indigenous Knowledges and culturally responsive pedagogies are disrupting ethnocentric ontologies within the university sector through an emergent undisciplined strategy. 

  • 43. Mörkenstam, Ulf
    et al.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    De svenska samerna och kampen för erkännande och rättigheter som urfolk2021Ingår i: Migration och etnicitet: perspektiv på mångfald i Sverige / [ed] Mehrdad Darvishpour, Charles Westin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, 3, s. 135-162Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 44.
    Nachet, Louise
    et al.
    Université Laval, Canada.
    Beckett, Caitlynn
    Memorial University, Canada.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Framing extractive violence as environmental (in)justice: A cross-perspective from indigenous lands in Canada and Sweden2022Ingår i: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 12, artikel-id 100949Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore Environmental Justice in two Indigenous contexts, Canada and Sweden, and uses the concept of Extractive Violence to discuss colonial articulations of extractivism and community strategies for dealing with it. Through analysis of existing research, as well as the experiences shared by the two Indigenous leaders, the paper investigates the different strategies and narratives of environmental justice enacted, and how is justice framed and discussed in response to extractive violence.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45. Neufeld, Hannah Tait
    et al.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Griffith Jones, Rhys
    Indigenous peoples' health and well-being in a changing climate2022Ingår i: Climate change 2022: impacts, adaptation and vulnerability : contribution of Working Group II to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) / [ed] Hans-Otto Pörtner, Debra C. Roberts, Melinda M.B. Tignor, Elvira Poloczanska, Katja Mintenbeck, Andrés Alegría, Marlies Craig, Stefanie Langsdorf, Sina Löschke, Vincent Möller, Andrew Okem, Bardhyl Rama, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022, s. 1054-1058Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Chapter 7, Box 7.1: Studies on climate change as it affects the health of Indigenous Peoples generally focus on non-displaced indigenous groups; that is, Indigenous Peoples maintaining culturally important elements of a land-based traditional lifestyle. Here we use an eco-medicine perspective in which the impacts of climate change on health are divided into primary, secondary and tertiary effects, as discussed below. Many analyses of indigenous health in relation to climate change use the One Health concept.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46. Niia, Lars Petter
    Gabna sameby i förändringens tid 1890-19402023Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 47.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Some reflections on Swedish food strategies from a Sami and an Arctic perspective2021Ingår i: Food Security in the High North: contemporary challenges across the circumpolar region / [ed] Kamrul Hossain, Lena Maria Nilsson, and Thora Martina Herrmann, Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, s. 203-218Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The European North is generally considered a food secure area, which is an area where 'all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life' (F.A.O., 1996). This depends to a large extent on food imports and national and international trade. In Sweden, the level of food sovereignty is low and, since the nation's entrance into the European Union in 1995, rapidly declining. In 2017, all political parties in Sweden agreed to the first ever National Food Strategy. The key concept of this strategy is market orientation. The aim is to increase food production sector in relation to consumers' demands and to increase the product value of local foods.

    One hundred years ago, the strong interconnection between the food strategies of Indigenous Sami and settlers in a system based on knowledge and relationships was significant for the traditional lifestyles of Northernmost Sweden. This chapter reflects on the extent to which it is possible to apply traditional knowledge of food strategies in Arctic Sweden to modern policies aimed at food sovereignty.

    According to these reflections, a future sustainable food strategy for Sápmi/Northern Sweden should be outlined and agreed on by the Swedish government and the Swedish Sami Parliament. It should be product oriented, ecological, in balance with nature, and based primarily on plants and animals adapted to an Arctic or sub-Arctic boreal climate zone. It should also specify caloric values and nutritional content, include local and traditional perspectives, include strategies for waste reduction, promote knowledge sharing from different knowledge systems, and strengthen relationships among all inhabitants in the area.This chapter reflects on the extent to which it is possible to apply traditional knowledge of food strategies in Arctic Sweden to modern policies aimed at food sovereignty. It discusses how traditional knowledge of foods and food systems in Arctic Sweden could be applied to food security policies today, especially as Northern Europe is increasingly affected by climate change. This chapter reviews Sweden's 2017 National Food Strategy and reflect on it from a Sami cultural perspective. World War II challenged Sweden's food system and initiated the shift toward national rather than local food systems. From 1945 to 1990, domestic food production was financially supported and protected from international competition by customs and regulations. Food prices have been decreasing for a long time, and most Swedes trust that global market food will continue providing them with their daily bread. Consequently, food security and sovereignty have been considered non-issues.

  • 48.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Nilsson, Aina
    Minnesbild från en skogssamisk skoltid2020Ingår i: Skogssamisk vilja: en jubileumsantologi om skriften "Dat läh mijen situd", Karin Stenberg och skogssamisk historia och nutid / [ed] Åsa Össbo, Bertil Marklund, Lena Maria Nilsson, Krister Stoor, Umeå: Várdduo, centrum för samisk forskning , 2020, s. 251-266Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    När en bok om minnesbilder från samernas skoltid gavs ut inom Svenska kyrkans vitboksprojekt saknade Aina Nilsson berättelser om de samer som gick i vanlig folkskola, vilket merparten av skogssamerna gjorde. I detta kapitel berättar Aina för Lena Maria Nilsson om sin skolgång i Árviesjávrrie under 1930- och 1940-talet där hon under ett par år hade Karin Stenberg som lärarinna.

  • 49.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Stoor, Jon Petter A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Centre for Sámi Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, UiT – the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway.
    The health experience of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Sámi in Sweden: a cross-sectional comparative study2023Ingår i: The Arctic Yearbook, ISSN 2298-2418, s. 1-13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns en internationell oro för att COVID-19-pandemin kan ha haft allvarliga effekter på urfolkens levnadsförhållanden och hälsa. Såvitt vi vet har ingen forskning publicerats om påverkan av COVID-19 på samernas liv. Syftet med denna studie är att bedöma hälso- och sociala upplevelser bland samerna, jämfört med den nationella befolkningen, i Sverige under den första perioden av pandemin innan vaccin mot COVID-19 fanns tillgängligt.

    Två populationsbaserade undersökningar genomfördes i den samiska och svenska befolkningen mellan februari och maj 2021. Förutom sociodemografisk och hälsoinformation inkluderades en enkät om COVID-19-hälsoupplevelse utformad av Folkhälsomyndigheten i Sverige. Båda undersökningarna riktade sig till individer i åldrarna 18-84 år och deltagandegraden var 40,9% i den samiska studien och 44,3% i den nationella studien.

    Baserat på den insamlade datan verkar det som att samer i Sverige har påverkats på ett liknande eller till och med mildare sätt än den nationella befolkningen under för-vaccinfasen av COVID-19-pandemin. Vidare studier behövs för att utforska fördelningen av dessa utfall bland olika samiska grupper. Registerstudier behövs också för att utvärdera den kliniska påverkan av COVID-19 i den samiska befolkningen, det vill säga sjuklighet och dödlighet.

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Várdduo – Centrum för samisk forskning.
    Forskning kring urfolk vid Umeå universitet - mångfald, tvärvetenskap och internationalisering2021Ingår i: Respons, ISSN 2001-2292, nr 4, s. 12-14Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan 1975 har det bedrivits utbildning och forskning i samiska språk och samisk kultur i olika institutionella konstellationer vid Umeå universitet. I sin essä i Respons nummer 2/2021 ger professor Jonny Hjelm en missvisande bild av denna forskning. Här ger vi vår egen bild av utvecklingen av urfolksrelaterad forskning vid Umeå universitet de senaste 20 åren med utgångspunkt från en översiktlig kvantitativ bibliometrisk analys av 416 vetenskapligt granskade publikationer i DiVa-databasen.

    Språk och utbildning är det dominerande forskningsfältet i den urfolksrelaterade vetenskapliga produktionen vid Umeå universitet och står för 26 procent av artiklarna. Hälsa och levnadsförhållanden är ett annat viktigt forskningsområde (20 procent), varpå följer mark och vatten (14 procent), kultur och historia (12 procent) samt övrig forskning (28 procent).

    Dagens Várdduo är en heterogen och dynamisk forskningsmiljö där många olika teoretiska inriktningar och metoder tillämpas. Utvecklingen framöver ser ut att gå mot en starkare betoning på det internationella forskningsområdet urfolksstudier.

12 1 - 50 av 98
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf