Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abramsson, Linnea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Backman, Annica C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Edvardsson, David
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, VIC, Bundoora, Australia.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Use of heart failure medications in older individuals and associations with cognitive impairment2023In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To achieve the best treatment of heart failure, it is important to use all recommended drugs at their target doses. Given that underuse of medications can occur in individuals with cognitive impairment, we investigated the filled prescriptions and target doses of heart failure medication for older individuals with and without cognitive impairment as well as associated factors.

    Methods: The study was based on two separate datasets. The first dataset, which was based on data from questionnaires sent to nursing homes in Sweden, included 405 individuals with heart failure. The data were linked with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the National Patient Register to obtain information regarding filled prescriptions of heart failure medications and heart failure diagnoses among the population. In the second dataset, medical records of individuals aged 75 years or older admitted to a hospital in northern Sweden were reviewed and individuals with heart failure were identified. Target doses of heart failure medications were evaluated in 66 individuals who lived at home.

    Results: Filled prescriptions of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and loop diuretics were significantly more common in individuals without cognitive impairment (OR 1.087; 95% CI 1.026–1.152, p < 0.05) and (OR 1.057; 95% CI 1.017–1.098, p < 0.05), respectively. There were no significant differences between individuals with and without cognitive impairment in terms of achieving target doses for any of the drug classes. A higher age was associated with fewer filled prescriptions and less ability to reach the target doses of beta blockers (OR 0.950; 95% CI 0.918–0.984, p < 0.05) and (OR 0.781; 95% CI 0.645–0.946, p < 0.05), respectively.

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that individuals with cognitive impairment are partly undertreated for heart failure in that they had fewer filled prescriptions of important heart medications. Separately, the relatively low proportion of older individuals reaching target doses is an important observation and indicates that treatment of heart failure could be further optimised among older individuals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ahnlund, Petra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    McGilton, Katherine S.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia .
    Leading towards person-centred care – Nursing home managers' experiences of leading person-centred care in highly person-centred Swedish nursing homesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Although a growing body of research knowledge exists highlighting the importance of leadership for person-centred care, studies focused on nursing home managers’ own descriptions of leading their staff to provide person-centred care is lacking. This study aims to explore the process of nursing home managers’ leading person-centred care in Swedish nursing homes.

    Methods:The methods of the study consisted of semi-structured interviews with 12 nursing home managers within 11 highly person-centred nursing homes purposively selected from a national wide survey of nursing homes in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was performed for data analyses.

    Results:The study revealed that the leading person-centred care in nursing homes can be outlined as comprising four processes: Embodying person-centred being and doing; promoting a person-centred atmosphere; maximizing person-centred team potential; and finally, optimizing person-centred support structures.

    Conclusion:This study contributes to the literature by providing concrete descriptions of how person-centred care can be operationalised and supported in everyday practice by the leadership of nursing home managers. The study is significant in that it provides evidence on how the provision of person centred care can be facilitated by managers and the important role they play in developing and maintaining this philosophy of care within nursing homes.

  • 3.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ahnlund, Petra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Edvardsson, David
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nursing home managers' descriptions of multi-level barriers to leading person-centred care: a content analysis2024In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 19, no 1, article id e12581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research suggests that person-centred care can be beneficially implemented and sustained, even though barriers remain that prevent uptake in clinical practice. Understanding barriers to person-centred care seems important, as this has an impact on care practices and resident outcomes. Moreover, there is limited knowledge about nursing home managers' descriptions of barriers when leading person-centred care.

    Objectives: To explore barriers to leading person-centred care as narrated by nursing home managers.

    Methods: A descriptive qualitative design was used to collect data using individual interviews with 12 nursing home managers in highly person-centred nursing homes. Data were analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Multi-level barriers to leading person-centred care were identified on the (1) person level, (2) team level and (3) organisational level. Placing professional and family considerations ahead of resident considerations was described as a barrier on the personal level (1). Also, staff's divergent care values, processes, and priorities together with turnover and low foundational knowledge were identified as barriers on the team level (2). On an organisational level (3), constrained finances, functional building design and group level rostering were identified as barriers.

    Conclusion: Multi-level barriers influence nursing home managers' ability to lead and promote person-centred care. Promoting the development of person-centred practices requires efforts to eliminate barriers on person, team and organisational level.

    Implications for Practice: Identifying and overcoming barriers at various levels in nursing home care has the potential to promote person-centred practices. This study can inform stakeholders and policymakers of challenges and complexities in person-centred practices. Multi-level strategies are needed to target challenges at person-, team- and organisational level when striving to develop person-centred care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ahnlund, Petra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    McGilton, Katherine S.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Embodying person-centred being and doing: leading towards person-centred care in nursing homes as narrated by managers2020In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 29, no 1-2, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore how managers describe leading towards person-centred care in Swedish nursing homes.

    BACKGROUND: Although a growing body of research knowledge exists highlighting the importance of leadership to promote person-centred care, studies focused on nursing home managers' own descriptions of leading their staff towards providing person-centred care is lacking.

    DESIGN: Descriptive interview study. COREQ guidelines have been applied.

    METHODS: The study consisted of semi-structured interviews with 12 nursing home managers within 11 highly person-centred nursing homes purposively selected from a nationwide survey of nursing homes in Sweden. Data collection was performed in April 2017, and the data were analysed using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Leading towards person-centred care involved a main category; embodying person-centred being and doing, with four related categories: operationalising person-centred objectives; promoting a person-centred atmosphere; maximising person-centred team potential; and optimising person-centred support structures.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings revealed that leading towards person-centred care was described as having a personal understanding of the PCC concept and how to translate it into practice, and maximising the potential of and providing support to care staff, within a trustful and innovative work place. The findings also describe how managers co-ordinate several aspects of care simultaneously, such as facilitating, evaluating and refining the translation of person-centred philosophy into synchronised care actions.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings can be used to inspire nursing home leaders' practices and may serve as a framework for implementing person-centred care within facilities. A reasonable implication of these findings is that if organisations are committed to person-centred care provision, care may need to be organised in a way that enables managers to be present on the units, to enact these strategies and lead person-centred care.

  • 5.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine in Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring the impact of nursing home managers' leadership on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave in nursing homes2023In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7227-7237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and Objectives: To explore the impact of nursing home leadership and staffing characteristics on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave.

    Background: The number of older people has outpaced growth in the nursing home workforce worldwide. Identifying predictors with the potential to positively impact staff job satisfaction, health and intentions to leave are important. Leadership of the nursing home manager can be one such predictor.

    Design: Cross-sectional design.

    Methods: A sample of 2985 direct care staff in 190 nursing homes in 43 randomly selected municipalities in Sweden completed surveys on leadership, job satisfaction, self-rated health and intention to leave (response rate 52%). Descriptive statistics and Generalised Estimating Equations were conducted. The STROBE reporting checklist was applied.

    Results: Nursing home managers' leadership was positively related to job satisfaction, self-rated health and low intention to leave. Lower staff educational levels were related to poorer health and lower job satisfaction.

    Conclusions: Nursing home leadership plays a significant role in the job satisfaction, self-reported health and intention to leave of direct care staff. Low education levels among staff seem to negatively influence staff health and job satisfaction, suggesting that educational initiatives for less-educated staff could be beneficial for improving staff health and job satisfaction.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Managers seeking to improve staff job satisfaction can consider how they support, coach and provide feedback. Recognising staff achievement at work can contribute to high job satisfaction. One important implication for managers is to offer continuing education to staff with lower or no education, given the large amount of uneducated direct care workers in aged care and the impact this may have on staff job satisfaction and health.

    No patient or public contribution: No patient or public contribution was required to outcome measures in this study. Direct care staff and managers contributed with data.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff job strain and social support in Swedish nursing homes: findings from the U-AGE SWENIS study2023In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 18, no 1, article id e12515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Promoting healthy work environment as a manager in nursing homes is important to safeguard staff health and well-being as well as care quality when facing increasing demands. The impact of leadership on staff work environment needs further exploration.

    Objectives: To describe longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff characteristics, job strain and social support.

    Methods: This study has a repeated cross-sectional design, a five-year follow-up study. Nursing home staff in 181 corresponding units (n = 1253 in 2014 and n = 1176 in 2019) completed surveys about leadership, staff job strain and social support in a five-year follow-up study. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: A higher degree of leadership defined by coaching and providing direct feedback to care staff, handling conflicts in a constructive way and having control of the clinical work, was significantly associated with a lower degree of job strain and a higher degree of social support among staff, with stronger associations at follow-up. The proportion of enrolled nurses increased significantly at follow-up.

    Conclusions: Leadership is increasingly important for staff work environment, especially in times of increased workload and decreasing collegiality and deteriorating work atmosphere at work. Implications for Practice: Stakeholder and policy makers in nursing home care may reflect on how managers' leadership is prioritised in these environments because such leadership is associated with staff job strain and social support. Managers striving to improve the work situation of staff may consider their own role and allow flexibility in how and when the work can be performed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, VIC, Melbourne, Australia.
    The significance of nursing home managers' leadership: longitudinal changes, characteristics and qualifications for perceived leadership, person-centredness and climate2022In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, no 9-10, p. 1377-1388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim was to explore changes in nursing home managers' leadership, person-centred care and psychosocial climate comparing matched units in a five-year follow-up and to explore the significance of managers' educational qualifications and the ownership of nursing homes for perceived leadership, person-centred care and psychosocial climate in the follow-up data.

    Background: Leadership has been described as crucial for person-centred care and psychosocial climate even though longitudinal data are lacking. The significance of managerial leadership, its characteristics, managerial qualifications and ownership of nursing homes for perceived leadership, person-centred care and psychosocial climate also needs further exploration.

    Design: Repeated cross-sectional study.

    Methods: This study used valid and reliable measures of leadership, person-centred care, psychosocial climate and demographic variables collected from managers and staff n = 3605 in 2014 and n = 2985 in 2019. Descriptive and regression analyses were used. The STROBE checklist was used in reporting this study.

    Results: Leadership was still positively significantly associated to person-centred care in a five-year follow-up, but no changes in strength were seen. Leadership was still positively significantly associated with psychosocial climate, with stronger associations at follow-up. Six leadership characteristics increased over time. It was also shown that a targeted education for nursing home managers was positively associated with person-centred care.

    Conclusions: Leadership is still pivotal for person-centred care and psychosocial climate. Knowledge of nursing home managers' leadership, characteristics and educational qualifications of significance for person-centred delivery provides important insights when striving to improve such services.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The findings can be used for management and clinical practice development initiatives because it was shown that nursing home managers' leadership is vital to person-centred care practices and improves the climate for both staff and residents in these environments.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. La Trobe Univ, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Leadership behavior in relation to person-centeredness and person-centered climate - a cross-sectional study in residential aged care in Sweden2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 806-807Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Edvardsson, David
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moving between doing and being - Meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers: A phenomenological hermeneutical study2024In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aimed to illuminate meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers in nursing homes rated as highly person-centred.

    Design: A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used.

    Methods: Twelve nursing home managers in 11 highly person-centred nursing homes in 7 municipalities in Sweden were included in this interview study. The findings were interpreted, reflected and discussed through the lens of Ricoeur.

    Results: Meanings of person-centredness could be understand as moving between doing and being through knowing, sensing, sharing and giving for person-centredness. These aspects contributed via knowledge, understanding, interaction and action that involved doing for and being with older persons through these caring dimensions. By moving between doing for, being with and being part of the overall nursing home narrative, knowing, sensing, sharing and giving could support the persons' identity in different ways. This may also contribute to sense-making, preserving dignity and promoting self-esteem when aiming to provide a good life for older persons in nursing homes, within an ever-present ethical frame.

    No Patient or Public Contribution: This study illuminated meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers. No patient of public contribution was investigated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The influence of nursing home managers’ leadership on person-centred care and stress of conscience: A cross-sectional study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Leadership and stress are common concepts in nursing, and this study explores empirically the connection between leadership and stress of conscience in the context of aged care practice. Previous literature has shown that when staff are unable to carry out their ethical liabilities towards the residents, feelings of guilt may occur among staff, which may be an expression of stress of conscience. Although leadership has been described as crucial for staff’s work perceptions of stress as well as for person-centred practices, the influence of nursing home managers’ leadership on stress of conscience among staff and person-centred practices is still not fully explored. This study attempts to address that knowledge gap by exploring the relationship between leadership, person-centred care, and stress of conscience.

    Methods: This study was based on a cross-sectional national survey of 2985 staff and their managers in 190 nursing homes throughout Sweden. Descriptive statistics and regression modelling were used to explore associations.

    Results: Leadership was associated with a higher degree of person-centred care and less stress of conscience. A higher degree of person-centred care was also associated with less stress of conscience. The results also showed that leadership as well as person-centred care were individually associated with lower levels of stress of conscience when adjusting for potential confounders.

    Conclusion: Nursing home managers’ leadership was significantly associated with less staff stress of conscience and more person-centred care. This indicates that a leadership most prominently characterised by coaching and giving feedback, relying on staff and handling conflicts constructively, experimenting with new ideas, and controlling work individually can contribute to less staff stress as well as higher degree of person-centred care provision.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.  School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Characteristics of highly rated leadership in Swedish nursing homes2016In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, p. 283-283Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Characteristics of highly rated leadership in nursing homes using item response theory2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 12, p. 2903-2913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify characteristics of highly rated leadership in nursing homes. Background: An ageing population entails fundamental social, economic and organizational challenges for future aged care. Knowledge is limited of both specific leadership behaviours and organizational and managerial characteristics which have an impact on the leadership of contemporary nursing home care. Design: Cross-sectional. Method: From 290 municipalities, 60 were randomly selected and 35 agreed to participate, providing a sample of 3605 direct-care staff employed in 169 Swedish nursing homes. The staff assessed their managers' (n = 191) leadership behaviours using the Leadership Behaviour Questionnaire. Data were collected from November 2013 - September 2014, and the study was completed in November 2016. A two-parameter item response theory approach and regression analyses were used to identify specific characteristics of highly rated leadership. Results: Five specific behaviours of highly rated nursing home leadership were identified; that the manager: experiments with new ideas; controls work closely; relies on subordinates; coaches and gives direct feedback; and handles conflicts constructively. The regression analyses revealed that managers with social work backgrounds and privately run homes were significantly associated with higher leadership ratings. Conclusion: This study highlights the five most important leadership behaviours that characterize those nursing home managers rated highest in terms of leadership. Managers in privately run nursing homes and managers with social work backgrounds were associated with higher leadership ratings. Further work is needed to explore these behaviours and factors predictive of higher leadership ratings.

  • 13.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifer y, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Towards person-centredness in aged-care: exploring the impact of leadership2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 766-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the association between leadership behaviours among managers in aged care, and person‐centredness of care and the psychosocial climate.

    Background: Theory suggests that leadership is important for improving person‐centredness in aged care, however, empirical evidence is lacking.

    Methods: A cross‐sectional design was used to collect data from Swedish aged care staff (= 3661). Valid and reliable questionnaires assessing leadership behaviours, person‐centeredness of care and the psychosocial climate were used. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression including interaction terms.

    Results: Leadership behaviours were significantly related to the person‐centredness of care and the psychosocial climate. The level of person‐centredness of care moderated the impact of leadership on the psychosocial climate.

    Conclusions and implications for nursing management: The leadership behaviour of managers significantly impacts person‐centred care practice and contributes to the psychosocial climate for both staff and residents in aged care. This study is the first empirically to confirm that middle managers have a central leadership role in developing and supporting person‐centred care practice, thereby creating a positive psychosocial climate and high quality care.

  • 14.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Job strain in nursing homes: exploring the impact of leadership2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. 1552-1560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore the association between nursing home managers' leadership, job strain and social support as perceived by direct care staff in nursing homes.

    Background: It is well known that aged care staff experience high levels of job strain, and that aged care staff experiencing job strain are exposed to increased risk for adverse health effects. Leadership styles have been associated with job strain in the literature; however, the impact of perceived leadership on staff job strain and social support has not been clarified within nursing home contexts.

    Design: This study had a cross‐sectional design.

    Methods: Participating staff (n = 3,605) completed surveys which included questions about staff characteristics, valid and reliable measures of nursing home managers' leadership, perceived job strain and social support. Statistical analyses of correlations and multiple regression analysis with interaction terms were conducted.

    Results: Nursing home managers' leadership were significantly associated with lower level of job strain and higher level of social support among direct care staff. A multiple regression analysis including an interaction term indicated individual and joint effects of nursing home managers' leadership and social support on job strain.

    Conclusions: Nursing home managers' leadership and social support were both individually and in combination associated with staff perception of lesser job strain. Thus, nursing home managers' leadership are beneficial for the working situation and strain of staff.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Promoting a supporting work environment through leadership is an important implication for nursing home managers as it can influence staff perception of job strain and social support within the unit. By providing leadership, offering support and strategies towards a healthy work environment, nursing home managers can buffer adverse health effects among staff.

  • 15.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, VIC, Melbourne, Australia.
    Exploring changes to resident thriving and associated factors in Swedish nursing homes: a repeated cross-sectional study2022In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 37, no 6, article id GPS5731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to explore changes to resident thriving in Swedish nursing homes over a 5-year period and describe changes in associated factors.

    MethodsCross-sectional data were collected from a randomised sample of Swedish nursing homes in 2013/2014 (baseline) and 2018/2019 (follow-up). Descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, and chi squared tests were used to statistically evaluate differences between the samples. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were used to explore associations between thriving and the study variables.

    ResultsResident characteristics were relatively consistent between the full baseline (N = 4831) and follow-up (N = 3894) samples. Within a sub-sample of nursing homes that participated in both data collections mean thriving scores were found to have increased from 152.9 to 155.2 (p ≤ 0.003; d =0.09) and overall neuropsychiatric index scores had decreased from 16.0 to 14.3 (p ≤ 0.004; d =0.09), as had the prevalence of several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Thriving was found to have a positive association with the neuropsychiatric symptom of elation/euphoria, and negative associations with the symptoms of aggression/agitation, depression/dysphoria, apathy, and irritability.

    ConclusionsThe results show an increase in overall thriving scores and a decrease in overall neuropsychiatric scores between baseline and follow-up. This study confirmed associations between thriving and certain neuropsychiatric symptoms and established comparative knowledge regarding changes in resident thriving, characteristics, and symptom prevalence. These findings could inform future care and organisational policies to support thriving in nursing homes, particularly among residents at risk of lower thriving due to cognitive impairment or neuropsychiatric symptoms.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bergland, Ådel
    Winblad, Bengt
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing & Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The thriving of older people assessment scale: Psychometric evaluation and short‐form development2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 12, p. 3831-3843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the psychometric properties and performance of the 32‐item Thriving of Older People Assessment Scale (TOPAS) and to explore reduction into a short‐form.

    Background: The 32‐item TOPAS has been used in studies of place‐related well‐being as a positive measure in long‐term care to assess nursing home resident thriving; however, item redundancy has not previously been explored.

    Design: Cross‐sectional.

    Method: Staff members completed the 32‐item TOPAS as proxy‐raters for a random sample of Swedish nursing home residents (N = 4,831) between November 2013 and September 2014. Reliability analysis, exploratory factor analysis and item response theory‐based analysis were undertaken. Items were systematically identified for reduction using statistical and theoretical analysis. Correlation testing, means comparison and model fit evaluation confirmed scale equivalence.

    Results: Psychometric properties of the 32‐item TOPAS were satisfactory and several items were identified for scale reduction. The proposed short‐form TOPAS exhibited a high level of internal consistency (α=0.90) and strong correlation (r=0.98) to the original scale, while also retaining diversity among items in terms of factor structure and item difficulties.

    Conclusion: The 32‐item and short‐form TOPAS' indicated sound validity and reliability to measure resident thriving in the nursing home context.

    Impact: There is a lack of positive life‐world measures for use in nursing homes. The short‐form TOPAS indicated sound validity and reliability to measure resident thriving, providing a feasible measure with enhanced functionality for use in aged care research, assessments and care planning for health promoting purposes in nursing homes.

  • 17.
    Björk, Sabine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bergland, Ådel
    Wimo, Anders
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Exploring resident thriving in relation to the nursing home environment: A cross‐sectional study2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 2820-2830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the extent to which environmental factors are associated with resident thriving. Background: Thriving is a concept that denotes experiences of well-being in relation to the living environment. Although there is a substantial body of research into quality of life in nursing homes, less is known about what contributes to thriving among residents. Recent research on resident thriving has focused mainly on resident characteristics and activities associated with thriving. Less attention has been given to explore associations with the physical and psychosocial environment of the nursing home. This study explores facility- and unit-level factors associated with resident thriving. Design: A cross-sectional national survey. Methods: Data on 4,205 residents, 3,509 staff, and environment of 147 nursing home facilities collected in 2013–2014 were analysed using descriptive statistics, multilevel simple, and multiple linear regression to explore resident thriving in relation to environmental factors. Results: Multilevel analysis revealed that residents’ thriving varied significantly across nursing home units. Several environmental factors were associated with thriving in univariate analyses. However, a positive psychosocial climate of units, having access to newspapers, living in a special care unit, and living in an unlocked facility showed significant positive associations with resident thriving when controlling for resident characteristics. The psychosocial climate showed the strongest association of the environment variables with resident thriving. Conclusions: Nursing home environments may have an impact on residents’ thriving. A positive psychosocial climate of units seems to have an important role in facilitating thriving in nursing home residents.

  • 18.
    Björk, Sabine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Wimo, Anders
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Thriving in relation to cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptoms in Swedish nursing home residents2018In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 33, no 1, p. E49-E57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore relations among thriving, cognitive function, and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home residents.

    Methods: A national, cross-sectional, randomized study of Swedish nursing home residents (N = 4831) was conducted between November 2013 and September 2014. Activities of daily life functioning, cognitive functioning, NPS, and thriving were assessed with the Katz activities of daily living, Gottfries' Cognitive Scale, Nursing Home version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and Thriving of Older People Scale, respectively. Individual NPS were explored in relation to cognitive function. Simple linear and multiple regression models were used to explore thriving in relation to resident characteristics.

    Results: Aggression and depressive symptoms were identified as negatively associated with thriving regardless of resident cognitive functioning. At higher levels of cognitive functioning, several factors showed associations with thriving; however, at lower levels of cognitive functioning, only the degree of cognitive impairment and the NPS was associated with thriving. Most of the individual NPS formed nonlinear relationships with cognitive functioning with higher symptom scores in the middle stages of cognitive functioning. Exceptions were elation/euphoria and apathy, which increased linearly with severity of cognitive impairment.

    Conclusions: The lower the cognitive functioning was, the fewer factors were associated with thriving. Aggression and depressive symptoms may indicate lower levels of thriving; thus, targeting these symptoms should be a priority in nursing homes.

  • 19.
    Brännström, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Boström, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: investigating sex differences2017In: BMC Pharmacology & Toxicology, E-ISSN 2050-6511, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychotropic drugs are common among old people with dementia, and have been associated with increased mortality. Previous studies have not investigated sex differences in this risk. This study was conducted to analyse associations between the use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and benzodiazepines and 2-year mortality in old people with dementia, and to investigate sex differences therein.

    Methods: In total, 1037 participants (74% women; mean age, 89 years) with dementia were included from four cohort studies and followed for 2 years. Data were collected through home visits and medical records. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyse associations between ongoing baseline drug use and mortality. Multiple possible confounders were evaluated and adjusted for.

    Results: In fully adjusted models including data from the whole population, no association between baseline psychotropic drug use and increased 2-year mortality was seen. Significant sex differences were found in mortality associated with antidepressant use, which was protective in men, but not in women (hazard ratio [HR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40–0.92 and HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.87–1.38, respectively). The interaction term for sex was significant in analyses of benzodiazepine use, with a higher mortality risk among men than among women.

    Conclusions: Among old people with dementia, ongoing psychotropic drug use at baseline was not associated with increased mortality in analyses adjusted for multiple confounders. Sex differences in mortality risk associated with antidepressant and benzodiazepine use were seen, highlighting the need for further investigation of the impact of sex.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Brännström, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Molander, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gender disparities in the pharmacological treatment of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in the very old: an epidemiological, cross-sectional survey2011In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, E-ISSN 1179-1969, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 993-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There are many reports of disparities in health and medical care both between women and men and between various age groups. In most cases, men receive better treatment than women and young and middle-aged people are privileged compared with the old and the very old. Cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes mellitus are common, increase with age and are often treated extensively with drugs, many of which are known to have significant adverse effects.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to analyse gender differences in the pharmacological treatment of cardiovascular disease and diabetes among very old people.

    METHODS: The study took the form of an epidemiological, cross-sectional survey. A structured interview was administered during one or more home visits, and data were further retrieved from medical charts and interviews with relatives, healthcare staff and other carers. Home-dwelling people as well as people living in institutional care in six municipalities in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden, in 2005-7 were included in the study. Half of all people aged 85 years, all of those aged 90 years and all of those aged ≥95 years living in the selected municipalities were selected for inclusion in the study. In total, 467 people were included in the present analysis. The main study outcome measures were medical diagnoses and drug use.

    RESULTS: In total, women were prescribed a larger number of drugs than men (mean 7.2 vs 5.4, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression models adjusted for age and other background variables as well as relevant medical diagnoses (hypertension, heart failure) showed strong associations between female sex and prescriptions of thiazide diuretics (odds ratio [OR] 4.4; 95% CI 1.8, 10.8; p = 0.001), potassium-sparing diuretics (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.4, 8.7; p = 0.006) and diuretics as a whole (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1, 2.9; p = 0.021). A similar model, adjusted for angina pectoris, showed that female sex was associated with prescription of short-acting nitroglycerin (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.6, 8.9; p = 0.003). However, more men had been offered coronary artery surgery (p = 0.001). Of the participants diagnosed with diabetes, 55% of the women and 85% of the men used oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (p = 0.020), whereas no gender difference was seen in prescriptions of insulin.

    CONCLUSIONS: Significant gender disparities in the prescription of several drugs, such as diuretics, nitroglycerin and oral antihyperglycaemic drugs, were observed in this study of very old people. In most cases, women were prescribed more drugs than men. Men more often had undergone coronary artery surgery. These disparities could only in part be explained by differences in diagnoses and symptoms.

  • 21.
    Brännström, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Antipsychotic Drugs and Hip Fracture: Associations Before and After the Initiation of Treatment2020In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1636-1642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the association between antipsychotic drug treatment and hip fracture, before and after the initiation of treatment.

    Design: Nationwide cohort study.

    Setting and Participants: In this study based on several Swedish registers, all individuals age ≥65 years who filled prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs in 2007–2017 were matched 1:1 by sex and age with controls, resulting in a cohort of 255,274 individuals.

    Measures: Associations between antipsychotic drug treatment and hip fracture were investigated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models and flexible parametric survival models for nonproportional hazards, starting 1 year before the first prescription was filled and extending to 1 year thereafter.

    Results: The studied cohort had a mean age of 81.5 (standard deviation, 8.1) years; 152,890 (59.9%) individuals were women. Antipsychotic drug use was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in all studied time frames, before and after the initiation of treatment. The risk was highest 16–30 days before the initiation of treatment (odds ratio 9.09; 95% confidence interval 7.00–11.81). The pattern was consistent in subgroup analyses of users of conventional and atypical antipsychotics, men and women, as well as in younger old and older old participants. The association with hip fracture was not influenced by antipsychotic drug dose.

    Conclusions and Implications: The association between antipsychotic drug use and the risk of hip fracture was observed before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment. This finding suggests that factors other than exposure to antipsychotic drugs are responsible for the increased risk of hip fracture in the treatment group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Brännström, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Association Between Antidepressant Drug Use and Hip Fracture in Older People Before and After Treatment Initiation2019In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 172-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: Treatment with antidepressants has been associated with hip fracture. This association could restrict the treatment options, especially in older patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between antidepressant drug treatment and hip fracture starting 1 year before the initiation of treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this nationwide cohort study, 204 072 individuals in the Prescribed Drugs Register of Sweden's National Board of Health and Welfare aged 65 years or older who had a prescription of antidepressants filled between July 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011, were matched by birth year and sex to 1 control participant who was not prescribed antidepressants (for a total of 408 144 people in the register). Outcome data were collected from 1 year before to 1 year after the index date (date of prescription being filled). Data analysis was performed from July 1, 2005, to December 31, 2012. EXPOSURES: First filled prescription of an antidepressant drug. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Incident hip fractures occurring in the year before and year after initiation of antidepressant therapy were registered. Associations were investigated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models and flexible parametric models. RESULTS: Of the 408 144 people in the register who were included in the study, 257 486 (63.1%) were women, with a mean (SD) age of 80.1 (7.2) years. Antidepressant users sustained more than twice as many hip fractures than did nonusers in the year before and year after the initiation of therapy (2.8% vs 1.1% and 3.5% vs 1.3%, respectively, per actual incidence figures). In adjusted analyses, the odds ratios were highest for the associations between antidepressant use and hip fracture 16 to 30 days before the prescription was filled (odds ratio, 5.76; 95% CI, 4.73-7.01). In all separate analyses of age groups, of men and women, and of individual antidepressants, the highest odds ratios were seen 16 to 30 days before initiation of treatment, and no clear dose-response relationship was seen. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The present study found an association between antidepressant drug use and hip fracture before and after the initiation of therapy. This finding raises questions about the association that should be further investigated in treatment studies.

  • 23.
    Conradsson, Mia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Usefulness of the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version among very old people with and without cognitive impairment2013In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 81p. 638-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the usefulness of the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) to assess depressive symptoms among very old people with differing levels of cognitive function.

    Methods: The 834 participants were aged 85 and over. Feasibility of GDS-15 was evaluated as the proportion of people who completed the scale. Concurrent criterion validity was evaluated by calculating correlations between GDS-15 and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS). PGCMS measures psychological wellbeing which is closely related with depressive symptoms. Correlations were calculated within groups according to cognitive function assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE); 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-27, and 28-30, using Pearson's two-sided correlation and compared using Fisher r-to-z transformation. Internal consistency of the GDS-15 was evaluated by calculating Cronbach's in each group.

    Results: In total, 651 (78%) of the 834 participants completed the GDS-15. For the two MMSE-groups with scores of <10, the proportion who completed GDS-15 were 1% and 42%, respectively, compared to 65-95% in the MMSE-groups with scores of 10. Cronbach's in each MMSE-group ranged from 0.636 (MMSE 28-30) to 0.821 (MMSE 5-9). The level of correlation between GDS-15 and PGCMS did not significantly differ between MMSE-groups with scores of 5-27 compared to the MMSE-group with scores of 28-30.

    Conclusions: The GDS-15 seems to have an overall usefulness to assess depressive symptoms among very old people with an MMSE score of 10 or more. More studies are needed to strengthen the validity of GDS-15 among older people with MMSE scores of 10-14. For older people with MMSE scores lower than 10, there is a need to develop and validate other measurements.

  • 24.
    Corneliusson, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Austin Health Clinical School of Nursing, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Relocation patterns and predictors of relocation and mortality in Swedish sheltered housing and aging in place2023In: Journal of Aging and Environment, ISSN 2689-2618, E-ISSN 2689-2626, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 386-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reported objective of Swedish sheltered housing is to postpone care needs and relocation. The aim of this study was to describe migration patterns and explore predictors of relocation to nursing homes and mortality, in a sample of residents in sheltered housing and aging in place. To explore longitudinal differences between groups, study data were combined with registry data. The results showed that a higher percentage of residents in sheltered housing had relocated to a nursing home and deceased over a three-year time period, compared to aging in place, implying further interventions may be required to promote health in sheltered housing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Corneliusson, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wimo, Anders
    Winblad, Bengt
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Australia; Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Well‐being and Thriving in Sheltered Housing versus Ageing in Place: Results from the U‐Age Sheltered Housing Study2020In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 856-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore to what extent type of residence (sheltered housing or ageing in place) contributes to thriving and well-being in older adults, when controlling for age, sex, living alone, being a widow and adjusting for functional status, self-rated health, and depressive mood.

    Design: A matched cohort study.Methods A self-report survey was sent out to a total population of residents in all sheltered housings in Sweden and a matched control group ageing in place (N = 3,805). The data collection took place between October 2016-January 2017.

    Results: The interaction analyses related to thriving showed that with increasing level of depressive mood and decreasing levels of self-rated health and functional status, those residing in sheltered housing generally reported higher levels of thriving, as compared with those ageing in place. Well-being was not found to be significantly associated with type of accommodation.

    Conclusion: There may be features in sheltered housing that are associated with resident thriving especially among individuals with impairments of function, health or mood, although further studies are required to identify these specific features.

    Impact: This study informs staff and policymakers about thriving and well-being in sheltered housing accommodations. These findings may be used to further the development of sheltered housing accommodations.

  • 26.
    Corneliusson, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Wimo, Anders
    Winblad, Bengt
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia; Austin Health, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Residing in sheltered housing versus ageing in place: population characteristics, health status and social participation2019In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 27, no 4, p. E313-E322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sheltered housing is a housing model that provides accessible apartments with elevated social possibilities for older people, which is expected to increase resident health and independence, reducing the need for care. As previous research on sheltered housing is scarce, the aim of this study was to explore the characteristics, health status and social participation of older people living in sheltered housing, compared to ageing in place. The study utilised baseline data from a matched cohort study survey on a nationally representative total population of residents in all sheltered housings in Sweden, and a matched control group (n = 3,805). The data collection took place between October 2016 and January 2017. The survey assessed functional capability using the Katz ADL and Lawton IADL scale, self-rated health using the EQ5D scale, and depressive mood using the GDS-4 scale. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, mean scores, independent t tests, p-values and effect sizes were utilised to compare the two groups. The results of the study show that older people living in sheltered housing, compared to ageing in place, had lower self-reported health (M = 64.68/70.08, p = <0.001), lower self-reported quality of life (M = 0.73/0.81, p = <0.001), lower functional status concerning activities of daily living (M = 5.19/5.40, p = <0.001), lower functional status concerning instrumental activities of daily living (M = 4.98/5.42 p = <0.001,), and higher probability of depressive mood (M = 0.80/0.58, p = <0.001). The results imply that residents in sheltered housing may have more care needs than those ageing in place. Further longitudinal comparative studies are needed to explore the impact residence in sheltered housing has on resident health and well-being.

  • 27.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Backman, Annica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Bergland, Ådel
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Bölenius, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lood, Qarin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Wimo, Anders
    Winblad, Bengt
    The Umeå Ageing and health research programme (U-age): exploring person-centred care and health promoting living conditions for an ageing population2016In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 168-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe the Umeå ageing and health research programme that explores person-centred care and health-promoting living conditions for an ageing population in Sweden, and to place this research programme in a national and international context of available research evidence and trends in aged care policy and practice. Contemporary trends in aged care policy includes facilitating ageing in place and providing person-centred care across home and aged care settings, despite limited evidence on how person-centred care can be operationalised in home care services and sheltered housing accommodation for older people. The Umeå ageing and health research programme consists of four research projects employing controlled, cross-sectional and longitudinal designs across ageing in place, sheltered housing, and nursing homes. The research programme is expected to provide translational knowledge on the structure, content and outcomes of person-centred care and health-promoting living conditions in home care, sheltered housing models, and nursing homes for older people and people with dementia.

  • 28.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Behavioral and psychological symptoms and psychotropic drugs among people with cognitive impairment in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132016In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 987-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The use of psychotropic drugs to treat behavioral and psychological symptoms among people with dementia has been widely questioned because of its limited efficacy and risk of harmful side-effects. The objectives of this study was to compare the prevalence of behavioral and psychological symptoms and the use of psychotropic drug treatments among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care units in 2007 and 2013.

    METHODS: Two questionnaire surveys were performed in 2007 and 2013, comprising all those living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten in northern Sweden. A comparison was made between 1971 people from 2007 and 1511 people from 2013. Data were collected concerning psychotropic and antidementia drug use, functioning in the activities of daily living (ADL), cognition, and behavioral and psychological symptoms, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS).

    RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2013, the use of antipsychotic drugs declined from 25.4 to 18.9 %, and of anxiolytic, hypnotic, and sedative drugs from 35.5 to 29.4 %. The prevalence of people prescribed antidepressant drugs remained unchanged while antidementia drug prescription increased from 17.9 to 21.5 %. When controlled for demographic changes, 36 out of 39 behavioral and psychological symptoms showed no difference in prevalence between the years.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of antipsychotic, anxiolytic, hypnotic, and sedative drugs declined considerably between 2007 and 2013 among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care units. Despite this reduction, the prevalences of behavioral and psychological symptoms remained largely unchanged.

  • 29.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Psychotropic drug use among people with dementia - a six-month follow-up study2013In: BMC Pharmacology & Toxicology, E-ISSN 2050-6511, Vol. 14, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychotropic drugs are widely used among old people with dementia but few studies have described long-term treatment in this group of patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the long-term use of psychotropic drugs in old people with dementia.

    METHODS: Data on psychotropic drug use, functioning in the activities of daily living (ADL), cognitive function and behavioral and psychological symptoms were collected at baseline and six months later, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). The data were collected in 2005-2006. Detailed data about the prescribing of psychotropic drugs were collected from prescription records. This study was conducted in 40 specialized care units in northern Sweden, with a study population of 278 people with dementia.

    RESULTS: At the start of the study, 229 of the participants (82%) were prescribed at least one psychotropic drug; 150 (54%) used antidepressants, 43 (16%) used anxiolytics, 107 (38%) used hypnotics and sedatives, and 111 (40%) used antipsychotics. Among the baseline users of antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics and sedatives and antipsychotics, 67%, 44%, 57% and 57% respectively, still used the same dose of the same psychotropic drug after six months. Associations were found between behavioral and psychological symptoms and different psychotropic drugs.

    CONCLUSION: Psychotropic drug use was high among people with dementia living in specialized care units and in many cases the drugs were used for extended periods. It is very important to monitor the effects and adverse effects of the prescribed drug in this frail group of people.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Inappropriate long-term use of antipsychotic drugs is common among people with dementia living in specialized care units2013In: BMC pharmacology & toxicology, ISSN 2050-6511, Vol. 14, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are widely used for the treatment of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), despite their limited efficacy and concerns about safety. The aim of this study was to describe antipsychotic drug therapy among people with dementia living in specialized care units in northern Sweden.

    METHODS: This study was conducted in 40 specialized care units in northern Sweden, with a total study population of 344 people with dementia. The study population was described in regard to antipsychotic drug use, ADL function, cognitive function and BPSD, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). These data were collected at baseline and six months later. Detailed data about antipsychotic prescribing were collected from prescription records.

    RESULTS: This study showed that 132 persons (38%) in the study population used antipsychotic drugs at the start of the study. Of these, 52/132 (39%) had prescriptions that followed national guidelines with regard to dose and substance.After six months, there were 111 of 132 persons left because of deaths and dropouts. Of these 111 people, 80 (72%) were still being treated with antipsychotics, 63/111 (57%) with the same dose. People who exhibited aggressive behavior (OR: 1.980, CI: 1.515-2.588), or passiveness (OR: 1.548, CI: 1.150-2.083), or had mild cognitive impairment (OR: 2.284 CI: 1.046-4.988), were at increased risk of being prescribed antipsychotics.

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of antipsychotic drug use among people with dementia living in specialized care units was high and inappropriate long-term use of antipsychotic drugs was common.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Inappropriate long-term use of antipsychotic drugs is common among people with dementia living in specialized care units
  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Constipation and laxative use among people living in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Constipation is a common condition among older people, particularly among people living in nursing homes, and the use of drugs such as opioids is one of many factors that contribute to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of constipation and the use of laxatives between 2007 and 2013, to analyze constipation and laxative use among people who are prescribed opioids, and to identify factors associated with constipation. Methods: In 2007 and 2013, two surveys were performed in the county of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden, comprising all those living in nursing homes. The Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale was used to collect data regarding laxative, opioid and anticholinergic drug use, functioning in activities of daily living (ADL), cognition and symptoms of constipation. A comparison was made between 2820 people from 2007 and 1902 people from 2013. Results: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation among people living in nursing homes increased from 36% in 2007 to 40% in 2013. After controlling for age, sex, ADL, cognitive impairment and use of opioid and anticholinergic drugs, this difference was found to be statistically significant. When controlled for demographic changes, there was a statistically significant difference in the regular use of laxatives between the respective years, from 46% in 2007 to 59% in 2013. People prescribed opioids and anticholinergic drugs were at increased risk of constipation, while people with a higher ADL score were at decreased risk. Further, among people prescribed opioids and rated as constipated, 35% in 2007 and 20% in 2013 were not prescribed laxatives for regular use, a difference that was found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation increased between 2007 and 2013. Although there was a decrease between the years, there were still a number of people being prescribed with opioids and rated as constipated who were not treated with laxatives. This study therefore indicates that constipation remains a significant problem among people in nursing homes and also indicates that those prescribed opioids could benefit from an increased awareness of the risk of constipation and treatment, if required.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Pharmacological Pain Treatment in 2012 and 2017 Among Older People with Major Neurocognitive Disorder2021In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, E-ISSN 1179-1969, Vol. 38, p. 1017-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Pain is highly prevalent among older people, and treatment is complicated because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Among people with major neurocognitive disorder additional difficulties might arise. The aim of this study was to describe analgesic drug use in 2012 and 2017 and associated factors among older people with major neurocognitive disorder.

    Methods: In this register-based study, the Swedish Dementia Registry and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register were combined in order to obtain data regarding analgesic drug use among older people with major neurocognitive disorder. One or more filled prescriptions during the timeframe of 6 months (1 July–31 December 2012 and 1 July–31 December 2017) defined drug use during the respective period. A comparison between 2012 and 2017 was made, including a total of 56,101 people (20,889 and 35,212 respectively) with a mean age of 81.9 and 82.7 years, respectively.

    Results: The overall use of analgesic drugs increased significantly from 41.6% of individuals to 46.0% between the years 2012 and 2017. Users of opioid analgesics (15.2% vs 17.3%) and paracetamol (37.0% vs 42.3%) increased, while the users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (4.9% vs 2.7%) declined between the two data collections. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed for different drugs and drug classes, and it was found that the use of opioids and paracetamol was associated with older age and a longer time since diagnosis. In contrast, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were associated with younger age and a shorter time since diagnosis.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that on a population level, pharmacological drug treatment has changed in line with guidelines between 2012 and 2017, with an increase in paracetamol and strong opioids and a decrease in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tramadol. The relatively high prevalence of opioids warrants concern given the significant risk of adverse effects among older people with major neurocognitive disorder.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Association between behavioral and psychological symptoms and psychotropic drug use among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care settings2013In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1415-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Behavioral and psychological symptoms are common among cognitively impaired individuals and psychotropic drugs are widely used for their treatment. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and associated factors of psychotropic and anti-dementia drug use among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care settings. Methods: The study comprised 2,019 cognitively impaired people living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. Data concerning psychotropic and anti-dementia drug use, function in activities of daily living, cognitive function, and prevalence of behavioral and psychological symptoms were collected, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale. Results: Of the study population, 1,442 individuals (71%) were prescribed at least one psychotropic drug (antidepressants (49%), anxiolytics, hypnotics, and sedatives (36%), antipsychotics (25%)). Furthermore, 363 individuals (18%) received anti-dementia drugs. Associations between various behavioral and psychological symptoms were found for all psychotropic drug classes and anti-dementia drugs. Verbally disruptive/attention-seeking behavior was associated with all psychotropic drugs. Use of antipsychotics was associated with several behavioral and psychological symptoms, including aggressive behavior. Conclusion: The associations between behavioral and psychological symptoms and psychotropic drug use found in this study indicate that these drugs are prescribed to treat behavioral and psychological symptoms among cognitively impaired individuals despite limited evidence of their efficacy. Given the significant risk of adverse effects among old people with cognitive impairment, it is important to ensure that any medication used is both appropriate and safe.

  • 34.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Reduction in the use of potentially inappropriate drugs among old people living in geriatric care units between 2007 and 20132015In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 507-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to investigate trends in the prevalence of potentially inappropriate drug use among old people living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten between 2007 and 2013 using six national quality indicators and to assess the impact of medication reviews on those quality indicators.

    METHODS: Data were collected concerning potentially inappropriate drug use, function in the activities of daily living (ADL) and cognitive function, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). A comparison was made between the years 2007 and 2013, comprising 2772 and 1902 people, respectively, living in geriatric care in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. We conducted a parallel investigation of a separate corresponding population in Västerbotten County from 2012, where potentially inappropriate drug use was measured before and after 895 medication reviews which involved a clinical pharmacist.

    RESULTS: After controlling for age, sex, ADL and cognitive impairment, there was a significant improvement in five out of six quality indicators between 2007 and 2013. While 44 % of the people were exposed to one or more potentially inappropriate medications in 2007, this number had declined to 26 % by 2013. In the separate population from 2012, the frequency of potentially inappropriate drug use was significantly reduced amongst the people who had a medication review performed.

    CONCLUSION: The extent of potentially inappropriate drug use declined between 2007 and 2013 according to the quality indicators used. Medication reviews involving clinical pharmacists might be an important factor in reducing potentially inappropriate drug use and improving drug treatment among old people.

  • 35.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Pfister, Bettina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Jonsson, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Drug-related hospital admissions among old people with dementia2016In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 1143-1153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Drug treatment associated problems are common and are the cause of a large proportion of hospitalizations in oldpeople. People with dementia are especially at risk of drug-related problems. The objectives of this study were to assess the occurrence and character of drug-related problems that lead to acute hospital admissions among old people (≥65 years) with dementia or cognitive impairment.

    METHODS: This study was conducted in orthopedic and internal medicine wards in two hospitals in Northern Sweden. Information about acute admissions was collected from the medical records. A total of 458 people aged 65 years or older with dementia or cognitive impairment were included in the study. The contribution of drug-related problems to each hospitalization was assessed.

    RESULTS: Of 458 acute hospital admissions, 189 (41.3 %) were determined to be drug-related. The most common drug-relatedproblem (86/189; 45.5 %) was an adverse drug reaction. In total, 264 drugs were judged to be involved in 189 drug-relatedadmissions, of which cardiovascular (29.5 %) and psychotropic (26.9 %) drugs were the most commonly involved drug classes. The relationship between the drug-related problem and the admission was judged certain in 25 cases, probable in 78 cases, and possible in 86 cases. Drug-related admissions were more common among people taking more drugs (p = 0.035) and among younger patients (p = 0.031).

    CONCLUSION: Drug-related problems appear to be responsible for a major proportion of hospitalizations among old peoplewith dementia or cognitive impairment. Targeted interventions such as education and medication reviews may be warranted to reduce drug-related problems.

  • 36.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Pfister, Bettina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Jonsson, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pharmacist participation in hospital ward teams and hospital readmission rates among people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial2017In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 7, no 73, p. 827-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess whether comprehensive medication reviews conducted by clinical pharmacists as part of a healthcare team reduce drug-related hospital readmission rates among people with dementia or cognitive impairment.

    Methods: This randomized controlled trial was carried out between January 9, 2012, and December 2, 2014. Patients aged ≥65 years with dementia or cognitive impairment admitted to three wards at two hospitals located in Northern Sweden were included.

    Results: Of the 473 deemed eligible for participation, 230 were randomized to intervention and 230 to control group by block randomization. The primary outcome, risk of drug-related hospital readmissions, was assessed at 180 days of follow-up by intention-to-treat analysis.

    During the 180 days of follow-up, 18.9% (40/212) of patients in the intervention group and 23.0% (50/217) of those in the control group were readmitted for drug-related reasons (HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.53–1.21, p = 0.28, univariable Cox regression). Heart failure was significantly more common in the intervention group. After adjustment for heart failure as a potential confounder and an interaction term, multiple Cox regression analysis indicated that pharmacist participation significantly reduced the risk of drug-related readmissions (HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.27–0.90, p = 0.02). A post-hoc analysis showed a significantly reduced risk of 30-day readmissions due to drug-related problems in the total sample (without adjustment for heart failure).

    Conclusion: Participation of clinical pharmacists in healthcare team conducting comprehensive medication reviews did not significantly reduce the risk of drug-related readmissions in patients with dementia or cognitive impairment; however, post-hoc and subgroup analyses indicated significant effects favoring the intervention. More research is needed.

    Trial registration: Clinical trials NCT01504672.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Pfister, Bettina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of pharmacists' interventions on inappropriate drug use and drug-related readmissions in people with dementia: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial2018In: Pharmacy, E-ISSN 2226-4787, Vol. 6, no 1, article id E7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-associated physiological changes and extensive drug treatment including use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) pose a significant risk of drug-drug interactions and adverse drug events among elderly people with dementia. This study aimed at analysing the effects of clinical pharmacists' interventions on use of PIMs, risk of emergency department visits, and time to institutionalization. Furthermore, a descriptive analysis was conducted of circumstances associated with drug-related readmissions. This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled intervention study conducted in two hospitals in Northern Sweden. The study included patients (n = 460) 65 years or older with dementia or cognitive impairment. The intervention consisted of comprehensive medication reviews conducted by clinical pharmacists as part of a healthcare team. There was a larger decrease in PIMs in the intervention group compared with the control group (p= 0.011). No significant difference was found in time to first all-cause emergency department visits (HR = 0.994, 95% CI = 0.755-1.307 p = 0.963, simple Cox regression) or time to institutionalization (HR = 0.761, 95% CI = 0.409-1.416 p = 0.389, simple Cox regression) within 180 days. Common reasons for drug-related readmissions were negative effects of sedatives, opioids, antidepressants, and anticholinergic agents, resulting in confusion, falling, and sedation. Drug-related readmissions were associated with living at home, heart failure, and diabetes. Pharmacist-provided interventions were able to reduce PIMs among elderly people with dementia and cognitive impairment.

  • 38.
    Hemmingsson, Eva-Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustavsson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Prevalence of pain and pharmacological pain and treatment among old people in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132018In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 483-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Many elderly people living in nursing homes experience pain and take analgesic medication. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of pain and pharmacological pain treatment among people living in nursing homes in Sweden, in two large, comparable, samples from 2007 to 2013.

    Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2007 and 2013, including all residents in nursing homes in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. A total of 4933 residents (2814 and 2119 respectively) with a mean age of 84.6 and 85.0 years participated. Of these, 71.1 and 72.4% respectively were cognitively impaired. The survey was completed by the staff members who knew the residents best.

    Results: The prescription of opioids became significantly more common while the use of tramadol decreased significantly. The staff reported that 63.4% in 2007 and 62.3% in 2013 had experienced pain. Of those in pain, 20.2% in 2007 and 16.8% in 2013 received no treatment and 73.4 and 75.0% respectively of those with pain, but no pharmacological treatment, were incorrectly described by the staff as being treated for pain.

    Conclusions: There has been a change in the pharmacological analgesic treatment between 2007 and 2013 with less prescribing of tramadol and a greater proportion taking opioids. Nevertheless, undertreatment of pain still occurs and in many cases, staff members believed that the residents were prescribed analgesic treatment when this was not the case.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Hemmingsson, Eva-Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hjelmare, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Weidung, Bodil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatric Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Antiviral treatment associated with reduced risk of clinical Alzheimer's disease: A nested case-control study2021In: Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, E-ISSN 2352-8737, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e12187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In this nested case-control study, we investigated if antiviral treatment given prior to onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) could influence incident AD.

    Methods: From a large population-based cohort study in northern Sweden, 262 individuals that later developed AD were compared to a non-AD matched control group with respect to prescriptions of herpes antiviral treatment. All included subjects were herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) carriers and the matching criteria were age, sex, apolipoprotein E genotype (ε4 allele carriership), and study sample start year.

    Results: Among those who developed AD, 6 prescriptions of antivirals were found, compared to 20 among matched controls. Adjusted for length of follow-up, a conditional logistic regression indicated a difference in the risk for AD development between groups (odds ratio for AD with an antiviral prescription 0.287, P = .018).

    Discussion: Antiviral treatment might possibly reduce the risk for later development of HSV1-associated AD.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Hägglund, Patricia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Oropharyngeal dysphagia and associated factors among individuals living in nursing homes in northern Sweden in 2007 and 20132022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Swallowing difficulties in the oral cavity or pharynx (i.e., oropharyngeal dysphagia) are a common problem in the aging population, which may result in severe consequences, such as malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and mortality. Identifying oropharyngeal dysphagia and its associated factors is essential for establishing better healthcare policies in nursing homes. In this study, we aimed to describe the oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence among nursing home residents, and to investigate the association between dysphagia and potentially related factors in a large survey of nursing home residents in Sweden, including individuals with various degrees of cognitive impairment. A secondary aim was to compare findings between years on oropharyngeal dysphagia and its associated factors.

    Methods: This study is based on two cross-sectional surveys performed in 2007 and 2013, including 4,995 individuals living in nursing homes in the Region of Västerbotten, Sweden. Data were collected from caregivers’ reports regarding swallowing ability, nutritional status, chewing ability, and other baseline characteristics, such as cognitive function and activity of daily living (ADL). Data were analyzed using logistic regression models to calculate the odds of the association between oropharyngeal dysphagia and associated factors.

    Results: Oropharyngeal dysphagia was reported in 14.9% (95% CI: 13.9–16.0) of the nursing home residents. An adjusted model revealed that oropharyngeal dysphagia was associated by severe cognitive impairment (OR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.14–2.12) and ADL independence (OR: 0.81 95% CI: 1.82–2.66) among nursing home residents. We also identified the following as independently associated factors of dysphagia: reduced nutritional status (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.49–2.27), artificial nutrition (OR: 6.33, 95% CI: 2.73–14.71), and clinical signs of aspiration (OR: 10.89, 95% CI: 8.40–14.12).

    Conclusions: Oropharyngeal dysphagia was reported among approximately 15% nursing home residents and was associated with cognitive impairment and ADL capability. Furthermore, reduced nutritional status and artificial nutrition were also associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Implementing routine protocols in nursing homes may help detect oropharyngeal dysphagia and manage oropharyngeal dysphagia among residents.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Boström, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Measurement error of the Mini-Mental State Examination among individuals with dementia that reside in nursing homes2021In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have investigated the measurement error of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in the same unit of measurement, also known as absolute reliability. This measurement can help determine whether an observed score change for an individual is likely to represent true change. The aim of this study was to investigate the absolute reliability of the MMSE among individuals with dementia that reside in nursing homes. Among 88 participants, 19 (21.6%) were men, 35 (39.8%) had Alzheimer's disease, 35 (39.8%) had vascular dementia, and the mean age was 84.0 years (range 65-98). The participants were tested and retested with the MMSE within 1-6 days. Both tests were administered by the same assessor at the same time of day. The mean MMSE score was 13.7 (range 0-28). The absolute difference between MMSE scores varied from 0 to 6 points, and the differences did not correlate with the corresponding score means (p = 0.874). The smallest detectable change (SDC) between two measurements was 4.00. The SDC was independent of depression, impaired vision and hearing, delirium within the last week, dementia type and age. However, the SDC was 5.56 among men and 3.50 among women (p = 0.003). In conclusion, for individuals with dementia that reside in nursing homes, it seems like their MMSE score needs to change by four or more points between two measurements in order for their score change to be reliably higher than the measurement error.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    The association between stroke, depression, and 5-year mortality among very old people2013In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2587-2589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: Depression after stroke has been associated with increased mortality, but little is known about this association among very old people.

    Methods: A population-based study among people ≥85 years of age was conducted in northern Sweden and Finland, comprising cross-sectional assessments and subsequent survival data. The 452 individuals who had completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 assessment were selected. Depression was defined as a score of ≥5 on the geriatric depression scale.

    Results: Of those with a history of stroke, 38 of 88 (43.2%) people were depressed, and 11 of the 38 (28.9%) were treated with antidepressants, compared with 91 of 364 (25.0%) depressed (P=0.001) and 17 of 91 (18.7%) treated with antidepressants among those without stroke. Having a history of stroke and ongoing depression was associated with increased 5-year mortality compared with having only stroke (hazard ratio, 1.90; confidence interval, 1.15–3.13), having only depression (hazard ratio, 1.59; confidence interval, 1.03–2.45), and compared with having neither stroke nor depression (hazard ratio, 2.50; confidence interval, 1.69–3.69). Having only stroke without depression did not increase mortality compared with having neither stroke nor depression.

    Conclusions: A history of stroke was associated with increased mortality among very old people but only among those who were also depressed. Depression seemed to be underdiagnosed and undertreated.

  • 43.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    The prevalence of stroke and depression and factors associated with depression in elderly people with and without stroke2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 174Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have investigated factors associated with depression among elderly people with and without stroke concurrently, using identical settings, procedures and study variables. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of stroke and depression and to compare the factors associated with depression in people with and without stroke. Methods: A postal mail survey was sent to 65-, 70-, 75- and 80-year-olds in northern Sweden and Finland in 2010 (n = 6098). Stroke was defined as answering "yes" to the question "Have you had a stroke?" Depression was defined as answering "yes" to the question "Are you depressed?" or having a Geriatric Depression Scale-4 score >= 2. Dependence in personal activities of daily living was defined as not showering without human assistance. Associations were tested with log-binomial regression. Results: The overall stroke prevalence was 7.0 +/- 0.3 % and increased from 4.7 +/- 0.4 % among 65-year-olds to 11.6 +/- 1.0 % among 80-year-olds (p < 0.001). The overall depression prevalence was 12.8 +/- 0.4 % and increased from 11.0 +/- 0.6 % among 65-year-olds to 18.1 +/- 1.2 % among 80-year-olds (p < 0.001). Depression was more common among people with stroke (Prevalence Ratio 1.77, 95 % Confidence Interval 1.48-2.12). In the non-stroke group, depression was independently associated with diabetes, dependence in instrumental activities of daily living, living alone, not having someone to talk to, poor finances, pain problems and having a life crisis in the preceding year. In the group with stroke, depression was independently associated with dependence in personal activities of daily living and having a life crisis the preceding year. Conclusions: Depression in people without stroke appeared to be independently associated with a broader range of external factors than depression in people with stroke.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Weidung, Bodil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    High blood pressure as a risk factor for incident stroke among very old people: a population-based cohort study2016In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 2059-2065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: High blood pressure (BP) increases the risk of stroke, but there is limited evidence from studies including very old people. The aim was to investigate risk factors for incident stroke among very old people.

    METHODS: A prospective population-based cohort study was performed among participants aged at least 85 years in northern Sweden. The 955 participants were tested at their homes. BP was measured manually after 5-min supine rest. Incident stroke data were collected from medical charts guided by hospital registry, death records, and 5-year reassessments. Cox proportional hazards models were used.

    RESULTS: The stroke incidence was 33.8/1000 person-years (94 stroke events) during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years. In a comprehensive multivariate model, atrial fibrillation [hazard ratio 1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-3.19] and higher SBP (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.30 per 10-mmHg increase) were associated with incident stroke overall. However, higher SBP was not associated with incident stroke in participants with SBP less than 140 mmHg (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.53-1.53 per 10-mmHg increase). In additional multivariate models, DBP at least 90 mmHg (hazard ratio 2.45, 95% CI 1.47-4.08) and SBP at least 160 mmHg (vs. <140 mmHg; hazard ratio 2.80, 95% CI 1.53-5.14) were associated with incident stroke. The association between BP and incident stroke was not affected by interactions related to sex, dependence in activities of daily living, or cognitive impairment.

    CONCLUSION: High SBP (≥160 mmHg) and DBP (≥90 mmHg) and atrial fibrillation appeared to be risk factors for incident stroke among very old people.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45. Itzhaki, Ruth F.
    et al.
    Lathe, Richard
    Balin, Brian J.
    Ball, Melvyn J.
    Bearer, Elaine L.
    Braak, Heiko
    Bullido, Maria J.
    Carter, Chris
    Clerici, Mario
    Cosby, S. Louise
    Del Tredici, Kelly
    Field, Hugh
    Fulop, Tamas
    Grassi, Claudio
    Griffin, W. Sue T.
    Haas, Jurgen
    Hudson, Alan P.
    Kamer, Angela R.
    Kell, Douglas B.
    Licastro, Federico
    Letenneur, Luc
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Mancuso, Roberta
    Miklossy, Judith
    Otth, Carola
    Palamara, Anna Teresa
    Perry, George
    Preston, Christopher
    Pretorius, Etheresia
    Strandberg, Timo
    Tabet, Naji
    Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.
    Whittum-Hudson, Judith A.
    Microbes and Alzheimer's Disease2016In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 979-984Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are researchers and clinicians working on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or related topics, and we write to express our concern that one particular aspect of the disease has been neglected, even though treatment based on it might slow or arrest AD progression. We refer to the many studies, mainly on humans, implicating specific microbes in the elderly brain, notably herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), Chlamydia pneumoniae, and several types of spirochaete, in the etiology of AD [1–4]. Fungal infection of AD brain [5, 6] has also been described, as well as abnormal microbiota in AD patient blood [7]. The first observations of HSV1 in AD brain were reported almost three decades ago [8]. The ever-increasing number of these studies (now about 100 on HSV1 alone) warrants re-evaluation of the infection and AD concept.

    AD is associated with neuronal loss and progressive synaptic dysfunction, accompanied by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and abnormal forms of tau protein, markers that have been used as diagnostic criteria for the disease [9, 10]. These constitute the hallmarks of AD, but whether they are causes of AD or consequences is unknown. We suggest that these are indicators of an infectious etiology. In the case of AD, it is often not realized that microbes can cause chronic as well as acute diseases; that some microbes can remain latent in the body with the potential for reactivation, the effects of which might occur years after initial infection; and that people can be infected but not necessarily affected, such that ‘controls’, even if infected, are asymptomatic

  • 46.
    Itzhaki, Ruth F.
    et al.
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, United Kingdom; Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Level 6, West Wing, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Lathe, Richard
    Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Balin, Brian J.
    Center for Chronic Disorders of Aging, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, United States.
    Ball, Melvyn J.
    Department of Pathology (Neuropathology), Oregon Health and Science University, OR, Portland, United States.
    Bearer, Elaine L.
    Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, NM, Albuquerque, United States.
    Braak, Heiko
    Clinical Neuroanatomy Section, Department of Neurology, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
    Bullido, Maria J.
    Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Centro de Investigacion en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Madrid, Spain.
    Carter, Chris
    Polygenic Pathways, Hastings, East Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Clerici, Mario
    University of Milano and IRCCS SM Nascente, Don C Gnocchi Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Cosby, S. Louise
    Centre for Infection and Immunity, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Del Tredici, Kelly
    Clinical Neuroanatomy Section, Department of Neurology, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
    Field, Hugh
    Queens' College, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Fulop, Tamas
    Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Université de Sherbrooke, PQ, Sherbrooke, Canada.
    Grassi, Claudio
    Institute of Human Physiology, Medical School, Universitá Cattolica, Rome, San Raffaele Pisana Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization, and Health Care, Rome, Italy.
    Griffin, W. Sue T.
    Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, AR, Little Rock, United States.
    Haas, Jürgen
    Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Hudson, Alan P.
    Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, MI, Detroit, United States.
    Kamer, Angela R.
    NYU College of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, NY, New York, United States.
    Kell, Douglas B.
    School of Chemistry, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Licastro, Federico
    Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Letenneur, Luc
    INSERM, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Mancuso, Roberta
    Don Gnocchi Foundation ONLUS, Milan, Italy.
    Miklossy, Judith
    Prevention Alzheimer International Foundation, International Alzheimer Research Center, Martigny-Croix, Switzerland.
    Otth, Carola
    Institute of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Austral University of Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
    Palamara, Anna Teresa
    Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Institute Pasteur Cenci Bolognetti Foundation, Sapienza University of Rome, San Raffaele Pisana Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization, and Health Care, Rome, Italy.
    Perry, George
    College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, TX, San Antonio, United States.
    Preston, Christopher
    Institute of Virology, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Pretorius, Etheresia
    Applied Morphology Research Centre, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Z-Arcadia, South Africa.
    Strandberg, Timo
    Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, University of Oulu, Centre of Life Course Health Research, Oulu, Finland.
    Tabet, Naji
    Division of Old Age Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.
    St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Whittum-Hudson, Judith A.
    Departments of Immunology and Microbiology, Internal Medicine (Rheumatology), and Ophthalmology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, MI, Detroit, United States.
    Microbes and Alzheimer's disease2017In: Handbook of infection and Alzheimer's disease / [ed] Judith Miklossy, IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 5, p. 3-8Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Johansson, Sanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    A clinically feasible short version of the 15-item geriatric depression scale extracted using item response theory in a sample of adults aged 85 years and older2022In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To extract the items most suitable for a short version of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) in a sample of adults aged ≥ 85 years using item response theory (IRT).

    Method: This population-based cross-sectional study included 651 individuals aged ≥ 85 years from the Umeå 85+/GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA) study. Participants were either community dwelling (approximately 70%) or resided in institutional care (approximately 30%) in northern Sweden and western Finland in 2000–2002 and 2005–2007. The psychometric properties of GDS-15 items were investigated using an IRT-based approach to find items most closely corresponding to the GDS-15 cut off value of ≥5 points. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the performance of the proposed short version with that of previously proposed short GDS versions.

    Results: GDS-15 items 3, 8, 12, and 13 best differentiated respondents’ levels of depressive symptoms corresponding to the GDS-15 cut off value of ≥5, regardless of age or sex, and thus comprise the proposed short version of the scale (GDS-4 GERDA). For the identification of individuals with depression (total GDS-15 score ≥ 5), the GDS-4 GERDA with a cut-off score of ≥2 had 92.9% sensitivity and 85.0% specificity.

    Conclusion: The GDS-4 GERDA could be used as an optimized short version of the GDS-15 to screen for depression among adults aged ≥ 85 years.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Kindstedt, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Andersson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Westberg, Annica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Exploring medication-related hospital admissions and their association with cognitive impairment among acutely admitted older people2023In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1048-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Medication-related hospital admissions (MRAs) are common among older people. Persons with cognitive impairment are especially vulnerable to adverse drug effects. At the same time, increased home health care and social support could theoretically prevent medication-related problems. This study aims to estimate the proportion of MRAs and explore their relationship with cognitive impairment in a population of acutely admitted older people.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 300 individuals aged 75 years or older admitted to an acute medical ward. Two assessors identified possibly MRAs using the Assessment Tool for Hospital Admissions Related to Medications 10 (AT-HARM10). Screening for cognitive impairment was performed during ward stay using a 4-item test related to time orientation. Prevalence odds ratios between cognitive test scores and MRAs were analysed through logistic regression.

    Results: Using AT-HARM10, 108 out of 300 admissions (36%) were classified as possibly MRAs by both assessors. Moreover, MRAs were least common among patients with the lowest cognitive test scores. There was an association regarding MRAs when the lowest test score was treated as a cut-off and compared against a reference category comprising all other scores (OR, 0.31 [95% CI 0.10–0.93]; p = 0.037) in a logistic regression model adjusted for cohabitation and home health care.

    Conclusion: Approximately one-third of the hospital admissions among acutely admitted older people were considered at least possibly medication-related. Hence, there is still a great need to manage medication-related problems and reduce MRAs in this vulnerable population. Using a 4-item instrument to screen for cognitive impairment, there was a negative association between MRA and lowest cognitive test score. Further exploration of the relationship between MRAs and cognitive impairment may indicate appropriate components and target populations for interventions that aims to reduce the risk of MRA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Kindstedt, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Psychotropic drugs among older people in relation to major neurocognitive disorder and nursing home residency: a comparative registry-based studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Kindstedt, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    The impact of nursing home residency on psychotropic drug use in major neurocognitive disorder: a nationwide comparison2023In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 38, no 11, article id e6018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Psychotropic drugs are utilized against neuropsychiatric symptoms among people with major neurocognitive disorder (NCD) despite well-documented risks, and older people in nursing homes are expected to be more frequently exposed to those medicines. This study compared psychotropic drug use and associated factors between older people with major NCD and matched references.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study included individuals from three national registries in Sweden. References were randomly matched 1:1 by age and sex from the Swedish Total Population Register. Drug use was defined as at least one prescription fill from 1 July to 31 December 2019 and presented as proportion of drug users. In addition, ORs regarding psychotropic drug use and associated factors use were analysed using generalized estimating equations.

    Results: There were 102,419 complete matching pairs alive on 31 December 2019. The proportions of psychotropic drug users were 59% in the population of people with major NCD and 28% in the reference group. Moreover, there was a substantial number of individuals in nursing homes who had been treated with antipsychotics but who, for unknown reasons, had not been diagnosed with major NCD. Psychotropic drug use was positively associated with both major NCD and nursing home residency. The difference in drug use in relation to major NCD was more pronounced among people living in ordinary homes.

    Conclusion: Despite well-documented risks in people with cognitive impairment, psychotropic drug use was overall high and positively associated with both major NCD and nursing home residency. Taken together, interventions to better target neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people are warranted. Hypnotic drug use among older people in general as well as antipsychotic drug exposure among older people in nursing homes appear to be two important focus areas.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 1 - 50 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf