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  • 1. Alavi, Hamed S.
    et al.
    Churchill, Elizabeth F.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lalanne, Denis
    Dalsgaard, Peter
    gen Schieck, Ava Fatah
    Rogers, Yvonne
    Human-building interaction: sketches and grounds for a research program2019In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 58-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Alavi, Hamed S.
    et al.
    Churchill, Elizabeth F.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University.
    Lalanne, Denis
    Dalsgaard, Peter
    Schieck, Ava Fatah Gen
    Rogers, Yvonne
    Introduction to Human-Building Interaction (HBI): Interfacing HCI with Architecture and Urban Design2019In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 26, no 2, article id 6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Buildings and urban spaces increasingly incorporate artificial intelligence and new forms of interactivity, raising a wide span of research questions about the future of human experiences with, and within, built environments. We call this emerging area Human-Building Interaction (HBI) and introduce it as an interdisciplinary domain of research interfacing Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) with Architecture and Urban Design. HBI seeks to examine the involvement of HCI in studying and steering the evolution of built environments. Therefore, we need to ask foundational questions such as the following: what are the specific attributes of built environments that HCI researchers should take into account when shifting attention and scale from "artefacts" to "environments"? Are architecture and interaction design methods and processes compatible? Concretely, how can a team of interaction designers bring their tools to an architectural project, and collaborate with other stakeholders? Can and will architecture change the theory and practice of HCI? Furthermore, research in HBI should produce knowledge and practical guidelines by experimenting novel design instances that combine architecture and digital interaction. The primary aim of this article is to specify the mission, vision, and scope of research in HBI. As the introductory article to the TOCHI special issue, it also provides a summary of published manuscripts and describes their collective contribution to the development of this field.

  • 3.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forsblad, Mattias
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Autonomous vehicles for children with mild intellectual disability: perplexity, curiosity, surprise, and confusion2023In: ECCE '23: proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, article id 25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-driving buses will be part of the public transportation system of the future, and they must therefore be accessible to all. The study reported in this paper examines the user experiences of 16 children with mild intellectual disability riding a self-driving bus. The qualitative analysis, performed by iterative affinity diagramming, of interviews, observations, and a co-design session with five of the children, suggests that familiar situations were characterized by contemplation and curiosity, while unfamiliar ones were characterized by surprise or confusion. The temporal structure of past, present, and future situations in the field of attention played a significant role in the children's experiences. This leads to design considerations for an explainable interior of self-driving buses.

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  • 4.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    et al.
    LTU.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    User Driven Service Design and Innovation Platforms2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bley, Jessica
    et al.
    AD Safe Experience, Volvo Cars, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Alexander
    AD Safe Experience, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Lisa
    AD Safe Experience, Volvo Cars, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Design friction in autonomous drive: exploring transitions between autonomous and manual drive in non-urgent situations2023In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 2291-2305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the ongoing turn to automation, the growing trend towards the design of conditionally and highly automated vehicles (C/HAV) is evident. In a CAV, the driver no longer needs to partake in the driving. However, the vehicle might send a takeover request (TOR) when the CAV's system reaches its operational boundaries, i.e. a call for a transition from autonomous to manual drive. Previous research on TORs has focused on the context of urgent situations, e.g. hazards and unpredictable events. Furthermore, it has been noted that drivers’ situation awareness (SA) deteriorates after being in autonomous drive. However, less is known about TORs in non-urgent situations. Motivated by this need, the study explores how design friction can serve as a guiding concept for transferring control between autonomous and manual drive in non-urgent situations to increase situation awareness. Design friction is defined as elements of interactions that steer attention and guides the driver to take informed decisions. The work resulted in prototypes that leveraged design friction as part of a takeover sequence. The proposed design was empirically evaluated in a fixed-base medium-fidelity driving simulator. The results indicated that the level of friction might have been too extensive, as some annoyance was expressed. However, participants claimed to feel calm and aware of their surroundings at the moment of regaining control of the vehicle. This suggests that design friction is a promising tool for guiding concept design to enhance transitions from autonomous to manual drive.

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  • 6.
    Bodén, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lidström, Mattias
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Point or click?: Evaluating two input modalities for mobile games2007In: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in computer games have focused on user experience from the perspectives of game content, graphics, interactivity and underling game story while missing to address the effect of a certain input modality on the user experience. In this paper we report from two user studies that focus on players' experience and performance in relation to the use of two different input modalities for the same game and whether it changes the flow and gameplay in any way. The overall research was according to this whether a game can be more fun to play with a certain input modality? The paper presents the results from these studies and draws conclusions based on these data in relation to computer games and user experiences in the context of mobile game playing.

  • 7. Churchill, Elizabeth F.
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Infrastructures for Interactions2024In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 5-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Churchill, Elizabeth F.
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Speaking human – beyond humanizing AI2024In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Churchill, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From humans to AI: a timely debate on human-AI relations2024In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 5-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Churchill, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Some food for thought and some (digital) things to digest2023In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 6-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Digital Materiality as Imprints and Landmarks: the case of Northern Lights2010In: International Review of Information Ethics, E-ISSN 1614-1687, Vol. 12, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Dalton, Nicholas S
    et al.
    Schnädelbach, HolgerWiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.Varoudis, Tasos
    Architecture and interaction: human-computer interaction in time and place2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 13. Dalton, Nick
    et al.
    Green, Keith Evan
    Dalton, Ruth
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Hoelscher, Christoph
    Mathew, Anijo
    Schnädelbach, Holger
    Varoudis, Tasos
    Interaction and architectural space2014In: CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many in the field of HCI, location and space are synonymous; yet, as we move from the mobile era to the ubiquitous era, computing becomes entangled with notions of space. This workshop critically examines the role of space in human-computer interfaces. The objective is to bring together diverse perspectives of space, drawing from architecture, philosophy, art, geography, design, dance, spatial-cognition, mathematics, computing, and still other domains, towards foregrounding space in theoretical discussions and explorations within the CHI community. Expected outcomes are the reporting of fresh insights into the impact and role of space in the interaction process.

  • 14. Dalton, Ruth
    et al.
    Dalton, Nick
    Holscher, Christoph
    Veddeler, Christian
    Krukar, Jakub
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    HabiTech: Inhabiting Buildings, Data & Technology2020In: CHI'20: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2020 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 1-8, article id 3375179Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As larger parts of our lives are determined in the digital realm, it is critical to reflect on how democratic values can be preserved and cultivated by technology. At the city-scale, this is studied in the field of 'digital civics'; however, there seems to be no corresponding focus at the level of buildings/building inhabitants. The majority of our lives are spent indoors and therefore the impact that 'indoor digital civics' may have, might exceed that of city-scale, digital civics. The digitization of building design and building management creates an opportunity to better identify, protect, and cultivate civic values that, until now, were centralized in the hands of building designers and building owners. By bringing together leading architecture/HCI academics and commercial stakeholders, this workshop builds on previous workshops at CHI. The workshop will provide a forum where a new agenda for research in 'HabiTech(1)' can be defined and new research collaborations formed.

  • 15.
    Dalton, Sheep
    et al.
    Northumbria University.
    Schnädelbach, Holger
    University of Nottingham.
    Varoudis, Tasos
    University College London.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Architects of information2016In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 62-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is increasingly about embedding interactive technologies in our built environment; architecture is increasingly about the use of interactive technologies to reimagine and dynamically repurpose our built environment. This forum focuses on this intersection of interaction and architecture

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Edenius, Mats
    Uppsala universitet.
    Managing Open Innovation Technologies2012Book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Falkenberg Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik, Södertörns högskola.
    Wiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Introduktion till medieteknik2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion till medieteknik är boken för dig som vill få en introduktion till ämnet medieteknik. Vi vänder oss till dig som är intresserad av hur teknologier och dess användning möts − från ett fokus på mediekonsumtion, till hur medier formar vårt moderna samhälle. Boken ger en introduktion till medieteknikens olika former, ­kanaler, och uttryckssätt, och vi ger även en inblick i hur medieteknik skapas. Med en utgångspunkt i design, programmering och medieteknikens visuella och audiella uttryck ges en vidare introduktion till medieteknikens tillämpnings­om­­­råd­en − från speldesign till interaktiva medier. Boken berör också angreppssätt för att arbeta användarcentrerat med digital medieutveckling och design, samt berör projektledning för utveckling av digital medieteknik. Med denna intro­duktion till medieteknik som ämne visar boken på ett antal framväxande områden för vidare forskning inom medieteknik.

    Introduktion till medieteknik är sammansatt så att den med fördel kan ­användas som kurslitteratur i utbildning inom områden som medieteknik, ­medie­­produktion, design för digitala medier eller motsvarande. Boken kan läsas som en helhet, alternativt som fristående kapitel.

  • 18. Faraon, Montathar
    et al.
    Ronkko, Kari
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Learning by coding: A sociocultural approach to teaching web development in higher education2020In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 1759-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As information technology continues to evolve rapidly in society, coding skills become increasingly essential to develop. The purpose of this article is to examine differences between the learner-centered and sociocultural approaches when teaching and learning coding in higher education. A quasi-experiment was applied over six academic semesters evaluating the mentioned approaches in terms of students' explicit attitudes, grades, and course evaluations. The findings indicated that the sociocultural approach may be a viable alternative to the learner-centered approach. More specifically, students indicated a preference for the sociocultural approach over the learner-centered approach, a greater number of students who passed the courses were educated via the sociocultural approach, and overall satisfaction was significantly higher for this approach as well. While the sociocultural approach has demonstrated to be advantageous, its integration in courses must concurrently be carefully balanced against constraints that teachers continuously experience in higher education, such as time and resources, which presents a challenge to the design of courses and to academia at large.

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  • 19.
    Forsblad, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Philip
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Solís-Marcos, Ignacio
    VTI, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    How children with mild intellectual disability experience self-driving buses: in support of agency2023In: Transaction on Transport Sciences, ISSN 1802-971X, E-ISSN 1802-9876, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging technology for public transportation is often not fully aligned with an inclusive design strategy. Many people with intellectual disability experience their needs and desires not being fully considered. Responding to this problem, the purpose of this study is to investigate how children with mild intellectual disability experience self-driving buses. On each bus, a person called "safety driver" monitors the ride and takes control if a problematic situation arises. The purpose is also to investigate what roles support persons and safety drivers play. In addition, the research aims to propose improvements in how the design of these self-driving buses can better motivate children with intellectual disability to use them in support of their agency. To address this, we arranged and studied seven rides on self-driving buses, for 16 children diagnosed to have mild intellectual disability, and their support persons. Interviews with the children were held after the rides, and both the rides and interviews were video recorded. The analysis was in part inductive but also employed a theory based on motivation: self-determination theory. For several children, the bus worked as a vehicle for a social sightseeing tour of the local environment, and the current design did not hinder such an experience. Overall, many of the children had a positive experience, but there is room for improvement regarding the design of the buses. Some children expressed curiosity and a few frustrations with how the bus behaved in traffic. For instance, it was difficult for the children to understand why the bus braked for things that were hard for them to perceive. From observation, it appears that the accompanying support person and safety driver played an important role in making children safe and shaping the social environment on the bus. The support persons were also essential for some children to ride the bus at all. The safety driver provided the children with information about how the bus worked. Both the safety driver and the support person had a positive impact on the children's experience. To meet the children's needs and skills, and to improve their motivation for riding the buses again, the buses need to decelerate less abruptly, have easier and consistently designed seatbelts, and communicate what they do, see, and signal more clearly. We argue that further studies at this level of detail are crucial to ensure that new technologies are indeed designed for everyone.

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  • 20.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Inside-Out Interaction: An Interaction Technique for Dealing with Large Interface Surfaces such as Web Pages on Small Screen Displays2004In: International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques: ACM SIGGRAPH 2004 Sketches, 2004, p. 106-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics. Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    ScrollPad: Tangible Scrolling with Mobile Devices2004In: Proceedings of the 37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS'04), 2004, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we approach the problem of managing large visual sets of data on small mobile devices. While current approaches either focuses on 1) scrolling on the mobile device, or 2) reducing the content in various ways (e.g. zooming, automatic redesign depending on the screen size of a mobile device, etc) our approach is to scroll with the mobile device itself (i.e. object in the world scrolling) over a large virtual area. We present the background for this project and working prototype called Scrollpad developed to illustrate this concept. We then present an initial user study conducted and relate this project to similar efforts made before concluding the paper.

  • 22.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Arts and Communication Malmö University, Sweden.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    College of Information Sciences and Technology, Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Renner, Alison Smith
    Machine Learning Visualization Lab Decisive Analytics Corporation, United States.
    Krogh, Peter Gall
    Department of Enginering, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Höök, Kristina
    Media Technology and Interaction Design, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Cuartielles, David
    Arts and Communication Malmö University, Sweden.
    Boer, Laurens
    IT University Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From "Explainable AI" to "Graspable AI"2021In: TEI 2021 - Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2021, article id 69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), researchers have asked how intelligent computing systems could interact with and relate to their users and their surroundings, leading to debates around issues of biased AI systems, ML black-box, user trust, user's perception of control over the system, and system's transparency, to name a few. All of these issues are related to how humans interact with AI or ML systems, through an interface which uses different interaction modalities. Prior studies address these issues from a variety of perspectives, spanning from understanding and framing the problems through ethics and Science and Technology Studies (STS) perspectives to finding effective technical solutions to the problems. But what is shared among almost all those efforts is an assumption that if systems can explain the how and why of their predictions, people will have a better perception of control and therefore will trust such systems more, and even can correct their shortcomings. This research field has been called Explainable AI (XAI). In this studio, we take stock on prior efforts in this area; however, we focus on using Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI) as an interaction modality for understanding ML. We note that the affordances of physical forms and their behaviors potentially can not only contribute to the explainability of ML systems, but also can contribute to an open environment for criticism. This studio seeks to both critique explainable ML terminology and to map the opportunities that TEI can offer to the HCI for designing more sustainable, graspable and just intelligent systems.

  • 23.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Department of Architecture and Design, Politecnico di Torino, Italy.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Thinking with Interactive Artifacts: Reflection as a Concept in Design Outcomes2018In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflection is a recurring notion in the HCI/interaction design literature. Throughout the years reflection has been highlighted as a key dimension of design thinking and as an important ingredient of design processes. In this paper we take stock in our community's interest in reflection, and we suggest that while it has been acknowledged as a cornerstone for design processes, it has been less explored as a basis for design outcomes. Given this extensive literature study, it seems that 1) the interest in this area is growing, and we present tables that illustrate this growing interest over time; 2) reflection and behavioral change are two interrelated notions; and 3) these notions are well-explored in our field. Further, we suggest that as interaction design is increasingly exploring the design of tangible, smart, connected, and even intelligent artifacts, we should think about how reflection and our ability to think with artifacts can be extended to include the design of interactive artifacts. In this paper we suggest how that might be done, and we point at a design space for designing such interactive artifacts to think with.

  • 24. Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach2018In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems are, to a large extent, about relationships between people, activities, objects, technologies, and places. A systems approach focuses on how things are interrelated, and what the different parts can accomplish together. In similar terms, reflective thinking is also relational. We think often with each other when we talk about and share our experiences and memories. We are also increasingly using smart objects for our everyday activities. However, designing IoT (Internet of Things) devices typically relies on artifacts rather than relationships. In this paper, we present a modeling technique for the design and analysis of IoT artifacts and systems that is fundamentally relational in its approach. Having outlined the need for relational approaches to designing IoT systems, we first present three examples, where we demonstrate how our relational approach allows for the analysis of existing smart objects designed to function in different relationships with the user, user activity and the situation. Accordingly, we present these IoT systems from the perspectives of the augment me, the comply with me, and the engage me relational models. Having presented these three examples that illustrate how IoT systems can be analyzed as systems of relationships, we then present the prototype of an IoT artifact intended to support reflection in the user. With this fourth example, we introduce the make me think relationship, and also show how our modeling technique can be useful for design of new IoT systems. Accordingly, we suggest a modeling technique that can be used as a tool for designing and analyzing IoT systems. We believe this modeling technique can contribute to a relational approach toward IoT. We conclude this paper suggesting that our proposed modeling technique cannot only help to model relationships between a user and a smart object, but can also be scaled, allowing for the modeling of more complex IoT systems, where there are an increased number of users using many smart objects in different places, but still integrated as a complex system.

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  • 25. Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Designing places for reflection: an examination of social IoT as a relational approach in designing spaces for reflective thinking2019In: Social Internet of Things / [ed] Alessandro Soro, Margot Brereton, Paul Roe, Springer, 2019, p. 107-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sherry Turkle points out in her book, Evocative Objects, that we often consider objects as useful or aesthetic, but rarely count them as our companions or as provocations to our thoughts (2007). Indeed, according to distributed cognition theory, our cognitive activities are considerably influenced by and also a product of our interactions with external stimuli, such as everyday objects. Within this vast category of external stimuli, we can also include our indoor places: the architectural three-dimensional space, where we spend a large part of our days, doing various activities, using numerous objects, and interacting with people. With the advent of "smarter" homes and the Internet of Things (IoT), space becomes a crucial factor that, together with all other objects, influence peoples' thinking. We are particularly interested in the kind of thinking that can be labeled as "reflective thinking" as a conceptual way of thinking that enables the re-consideration of experiences and actions. Reflective thinking also as a distributed cognitive process depends not only to the individual mental process, but also it is closely related to the external stimuli (e.g. Hutchins, Cognition in the wild. MIT Press, 1995, [1], Dewey, How we think: A restatement of the relation of reflective thinking to the educative process. D.C. Heath & Co Publishers, USA, 1933, [2]). In this book chapter, we present a relational approach to the design of such places considering the social IoT (SIoT) as a technical enabler. We do this by specifically focusing on "reflective thinking" and how it is situated in relation to computer-enhanced and smart places. We will describe how reflective thinking is related to people's activities and smart objects within that place. Further, we provide models intended to clarify the relationships between the external factors that influence reflective thinking in a space, and how those relationships make a space a Place (Cresswell, International encyclopedia of human geography, 8, 169–177. Elsevier, Oxford, 2009, [3]). Finally, we provide an example in the form of a narrative, to show how might an SIoT-enabled place look like in prototyping lab of a design school as a very specific place. In short, the aim of our work as presented in this chapter is to spark a conversation and discussion about how HCI/Interaction Design can engage in designing of places that supports reflection using Social IoT. In doing so, we suggest that a central dimension in design of such places should be based on the study of relationships among involved components: people, their activities, and objects. We also suggest, as a theoretical contribution, that Social IoT is not only a technical platform, but rather should be understood as a relational technology that enables new kinds of places for reflection.

  • 26.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lost in translation: investigating the ambiguity of availability cues in an online media space2007In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Behaviour & Information Technology: An international journal on the human aspects of computing, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 243-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of an online media space addressing the question of how availability is managed in an interaction-intensive organization. We relied on three different data collection techniques and analysed our data in relation to three different work modes. During this study we participated in an online media space, for approximately six months making spot checks and observing the population from which ten subjects were selected for interviews. Our results show how techniques and strategies for availability management are developed and continuously adapted to a shared common ground. Further, our results show how having the communication channel open, and regulating availability on a social level instead of on a solely technical level, has the advantage of better coping with the ever-changing dynamics in group works. Finally, we show that there exists an ambiguity of availability cues in online media spaces that is smoothly handled by individuals.

  • 27.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Whittaker, Steve
    UCSC.
    Understanding search behavior in professional social networks2011In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 194-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an empirical study of social interaction in a professional social network. As the point of departure, we take previous research into distributed work and information foraging theory to explore interaction search behavior of individuals active in professional networks, examining how social factors govern their behavior. For this exploration, we focused on the process through which relevant collaborators are chosen to execute shared work tasks in the area of logistics, and identified six characteristics of the explored processes. We recognized the “survival of the social” as a cornerstone for efficient and long-term professional networks and outlined design implications arising from our findings. More specifically, we found that participants are oriented to solutions that involve active social agents and social relations, rather than optimizing based on task characteristics, efficiency, and cost. These behaviors motivate the need for the concept of social interaction foraging.

  • 28. Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    SeamlessTalk: User-controlled session management for sustained car conversations2004In: The Interaction Society: Practice, Theories, and Supportive Technologies, 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.Lund, AndreasUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Industrial informatics design use and innovation: perspectives and services2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial informatics as a field is currently expanding beyond improving the manufacture of goods to facilitating every aspect of the process, from after-market sales, to service production, sourcing, and e-maintenance, demonstrating the profound impact of informatics in modern society. Industrial Informatics Design, Use and Innovation: Perspectives and Services establishes not only a sound grounding in industrial informatics but it also provides a broad state-of-the-art review and showing connections and gaps in the current knowledge for researchers working in the field today. This compilation also represents guidance to those who design and use information technologies in industrial settings, and making it easier to create an informed basis for decisions.

  • 30.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Industrial informatics: what we know and what we don't know2010In: Industrial informatics design use and innovation: perspectives and servoces / [ed] Jonny Holmström; Mikael Wiberg; Andreas Lund, IGI Global, 2010, p. 1-4Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book investigates information technology in the context of the process industry. When this context is examined, the implications of information technology go far beyond the contemporary accounts of IT in manufacturing processes – it also includes after-market sales, service production, sourcing, e-maintenance and so on. The sum effects of these changes are rapidly transforming the process industry.

  • 31.
    Hyuk Park, Jong
    et al.
    Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea.
    AU, Oscar C.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Hong Kong, China.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lee, Changhoon
    Hanshin University, Yangsan-dong, Osan Korea.
    Recent advances and future directions in multimedia and mobile computing2011In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, ISSN 1380-7501, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 237-242Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Häkkilä, Jonna
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Finland.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Eira, Nils Johan
    Sámi Archives, National Archives of Norway, Norway.
    Seppänen, Tapio
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Juuso, Ilkka
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Mäkikalli, Maija
    University of Lapland, Finland.
    Wolf, Katrin
    Beuth University of Applied Sciences, Berlin, Germany.
    Design Sensibilities - Designing for Cultural Sensitivity2020In: NordiCHI '20: Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing interactive systems and applications, we need to take into account different user groups, contexts, and cultural sensitivities. The challenges in culturally sensitive design can arise e.g. from historical, ideological, or ethical factors, and need to be considered when conducting HCI research, e.g. with cultural heritage, under-represented user groups, topics of cultural rituals, or in cross-cultural interfaces. The digitalizing world crosses old borders by bringing technology connectivity for new domains, and provides the means to distribute information that has previously been harder to access, and which may contain strong cultural meanings. With emerging technology use, new etiquette and social practices are formed to reflect the new sub-cultures. This workshop addresses the cultural sensitivities when designing interactive systems. The workshop invites researchers and practitioners to present and discuss about related case studies, applications, research methods, and experiences.

  • 33.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Pervasive gaming meets CSCW: Continuity, Collaboration & Context2005In: "Computer games & CSCW" workshop at the 9th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW ´05), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Pervasive Gaming in the Everyday World2006In: IEEE Pervasive Computing, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    User Behavior in Pervasive Gaming2004In: IEEE Pervasive computing: Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: work-in-progress paper, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 35-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lassinantti, Josefin
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile e-Services and Open Data in e-Government Processes: concept and Design2015In: Mobile Web and Intelligent Information Systems: 12th International Conference, MobiWis 2015, Rome, Italy, August 24-26, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Muhammad Younas, Irfan Awan, Massimo Mecella, Springer, 2015, Vol. 9228, p. 149-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional service life cycle starts with the formulation of required needs and ends with the adoption and ownership of the service. In an e-government context, this takes the form of citizens consuming services provided by the public sector bodies. We examine how a combination of mobile e-services and open data can extend and allow possible citizen-driven continuation of the service life cycle. The chosen method is a concept-driven approach, manifesting our concept in a digital prototype, which allows citizens to generate and acquire open data, as well as develop and publish their own e-services. 

  • 37.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lassinantti, Josefin
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile e-Services and Open Data in e-Government Processes: Transforming Citizen Involvement2015In: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Information Integration and Web-based Applications & Services (iiWAS2015) / [ed] Maria Indrawan-Santiago, Matthias Steinbauer, Ismail Khalil, Gabriele Anderst-Kotsis, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 58-67Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile computing is one of the most important paradigms to influence and enhance modern e-services, mainly due to its anytime and anywhere availability adding value to the delivered service. In a traditional e-government context, the service life cycle takes the form of citizens consuming services provided by public sector bodies. In this paper, we use a novel concept combining mobile e-services and open data to extend and allow possible citizen-driven continuation of the service life cycle. The concept is evaluated throughout the design process, and also becomes the subject of a focus group. Our most important conclusions are that the concept design extends the service life cycle within the public sector context, and also creates new entrances for citizens to participate in generating and acquiring open data, thus transforming citizens' involvement. The result is increased co-operation, as well as increased adoption and availability of data and e-services, enhancing citizen participation.

  • 38. Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Application Mobility: Concept and Design2015In: Recent Advances in Ambient Intelligence and Context-Aware Computing / [ed] Kevin Curran, USA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 169-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility has become an omnipresent part of our modern IT society. Alongside the general taxonomy of mobile users, terminals, sessions, and services, there are also more specialized forms of mobility. Context-Awareness Supported Application Mobility (CASAM) or “Application Mobility” is one such form that is explored in this chapter. CASAM builds on the idea of using context to move an application between different devices during its execution in order to provide relevant information and/or services. The authors use a concept-driven approach to advance mobile systems research, integrating it with a more traditional user-centric method and a case study, further exploring the concept of CASAM. To empirically situate our design work they conducted an empirical study of a home care service group serving the Swedish municipality of Skellefteå, followed by an exercise in matching the properties of the CASAM concept in relation to problems within current workflow.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Conceptually Advancing “Application Mobility” Towards Design2012In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence, ISSN 1941-6245, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility has become an omnipresent part of our modern IT society. Alongside the general mobility taxonomy of mobile users, terminals, sessions and services, there are also more specialized forms of mobility. Context Awareness Supported Application Mobility (CASAM) or “Application Mobility” is one such form that is explored in this paper. CASAM builds on the idea of using context to move an application between different devices during its execution, in order to provide relevant information and/or services. In this article we use a concept-driven approach to advance mobile systems research, integrating it with a more traditional user-centric method and a case study, further exploring the concept of CASAM. To empirically situate our design work we conducted an empirical study of a home care service group serving the Swedish municipality of Skellefteå, followed by an exercise in matching the properties of the CASAM concept in relation to problems within current workflow (e.g. scheduling, travel, care situation, communication and debriefing). The result is a proposal for an IT artifact manifesting the CASAM concept, attending to all the identified problems while at the same time validating the concept.

  • 40. Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, USA.
    Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts2017In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 53, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As materiality of interactive artifacts is diversified with integrated physical and digital materials, metaphoric design approaches in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) go beyond resembling the appearance of physical objects, exploring novel materials and forms of interactive artifacts. The hybrid materialities and forms of artifacts influence how interactivity is perceived, reframing the concept of affordances according to its evolving relationship to metaphors and materialities. By conceptualizing interactive forms in their surface, behavioral and systemic aspects, we examine multifaceted roles of metaphors in HCI from concealing and revealing a formal system to expanding and reifying its meaning; and propose a morphologic perspective on affordances as an invitation for making variations of interactive forms by compositing multiple design resources.

  • 41.
    Kakihara, Masao
    et al.
    Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan.
    Sorensen, Carsten
    London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fluid interaction in mobile work practices2004In: The interaction society: practice, theories and supportive technologies / [ed] Mikael Wiberg, Information Science Publishing, 2004, p. 171-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile Remote Presence Enhanced with Contactless Object Manipulation: An Exploratory Study2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2017, p. 2690-2697Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A telepresence robot is a mobile telecommunication device, remotely controlled by its "pilot", which supports an embodied presence of the pilot in a different location (the "local setting"). A common problem with telepresence robots is their limited capability of interacting with the physical environment. A potential solution, explored in the present study, is supporting "double remote control" interaction, that is, making it possible for the pilot, in addition to remotely controlling the robot, to also remotely control objects in the local setting. In the study we enacted meaningful scenarios of employing telepresence robots with and without double remote control capabilities. The evidence collected in the study allows us to tentatively assess the effects of double remote control interaction on user experience and social context. Issues for future research are discussed.

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  • 43.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Performance, Power, and Place: User Experience of Contactless Object Manipulation in Robotic Telepresence2020In: NordiCHI '20: Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most robotic telepresence systems are severely limited in their ability to physically interact with surrounding objects. The solution we propose, "double remote control", or DRC, is to make it possible for the user controlling the telepresence robot ("the pilot"), to also remotely control objects in the robot's physical environment. This paper reports a user experience study, comparing a Wizard of Oz-style prototype of a DRC-enabled environment with a control condition, in which DRC was not enabled. The participants, who acted as either remote pilots (NP=16) or local people in the robot's proximity (NLP=16), were asked to carry out joint activities in each of these conditions. It was found that DRC had a generally positive effect on how participants, and especially pilots, performed their tasks, but the impact of DRC on the social context of interaction was mixed.

  • 44.
    Keller, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping.
    Wiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.Ågerfalk, PärUppsala universitet.Eriksson, JennyUppsala universitet.
    Nordic Contributions in IS Research: Proceedings of the Third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 20122012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Krukar, Jakub
    et al.
    University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
    Dalton, Ruth
    Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
    Hoelscher, Christoph
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Future Cities Laboratory, Singapore-ETH Centre, Singapore.
    Dalton, Nick Sheep
    Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
    Veddeler, Christian
    3XN Architects, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    HabiTech: Inhabiting buildings, data & technology2024In: CHI EA '24: Extended abstracts of the 2024 CHI Conference on human factors in computing systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2024, article id 474Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As larger parts of our lives are determined in the digital realm, it is critical to reflect on how democratic values can be preserved and cultivated by technology. At the city-scale, this is studied in the field of 'digital civics'; however, there seems to be no corresponding focus at the level of buildings/building inhabitants. The majority of our lives are spent indoors and therefore the impact that 'indoor digital civics' may have, might exceed that of city-scale, digital civics. The digitization of building design and building management creates an opportunity to better identify, protect, and cultivate civic values that, until now, were centralized in the hands of building designers and building owners. By bringing together leading architecture/HCI academics and commercial stakeholders, this workshop builds on previous workshops at CHI. The workshop will provide a forum where a new agenda for research in 'HabiTech' can be defined and new research collaborations formed.

  • 46.
    Lund, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Ambient Displays Beyond Conventions2004In: Designinig for Attention Workshop: Workshop at HCI 2004, Design for Life. The 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference., 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Lund, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Boden, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    On the making of things: taking a risk with 3D printing2015In: PIN-C 2015 reframing design: proceedings of the 4th participatory innovation conference 2015 / [ed] Rianne Valkenburg, Coen Dekkers and Janneke Sluijs, Hauge: The Hauge University of applied sciences , 2015, Vol. 1, p. 485-499Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how the tradition of craft can be re-visited to assist a move beyond 3D-printed objects. While CAD, 3D modeling and 3D printing do offer precise tools for the repetitive manufacturing of small objects we argue that the closeness to "the materials at hand" is lost at the current moment. Via a practical design case we illustrate how we have experimented with ways of re-introducing craftsmanship both as an opportunity and as a necessity for moving forward. We combine this explorative/maker approach with an analytical approach, and analyze the process using the viewpoint of David Pye's (1968) notions of "workmanship of risk" and "workmanship of certainty".

  • 48. Molka-Danielsen, Judith
    et al.
    Keller, ChristinaWiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    IRIS – Selected Papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: issue theme: "IRIS 35 Designing the Interactive Society"2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Deshpande, Parag
    Wahlström, Viktoria
    Olsson, Tommy
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A NEAT Solution: Where Interaction Design and Public Health MeetManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Office workers tend not to move about during work hours. A series of medical observational studies

    have shown that extended sitting is associated with several negative health outcomes including

    obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), breast and colon cancer and premature

    mortality. Therefore, developing ways to encourage physical activity and breaking the habit of

    prolonged sitting in offices is urgently needed. Few studies, however, have investigated the nature

    of local movement and mobility in workspaces in depth and taking a cross disciplinary approach.

    This paper reports on an ongoing cross-disciplinary research project targeted at increasing physical

    activity of office workers while reducing prolonged sitting. Our collaboration between the

    departments of Informatics, Public Health and Clinical Medicine and the Design School at Umeå

    University resulted in two ethnographic studies. This led to the development and implementation of

    two prototypes referred to as the “NEAT Lamp” and the “Talking Tree”. The “NEAT Lamp” is a

    simple sensor-based lamp that was evaluated in situ in our second ethnographic study. The results

    of this study deepened our understanding of local movement and mobility in offices and resulted in

    the design of a second prototype, the “Talking Tree”. Using the knowledge gained through our

    ethnographic studies and the experience of using the prototypes, we were able to develop a

    conceptual framework for describing the patterns of local movement and mobility of office workers.

    This paper describes the process leading to the development of this framework. Moreover, it

    highlights how this process benefited from the cross-disciplinary nature of the project.

  • 50.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Creating a Sense of Unity: From Quantified Self to Qualitative Space2016In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction: Methods, Techniques, and Best Practices / [ed] Margherita Antona, Constantine Stephanidis, Springer, 2016, p. 371-381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and usage of Personal Informatics (PI) systems have been subjects of rapidly growing interest in recent years. PI systems are typically designed to monitor individuals' physical activity and encourage them to be more active, thereby 'hacking' the habit of prolonged sitting. Most PI systems focus solely on collecting quantitative data to encourage self-reflection and are therefore sometimes discussed in terms of the Quantified Self movement. However, this perspective is wholly focused on individual bodily movements and neglects the role of architectural spaces. This paper discusses an ongoing project focused on PI systems design at the intersection of bodily movements and the office as an architectural space. Taking this as a point of departure, we introduce a simple prototype interactive lamp known as the NEAT lamp, which was designed, implemented and evaluated in relation to everyday office work. The rationale underpinning the prototype's design is presented, followed by the results of a real-world evaluation of its effects in practice. We also discuss the role of the NEAT lamp as an ambient light that promotes awareness of sedentary behavior in the office as an open architectural space. Finally, we highlight the role of ambient displays as a medium for creating a sense of unity between the self and the architectural space, and propose that this observation suggests that we should move the discussion away from "quantified selves" towards qualitative spaces.

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