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  • 1.
    Alfvén, Tobias
    et al.
    Institutionen för global folkhälsa, Karolinska institutet; Sachsska barn- och ungdomssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Ekman, Anna-Theresia
    Institutionen för global folkhälsa, Karolinska institutet; S:t Görans sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Awil, Hana
    ST-läkare i allmänmedicin, Mora.
    Holmer, Hampus
    Institutionen för global folkhälsa, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm; Duke Global Health Institute, USA.
    Mia Ekström, Anna
    Institutionen för global folkhälsa, Karolinska institutet; Tema infektion och inflammation, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Agardh, Anette
    Socialmedicin och global hälsa, Lunds universitet.
    Frielingsdorf Lundqvist, Helena
    Flyktingmedicinskt centrum, Norrköping; Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap, Linköpings universitet.
    Agenda 2030 och målen för en hållbar utveckling angår oss alla: [The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development - an important opportunity to improve global health]2020In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117, article id 20037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its seventeen Sustainable Development Goals were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2015. It is a bold agenda for global social, environmental and economic development, with human health as a central theme. Even though substantial improvements in health have been achieved during the last decades, every year over 5 million children die, mostly from preventable causes, and 300 000 women die in conjunction with childbirth. Premature deaths from non-communicable diseases are increasing, and our ability to treat infections is under threat through widespread anti-microbial resistance. Climate change is recognized as the biggest threat to health in our time. When the world now starts to plan for how society and our health systems should be reorganized after the COVID-19 pandemic the 2030 Agenda could and should play a central role. In this context, Agenda 2030 provides an ambitious roadmap for development, with its emphasis on collaboration across borders and disciplines. The agenda is achievable but reaching its goals will require strong commitment at all levels and societal change on a large scale.

  • 2.
    Bancroft, Dani
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Environments and Society, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Power, Grace M.
    Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Jones, Robert T.
    Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Massad, Eduardo
    School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; School of Applied Mathematics, Fundação Getulio Vargas, RJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Iriat, Jorge Bernstein
    Institute of Collective Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, BA, Brazil.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Logan, James G.
    Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Vector control strategies in Brazil: a qualitative investigation into community knowledge, attitudes and perceptions following the 2015-2016 Zika virus epidemic2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e050991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern following the rapid emergence of neonatal microcephaly in Brazil during the 2015-2016 Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. In response, a national campaign sought to control Aedes mosquito populations and reduce ZIKV transmission. Achieving adherence to vector control or mosquito-bite reduction behaviours, including the use of topical mosquito repellents, is challenging. Coproduction of research at the community level is needed to understand and mitigate social determinants of lower engagement with Aedes preventive measures, particularly within disempowered groups.

    DESIGN: In 2017, the Zika Preparedness Latin America Network (ZikaPLAN) conducted a qualitative study to understand individual and community level experiences of ZIKV and other mosquito-borne disease outbreaks. Presented here is a thematic analysis of 33 transcripts from community focus groups and semistructured interviews, applying the Health Belief Model (HBM) to elaborate knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of ZIKV and vector control strategies.

    PARTICIPANTS: 120 purposively sampled adults of approximate reproductive age (18-45); 103 women participated in focus groups and 17 men in semistructured interviews.

    SETTING: Two sociopolitically and epidemiologically distinct cities in Brazil: Jundiaí (57 km north of São Paolo) and Salvador (Bahia state capital).

    RESULTS: Four key and 12 major themes emerged from the analysis: (1) knowledge and cues to action; (2) attitudes and normative beliefs (perceived threat, barriers, benefits and self-efficacy); (3) behaviour change (household prevention and community participation); and (4) community preferences for novel repellent tools, vector control strategies and ZIKV messaging.

    CONCLUSIONS: Common barriers to repellent adherence were accessibility, appearance and effectiveness. A strong case is made for the transferability of the HBM to inform epidemic preparedness for mosquito-borne disease outbreaks at the community level. Nationally, a health campaign targeting men is recommended, in addition to local mobilisation of funding to strengthen surveillance, risk communication and community engagement.

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  • 3.
    Depoux, Anneliese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Martin, Sam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Karafillakis, Emilie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Larson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre Virchow-Villerme, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    The pandemic of social media panic travels faster than the COVID-19 outbreak2020In: Journal of Travel Medicine, ISSN 1195-1982, E-ISSN 1708-8305, Vol. 27, no 3, article id taaa031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We need to rapidly detect and respond to public rumours, perceptions, attitudes and behaviours around COVID-19 and control measures. The creation of an interactive platform and dashboard to provide real-time alerts of rumours and concerns about coronavirus spreading globally would enable public health officials and relevant stakeholders to respond rapidly with a proactive and engaging narrative that can mitigate misinformation.

  • 4.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Johansson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mohamud, Khalif Bile
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Freij, Lennart
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dalmar, Abdirisak Ahmed
    Ibrahim, Abdirashid Omer
    Hagi, Abdisamad Abikar
    Abdi, Abshir Ali
    Hussein, Abdullahi Sheik
    Shirwa, Abdulkadir Mohamed
    Warsame, Amina
    Ereg, Derie Ismail
    Aden, Mohamed Hussain
    Qasim, Maryan
    Ali, Mohamed Khalid
    Elmi, Abdullahi
    Afrah, Abdullahi Warsame
    Sabtiye, Faduma Omar
    Guled, Fatuma Ege
    Ahmed, Hinda Jama
    Mohamed, Halima
    Tinay, Halima Ali
    Mohamud, Kadigia Ali
    Yusuf, Mariam Warsame
    Omar, Mayeh
    Abdi, Yakoub Aden
    Abdulkadir, Yusuf
    Johansson, Annika
    Kulane, Asli Ali
    Schumann, Barbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Essen, Birgitta
    Kalengayi, Faustine Nkulu
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lönnberg, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norder, Helene
    Schröders, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Edin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sahlen, Klas-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gustafsson, Lars L.
    Persson, Lars-Ake
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Hasselberg, Marie
    Klingberg, Marie
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hogberg, Ulf
    Sjostrom, Urban
    Omar, Saif
    Healing the health system after civil unrest2015In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 5. Kailembo, Alexander
    et al.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. 2.Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle.
    Common risk factors and edentulism in adults, aged 50 years and over, in China, Ghana, India and South Africa: results from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)2016In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Edentulism (loss of all teeth) is a final marker of disease burden for oral health common among older adults and poorer populations. Yet most evidence is from high-income countries. Oral health has many of the same social and behavioural risk factors as other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) which are increasing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries with ageing populations. The "common risk factor approach" (CRFA) for oral health addresses risk factors shared with NCDs within the broader social and economic environment. Methods: The aim is to improve understanding of edentulism prevalence, and association between common risk factors and edentulism in adults aged 50 years and above using nationally representative samples from China (N = 11,692), Ghana (N = 4093), India (N = 6409) and South Africa (N = 2985). The data source is the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 (2007-2010). Multivariable logistic regression describes association between edentulism and common risk factors reported in the literature. Results: Prevalence of edentulism: in China 8.9 %, Ghana 2.9 %, India 15.3 %, and South Africa 8.7 %. Multivariable analysis: in China, rural residents were more likely to be edentulous (OR 1.36; 95 % CI 1.09-1.69) but less likely to be edentulous in Ghana (OR 0.53; 95 % CI 0.31-0.91) and South Africa (OR 0.52; 95 % CI 0.30-0.90). Respondents with university education (OR 0.31; 95 % CI 0.18-0.53) and in the highest wealth quintile (OR 0.68; 95 % CI 0.52-0.90) in China were less likely to be edentulous. In South Africa respondents with secondary education were more likely to be edentulous (OR 2.82; 95 % CI 1.52-5.21) as were those in the highest wealth quintile (OR 2.78; 95 % CI 1.16-6.70). Edentulism was associated with former smokers in China (OR 1.57; 95 % CI 1.10-2.25) non-drinkers in India (OR 1.65; 95 % CI 1.11-2.46), angina in Ghana (OR 2.86; 95 % CI 1.19-6.84) and hypertension in South Africa (OR 2.75; 95 % CI 1.72-4.38). Edentulism was less likely in respondents with adequate nutrition in China (OR 0.68; 95 % CI 0.53-0.87). Adjusting for all other factors, compared with China, respondents in India were 50 % more likely to be edentulous. Conclusions: Strengthening the CRFA should include addressing common determinants of health to reduce health inequalities and improve both oral and overall health.

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  • 6. Kailembo, Alexander
    et al.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, New Lambton Heights, Australia.
    Socioeconomic inequality in self-reported unmet need for oral health services in adults aged 50 years and over in China, Ghana, and India2018In: International Journal for Equity in Health, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 17, article id 99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The 2015 Global Burden of Disease Study estimated that oral conditions affect 3.5 billion people worldwide with a higher burden among older adults and those who are socially and economically disadvantaged. Studies of inequalities in the use of oral health services by those in need have been conducted in high-income countries but evidence from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study measures and describes socioeconomic inequality in self-reported unmet need for oral health services in adults aged 50 years and over, in China, Ghana and India.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of national survey data from the WHO SAGE Wave 1 (2007-2010) was conducted. Study samples in China (n = 1591), Ghana (n = 425) and India (n = 1307) were conditioned on self-reported need for oral health services in the previous 12 months. The binary dependent variable, unmet need for oral health services, was derived from questions about self-reported need and service use. Prevalence was estimated by country. Unmet need was measured and compared in terms of relative levels of education and household wealth. The methods were logistic regression and the relative index of inequality (RII). Models were adjusted for age, sex, area of residence, marital status, work status and self-rated health.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of unmet need was 60, 80, and 62% in China, Ghana and India respectively. The adjusted RII for education was statistically significant for China (1.5, 95% CI:1.2-1.9), Ghana (1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.7), and India (1.5, 95% CI:1.2-2.0), whereas the adjusted RII for wealth was significant only in Ghana (1.3, 95% CI:1.1-1.6). Male sex was significantly associated with self-reported unmet need for oral health services in India.

    CONCLUSIONS: Given rapid population ageing, further evidence of socioeconomic inequalities in unmet need for oral health services by older adults in LMICs is needed to inform policies to mitigate inequalities in the availability of oral health services. Oral health is a universal public health issue requiring attention and action on multiple levels and across the public private divide.

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  • 7. Kailembo, Alexander
    et al.
    Quiñonez, Carlos
    Lopez Mitnik, Gabriela V.
    Weintraub, Jane A.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Iafolla, Timothy
    Dye, Bruce A.
    Income and wealth as correlates of socioeconomic disparity in dentist visits among adults aged 20 years and over in the United States, 2011–20142018In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most studies in the United States (US) have used income and education as socioeconomic indicators but there is limited information on other indicators, such as wealth. We aimed to assess how two socioeconomic status measures, income and wealth, compare as correlates of socioeconomic disparity in dentist visits among adults in the US.

    Methods: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014 were used to calculate self-reported dental visit prevalence for adults aged 20 years and over living in the US. Prevalence ratios using Poisson regressions were conducted separately with income and wealth as independent variables. The dependent variable was not having a dentist visit in the past 12 months. Covariates included sociodemographic factors and untreated dental caries. Parsimonious models, including only statistically significant (p < 0.05) covariates, were derived. The Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) measured the relative statistical quality of the income and wealth models. Analyses were additionally stratified by race/ethnicity in response to statistically significant interactions.

    Results: The prevalence of not having a dentist visit in the past 12 months among adults aged 20 years and over was 39%. Prevalence was highest in the poorest (58%) and lowest wealth (57%) groups. In the parsimonious models, adults in the poorest and lowest wealth groups were close to twice as likely to not have a dentist visit (RR 1.69; 95%CI: 1.51–1.90) and (RR 1.68; 95%CI: 1.52–1.85) respectively. In the income model the risk of not having a dentist visit were 16% higher in the age group 20–44 years compared with the 65+ year age group (RR 1.16; 95%CI: 1.04–1.30) but age was not statistically significant in the wealth model. The AIC scores were lower (better) for the income model. After stratifying by race/ethnicity, age remained a significant indicator for dentist visits for non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Asians whereas age was not associated with dentist visits in the wealth model.

    Conclusions: Income and wealth are both indicators of socioeconomic disparities in dentist visits in the US, but both do not have the same impact in some populations in the US.

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  • 8. Khan, Ns
    et al.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tobacco Control: Exploring Oral Health Professionals’ Outlook in North Sweden2014In: 19th Annual Congress of the European Association of Dental Public Health. Abstract no: 2683, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Gender-based violence among people with disabilities is a neglected public health topic2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, p. 97-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to provide an analytical insight on the current state of knowledge on gender-based violence among people with disabilities, a topic where the level of data is relatively low. We briefly discuss the current research on: (a) the prevalence, risk factors and the theoretical approaches for gender-based violence among people with disabilities. (b) Service provision among people with disabilities who experience gender-based violence. (c) We also highlight areas where further research is required, the applicable theoretical approaches and provide an example on how Sweden is attempting to bridge this knowledge gap through implementing the Disability and Intimate-partner violence project (DIS-IPV) project

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  • 10.
    Nordenstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Holmer, Hampus
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Agardh, Anette
    Lunds universitet.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet.
    Ekström, Anna Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Mellander, Lotta
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala universitet.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Shakely, Delér
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sinabulya, Helen
    Institutionen för molekylär medicin och kirurgi, Karolinska Institutet.
    Global hälsa på läkarutbildningen igår, idag och imorgon2021In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 232-243Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global health education exists in different forms in all medical programs in Sweden, and in some places parts of courses with a focus on international health has existed for more than 30 years. In this article we the development of global health education in the medical programs in Sweden is presented – from then to now and into the future. Each university has contributed texts, and these contributions have then been compiled by Helena Nordenstedt and Hampus Holmer.

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  • 11.
    Osman, Sarah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dengue, chikungunya and Zika in GeoSentinel surveillance of international travellers: a literature review from 1995 to 20202020In: Journal of Travel Medicine, ISSN 1195-1982, E-ISSN 1708-8305, Vol. 27, no 8, article id taaa222Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: GeoSentinel is a global surveillance network of travel medicine providers seeing ill-returned travellers. Much of our knowledge on health problems and infectious encountered by international travellers has evolved as a result of GeoSentinel surveillance, providing geographic and temporal trends in morbidity among travellers while contributing to improved pre-travel advice. We set out to synthesize epidemiological information, clinical manifestations and time trends for dengue, chikungunya and Zika in travellers as captured by GeoSentinel.

    METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed on international travellers who presented with dengue, chikungunya or Zika virus infections to GeoSentinel sites around the world from 1995 until 2020.

    RESULTS: Of 107 GeoSentinel publications, 42 articles were related to dengue, chikungunya and/or Zika. The final analyses and synthesis of and results presented here are based on the findings from 27 original articles covering the three arboviral diseases.

    CONCLUSIONS: Dengue is the most frequent arboviral disease encountered in travellers presenting to GeoSentinel sites, with increasing trends over the past two decades. In Southeast Asia, annual proportionate morbidity increased from 50 dengue cases per 1,000 ill returned travellers in non-epidemic years to an average of 159 cases per 1,000 travellers during epidemic years. The highest number of travelers with chikungunya virus infections was reported during the chikungunya outbreak in the Americas and the Caribbean in the years 2013-2016. Zika was first reported by GeoSentinel already in 2012, but notifications peaked in the years 2016-2017 reflecting the public health emergency in the Americas at the time.

  • 12. Peltzer, Karl
    et al.
    Hewlett, Sandra
    Yawson, Alfred E
    Moynihan, Paula
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wu, Fan
    Guo, Godfrey
    Arokiasamy, Perianayagam
    Snodgrass, James J
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Engelstad, Mark E
    Kowal, Paul
    Prevalence of loss of all teeth (Edentulism) and associated factors in older adults in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa2014In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 11308-11324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little information exists about the loss of all one's teeth (edentulism) among older adults in low- and middle-income countries. This study examines the prevalence of edentulism and associated factors among older adults in a cross-sectional study across six such countries. Data from the World Health Organization (WHO's) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 was used for this study with adults aged 50-plus from China (N = 13,367), Ghana (N = 4724), India (N = 7150), Mexico (N = 2315), Russian Federation (N = 3938) and South Africa (N = 3840). Multivariate regression was used to assess predictors of edentulism. The overall prevalence of edentulism was 11.7% in the six countries, with India, Mexico, and Russia has higher prevalence rates (16.3%-21.7%) than China, Ghana, and South Africa (3.0%-9.0%). In multivariate logistic analysis sociodemographic factors (older age, lower education), chronic conditions (arthritis, asthma), health risk behaviour (former daily tobacco use, inadequate fruits and vegetable consumption) and other health related variables (functional disability and low social cohesion) were associated with edentulism. The national estimates and identified factors associated with edentulism among older adults across the six countries helps to identify areas for further exploration and targets for intervention.

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  • 13.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dental health is a neglected topic in travel medicine2018In: Journal of Travel Medicine, ISSN 1195-1982, E-ISSN 1708-8305, Vol. 25, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!2013In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

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  • 15.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany; INDEPTH Network, Ghana; Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia; Universiteit Van Amsterdam, Netherlands; Harvard Centre for Population and Development Studies, USA.
    INDEPTH training and research centres of excellence (INTREC): building research capacity in social determinants of health in low- and middle-income countries2015In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. 428-428Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The major causes of poor health are rooted in society. Achieving health equity requires a global action in support of building the limited evidence on health and its determinants from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This intentionally demands building capacity for mobilizing research in these countries. The INDEPTH Training and Research Centres of Excellence (INTREC), an EU FP7 project was established with the aim of undertaking capacity-building activities to facilitate research on the social determinants of health (SDH) in LMICs. Therefore, a six members' consortium initiated this coordination action project in Jan 2012, which is due to conclude in June 2015. INTREC activities covered recruiting a social scientist from each participating country of INDEPTH network, three from Africa (Tanzania, Ghana, South Africa) and four from Asia (Bangladesh, India, Vietnam, and Indonesia) who were trained to produce a standardized-format country needs assessment. These reports provided the basis for the subsequent development of the INTREC training curriculum, including five individual training blocks developed to cover qualitative and quantitative research methods. These were delivered sequentially in five educational blocks over a 12 month period during 2014. The first block was an online course of video lectures and assignments. The second block was a two-week methods workshop, held in both Indonesia (16 students) and Ghana (15 students). A one-week data analysis workshop held at Harvard University comprised the third block, translating research findings to policy and practice comprised Block 4 and the final block had the students share their papers on the course website. The main result of the INTREC action is the development of a conceptual framework detailing how to build a sustainable capacity for research on SDH in LMICs; currently being developed using documentation produced. Furthermore, a total of 31 young researchers are now trained in SDH, and they themselves constitute a network that is promising to develop into the future. The findings indicate a pressing need for mentors who are available to support young researchers in these countries. Also, such a research capacity development has the potential for identifying critical areas requiring policy attention; contributing to health equity in the future.

  • 16.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Oral public health lectures in masters of public health (MPH) course at a university in north Sweden2014In: Universities 2.0: Advancing Global Health in the Post-MDG Era, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more integration is where global health is heading and is a fact that is supported by initiatives to address interprofessional education.

     In the university of Umeå, from 2008 to 2013, an oral public health lecture has been given to master of public health students in their global public health course. The MPH education of this university has been ranked first in the country. A total of 300 students have taken this course during these six years, out of which only 10 were dental graduates. 

    This two-hour lecture is a part of global public health course that introduces the two years master’s education to the students. The oral health lectures inform about what is oral public health, why is it a public health problem and the prevention and promotion strategies aimed at being very comprehensive as is targeting the non dental professionals. The course evaluation by students undertaken at the end of each course over the time has reported this lecture to be unexpected but very informative. Overall, more than 80% students express they benefitted from the information received.

     

    The short introductory lecture and the small effort is an example of addressing interprofessional education efforts and being inclusive in addressing the global health education and training. 

  • 17.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The Res.pon.se model: for implementing and developing global health2021In: CUGH 2021 Poster program: EPT8 Electronic Poster Track 8, 2021, article id EPT8.093Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the challenges in global health efforts. The World Health Organization while keeping the nations informed and updated about the transmission and spread of the disease has called for solidarity, in all forms and shapes, as a measure to respond to COVID-19 management. 

    The personal journey of the author weaving through between countries, professions, disciplines and learnings is conceptualised as experiences constructed being an educator, researcher and coordinator in global health. Using an auto-ethnographic approach, the personal account draws upon the knowledge for the purpose of enhancing and realizing individual resources to implement global health. 

    A Res.pon.se (Research, Education, System, Projects, Operations, Networks, Sustainable, Evidence) model interlinked with eight working Cs is proposed. This model is used as a framework to explore social solidarity, and its two components: i) social regulation and ii) social integration. While constructing deconstructing and re-constructing processes in different spaces, roles and responsibilities an academician operationalises and advances global health. 

    This model (pedagogical model) facilitates exploration of solidarity, from an individual (global) public health professional’s perspective. It provides a space for a dialogue on how one complies with regulations and strives for integration within academia and how some of the realizations may contribute towards reforming the academia. 

  • 18.
    Preet, Raman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Khan, Nausheen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Assessing dental professionals' understanding of tobacco prevention and control: a qualitative study in Västerbotten County, Sweden2016In: BDJ Open, E-ISSN 2056-807X, no 2, p. 1-6, article id 16009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess dental professionals’ understanding of tobacco prevention and control.

    Materials and methods: In Sweden dental hygienists receive training in tobacco prevention and control. The study setting is Västerbotton County in the north of Sweden where a number of successful tobacco control initiatives have been established. A purposeful sample comprising five male and four female dental professionals and trainees was selected. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured individual interviews and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Informants acknowledged limited adherence to tobacco prevention. They were not confident of their knowledge of tobacco and non-communicable disease prevention and had limited awareness of global oral health policies. Reasons for poor adherence included professional fragmentation, lack of training, and the absence of reimbursement for time spent on prevention activities.

    Discussion: The success of efforts to reduce smoking in Västerbotton County is attributed to the network of local public health initiatives with very limited involvement by local dental professionals.

    Conclusions: The findings highlight the need to more actively engage the dental workforce in tobacco control and prevention. Moreover, it is important to recognise that dental professionals can be public health advocates for tobacco control and prevention at global, national and local levels.

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  • 19.
    Preet, Raman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Schumann, Barbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    The gender perspective in climate change and global health2010In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 3, p. 5720-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite recognizing the differential effects of climate change on health of women and men as a consequence of complex social contexts and adaptive capacities, the study finds gender to be an underrepresented or non-existing variable both in research and studied policy documents in the field of climate change and health.

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    The gender perspective in climate change and global health
  • 20.
    Rajeev, BR
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
    Prasad, KVV
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
    Shetty, Preetha J
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The relationship between orofacial clefts and consanguineous marriages: A hospital register-based study in Dharwad, South India2017In: Journal of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies, ISSN 2348–2125, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orofacial cleft (OFC) is one of the common craniofacial malformations. The etiology of these OFCs is multifactorial. One of the etiological factors is consanguinity (marriage between blood relatives). There is a lack of literature reporting the number of people affected with OFCs due to consanguinity. Aims: The aim of this study is to report the occurrence of OFC and associated factors in relation to consanguinity from a craniofacial hospital specializing in OFCs, head and neck cancer, and trauma management in South India. Setting and Design: This was a hospital-based study, retrospective case record analysis. Methodology: One thousand two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients' secondary data records with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip and palate (CL/P) were collected from January 2007 to July 2009. Statistics: Frequency of consanguinity in relation to OFC was analyzed using Chi-square test according to the nature of clefts and selected demographic features such as sex, region, and religion. Results: A total of 47.2% patients' parents had consanguineous marriage. Consanguinity was seen in 60.2% of male and 39.7% of female patients. CL/P was noticed in 40.9%, followed by CL (36.7%) and CP (22.2%). Males predominated in all types of clefts proportionally with the study population as compared to females. Statistically, significant association (P = 0.04) was seen with consanguinity and CP. Conclusion: Nearly half of the study population had a positive history of consanguinity. Statistically, a significant association was seen between CP and consanguinity. CL/P cases were the most common type identified, followed by CL and CP. Males predominated in all types of clefts. The prevalence of OFC is high, and there is a potential of congenital disabilities from consanguinity. These findings indicate a clear and urgent need for setting up a National Registry of Congenital Anomalies along with craniofacial defects, to monitor these trends and the corresponding need for supportive services.

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  • 21.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Heidelberg Institute of Global Health (HIGH) & Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Semenza, Jan C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Heidelberg Institute of Global Health (HIGH) & Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Dasgupta, Shouro
    Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Venice, Italy; Graham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), London, United Kingdom.
    Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z.
    Graham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), London, United Kingdom.
    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed
    Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Hygiene and Veterinary Public Health, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Alcayna, Tilly
    Red Cross Red Crescent Centre on Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness, The Hague, Netherlands; Centre on Climate Change & Planetary Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London, United Kingdom; Centre for Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London, United Kingdom; Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London, United Kingdom.
    Arnés-Sanz, Cristina
    Heidelberg Institute of Global Health (HIGH) & Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bailey, Meghan
    Red Cross Red Crescent Centre on Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Bärnighausen, Till
    Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States.
    Bartumeus, Frederic
    Theoretical and Computational Ecology Group, Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Spain; Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain; Centre de Recerca Ecològica i Aplicacions Forestals (CREAF), Barcelona, Spain.
    Borrell, Carme
    Pest Surveillance and Control, Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona (ASPB), Barcelona, Spain; Biomedical Research Center Network for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
    Bouwer, Laurens M.
    Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Hamburg, Germany.
    Bretonnière, Pierre-Antoine
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Bunker, Aditi
    Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States.
    Chavardes, Chloe
    Three O'clock, Paris, France.
    van Daalen, Kim R.
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain; British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Heart and Lung Research Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Encarnação, João
    Irideon, Barcelona, Spain.
    González-Reviriego, Nube
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Guo, Junwen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johnson, Katie
    Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Venice, Italy.
    Koopmans, Marion P.G.
    Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Máñez Costa, María
    Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Hamburg, Germany.
    Michaelakis, Antonios
    Laboratory of Insects & Parasites of Medical Importance, Benaki Phytopathological Institute (BPI), Attica, Greece.
    Montalvo, Tomás
    Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona (ASPB), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica Sant Pau (IIB SANT PAU), Barcelona, Spain.
    Omazic, Anna
    Department of Chemistry, Environment, and Feed Hygiene, National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Palmer, John R.B.
    Department of Political and Social Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Romanello, Marina
    Institute for Global Health, University College London (UCL), London, United Kingdom.
    Shafiul Alam, Mohammad
    Infectious Disease Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sikkema, Reina S.
    Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Terrado, Marta
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Treskova, Marina
    Heidelberg Institute of Global Health (HIGH) & Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Urquiza, Diana
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Lowe, Rachel
    Centre on Climate Change & Planetary Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London, United Kingdom; Centre for Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London, United Kingdom; Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain; Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Farooq, Zia
    IDAlert Consortium.
    Decision-support tools to build climate resilience against emerging infectious diseases in Europe and beyond2023In: The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, E-ISSN 2666-7762, Vol. 32, article id 100701Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is one of several drivers of recurrent outbreaks and geographical range expansion of infectious diseases in Europe. We propose a framework for the co-production of policy-relevant indicators and decision-support tools that track past, present, and future climate-induced disease risks across hazard, exposure, and vulnerability domains at the animal, human, and environmental interface. This entails the co-development of early warning and response systems and tools to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures across sectors, to increase health system resilience at regional and local levels and reveal novel policy entry points and opportunities. Our approach involves multi-level engagement, innovative methodologies, and novel data streams. We take advantage of intelligence generated locally and empirically to quantify effects in areas experiencing rapid urban transformation and heterogeneous climate-induced disease threats. Our goal is to reduce the knowledge-to-action gap by developing an integrated One Health—Climate Risk framework.

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  • 22. Susilo, Dwidjo
    et al.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Padmawati, Siwi
    Kandarina, Istiti
    Trisnantoro, Laksono
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Reducing health inequity in Indonesia through a comprehensive training on social determinants of health among researchers and policy makers2013In: Proceedings of the 7th Postgraduate Forum on Health Systems and Policies / [ed] Chayanin Pratoomsoot and Supasit Pannarunothai, 2013, Vol. 14 (Suppl 1), p. O2-O2Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 23.
    Valcke, Jennifer
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet (KI), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Knipper, Michael
    Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, Germany.
    Båge, Karin
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Conceptualising Teaching Spaces: The Intersection of Being, Belonging, and Becoming2021In: Teaching and learning in higher education: the context of being, interculturality and new knowledge systems / [ed] Margaret Kumar and Thushari Welikala, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2021, p. 65-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationalisation of education is often regarded as preparing students to work in a globalised world. Our graduates are not only workers and consumers of the increasingly global labour market, but they are also people, friends, parents, colleagues, neighbours, partners, voters and (global) citizens. Attitudes towards oneself and other people, and the underlying values that these attitudes are based on, poses challenges to quality education. Education in the context of globalisation needs to be inclusive and equitable in order to be of quality (United Nations, 2015), but what does this look like in practice? What does it require of students, and for those responsible for designing education? Do students and teachers have the possibility to reflect on and conceptualise the realities they live in? Apart from knowledge and technical skills, what growth mindset do students and teachers need in order to navigate international and intercultural perspectives responsibly and ethically? This chapter proposes to address these questions through the prism of four teachers in the field of global health education. The students they teach and interact with, as well as their needs as active citizens in a globalised world, will provide the backdrop for further reflection. The personal journeys of the authors between countries, disciplines, professions, learning and teaching will thus be conceptualised as experiences continuously being reconstructed and deconstructed in the classroom through processes of being, belonging and becoming. It is argued that these processes can be used as resources to create inclusive and equitable quality education.

  • 24.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brickley, Elizabeth B.
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar
    Departamento de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.
    Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros
    Departamento de Medicina Interna, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.
    Turchi Martelli, Celina Maria
    , Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Recife, Brazil.
    Solomon, Tom
    NIHR Health Protection Research Unit for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Jacobs, Bart C.
    Departments of Neurology and Immunology, Erasmus Universitair Medisch Centrum Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Pardo, Carlos A.
    Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, MD, Baltimore, United States.
    Osorio, Lyda
    Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia.
    Parra, Beatriz
    Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia.
    Lant, Suzannah
    NIHR Health Protection Research Unit for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Willison, Hugh J.
    Institute of Infection, Immunity & Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Leonhard, Sonja
    Departments of Neurology and Immunology, Erasmus Universitair Medisch Centrum Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Turtle, Lance
    NIHR Health Protection Research Unit for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Ferreira, Maria Lúcia Brito
    Hospital da Restauração, Recife, Brazil.
    de Oliveira Franca, Rafael Freitas
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Recife, Brazil.
    Lambrechts, Louis
    Insect-Virus Interactions Unit, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Neyts, Johan
    KU Leuven Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kaptein, Suzanne
    KU Leuven Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Leuven, Belgium.
    Peeling, Rosanna
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Boeras, Deborah
    Global Health Impact Group, United States.
    Logan, James
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Dolk, Helen
    Centre for Maternal, Fetal and Infant Research, Institute for Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, Ulster, United Kingdom.
    Orioli, Ieda M.
    RELAMC and ECLAMC at Genetics Department, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Neumayr, Andreas
    Department of Medicine, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
    Lang, Trudie
    Global Health Network, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Baker, Bonny
    Global Health Network, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Massad, Eduardo
    School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo and Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The legacy of ZikaPLAN: a transnational research consortium addressing Zika2021In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 14, article id 2008139Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global health research partnerships with institutions from high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries are one of the European Commission's flagship programmes. Here, we report on the ZikaPLAN research consortium funded by the European Commission with the primary goal of addressing the urgent knowledge gaps related to the Zika epidemic and the secondary goal of building up research capacity and establishing a Latin American-European research network for emerging vector-borne diseases. Five years of collaborative research effort have led to a better understanding of the full clinical spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome in children and the neurological complications of Zika virus infections in adults and helped explore the origins and trajectory of Zika virus transmission. Individual-level data from ZikaPLAN`s cohort studies were shared for joint analyses as part of the Zika Brazilian Cohorts Consortium, the European Commission-funded Zika Cohorts Vertical Transmission Study Group, and the World Health Organization-led Zika Virus Individual Participant Data Consortium. Furthermore, the legacy of ZikaPLAN includes new tools for birth defect surveillance and a Latin American birth defect surveillance network, an enhanced Guillain-Barre Syndrome research collaboration, a de-centralized evaluation platform for diagnostic assays, a global vector control hub, and the REDe network with freely available training resources to enhance global research capacity in vector-borne diseases.

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  • 25.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Renhorn, Karl-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ximenes, R. A.
    Rodrigues, L. C.
    Solomon, T.
    Neyts, J.
    Lambrechts, L.
    Willison, H.
    Peeling, R.
    Falconar, A. K.
    Precioso, A. R.
    Logan, J.
    Lang, T.
    Endtz, H. P.
    Erasmus, M. C.
    Massad, E.
    ZikaPLAN: Zika Preparedness Latin American Network2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1398485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Islands has underlined the need for a coordinated research network across the whole region that can respond rapidly to address the current knowledge gaps in Zika and enhance research preparedness beyond Zika. The European Union under its Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme awarded three research consortia to respond to this need. Here we present the ZikaPLAN (Zika Preparedness Latin American Network) consortium. ZikaPLAN combines the strengths of 25 partners in Latin America, North America, Africa, Asia, and various centers in Europe. We will conduct clinical studies to estimate the risk and further define the full spectrum and risk factors of congenital Zika virus syndrome (including neurodevelopmental milestones in the first 3 years of life), delineate neurological complications associated with ZIKV due to direct neuroinvasion and immune-mediated responses in older children and adults, and strengthen surveillance for birth defects and Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Laboratory-based research to unravel neurotropism and investigate the role of sexual transmission, determinants of severe disease, and viral fitness will underpin the clinical studies. Social messaging and engagement with affected communities, as well as development of wearable repellent technologies against Aedes mosquitoes will enhance the impact. Burden of disease studies, data-driven vector control, and vaccine modeling as well as risk assessments on geographic spread of ZIKV will form the foundation for evidence-informed policies. While addressing the research gaps around ZIKV, we will engage in capacity building in laboratory and clinical research, collaborate with existing and new networks to share knowledge, and work with international organizations to tackle regulatory and other bottlenecks and refine research priorities. In this way, we can leverage the ZIKV response toward building a long-term emerging infectious diseases response capacity in the region to address future challenges.

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  • 26.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tissera, Hasitha
    AbuBakar, Sazaly
    Kittayapong, Pattamaporn
    Logan, James
    Neumayr, Andreas
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Louis, Valerie R.
    Tozan, Yesim
    Massad, Eduardo
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Novel tools for the surveillance and control of dengue: findings by the dengueTools research consortium2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1549930Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dengue fever persists as a major global disease burden, and may increase as a consequence of climate change. Along with other measures, research actions to improve diagnosis, surveillance, prevention, and predictive models are highly relevant. The European Commission funded the DengueTools consortium to lead a major initiative in these areas, and this review synthesises the outputs and findings of this work conducted from 2011 to 2016. Research areas: DengueTools organised its work into three research areas, namely [1] Early warning and surveillance systems; [2] Strategies to prevent dengue in children; and [3] Predictive models for the global spread of dengue. Research area 1 focused on case-studies undertaken in Sri Lanka, including developing laboratory-based sentinel surveillance, evaluating economic impact, identifying drivers of transmission intensity, evaluating outbreak prediction capacity and developing diagnostic capacity. Research area 2 addressed preventing dengue transmission in school children, with case-studies undertaken in Thailand. Insecticide-treated school uniforms represented an intriguing potential approach, with some encouraging results, but which were overshadowed by a lack of persistence of insecticide on the uniforms with repeated washing. Research area 3 evaluated potential global spread of dengue, particularly into dengue-naive areas such as Europe. The role of international travel, changing boundaries of vectors, developing models of vectorial capacity under different climate change scenarios and strategies for vector control in outbreaks was all evaluated. Concluding remarks: DengueTools was able to make significant advances in methods for understanding and controlling dengue transmission in a range of settings. These will have implications for public health agendas to counteract dengue, including vaccination programmes. Outlook: Towards the end of the DengueTools project, Zika virus emerged as an unexpected epidemic in the central and southern America. Given the similarities between the dengue and Zika viruses, with vectors in common, some of the DengueTools thinking translated readily into the Zika situation.

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