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  • 1.
    af Klinteberg, Maja
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Winberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Decreasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis in Swedish schoolchildren: three repeated population-based surveys2024In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 190, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has increased over several decades and now affects about one-fifth of all children in high-income countries (HICs). While the increase continues in lower-income countries, the prevalence of AD might have reached a plateau in HICs.

    Objectives: To investigate trends in the prevalence of AD and atopic comorbidity in schoolchildren in Sweden.

    Methods: The study population consisted of three cohorts of children (median age 8 years) in Norrbotten, Sweden, for 1996 (n = 3430), 2006 (n = 2585) and 2017 (n = 2785). An identical questionnaire that included questions from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) protocol was used in all three cohorts. Trends in AD prevalence were estimated, as well as trends in atopic comorbidity. AD prevalence was estimated both according to the ISAAC definition of AD and by adding the reported diagnosis by a physician (D-AD).

    Results: The prevalence of AD decreased in the last decade, from 22.8% (1996) and 21.3% (2006) to 16.3% (2017; P < 0.001). The prevalence of D-AD was lower, but the same pattern of decrease was seen, from 9.3% (1996) and 9.4% (2006) to 5.7% (2017; P < 0.001). In all three cohorts, AD was more common among girls than boys (18.9% vs. 13.8% in 2017; P < 0.001). Children from the mountain inlands had a higher prevalence of AD than children from coastal cities (22.0% vs. 15.1% in 2017; P < 0.001). In comparing D-AD, there were no significant differences between the sexes or between inland or coastal living. Concomitant asthma increased over the years from 12.2% (1996) to 15.8% (2006) to 23.0% (2017; P < 0.001). Concomitant allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitization increased from 1996 (15.0% and 27.5%) to 2006 (24.7% and 49.5%) but then levelled off until 2017 (21.0% and 46.7%).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of AD among schoolchildren in Sweden decreased over the study period, whereas atopic comorbidity among children with AD increased. Although a decrease was seen, AD is still common and the increase in atopic comorbidity among children with AD, especially the increase in asthma, is concerning.

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  • 2. Allinson, James
    et al.
    Afzal, Shoaib
    Colak, Yunus
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Van den Berghe, Maarten
    Boezen, Marike
    Breyer, Marie
    Breyer-Kohansal, Robab
    Burghuber, Otto C.
    Faner, Rosa
    Hartl, Sylvia
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Lahouse, Lies
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    Lundback, Bo
    Nwaru, Bright
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Vikjord, Sigrid
    Vonk, Judith
    Vijnant, Sara
    Szabo, Viktoria
    Agusti, Alvar
    Donaldson, Gavin
    Wedzicha, Jadwiga
    Vestbo, Jorgen
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Collating data from major European population studies - The CADSET (Chronic airway disease early stratification) clinical research collaboration2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56, no suppl 64, article id 3757Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: European population cohorts continue to expand our understanding of chronic airways disease and inter-study collaboration may help address the inevitable limitations of study size, duration, era and geography. Towards this aim, CADSET has collated data from ten major general population European cohorts: Asklepios; Copenhagen City Heart Study; Copenhagen General Population Study; ECRHS; HUNT; LEAD; Lifelines, OLIN, Rotterdam Study and WSAS. We included males and females aged 20 to 95 years with baseline demographic and spirometry data.

    Results: Data from 262,829 individuals (44% male) from multiple European countries provided good coverage across all adult ages (Fig.1A). Recruitment occurred in every year from 1976 through 2020. 23% were current-smokers and 42% were never-smokers, a pattern varying with advancing age (Fig.1B). The prevalence of airflow limitation varied according to whether lower limit of normal (LLN) or <0.70 thresholds were applied, increasing with age if the latter was used (Fig.1C).

    Interpretation: These results fit with previous reports, however the size, geographical reach and span of recruitment provided by this collaboration provides a unique opportunity to explore chronic airways disease development. Together, we are now pursuing research questions previously beyond the scope of individual cohort studies.

  • 3.
    Allinson, James P.
    et al.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital, UK, London, United Kingdom; National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK, London, United Kingdom.
    Afzal, Shoaib
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Çolak, Yunus
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Respiratory Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jarvis, Debbie
    National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK, London, United Kingdom.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    van den Berge, Maarten
    Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Boezen, H. Marike
    Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Breyer, Marie-Kathrin
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Lung Health, Vienna, Austria.
    Breyer-Kohansal, Robab
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Lung Health, Vienna, Austria.
    Brusselle, Guy
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Burghuber, Otto C.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Lung Health, Vienna, Austria; Faculty of Medicine, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna, Austria.
    Faner, Rosa
    Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain.
    Hartl, Sylvia
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Lung Health, Vienna, Austria; Faculty of Medicine, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna, Austria.
    Lahousse, Lies
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Bioanalysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Levanger, Norway; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Vikjord, Sigrid A. Aalberg
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Levanger, Norway; Department of Medicine and Rehabilitation, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Vonk, Judith M.
    Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wijnant, Sara R. A.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Bioanalysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Lange, Peter
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Respiratory Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nordestgaard, Børge G.
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olvera, Nuria
    Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain.
    Agusti, Alvar
    Càtedra Salut Respiratòria, Universitat Barcelona, Spain; Respiratory Institute, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain; Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain.
    Donaldson, Gavin C.
    National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK, London, United Kingdom.
    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A.
    National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK, London, United Kingdom.
    Vestbo, Jørgen
    Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; North West Lung Centre, Manchester University National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie E. G. W.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; COPD Centre, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Changes in lung function in European adults born between 1884 and 1996 and implications for the diagnosis of lung disease: a cross-sectional analysis of ten population-based studies2022In: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 2213-2600, E-ISSN 2213-2619, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the past century, socioeconomic and scientific advances have resulted in changes in the health and physique of European populations. Accompanying improvements in lung function, if unrecognised, could result in the misclassification of lung function measurements and misdiagnosis of lung diseases. We therefore investigated changes in population lung function with birth year across the past century, accounting for increasing population height, and examined how such changes might influence the interpretation of lung function measurements.

    Methods: In our analyses of cross-sectional data from ten European population-based studies, we included individuals aged 20–94 years who were born between 1884 and 1996, regardless of previous respiratory diagnoses or symptoms. FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), height, weight, and smoking behaviour were measured between 1965 and 2016. We used meta-regression to investigate how FEV1 and FVC (adjusting for age, study, height, sex, smoking status, smoking pack-years, and weight) and the FEV1/FVC ratio (adjusting for age, study, sex, and smoking status) changed with birth year. Using estimates from these models, we graphically explored how mean lung function values would be expected to progressively deviate from predicted values. To substantiate our findings, we used linear regression to investigate how the FEV1 and FVC values predicted by 32 reference equations published between 1961 and 2015 changed with estimated birth year.

    Findings: Across the ten included studies, we included 243 465 European participants (mean age 51·4 years, 95% CI 51·4–51·5) in our analysis, of whom 136 275 (56·0%) were female and 107 190 (44·0%) were male. After full adjustment, FEV1 increased by 4·8 mL/birth year (95% CI 2·6–7·0; p<0·0001) and FVC increased by 8·8 mL/birth year (5·7–12·0; p<0·0001). Birth year-related increases in the FEV1 and FVC values predicted by published reference equations corroborated these findings. This height-independent increase in FEV1 and FVC across the last century will have caused mean population values to progressively exceed previously predicted values. However, the population mean adjusted FEV1/FVC ratio decreased by 0·11 per 100 birth years (95% CI 0·09–0·14; p<0·0001).

    Interpretation: If current diagnostic criteria remain unchanged, the identified shifts in European values will allow the easier fulfilment of diagnostic criteria for lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but the systematic underestimation of lung disease severity. Funding: The European Respiratory Society, AstraZeneca, Chiesi Farmaceutici, GlaxoSmithKline, Menarini, and Sanofi-Genzyme.

  • 4.
    Almqvist, Linnea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    No remission in 60% of those with childhood-onset asthma: a population-based cohort followed from 8 to 28 years of age2024In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 224, article id 107581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although remission occur, childhood-onset asthma may persist until adulthood. Since few longitudinal population-based studies have followed a cohort from childhood until adulthood, the knowledge on predictors of persistence of asthma is sparse.

    Aim: To estimate persistence of asthma from 8 to 28 years and its associated factors. Methods: Within the OLIN (Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden) studies, a cohort was recruited in 1996 (age 8y, n = 3430) and followed annually with questionnaires about asthma and risk factors until 19y. Clinical examinations included skin prick tests (at 8, 12 and 19y) and lung function tests (17 and 19y) whereof a subsample performed bronchial hyperreactivity test. We identified n = 248 with asthma at 8y whereof 170 (69%) participated in a follow-up at 28y (73% of possible to invite).

    Results: Of the 170 participants at 28y, 105 (61.8%) had persistent asthma (women: 49/76, 64.5%; men: 56/94, 59.6%, p = 0.513). Factors collected at recruitment: allergic sensitization (OR7.8, 95%CI 3.0–20.2), severe respiratory infection (OR2.6, 95%CI 1.1–6.3) and higher asthma severity score (OR1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4) were associated with asthma at 28y after adjustment for sex, family history of asthma, breastfeeding <3 months and eczema. Replacing allergic sensitization with rhinoconjunctivitis in the model yielded OR3.4 (95%CI 1.5–8.0). Bronchial hyperreactivity at age 17y associated with asthma at 28y (OR9.0, 95%CI 1.7–47.0).

    Conclusions: Among children with asthma onset by 8y, 62% still had asthma at age 28 years. Persistent asthma was associated with allergic sensitization, rhinoconjunctivitis, severe respiratory infection, a more severe asthma and bronchial hyperreactivity.

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  • 5.
    Almqvist, Linnéa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    The coexistence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema from childhood to young adulthoodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Almqvist, Linnéa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Clinical outcome of adult onset asthma in a 15 year follow-up2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Almqvist, Linnéa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Remission of adult-onset asthma is rare: a 15-year follow-up study2020In: ERJ Open Research, E-ISSN 2312-0541, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 00620-2020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are few long-term clinical follow-up studies of adult-onset asthma. The aim of this article was to study clinical characteristics of adult-onset asthma in relation to remission and persistence of the disease in a 15-year follow-up.

    Methods: A cohort of 309 adults aged 20-60 years with asthma onset during the last 12 months verified by bronchial variability, was recruited between 1995 and 1999 from the general population in northern Sweden. The cohort was followed-up in 2003 (n=250) and between 2012 and 2014 (n=205). Structured interviews and spirometry were performed at recruitment and the follow-ups. Bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) and skin-prick tests were performed at recruitment and blood samples were collected at the last follow-up. Remission of asthma was defined as no asthma symptoms and no use of asthma medication during the last 12 months.

    Results: Of eight individuals in remission in 2003, five had relapsed between 2012 and 2014 and in total, 23 (11%) were in remission, while 182 had persistent asthma. Those in remission had higher mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted at recruitment than those with persistent asthma (94.6 versus 88.3, p=0.034), fewer had severe BHR (27.3% versus 50.9%, p=0.037) and they had less body mass index increase (+1.6 versus +3.0, p=0.054). Of those with persistent asthma, 13% had uncontrolled asthma and they had higher levels of blood neutrophils than those with partly controlled or controlled asthma.

    Conclusion: Higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted and less-severe BHR was associated with remission of adult-onset asthma, but still, the proportion in remission in this 15-year follow-up was low.

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  • 8. Andersen, Heidi
    et al.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Honkamaki, Jasmin
    Tuomisto, Leena E.
    Piirila, Paivi
    Hisinger-Molkanen, Hanna
    Sovijarvi, Anssi
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lehtimaki, Lauri
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Dyspnea has an association with lifestyle: differences between Swedish and Finnish speaking persons in Western Finland2021In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1855702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Difference in dyspnea mMRC >= 2 between Finnish speaking and Swedish-speaking populations in Finland has not been previously studied.

    Methods: In February 2016, a respiratory questionnaire was sent to 8000 randomly selected subjects aged 20-69 years in western Finland with a response rate of 52.3%. The registered native language of each subject determined whether questionnaire in Finnish or Swedish was applied. Multiple logistic regression was performed to calculate Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% CI for the simultaneous effects of independent variables on dyspnea mMRC >= 2.

    Results: Of all participants, 2780 (71.9%) were Finnish speakers and 1084 (28.1%) were Swedish speakers. Finnish speakers had a higher prevalence of dyspnea mMRC >= 2 (11.1% vs 6.5% p < 0.001) when compared to Swedish speakers. Finnish speakers smoked more often, had higher BMI, spent less time moving during the day, had more often occupational exposure to vapours, gases, dusts or fumes (VGDF), and had lower socioeconomic status based on occupation. Significant risk factors for dyspnea mMRC >= 2 were COPD (OR = 10.94), BMI >35 (OR = 9.74), asthma (OR = 4.78), female gender (OR = 2.38), older age (OR = 2.20), current smoking (OR = 1.59), and occupational exposure to VGDF (OR = 1.47).

    Conclusions: Swedish speakers had less dyspnea mMRC >= 2 which is explained by a healthier lifestyle. Smoking, obesity, and occupational exposures should be in focus to improve respiratory health.

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  • 9. Andersen, Heidi
    et al.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Tuomisto, Leena
    Piirila, Paivi
    Sovijarvi, Anssi
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lehtimaki, Lauri
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Difference in Dyspnea between Swedish and Finnish Speaking Persons in Western Finland: Association with Lifestyle2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden..
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hagenbjörk, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Early life swimming pool exposure and asthma onset in children: a case-control study2018In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 17, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Trichloramine exposure in indoor swimming pools has been suggested to cause asthma in children. We aimed to investigate the risk of asthma onset among children in relation to individual trichloramine exposure.

    METHODS: A longitudinal nested case-control study of 337 children with asthma (cases) and 633 controls aged 16-17 years was performed within a population-based cohort from The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden studies (OLIN). Year of asthma onset and exposure time at different ages were obtained in telephone interviews. Trichloramine concentrations in the pool buildings were measured. Skin prick test results for inhalant allergens were available from previous examinations of the cohort. The risk for asthma was analyzed in relation to the cumulative trichloramine exposure before onset of asthma.

    RESULTS: Swimming pool exposure in early life was associated with a significantly higher risk of pre-school asthma onset. A dose-response relationship between swimming pool exposure and asthma was indicated in children with asthma onset at 1 year of age. Children who were both sensitized and exposed had a particularly high risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: Early life exposure to chlorinated swimming pool environments was associated with pre-school asthma onset.

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  • 11.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    The clinical expression of asthma in schoolchildren has changed between 1996 and 20062010In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 859-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have reported diverging trends in the prevalence of asthma and wheeze. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical expression of childhood asthma in 1996 and 2006 by studying asthma morbidity, treatment, and environmental exposures in school children with physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze, respectively. All children enrolled in first or second grade (7-8 yr-old) in three municipalities in northern Sweden were invited to a questionnaire study in 1996 and 2006, respectively. In 1996, 3430 (97%) participated; and in 2006, 2585 (96%) participated. The same parental completed questionnaire, including the ISAAC questions, was used in both surveys. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported at 5.7% in 1996 and 7.4% in 2006. A significantly greater proportion of children with asthma were using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in 2006, 67% vs. 55% in 1996. This increase was parallel to a major decrease in severe asthma symptoms such as disturbed sleep because of wheeze (49% vs. 38%) and troublesome asthma (21% vs. 11%). The prevalence of current wheeze among the asthmatics decreased significantly; however, this was seen only among children not using ICS. Parental smoking decreased significantly as did the proportion living in damp buildings. In conclusion, although asthma remains a major public health issue in school age children, children with asthma had less respiratory symptoms and a better asthma control in 2006 compared to 1996. This parallels with an increase in treatment with ICS, more beneficial environmental conditions, and an increased diagnostic intensity resulting in a larger proportion of children with mild symptoms being diagnosed as having asthma.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå ; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Göteborgs universitet.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    The OLIN Studies, Luleå ; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Remission and Persistence of Asthma Followed From 7 to 19 Years of Age2013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E435-E442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To date, a limited number of population-based studies have prospectively evaluated the remission of childhood asthma. This work was intended to study the remission and persistence of childhood asthma and related factors. METHODS: In 1996, a questionnaire was distributed to the parents of all children aged 7 to 8 years in 3 municipalities in northern Sweden, and 3430 (97%) participated. After a validation study, 248 children were identified as having asthma; these children were reassessed annually until age 19 years when 205 (83%) remained. During the follow-up period lung function, bronchial challenge testing, and skin prick tests were performed. Remission was defined as no use of asthma medication and no wheeze during the past 12 months as reported at endpoint and in the 2 annual surveys preceding endpoint (ie, for >= 3 years). RESULTS: At age 19 years, 21% were in remission, 38% had periodic asthma, and 41% persistent asthma. Remission was more common among boys. Sensitization to furred animals and a more severe asthma (asthma score >= 2) at age 7 to 8 years were both inversely associated with remission, odds ratio 0.14 (95% confidence interval 0.04-0.55) and 0.19 (0.07-0.54), respectively. Among children with these 2 characteristics, 82% had persistent asthma during adolescence. Asthma heredity, damp housing, rural living, and smoking were not associated with remission. CONCLUSIONS: The probability of remission of childhood asthma from age 7- to 8-years to age 19 years was largely determined by sensitization status, particularly sensitization to animals, asthma severity, and female gender, factors all inversely related to remission.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Lundbäck, B
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Persistence and remission of asthma followed from 7 to 19 years of ageManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Swimming pool attendance is related to asthma among atopic school children: a population-based study2015In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 14, no 14, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: By-products of water disinfectants have been suggested to cause asthma, especially in atopic children. However, studies on indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma in children have presented conflicting results. The present study examined the relationship between indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma among sensitized and non-sensitized children aged 11-12 years.

    Methods: An extended ISAAC questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending fifth or sixth grade, aged 11-12 years, in two municipalities in Northern Sweden in 2010. A total of 1866 participated (96% of those invited) in the questionnaire study and 1652 (89%) also participated in skin prick testing for 10 standard airborne allergens. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma in combination with wheeze or use of asthma medication in the last 12 months. Current swimming pool attendance was reported as >= 1/week or <1/week. Logistic regression models were used for data analysis.

    Results: The prevalence of current asthma was 8.9% (10.0% of boys; 7.9% of girls) and 14% had attended indoor pools >= 1/week. Children currently attending swimming pools >= 1/week had an increased risk of current asthma. Stratified analyses for allergic sensitization adjusted for sex, parental smoking, parental asthma, and damp housing, showed a statistically significant association for current asthma only among sensitized subjects (OR 95% CI 1.90 1.09-3.32). No association was found between current pool attendance and wheeze, sensitization, rhinitis or eczema.

    Conclusions: The present study supports the proposed link between indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma in sensitized children.

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  • 15.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Heavy vehicle traffic is related to wheeze among schoolchildren: a population-based study in an area with low traffic flows2011In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 10, no 91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An association between traffic air pollution and respiratory symptoms among children has been reported. However, the effects of traffic air pollution on asthma and wheeze have been very sparsely studied in areas with low traffic intensity in cold climate with poor dispersion. We evaluated the impact of vehicle traffic on childhood asthma and wheeze by objective exposure assessment.

    Methods: As a part of the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies, a questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending first or second grade in Luleå (72,000 inhabitants) in Northern Sweden in 2006. The age of the children was 7-8 years and the participation rate was 98% (n = 1357). Skin prick tests were performed in 1224 (89%) children. The home addresses were given geographical coordinates and traffic counts were obtained from the local traffic authorities. A proximity model of average daily traffic and average daily heavy vehicle traffic within 200 meters from each participant's home address was used. The associations between traffic exposure and asthma and wheeze, respectively, were analysed in an adjusted multiple logistic regression model.

    Results: Exposure to high traffic flows was uncommon in the study area; only 15% of the children lived within 200 meters from a road with a traffic flow of ≥8000 vehicles per day. Living closer than 200 meters from a road with ≥500 heavy vehicles daily was associated with current wheeze, odds ratio 1.7 (confidence interval 1.0-2.7). A dose-response relation was indicated. An increased risk of asthma was also seen, however not significant, odds ratio 1.5 (confidence interval 0.8-2.9). Stratified analyses revealed that the effect of traffic exposure was restricted to the non-sensitized phenotype of asthma and wheeze. The agreement between self-reported traffic exposure and objective measurements of exposure was moderate.

    Conclusions: This study showed that already at low levels of exposure, vehicle traffic is related to an increased risk of wheeze among children. Thus, the global burden of traffic air pollution may be underestimated.

  • 16. Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Emtner, Margareta
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Physical activity and fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - A population based study2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1048-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), symptoms of fatigue, concomitant heart disease and low physical activity levels are more frequently described than in subjects without COPD. However, there are no population-based studies addressing the relationship between physical activity, fatigue and heart disease in COPD. The aim was to compare physical activity levels among subjects with and without COPD in a population based study, and to evaluate if concomitant heart disease and fatigue was associated to physical activity.

    METHODS: In this, 470 subjects with COPD and 659 subjects without COPD (non-COPD) participated in examinations including structured interview and spirometry. A ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/best of forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity (VC) < 0.7 was used to define COPD. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue scale (FACIT-F).

    RESULTS: The prevalence of low physical activity was higher among subjects with FEV1 < 80% predicted compared to non-COPD subjects (22.4% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.041). The factors most strongly associated with low physical activity in subjects with COPD were older age, OR 1.52, (95% CI 1.12-2.06), a history of heart disease, OR 2.11 (1.10-4.08), and clinically significant fatigue, OR 2.33 (1.31-4.13); while obesity was the only significant factor among non-COPD subjects, OR 2.26 (1.17-4.35).

    CONCLUSION: Physical activity levels are reduced when lung function is decreased below 80% of predicted, and the factors associated with low physical activity are different among subject with and without COPD. We propose that the presence of fatigue and heart disease are useful to evaluate when identifying subjects for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 17.
    Andersén, Heidi
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Thoracic Oncology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Tema Cancer, Stockholm, Sweden; Oncology Unit, Vaasa Keskussairaala, Vaasa, Finland.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Honkamäki, Jasmin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Tuomisto, Leena E.
    Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Hisinger-Mölkänen, Hanna
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Dept of Internal Medicine, Krefting Research Center, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Haahtela, Tari
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Unit of Clinical Physiology, Dept of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lehtimäki, Lauri
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Allergy Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Unit of Clinical Physiology, Dept of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Dept of Internal Medicine, Krefting Research Center, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease: a population study2022In: ERJ Open Research, E-ISSN 2312-0541, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 00462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may exacerbate respiratory symptoms. A recent European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology position paper recommended the use of an acronym, N-ERD (NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease), for this hypersensitivity associated with asthma or chronic rhinosinusitis with or without nasal polyposis. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of N-ERD and identify factors associated with N-ERD.

    Methods: In 2016, a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a random adult population of 16 000 subjects aged 20–69 years was performed in Helsinki and Western Finland. The response rate was 51.5%.

    Results: The prevalence was 1.4% for N-ERD, and 0.7% for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). The prevalence of N-ERD was 6.9% among subjects with asthma and 2.7% among subjects with rhinitis. The risk factors for N-ERD were older age, family history of asthma or allergic rhinitis, long-term smoking and exposure to environmental pollutants. Asthmatic subjects with N-ERD had a higher risk of respiratory symptoms, severe hypersensitivity reactions and hospitalisations than asthmatic subjects without N-ERD. The subphenotype of N-ERD with asthma was most symptomatic. Subjects with rhinitis associated with N-ERD, which would not be included in AERD, had the fewest symptoms.

    Conclusion: We conclude that the prevalence of N-ERD was 1.4% in a representative Finnish adult population sample. Older age, family history of asthma or allergic rhinitis, cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke, and occupational exposures increased odds of N-ERD. N-ERD was associated with significant morbidity.

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  • 18. Andersén, Heidi
    et al.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Honkamäki, Jasmin
    Tuomisto, Leena E.
    Hisinger-Mölkänen, Hanna
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lehtimäki, Lauri
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Influence of childhood exposure to a farming environment on age at asthma diagnosis in a population-based study2021In: Journal of Asthma and Allergy, ISSN 1178-6965, Vol. 14, p. 1081-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, and factors associated with different asthma phenotypes are poorly understood. Given the higher prevalence of farming exposure and late diagnosis of asthma in more rural Western Finland as compared with the capital of Helsinki, we investigated the relationship between childhood farming environment and age at asthma diagnosis.

    Methods: A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out with subjects aged 20– 69 years in Western Finland. The response rate was 52.5%. We included 3864 participants, 416 of whom had physician-diagnosed asthma at a known age and with data on the childhood environment. The main finding was confirmed in a similar sample from Helsinki. Participants were classified as follows with respect to asthma diagnosis: early diagnosis (0– 11 years), intermediate diagnosis (12–39 years), and late diagnosis (40–69 years).

    Results: The prevalence of asthma was similar both without and with childhood exposure to a farming environment (11.7% vs 11.3%). Allergic rhinitis, family history of asthma, ex-smoker, occupational exposure, and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 were associated with a higher like-lihood of asthma. Childhood exposure to a farming environment did not increase the odds of having asthma (aOR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.87–1.40). It did increase the odds of late diagnosis (aOR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.12–4.69), but the odds were lower for early (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.30–0.80) and intermediate diagnosis of asthma (aOR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.47–1.18).

    Conclusion: Odds were lower for early diagnosis of asthma and higher for late diagnosis of asthma in a childhood farming environment. This suggests a new hypothesis concerning the etiology of asthma when it is diagnosed late.

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  • 19.
    Andersén, Heidi
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Thoracic Oncology Unit, Tema Cancer, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Tuomisto, Leena E.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland .
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sovijärivi, Anssi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Department of Internal Medicine, Krefting Research Center, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lehtimäki, Lauri
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland., Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Multimorbidity in Finnish and Swedish speaking Finns - association with daily habits and socioeconomic status: A Nordic EpiLung study2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andersén, Heidi
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Thoracic Oncology Unit, Tema Cancer, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tuomisto, Leena E.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden .
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lehtimäki, Lauri
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Allergy Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Multimorbidity in Finnish and Swedish speaking Finns; association with daily habits and socioeconomic status – Nordic EpiLung cross-sectional study2021In: Preventive Medicine Reports, E-ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 22, article id 101338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimorbidity is an emerging public health priority. This study aims to assess the role of lifestyle and socioeconomic status in the prevalence of multimorbidity and chronic diseases by using two language groups that are part of the same genetic subgroup but differ by daily habits. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2016 with randomly selected population sample with 4173 responders (52.3%) aged 20–69 years in Western Finland. We included 3864 Finnish participants with Swedish (28.1%) or Finnish (71.9%) as a native language. We used a questionnaire to assess participants' chronic diseases and lifestyle. We determined multimorbidity as a disease count ≥ 2.

    Finnish speakers were more likely to have a diagnosis of COPD, heart failure, diabetes, reflux disease, chronic kidney failure, and painful conditions than Swedish speakers. The prevalence of multimorbidity was higher for Finnish speakers in the age group of 60–69 years (41.0% vs. 32.0%, p = 0.018) than Swedish speakers. A higher proportion of Finnish speakers smoked, were obese, inactive, and had lower socioeconomic status compared to Swedish speakers. All these factors, in addition to age and female sex, were significant risk factors for multimorbidity. Prevalence of multimorbidity was different in two language groups living in the same area and was associated with differences in lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity and obesity.

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  • 21.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; COPD Center, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, University Central Hospital, Finland and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jalasto, Juuso
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, University Central Hospital, Finland and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Seinäjoki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Rådinger, Madeleine
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD in Sweden: a Nordic Epilung study2023In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 217, article id 107347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The prevalence of COPD tends to level off in populations with decreasing prevalence of smoking but the extent of underdiagnosis in such populations needs further investigation. Aim: To investigate underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD with a focus on socio-economy, lifestyle determinants and healthcare utilization.

    Method: The 1839 participants were selected from two ongoing large-scale epidemiological research programs: The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden Studies and the West Sweden Asthma Study. COPDGOLD was defined according to the fixed post-bronchodilator spirometric criteria FEV1/FVC<0.70 in combination with respiratory symptoms.

    Results: Among the 128 participants who fulfilled the criteria for COPDGOLD, the underdiagnosis was 83.6% (n = 107) of which 57.9% were men. The undiagnosed participants were younger, had higher FEV1% of predicted and less frequently a family history of bronchitis. One in four of the undiagnosed had utilized healthcare and had more frequently utilized healthcare due to a burden of respiratory symptoms than the general population without COPD. Underdiagnosis was not related to educational level. Misclassification of COPD was characterized by being a woman with low education, ever smoker, having respiratory symptoms and having a previous asthma diagnosis.

    Conclusion: In the high income country Sweden, the underdiagnosis of COPD was highly prevalent. Reduced underdiagnosis can contribute to risk factor modification, medical treatment and self-management strategies in early stages of the disease, which may prevent disease progression and improve the quality of life among those affected. Therefore, there is a need to increase the use of spirometry in primary care to improve the diagnostic accuracy.

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  • 22.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Centre for COPD Research, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Research and Development, Region of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nwaru, Bright
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD in Sweden2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23. Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Hagstad, Stig
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Research and Development, Obstructive Lung Disease In Northern Sweden (OLIN) Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Lötvall, Jan
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Chronic bronchitis in West Sweden - a matter of smoking and social class2016In: European clinical respiratory journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 3, article id 30319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although chronic bronchitis is associated with impaired quality of life, hospitalisations and increased mortality, it has been less in focus after the introduction of the term chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are no recent published data on the prevalence of chronic bronchitis from the Scandinavian countries.

    AIM: The main aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in West Sweden by using data from a large-scale epidemiological study of the general population. A further aim was to identify current risk factors for chronic bronchitis in a population with a major decrease in the proportion of smokers.

    METHODS: From the 18,087 questionnaire responders out of 30,000 invited to participate at the West Sweden Asthma Study, 2,000 subjects were randomly selected and invited to detailed clinical examinations performed during 2009-2013. A total of 1,172 subjects aged 17-79 participated in the examinations which included, among others, spirometry and structured interviews. Chronic bronchitis was defined according to reported symptoms.

    RESULTS: The overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 7.2% (men 7.6%; women 6.8% ns), and it was 8.7% in subjects older than age 60. Chronic bronchitis was strongly associated with smoking, defined both as current smoking status and pack-years. Other risk factors were increasing age, low socio-economic class and urban living. Of those with chronic bronchitis, 22% fulfilled the GOLD criteria of COPD.

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was somewhat lower than found by studies in Sweden in the 1980s and the prevalence was now similar in men and women. Although smoking was still the dominating risk factor for chronic bronchitis, the relative importance of smoking had decreased parallel with a decreasing smoking prevalence, while the relative importance of other factors than smoking had increased compared to previous studies.

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  • 24.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Society, Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ilmarinen, Pinja
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindqvist, Ari
    Clinical Research Unit of Pulmonary Diseases, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki University and Clinical Research Institute HUCH Ltd, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nwaru, Bright, I
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pallasaho, Paula
    Espoo City Primary Health Care Services, Finland.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vähätalo, Lida
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Hisinger-Mölkänen, Hanna
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Differences in diagnostic patterns of obstructive airway disease between areas and sex in Sweden and Finland: the Nordic EpiLung study2021In: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1196-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the current prevalence of physician-diagnosed obstructive airway diseases by respiratory symptoms and by sex in Sweden and Finland.

    Method: In 2016, a postal questionnaire was answered by 34,072 randomly selected adults in four study areas: Västra Götaland and Norrbotten in Sweden, and Seinäjoki-Vaasa and Helsinki in Finland.

    Results: The prevalence of asthma symptoms was higher in Norrbotten (13.2%), Seinäjoki-Vaasa (14.8%) and Helsinki (14.4%) than in Västra Götaland (10.7%), and physician-diagnosed asthma was highest in Norrbotten (13.0%) and least in Västra Götaland (10.1%). Chronic productive cough was most common in the Finnish areas (7.7–8.2% versus 6.3–6.7%) while the prevalence of physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varied between 1.7 and 2.7% in the four areas. Among individuals with respiratory symptoms, the prevalence of asthma was most common in Norrbotten, while a diagnosis of COPD or CB was most common in Västra Götaland and Seinäjoki-Vaasa. More women than men with respiratory symptoms reported a diagnosis of asthma in Sweden and Seinäjoki-Vaasa but there were no sex differences in Helsinki. In Sweden, more women than men with symptoms of cough or phlegm reported a diagnosis of CB or COPD, while in Finland the opposite was found.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and corresponding diagnoses varied between and within the countries. The proportion reporting a diagnosis of obstructive airway disease among individuals with respiratory symptoms varied, indicating differences in diagnostic patterns both between areas and by sex.

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  • 25. Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Kainu, Annette
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Respiratory symptoms increase health care consumption and affect everyday life: a cross-sectional population-based study from Finland, Estonia, and Sweden2016In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 3, article id 31024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Even though respiratory symptoms are common in the adult population, there is limited research describing their impact on everyday life and association with health care consumption.

    AIM: The main objective of this population-based study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among adults in Finland, Estonia, and Sweden in relation to health care consumption and to identify factors influencing health care consumption. A secondary aim was to assess to which extent the presence of respiratory symptoms affect everyday life.

    METHOD: In the population-based FinEsS studies consisting of random samples of subjects aged 20 to 69 years from Finland (n=1,337), Estonia (n=1,346), and Sweden (n=1,953), data on demographics, respiratory health, and health care consumption were collected by structured interviews. Prevalence was compared and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were significantly more common in Finland (66.0%) and Estonia (65.2%) than in Sweden (54.1%). Among subjects with respiratory symptoms, the proportion reporting outpatient care during the past year was fairly similar in the three countries, while specialist consultations were more common in Finland (19.1%), and hospitalisations more common in Estonia (15.0%). Finnish and Estonian residency, female sex, and BMI>25 increased the risk for outpatient care consumption. Wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath in the past 12 months, recurrent sputum production, and cough were associated with an increased risk for health care consumption. Increasing number of respiratory symptoms increased the risk for consuming health care. A larger proportion of subjects in Estonia and Sweden experienced their everyday life being affected by respiratory symptoms compared with subjects in Finland.

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory symptoms are common in Finland, Estonia, and Sweden and contribute to a negative impact on everyday life as well as increased health care consumption. The observed differences in health care consumption between countries are probably related to national differences in health care structure.

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  • 26.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology , Lulea, Sweden.
    Bhatta, Laxmi
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology , Lulea, Sweden.
    Brumpton, Ben
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Clinic of Thoracic and Occupational Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Vähätalo, Iida
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Lassman-Klee, Paul G.
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nwaru, Bright
    Krefting Research center, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mai, Xiao-Mei
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Vikjord, Sigrid Anna
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research center, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Respiratory symptoms as risk factors for mortality - the Nordic EpiLung Study2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56, no Suppl. 64Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Bhatta, Laxmi
    K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; Division of Mental Health Care, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Brumpton, Ben
    K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Vähätalo, Iida
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Lassmann-Klee, Paul G.
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Helsinki University Hospital’s Diagnostic Center and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krokstad, Steinar
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger Hospital, Levanger, Norway.
    Vikjord, Sigrid Anna Aalberg
    K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Level of education modifies asthma mortality in Norway and Sweden. The Nordic EpiLung study2024In: Journal of Asthma and Allergy, ISSN 1178-6965, Vol. 17, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aim: The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES), asthma and mortality is complex and multifaceted, and it is not established if educational level modifies the association between asthma and mortality. The aim was to study the association between asthma and mortality in Sweden and Norway and to what extent educational level modifies this association.

    Participants and Methods: Within the Nordic EpiLung Study, >56,000 individuals aged 30–69 years participated in population-based surveys on asthma and associated risk factors in Sweden and Norway during 2005–2007. Data on educational level and 10-year all-cause mortality were linked by national authorities. The fraction of mortality risk attributable to asthma was calculated, and Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for mortality related to asthma, stratified by educational level.

    Results: In total, 5.5% of all deaths was attributed to asthma. When adjusted for potential confounders, the HR for mortality related to asthma was 1.71 (95% CI 1.52–1.93). Those with primary level of education had higher hazard of all-cause death related to asthma than those with tertiary level (HR 1.80, 95% CI 1.48–2.18, vs HR 1.39, 95% CI 0.99–1.95).

    Conclusion: Asthma was associated with an overall 71% increased all-cause mortality and 5.5% of deaths can be attributed to asthma. Educational levels modified the risk of mortality associated with asthma, with the highest risk among those with primary education.

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  • 28.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Strandkvist, Viktor
    Department of Health and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Sawalha, Sami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eriksson Ström, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lung function trajectories and associated mortality among adults with and without airway obstruction2023In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 208, no 10, p. 1063-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Spirometry is essential for diagnosis and assessment of prognosis in COPD.

    Objectives: To identify FEV1 trajectories and their determinants, based on annual spirometry measurements among individuals with and without airway obstruction. Furthermore, to assess mortality in relation to trajectories.

    Methods: In 2002-04, individuals with airway obstruction (AO) (FEV1/VC<0.70, n=993) and age- and sex-matched non-obstructive (NO) referents were recruited from population-based cohorts. Annual spirometries until 2014 were utilized in joint-survival Latent Class Mixed Models to identify lung function trajectories. Mortality data were collected during 15 years of follow-up.

    Results: Three trajectories were identified among the AO-cases and two among the NO referents. Trajectory membership was driven by baseline FEV1%predicted (%pred) in both groups and additionaly, pack-years in AO and current smoking in NO. Longitudinal FEV1%pred level depended on baseline FEV1%pred, pack-years and obesity. The trajectories were distributed: 79.6% T1AO FEV1-high with normal decline, 12.8% T2AO FEV1-high with rapid decline, and 7.7% T3AO FEV1-low with normal decline (mean 27, 72 and 26 mL/year) among AO-individuals, and 96.7% T1NO FEV1-high with normal decline and 3.3% T2NO FEV1-high with rapid decline (mean 34 and 173 mL/year) among referents. Hazard for death was increased for T2AO (HR1.56) and T3AO (HR3.45) vs. T1AO, and for T2NO (HR2.99) vs. T1NO.

    Conclusions: Three different FEV1 trajectories were identified among those with airway obstruction and two among the referents, with different outcomes in terms of FEV1-decline and mortality. The FEV1 trajectories among airway obstructive and the relationship between low FVC and trajectory outcome are of particular clinical interest.

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  • 29.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Eriksson, Berne
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Mincheva, Roxana
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hagstad, Stig
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ullman, Anders
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Decrease in prevalence of COPD in Sweden after decades of decrease in smoking2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The smoking prevalence in Sweden has steadily decreased during three decades. The prevalence of COPD in Sweden in the 1990s and around the millennium shift was similar to neighboring European countries, i.e. estimated at 11-17%, and of moderate to severe COPD to 7-11%, in ages over 40y.

    Aim: Has the prevalence of chronic airway obstruction (CAO) and of COPD in Sweden decreased after decades of decreasing smoking prevalence?

    Methods: Within two large scale population studies in progress, the West Sweden Asthma Study (WSAS) and the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden Studies (OLIN), the prevalence of COPD in ages 41-72y was calculated among randomly selected subjects from the general population in 2009-2012. The following post-bronchodilator definitions were used; CAO: FEV1/FVC<LLN and FEV1/FVC<0.7; moderate to severe CAO: FEV1/FVC<LLN with FEV1<LLN, and FEV1/FVC<0.7 with FEV1<80% of predicted. In line with the GOLD 2017 guidelines, both CAO and respiratory symptoms were required for the diagnosis of COPD.

    Results: The prevalence of CAO based on the FEV1/FVC<LLN and FEV1/FVC<0.7 criteria, respectively, was 6.4% and 10.3%, while the corresponding prevalence of COPD was 5.6% and 8.4%. The prevalence of moderate to severe CAO was 4.0% (LLN-criterion) and 5.0% (fixed ratio-criterion) and of moderate to severe COPD 3.8% and 4.4%, respectively. Main risk factors for both CAO and COPD were smoking, male sex and increasing age.

    Conclusion: As prevalence of COPD defined as chronic airway obstruction before and around the millennium shift was estimated at 11-17% in ages >40 years, the prevalence of COPD has decreased in Sweden, and the decrease in smoking over decades is probably the main causal factor.

  • 30.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Restrictive spirometric pattern in the general adult population: methods of defining the condition and consequences on prevalence2016In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 120, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Attempts have been made to use dynamic spirometry to define restrictive lung function, but the definition of a restrictive spirometric pattern (RSP) varies between studies such as BOLD and NHANES. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of RSP among adults in northern Sweden based on different definitions.

    METHODS: In 2008-2009 a general population sample aged 21-86y within the obstructive lung disease in northern Sweden (OLIN) studies was examined by structured interview and spirometry, and 726 subjects participated (71% of invited). The prevalence of RSP was calculated according to three different definitions based on pre-as well as post-bronchodilator spirometry: 1) FVC < 80% & FEV1/FVC > 0.7 2) FVC < 80% & FEV1/FVC > LLN 3) FVC < LLN & FEV1/FVC > LLN RESULTS: The three definitions yielded RSP prevalence estimates of 10.5%, 11.2% and 9.4% respectively, when based on pre-bronchodilator values. The prevalence was lower when based on post-bronchodilator values, i.e. 7.3%, 7.9% and 6.6%. According to definition 1 and 2, the RSP prevalence increased by age, but not according to definition 3. The overlap between the definitions was substantial. When corrected for confounding factors, manual work in industry and diabetes with obesity were independently associated with an increased risk for RSP regardless of definition.

    CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of RSP was 7-11%. The prevalence estimates differed more depending on the choice of pre- compared to post-bronchodilator values than on the choice of RSP definition. RSP was, regardless of definition, independently associated with manual work in industry and diabetes with obesity.

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  • 31.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Halmstad, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Decreased prevalence of moderate to severe COPD over 15 years in northern SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The burden of COPD in terms of mortality, morbidity, costs and prevalence has increased worldwide. Recent results on prevalence in Western Europe are conflicting. In Sweden smoking prevalence has steadily decreased over the past 30 years. 

    Aim: The aim was to study changes in prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD in the same area and within the same age-span 15 years apart.

    Material and methods: Two population-based cross-sectional samples in ages 23-72 years participating at examinations in 1994 and 2009, respectively, were compared in terms of COPD prevalence, severity and risk factor patterns. Two different definitions of COPD were used; FEV1/FVC<LLN and FEV1/FVC<0.7. The severity of COPD was assessed by FEV1, both as % of predicted and in relation to the LLN.

    Results: The prevalence of COPD decreased significantly from 9.5% to 6.3% (p=0.030) according to the FEV1/FVC<LLN criterion, while the decrease based on the FEV1/FVC<0.7 criterion from 10.5% to 8.5% was non-significant. The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially and significantly, and the risk factor pattern was altered in 2009 when, beside age and smoking, also socio-economic status based on occupation was significantly associated with COPD. 

    Conclusions: Changes in both prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD were observed between surveys. Following a continuing decrease in smoking habits over several decades, a decrease in the prevalence of moderate to severe COPD was observed from 1994 to 2009 in northern Sweden.

  • 32.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Berne
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden..
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Decreased prevalence of moderate to severe COPD over 15 years in northern Sweden2016In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 114, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The burden of COPD in terms of mortality, morbidity, costs and prevalence has increased worldwide. Recent results on prevalence in Western Europe are conflicting. In Sweden smoking prevalence has steadily decreased over the past 30 years.

    AIM: The aim was to study changes in prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD in the same area and within the same age-span 15 years apart.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two population-based cross-sectional samples in ages 23-72 years participating at examinations in 1994 and 2009, respectively, were compared in terms of COPD prevalence, severity and risk factor patterns. Two different definitions of COPD were used; FEV1/FVC < LLN and FEV1/FVC < 0.7. The severity of COPD was assessed by FEV1, both as % of predicted and in relation to the LLN.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of COPD decreased significantly from 9.5% to 6.3% (p = 0.030) according to the FEV1/FVC < LLN criterion, while the decrease based on the FEV1/FVC < 0.7 criterion from 10.5% to 8.5% was non-significant. The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD decreased substantially and significantly, and the risk factor pattern was altered in 2009 when, beside age and smoking, also socio-economic status based on occupation was significantly associated with COPD.

    CONCLUSIONS: Changes in both prevalence and risk factor patterns of COPD were observed between surveys. Following a continuing decrease in smoking habits over several decades, a decrease in the prevalence of moderate to severe COPD was observed from 1994 to 2009 in northern Sweden.

  • 33.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå,.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden ; Krefting Research Centre/Department of Internal Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Department of Research and Development, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Prevalence trends in respiratory symptoms and asthma in relation to smoking: two cross-sectional studies ten years apart among adults in northern Sweden2014In: World Allergy Organization Journal, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Smoking is considered to be the single most important preventable risk factor for respiratory symptoms. Estimating prevalence of respiratory symptoms is important since they most often precede a diagnosis of an obstructive airway disease, which places a major burden on the society. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence trends of respiratory symptoms and asthma among Swedish adults, in relation to smoking habits. A further aim was to estimate the proportion of respiratory symptom and asthma prevalence attributable to smoking.

    METHODS: Data from two large-scale cross-sectional surveys among adults performed in northern Sweden in 1996 and 2006 were analysed. Identical methods and the same questionnaire were used in both surveys. The association between smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma was analysed with multiple logistic regression analyses. Changes in prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma from 1996 to 2006 were expressed as odds ratios. Additionally, the population attributable risks of smoking were estimated.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of most respiratory symptoms decreased significantly from 1996 to 2006. Longstanding cough decreased from 12.4 to 10.1%, sputum production from 19.0 to 15.0%, chronic productive cough from 7.3 to 6.2%, and recurrent wheeze from 13.4 to 12.0%. Any wheeze and asthmatic wheeze remained unchanged. This parallels to a decrease in smoking from 27.4 to 19.1%. In contrast, physician-diagnosed asthma increased from 9.4 to 11.6%. The patterns were similar after correction for confounders. All respiratory symptoms were highly associated with smoking, and the proportion of respiratory symptoms in the population attributed to smoking (PAR) ranged from 9.8 to 25.5%. In 2006, PAR of smoking was highest for recurrent wheeze (20.6%).

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we found that respiratory symptoms, in particular symptoms common in bronchitis, decreased among adults in northern Sweden, parallel to a decrease in smoking from 1996 to 2006. In contrast, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased during the same time-period. Up to one fourth of the respiratory symptom prevalence in the population was attributable to smoking.

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  • 34.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden..
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    A population-based cohort of adults with asthma: mortality and participation in a long-term follow-up2017In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 4, article id 1334508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: Asthma is a major public health concern. The aim of this study was to characterize a large population-based cohort of adults with asthma, and to study factors associated with all-cause mortality and non-participation in a long-term follow-up. Design: Random and stratified samples from five population-based cohorts were clinically examined during 1986-2001, and all subjects with asthma were included in the study (n = 2055, age 19-72 years, 55% women). Independent associations between different risk factors and (i) mortality and (ii) non-participation in a clinical follow-up in 2012-2014 were estimated. Results: In 1986-2001, 95% reported any wheeze and/or attacks of shortness of breath in the past 12 months, and/or asthma medication use. Over the up to 28 years of follow-up time, the cumulative mortality was 22.7%. Male gender, current smoking, and lower forced expiratory volume in 1 sec of predicted (FEV1% of predicted) were independent risk factors for mortality, while obesity was associated with non-participation in the follow-up. Older ages, ischemic heart disease, and low socioeconomic status were associated with both mortality and non-participation. Conclusions: The risk factors associated with mortality in this adult population-based asthma cohort were similar to those commonly identified in general population samples, i.e. male gender, current smoking, and lower FEV1% of predicted, while obesity was associated with non-participation in a long-term follow-up. Ischemic heart disease, low socioeconomic status, and older ages were associated with both mortality and non-participation.

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  • 35.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eosinophilic inflammation and lung function decline in a long-term follow-up of a large population-based asthma cohort2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between lung function decline and airway inflammation among asthmatics has important therapeutic implications, but has rarely been studied in large samples or in population-based asthma cohorts.

    A population-based adult asthma cohort (n=2055) was recruited during 1986-2001 and clinically examined including spirometry. In 2012-2014, all still eligible subjects (n=1425) were invited to a clinical follow-up including spirometry, blood sampling, and a structured interview, and n=1006 participated (55% women, mean age 59y, 32-92y). Linear regression was performed with age, sex, smoking habits, year of first examination, family history of asthma, socioeconomic status, eosinophils (EOS)>=0.3x109/L, and neutrophils (NEUT)>=5.0x109/L as independent variables and pre-bronchodilator FEV1 decline/year (ml and % of predicted [pp], respectively) as dependent. In secondary models, both ICS use at baseline and ICS use at follow-up were also included.

    The mean annual FEV1 decline in ml (pp) among asthmatics with EOS<0.3, 0.4>EOS>=0.3 and EOS>=0.4x109/L, respectively, was 26ml (0.03pp), 29ml (0.10pp) and 34ml (0.27pp) (p<0.001). In adjusted analyses, EOS>=0.3 was significantly associated with FEV1 decline, both in terms of ml (4ml excess annual decline vs EOS<0.3) and pp. The association between EOS and FEV1 decline in pp, but not ml, remained when additionally adjusted for ICS use. The association with NEUT>=5.0x109/L was less clear.

    On group level, adult asthmatics with higher levels of eosinophils in blood have a history of excess FEV1 decline compared to asthmatics with lower levels of eosinophil inflammation, independent of other factors such as ICS use.

  • 36.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Eriksson, Berne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eklund, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Severe asthma among adults: Prevalence and clinical characteristics2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Severe asthma is a considerable challenge for patients, health care professionals and society. Few studies have estimated the prevalence of severe asthma according to modern definitions of which none based on a population study.

    Methods: We estimated the prevalence and studied characteristics of severe asthma in a large adult population-based asthma cohort followed for 10-28 years in northern Sweden: 1006 subjects participated in a follow-up during 2012-14, when 830 (82.5%) still had current asthma (mean age 59y, 32-92y, 56% women). Severe asthma was defined according to three internationally well-known criteria: the US SARP, ATS/ERS and GINA. All subjects with severe asthma were undergoing respiratory specialist care, and were also contacted by telephone to verify adherence to treatment.

    Results: The prevalence of severe asthma according to the three definitions was 3.6% (US SARP), 4.8% (ERS/ATS), and 6.1% (GINA) among subjects with current asthma. Although all were using high ICS doses and other maintenance treatment, >40% had uncontrolled asthma and <10% had controlled asthma according to the ACT. Severe asthma was related to age >50 years, nasal polyposis, decreased FEV1, not fully reversible airway obstruction, sensitization to aspergillus, elevated neutrophils and partly to eosinophils, and tended to be more common in women.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of severe asthma in this asthma cohort was 4-6%, corresponding to approximately 0.5% of the population in northern Sweden. A substantial proportion of those with severe asthma had uncontrolled disease, and severe asthma differed significantly from other asthma in terms of both clinical and inflammatory characteristics.

  • 37.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Berne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Eklund, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Severe asthma: A population study perspective2019In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 819-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Severe asthma is a considerable challenge for patients, health care professionals and society. Few studies have estimated the prevalence of severe asthma according to modern definitions of which none based on a population study.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe characteristics and estimate the prevalence of severe asthma in a large adult population-based asthma cohort followed for 10-28 years.

    METHODS: N=1006 subjects with asthma participated in a follow-up during 2012-14, when 830 (mean age 59y, 56% women) still had current asthma. Severe asthma was defined according to three internationally well-known criteria: the ATS workshop definition from 2000 used in the US Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP), the 2014 ATS/ERS Task force definition and the GINA 2017. All subjects with severe asthma according to any of these criteria were undergoing respiratory specialist care, and were also contacted by telephone to verify treatment adherence.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of severe asthma according to the three definitions was 3.6% (US SARP), 4.8% (ERS/ATS Taskforce), and 6.1% (GINA) among subjects with current asthma. Although all were using high ICS doses and other maintenance treatment, >40% had uncontrolled asthma according to the asthma control test. Severe asthma was related to age >50 years, nasal polyposis, impaired lung function, sensitization to aspergillus, and tended to be more common in women. Further, neutrophils in blood significantly discriminated severe asthma from other asthma.

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Severe asthma differed significantly from other asthma in terms of demographic, clinical and inflammatory characteristics, results suggesting possibilities for improved treatment regimens of severe asthma. The prevalence of severe asthma in this asthma cohort was 4-6%, corresponding to approximately 0.5% of the general population.

  • 38.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Muellerova, Hana
    Real-World Evidence&Epidemiology, GSK R&D, Uxbridge, UK.
    Wurst, Keele
    Real-World Evidence&Epidemiology, GSK R&D, Uxbridge, UK.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Chronic airway obstruction in a population-based adult asthma cohort: Prevalence, incidence and prognostic factors2018In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 138, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Asthma and COPD may overlap (ACO) but information about incidence and risk factors are lacking. This study aimed to estimate prevalence, incidence and risk factors of chronic airway obstruction (CAO) in a population-based adult asthma cohort.

    METHODS: /FVC<0.7.

    RESULTS: decline and higher levels of neutrophils than asthma only. Smoking, older age and male sex were independently associated with increased risk for both prevalent and incident CAO, while obesity had a protective effect.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective adult asthma cohort, the majority did not develop CAO. Smoking, older age and male sex were risk factors for prevalent and incident CAO, similar to risk factors described for COPD in the general population.

  • 39.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden..
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Dept of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden..
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    FEV1 decline in relation to blood eosinophils and neutrophils in a population-based asthma cohort2020In: World Allergy Organization Journal, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 100110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relationship between lung function decline and eosinophils and neutrophils has important therapeutic implications among asthmatics, but it has rarely been studied in large cohort studies.

    Objective: The aim is to study the relationship between blood eosinophils and neutrophils and FEV1 decline in a long-term follow-up of a population-based adult asthma cohort.

    Methods: In 2012-2014, an adult asthma cohort was invited to a follow-up including spirometry, blood sampling, and structured interviews, and n = 892 participated (55% women, mean age 59 y, 32-92 y). Blood eosinophils, neutrophils and FEV 1 decline were analyzed both as continuous variables and divided into categories with different cut-offs. Regression models adjusted for smoking, exposure to vapors, gas, dust, or fumes (VGDF), use of inhaled and oral corticosteroids, and other possible confounders were utilized to analyze the relationship between eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up and FEV1 decline.

    Results: The mean follow-up time was 18 years, and the mean FEV 1 decline was 27 ml/year. The annual FEV1 decline was related to higher levels of both blood eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up, but only the association with eosinophils remained when adjusted for confounders. Further, the association between FEV1 decline and eosinophils was stronger among those using ICS. With EOS <0.3 × 109/L as reference, a more rapid decline in FEV1 was independently related to EOS ≥0.4 × 109/L in adjusted analyses.

    Conclusions and clinical relevance: Besides emphasizing the importance of smoking cessation and reduction of other harmful exposures, our real-world results indicate that there is an independent relationship between blood eosinophils and FEV1 decline among adults with asthma.

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  • 40.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Oden, Anders
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Kainu, Annette
    Sovijärvi, Anssi
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Reference values for spirometry - report from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden studies2015In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 2, article id 26375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Abnormal lung function is commonly identified by comparing observed spirometric values to corresponding reference values. It is recommended that such reference values for spirometry are evaluated and updated frequently. The aim of this study was to estimate new reference values for Swedish adults by fitting a multivariable regression model to a healthy non-smoking general population sample from northern Sweden. Further aims were to evaluate the external validity of the obtained reference values on a contemporary sample from south-western Sweden, and to compare them to the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) reference values.

    Method: Sex-specific multivariable linear regression models were fitted to the spirometric data of n=501 healthy non-smoking adults aged 22–91 years, with age and height as predictors. The models were extended to allow the scatter around the outcome variable to depend on age, and age-dependent spline functions were incorporated into the models to provide a smooth fit over the entire age range. Mean values and lower limits of normal, defined as the lower 5th percentiles, were derived.

    Result: This modelling approach resulted in unbiased estimates of the spirometric outcomes, and the obtained estimates were appropriate not only for the northern Sweden sample but also for the south-western Sweden sample. On average, the GLI reference values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and, in particular, forced expiratory vital capacity (FVC) were lower than both the observed values and the new reference values, but higher for the FEV1/FVC ratio.

    Conclusion: The evaluation based on the sample of healthy non-smokers from northern Sweden show that the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden reference values are valid. Furthermore, the evaluation based on the south-western Sweden sample indicates a high external validity. The comparison with GLI brought further evidence to the consensus that, when available, appropriate local population-specific reference values may be preferred.

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  • 41.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sovijarvi, Anssi
    Larsson, Kjell
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Evaluation of the global lung function initiative 2012 reference values for spirometry in a Swedish population sample2015In: BMC Pulmonary Medicine, E-ISSN 1471-2466, Vol. 15, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Global Lung Function Initiative 2012 (GLI) reference values are currently endorsed by several respiratory societies but evaluations of applicability for adults resident in European countries are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the GLI reference values are appropriate for an adult Caucasian Swedish population.

    Methods: During 2008-2013, clinical examinations including spirometry were performed on general population samples in northern Sweden, in which 501 healthy Caucasian non-smokers were identified. Predicted GLI reference values and Z-scores were calculated for each healthy non-smoking subject and the distributions and mean values for FEV1, FVC and the FEV1/FVC ratio were examined. The prevalence of airway obstruction among these healthy non-smokers was calculated based on the Lower Limit of normal (LLN) criterion (lower fifth percentile) for the FEV1/FVC ratio. Thus, by definition, a prevalence of 5% was expected.

    Results: The Z-scores for FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC were reasonably, although not perfectly, normally distributed, but not centred on zero. Both predicted FEV1 and, in particular, FVC were lower compared to the observed values in the sample. The deviations were greater among women compared to men. The prevalence of airway obstruction based on the LLN criterion for the FEV1/FVC ratio was 9.4% among women and 2.7% among men.

    Conclusions: The use of the GLI reference values may produce biased prevalence estimates of airway obstruction in Sweden, especially among women. These results demonstrate the importance of validating the GLI reference values in different countries.

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  • 42.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Räisänen, Petri
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Increased prevalence of allergic asthma from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016: results from three population surveys2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1426-1435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the latter half of the 20th century, the prevalence of asthma and many other allergic diseases has increased. Information on asthma prevalence trends among adults after 2010, especially regarding studies separating allergic asthma from non-allergic asthma, is lacking.

    Objective: The aim was to estimate prevalence trends of current asthma among adults, both allergic and non-allergic, from 1996 to 2016.

    Methods: Three cross-sectional samples from the same area of Sweden, 20-69 years, participated in surveys with the same questionnaire in 1996 (n=7104 participants, 85% response rate), 2006 (n=6165, 77%) and 2016 (n=5466, 53%), respectively. Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis (ARC) was used as a marker for allergic sensitization to define allergic asthma.

    Results: The prevalence of current asthma increased from 8.4% (95% CI: 7.8-9.0) in 1996 to 9.9% (95% CI: 9.2-10.6) in 2006 and 10.9% (95% CI: 10.1-11.7) in 2016 (P<.001). Allergic asthma increased from 5.0% (95% CI: 4.5-5.5) in 1996 to 6.0% (95% CI: 5.4-6.6) in 2006 and further to 7.3% (95% CI: 6.6-8.0) in 2016 (P<.001), while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained stable around 3.4%-3.8%. The increase in current asthma was most pronounced among women and among the middle-aged. Physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use and ARC also increased significantly, while the prevalence of symptoms common in asthma such as wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath decreased slightly or was stable. The prevalence of current smoking decreased from 27.4% in 1996 to 12.3% in 2016.

    Conclusions and clinical relevance: The prevalence of allergic asthma increased from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016, while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained on a stable prevalence level. The prevalence of symptoms common in asthma decreased slightly or was stable despite a substantial decrease in the prevalence of current smoking. Clinicians should be aware that the previously observed increase in prevalence of allergic asthma is still ongoing.

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  • 43.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sawalha, Sami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie E. G. W.
    COPD Center, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Krefting Research Center, Institution of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    All-cause and cause-specific mortality by spirometric pattern and sex: a population-based cohort study2024In: Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease, ISSN 1753-4658, E-ISSN 1753-4666, Vol. 18, no January-DecemberArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic airway obstruction (CAO) and restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) are associated with mortality, but sex-specific patterns of all-cause and specific causes of death have hardly been evaluated.

    Objectives: To study the possible sex-dependent differences of all-cause mortality and patterns of cause-specific mortality among men and women with CAO and RSP, respectively, to that of normal lung function (NLF).

    Design: Population-based prospective cohort study.

    Methods: Individuals with CAO [FEV1/vital capacity (VC) < 0.70], RSP [FEV1/VC ⩾ 0.70 and forced vital capacity (FVC) < 80% predicted] and NLF (FEV1/VC ⩾ 0.70 and FVC ⩾ 80% predicted) were identified within the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies in 2002–2004. Mortality data were collected through April 2016, totally covering 19,000 patient-years. Cox regression and Fine–Gray regression accounting for competing risks were utilized to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, smoking habits and pack-years.

    Results: The adjusted hazard for all-cause mortality was higher in CAO and RSP than in NLF (HR, 95% CI; 1.69, 1.31–2.02 and 1.24, 1.06–1.71), and the higher hazards were driven by males. CAO had a higher hazard of respiratory and cardiovascular death than NLF (2.68, 1.05–6.82 and 1.40, 1.04–1.90). The hazard of respiratory death was significant in women (3.41, 1.05–11.07) while the hazard of cardiovascular death was significant in men (1.49, 1.01–2.22). In RSP, the higher hazard for respiratory death remained after adjustment (2.68, 1.05–6.82) but not for cardiovascular death (1.11, 0.74–1.66), with a similar pattern in both sexes.

    Conclusion: The higher hazard for all-cause mortality in CAO and RSP than in NLF was male driven. CAO was associated with respiratory death in women and cardiovascular death in men, while RSP is associated with respiratory death, similarly in both sexes.

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  • 44.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sawalha, Sami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie E. G. W.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Cause-specific Death in Chronic Airway Obstruction and Restrictive Spirometric Pattern2022In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, ISSN 2329-6933, E-ISSN 2325-6621, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1783-1787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundback, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Characterization of adults with asthma per GINA treatment steps2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönnebjerg, Lina
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Determinants of severe asthma: a long-term cohort study in northern Sweden2022In: Journal of Asthma and Allergy, ISSN 1178-6965, Vol. 15, p. 1429-1439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Risk factors for severe asthma are not well described. The aim was to identify clinical characteristics and risk factors at study entry that are associated with severe asthma at follow-up in a long-term prospective population-based cohort study of adults with asthma.

    Methods: Between 1986 and 2001, 2055 adults with asthma were identified by clinical examinations of population-based samples in northern Sweden. During 2012–2014, n = 1006 (71% of invited) were still alive, residing in the study area and participated in a follow-up, of which 40 were identified as having severe asthma according to ERS/ATS, 131 according to GINA, while 875 had other asthma. The mean follow-up time was 18.7 years.

    Results: Obesity at study entry and adult-onset asthma were associated with severe asthma at follow-up. While severe asthma was more common in those with adult-onset asthma in both men and women, the association with obesity was observed in women only. Sensitization to mites and moulds, but not to other allergens, as well as NSAID-related respiratory symptoms was more common in severe asthma than in other asthma. Participants with severe asthma at follow-up had lower FEV1, more pronounced FEV1 reversibility, and more wheeze, dyspnea and nighttime awakenings already at study entry than those with other asthma.

    Conclusion: Adult-onset asthma is an important risk factor for development of severe asthma in adults, and obesity increased the risk among women. The high burden of respiratory symptoms already at study entry also indicate long-term associations with development of severe asthma.

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  • 47.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Luleå University of Technology, Health Sciences, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, and Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, University of Tampere, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Risk factors for severe asthma among adults with asthma2020In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Sawalha, Sami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Radinger, Madeleine
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Ullman, Anders
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Lotvall, Jan
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Decreased COPD prevalence in Sweden after decades of decrease in smoking2020In: Respiratory Research, ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: COPD has increased in prevalence worldwide over several decades until the first decade after the millennium shift. Evidence from a few recent population studies indicate that the prevalence may be levelling or even decreasing in some areas in Europe. Since the 1970s, a substantial and ongoing decrease in smoking prevalence has been observed in several European countries including Sweden. The aim of the current study was to estimate the prevalence, characteristics and risk factors for COPD in the Swedish general population. A further aim was to estimate the prevalence trend of COPD in Northern Sweden from 1994 to 2009.

    Methods: Two large random population samples were invited to spirometry with bronchodilator testing and structured interviews in 2009-2012, one in south-western and one in northern Sweden, n = 1839 participants in total. The results from northern Sweden were compared to a study performed 15 years earlier in the same area and age-span. The diagnosis of COPD required both chronic airway obstruction (CAO) and the presence of respiratory symptoms, in line with the GOLD documents since 2017. CAO was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 0.70, with sensitivity analyses based on the FEV1/FVC < lower limit of normal (LLN) criterion.

    Results: Based on the fixed ratio definition, the prevalence of COPD was 7.0% (men 8.3%; women 5.8%) in 2009-2012. The prevalence of moderate to severe (GOLD >= 2) COPD was 3.5%. The LLN based results were about 30% lower. Smoking, occupational exposures, and older age were risk factors for COPD, whereof smoking was the most dominating risk factor. In northern Sweden the prevalence of COPD, particularly moderate to severe COPD, decreased significantly from 1994 to 2009, and the decrease followed a decrease in smoking.

    Conclusions: The prevalence of COPD has decreased in Sweden, and the prevalence of moderate to severe COPD was particularly low. The decrease follows a major decrease in smoking prevalence over several decades, but smoking remained the dominating risk factor for COPD.

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  • 49.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Winsa-Lindmark, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Wellbeing Services County of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland; Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Krefting Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Warm, Katja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bossios, Apostolos
    Karolinska Severe Asthma Center, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Lung and Airway Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    The interplay between obesity and blood neutrophils in adult-onset asthma2024In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 222, article id 107529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highlights:

    • Severe obesity strongly associates to blood neutrophils in adult-onset asthma.
    • B-neutrophils may partly mediate associations between obesity and asthma control.
    • Clinical evaluation of adult-onset asthma should include assessing B-neutrophils.
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  • 50. Bakke, PS
    et al.
    Rönnmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eagan, T
    Pistelli, F
    Annesi-Maesano, I
    Maly, M
    Meren, M
    Vermeire, P
    Vestbo, J
    Viegi, G
    Zielinski, J
    Lundbäck, B
    Recommendations for epidemiological studies on COPD2011In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1261-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been extensively studied, especially in Western Europe and North America. Few of these data are directly comparable because of differences between the surveys regarding composition of study populations, diagnostic criteria of the disease and definitions of the risk factors. Few community studies have examined phenotypes of COPD and included other ways of characterising the disease beyond that of spirometry. The objective of the present Task Force report is to present recommendations for the performance of general population studies in COPD in order to facilitate comparable and valid estimates on COPD prevalence by various risk factors. Diagnostic criteria in epidemiological settings, and standardised methods to examine the disease and its potential risk factors are discussed. The paper also offers practical advice for planning and performing an epidemiological study on COPD. The main message of the paper is that thorough planning is worth half the study. It is crucial to stick to standardised methods and good quality control during sampling. We recommend collecting biological markers, depending on the specific objectives of the study. Finally, studies of COPD in the population at large should assess various phenotypes of the disease.

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