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  • 1.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Blankenburg, Janet
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    How Do Students’ Interest and Conceptual Understanding Develop Over the Time of Their Secondary Chemistry Education? First Results From the Binational Project DoLiS2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2. Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Siebert, Sara
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Digitising teaching and learning: additional perspectives for chemistry education2019Inngår i: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 59, s. 554-564Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry requires and combines both observable and mental representations. Still we know that learners often struggle in combining these perspectives successfully, especially when experimental observations contradict the model-based explanations, e.g. in interpreting the chemical equilibrium as dynamic processes while observing a static system without any visible changes. Digital media offer potentials that might not have been accessible to this degree until now. However, we do not know enough with regard to the degree and effects these media tools have in supporting learning processes but perhaps also in hindering them. This article presents four approaches on how to potentially make use of digital media in learning processes based on theoretical considerations and empirical investigations. The projects will explore applications of media as visualization, learning and investigation tools in chemistry education, embracing techniques from virtual realities to eye-tracking.

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  • 3.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Köhler, Christine
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Die Verständnisentwicklung zentraler Fachkonzepte in der Sekundarstufe2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [de]

    Der Fachunterricht in der Sekundarstufe soll es Schülerinnen und Schülern ermöglichen, ein breites Verständnis grundlegender Konzepte zu erlernen. Verschiedene empirische Untersuchungen deuten jedoch darauf hin, dass dieses Lernziel nur eingeschränkt erreicht wird. Das Projekt DoLiS (Development of Learning in Science) zielt darauf ab, in mehreren Schritten Hinweise auf Umfang, Entwicklungswege und Einflussfaktoren des Konzeptverständnisses zu liefern. Kern der Studie ist eine quantitative Querschnittserhebung über die Jahrgangsstufen 5 bis 12, in der 2868 Schülerinnen und Schüler u.a. hinsichtlich ihres Konzeptverständnisses in den Bereichen Materie, Energie und chemische Reaktionen getestet wurden. Neben den Ergebnissen dieser ersten Erhebung soll aufbauend das Design einer Zwei-Kohorten-Längsschnittstudie vorgestellt werden, in der die beiden Jahrgangsstufen 5 und 9 sowohl quantitativ als auch qualitativ über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren begleitet werden sollen, um detaillierte Einblicke in individuelle Entwicklungsverläufe während der Sekundarstufe zu gewinnen.

  • 4.
    Blankenburg, Janet
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Interesse an naturwissenschaftlichen Tätigkeiten: Das RIASEC+N Modell2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    150-åring i nytt format2019Inngår i: Kemisk tidskrift, Vol. 1, s. 24-27Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 6.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Addressing Critical Features of Context-Based Science Curricula2014Inngår i: NARST 2014: Annual International Conference Abstracts, 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chemistry: content, context and choices: towards students' higher order problem solving in upper secondary school2015Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry is often claimed to be difficult, irrelevant, and uninteresting to school students. Even students who enjoy doing science often have problems seeing themselves as being scientists. This thesis explores and challenges the negative perception of chemistry by investigating upper secondary students’ views on the subject. Based on students’ ideas for improving chemistry education to make the subject more interesting and meaningful, new learning approaches rooted in context-based learning (CBL) are presented. CBL approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking.

    Students’ views on upper secondary school chemistry classes in combination with their problem- solving strategies and application of chemistry content knowledge when solving context-based chemistry tasks were investigated using a mixed methods approach. Questionnaire responses, written solutions to chemistry problems, classroom observations, and think-aloud interviews with upper secondary students at the Natural Science Programme and with experts working on context- based chemistry tasks were analysed to obtain a general overview and explore specific issues in detail.

    Several students were identified who had positive feelings about chemistry, found it interesting, and chose to continue with it beyond the compulsory level, mainly with the aim of future university studies or simply because they enjoyed it. Their suggestions for improving school chemistry by connecting it to everyday life prompted an exploration of CBL approaches. Studies on the cognitive learning outcomes arising from the students’ work on context-based tasks revealed that school chemistry heavily emphasises the recall of memorised facts. However, there is evidence of higher order thinking when students’ problem-solving processes are scaffolded using hints based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C). In addition, the contextualisation of problems is identified as something that supports learning rather than distracting students.

    To conclude, the students in this thesis are interested in chemistry and enjoy chemistry education, and their motives for choosing to study chemistry at the post-compulsory level are related to their aspirations; students’ identity formation is important for their choices. Because students are accustomed to recalling facts and solving chemistry problems that have “one single correct answer”, they find more open problems that demand higher order thinking (e.g. knowledge transfer) unfamiliar and complex, suggesting that such processes should be practiced more often in school chemistry. 

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  • 8.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chemistry: context, content and choices: Is school chemistry in crisis?2015Inngår i: Kemivärlden Biotech med Kemisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1653-5596, nr 1, s. 33-34Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chemistry Teachers' Development of Relevant and Interesting Context-Based Open-Ended Problems2019Inngår i: ESERA 2019: 2019 ESERA conference in Bologna, Italy, August 26-30, 2019, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches have become popular in several parts of the world. The intentions with this more unconventional teaching and learning approach are to frame content knowledge into interesting and relevant contexts and to engage students to higher interest, and thereby, hopefully, increased learning. An educational challenge has been to design suitable tasks adapted to both affective and cognitive aspects. To assess students’ chemistry content knowledge, tasks possible to use in class need to be developed, and to make the tasks interesting and relevant to the students, the teachers are central. In this project, chemistry teachers attending two different teacher conferences have worked together with a chemistry education researcher to develop context-based everyday-life open-ended chemistry problems. In this presentation, the process of the development of the context-based problems will be explored, and the ongoing work where the problems are applied in class where students have worked together solving the problems will be discussed.

  • 10.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Collaboration between university and school – how do we make use of each other’s competencies?2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 11.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Digital tools and techniques in chemistry2020Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    After the two first decades of the 21st century, digital tools and techniques are, in several countries, becoming an integrated part of school and university chemistry teaching. The tools are, according to students, often perceived exciting and fun, but from a teacher’s perspective, they have to enable learning to be relevant and meaningful (Seery & McDonnell, 2013). According to McKnight and colleagues (2016), digital tools and technology can have five different functions: (i) providing efficiencies, (ii) giving students access to broader, deeper and “richer” learning resources, (iii) personalising instruction to fit different learning needs, (iv) connecting people to extend the learning community, and (v) transforming teachers’ role as educators (McKnight et al., 2016, p. 207). In this presentation, these functions will be elaborated on from both a teacher and student perspective through chemistry education projects where digital tools and techniques have been applied to enhance students’ cognitive and affective learning.

    Visualisation of chemical representations, e.g., molecular structures and reaction mechanisms, is a foundation important for students to master to fully understand chemistry (e.g., Taber, 2018). Spatial ability, i.e., the move between two- and three-dimensional thinking, is complex, and students need to practice it (Buckely, Seery, & Canty, 2018; Harle & Towns, 2011). To practice spatial ability, digital tools as Virtual and Augmented Reality (VR and AR) have been applied to visualise chemical representations (Ferrell et al., 2019; Parong & Mayer, 2018), and in the projects, students’ learning has been analysed. Teachers’ use of the tools will be discussed from the TPACK model (Voogt et al, 2013). Students’ and teachers’ perspectives on digital chemistry education will be problematised.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Engagement and relevance through context-based, everyday life, open-ended chemistry problems2020Inngår i: Engaging learners with chemistry: projects to stimulate interest and participation / [ed] Ilka Parchmann; Shirley Simon; Jan Apotheker, London, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2020, s. 52-72Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning approaches have been introduced in several countries all over the world to make chemistry more relevant and interesting, and to enhance students' learning outcomes. This more unconventional approach towards chemistry, emphasises meaningful learning through higher-order thinking. An educational challenge has been to develop suitable tasks adapted to both affective and cognitive aspects of learning. To assess students' chemistry content knowledge and to engage students, tasks for use in class need to be designed. Also, to make the tasks interesting and relevant to the students, the teachers are central. In an on-going project, Swedish chemistry teachers attending two different teacher conferences have worked together to suggest contexts that are possible to develop further into context-based everyday life open-ended chemistry problems. In this chapter, teachers' suggestions of relevant and interesting contexts will be described through frameworks of interest, relevance and engagement. Moreover, the design process of context-based problems will be elaborated upon and the upcoming work where the problems are applied in class where students solve the problems, will be explored. Final reflections will be made regarding this type of teacher professional development program (i.e. chemistry teacher conferences), where practitioners meet researchers for design-based research and how these initiatives hopefully empower teachers in their profession.

  • 13.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Finding and elaborating frameworks for analysing context-based chemistry problems2016Inngår i: Narratives of doctoral studies in science education: making the transition from educational practitioner to researcher / [ed] Shirley Simon, Christina Ottander, and Ilka Parchmann, Routledge, 2016, s. 128-139Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Kemi i 3D med virtual reality2021Inngår i: Kemisk tidskrift, ISSN 2003-2722, nr 3, s. 31-31Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 15.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Kemikurs i förändring – Virtual Reality (del 2)2018Inngår i: Kemivärlden, Biotech, Kemisk tidskfrift, ISSN 1653-5596, nr 7, s. 14-15Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 16.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Kjemi i krise?2011Inngår i: Naturfag, ISSN 1504-4564, nr 1, s. 74-77Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 17.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Labbar gör kemin synligare2022Inngår i: Kemisk tidskrift, ISSN 2003-2722, nr 1, s. 28-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 18.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Läsecirklar - ett sätt att arbeta med kollegialt lärande kring naturvetenskapernas didaktik2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 19.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Problems and problem solving in the light of context-based chemistry2021Inngår i: Problems and problem solving in chemistry education: analysing data, looking for patterns and making deductions / [ed] Georgios Tsaparlis, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2021, s. 253-278Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve higher-order thinking and meaningful deep learning, problem solving is fundamental for students to master. If one wants to make students engaged in their own learning and their problem-solving process, interesting and relevant tasks are a fruitful way to increase students’ engagement. In this chapter, problems and problem solving are discussed emanating from context-based learning approaches, where open-ended problems focusing on higher-order thinking, and not merely recall of memorised factual knowledge, are explored. During two teacher conferences, Swedish chemistry teachers suggested contexts they thought their students would find interesting and relevant. These topic-related contexts, e.g., chocolate, doping, and dietary supplement, have been applied when designing ten everyday life, open-ended, context-based chemistry problems. Upper secondary students (n=40) have worked with the problems and their responses from interviews have been analysed. The chapter discusses how to enhance student interest and perceived relevance in chemistry, and how students’ learning can be improved through the use of open-ended, context-based chemistry problems that demand higher-order thinking.

  • 20.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Role models affecting students’ secondary and tertiary educational choices2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest and identity are perspectives often explored when discussing students' educational choices. In Sweden, students have the possibility to choose (or not to choose) a STEM-focused education both at secondary level between grade 9 and 10, and towards university level after grade 12. In this study, interviews have been made with students in the end of grade 12 to investigate which aspects they highlight as important in their choices, both how they already have chosen between lower and upper secondary and how they plan to choose for tertiary level. The study analyses students' perceived interest as well as identity perspectives. Moreover, role models have in previous research been stated as fundamental for influencing students in their educational choices. Therefore, interest, identity and role models are in focus of this study where Eccles et al.´s (1983) expectancy-value model is used as a theoretical lens to further elaborate students' own ideas on educational choices towards STEM in general, and the career of medical doctors and engineers in specific.

  • 21.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Spelifiering och kemi – metod för ökad motivation2018Inngår i: Kemivärlden, Biotech, Kemisk tidskfrift, ISSN 1653-5596, nr 8, s. 14-15Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 22.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Stängningen en prövning för universiteten2020Inngår i: Kemisk Tidskrift, ISSN 2003-2722, nr 3, s. 29-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 23.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Upper Secondary School Students' Opinions On How To Improve Their Chemistry Education2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel university, Germany.
    A Mature Examination of Juvenile Technologies in Science Education2019Inngår i: ESERA 2019, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Era has influenced education for quite some time, and after the hype that technology is “everything”, digitalisation of education needs to be scrutinised in a sensible and mature way. In several countries, a top-down approach from politicians and stakeholders state that digital tools must be implemented to improve students’ learning. Since there are several available types of digital tools, often developed by people with explicit competence in technology and perhaps not a chemistry competence, we find it important to explore and examine how these tools are helpful for students in their learning processes. In this symposium, we want to discuss how juvenile technologies influence students’ cognitive and affective learning and which aspects an implementation of these technologies need to take into account in order to enhance students’ learning.

  • 25.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Interest and relevance as aspects of context-based chemistry problems2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer. Both qualitative interview data and quantitative survey data will be explored in relation to interest frameworks to discuss students’ perceived interest and relevance.

  • 26.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Relevance or interest? Students’ affective responses towards contextual settings in chemistry problems2017Inngår i: NFSUN: Nordiske Forskersymposium om Undervisning i Naturfag. Abstracts / [ed] Astrid Johansen, John Magne Grindeland, 2017, s. 23-23Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer.

  • 27.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Christensson, Camilla
    Katedralskolan, Lund.
    Relevant or interesting according to upper secondary students? Affective aspects of context-based chemistry problems2022Inngår i: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 478-498Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To make students more interested and engaged in science, new teaching approaches have been developed aiming at higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanate from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a relevant context for students to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more engaged in science. Previous research on context-based learning approaches has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to explicitly consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant to improve chemistry education.

    Purpose: In this paper, the constructs of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ are explored to analyse which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems engage students. 

    Sample and Design: Both qualitative interview data and quantitative survey data are elaborated on in three subsequent studies with Swedish upper secondary chemistry students. Students’ statements when discussing contextualisation of chemistry problems are analysed in relation to analytical frameworks to explore students’ perceived interest and relevance.

    Results: The results highlight the importance of connections to personal dimensions in chemistry to make students more engaged and interested in chemistry. The language of the context-based problems is also found essential as the students indicate trigger-words in the tasks influencing perceived interest and relevance. This in combination with students’ distinction between high interest as a positive feeling, and high relevance as something important or worthwhile, are important results from this study. 

    Conclusion: From the results, conclusions are drawn to help researchers and teachers develop chemistry problems aiming for higher order thinking, but on the same time are found interesting and relevant for the students.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Analysing Task Design and Students’ Responses to Context-Based Problems Through Different Analytical Frameworks2015Inngår i: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 33, nr 2, s. 143-161Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Context-based learning approaches are used to enhance students’ interest in, and knowledge about, science. According to different empirical stud- ies, students’ interest is improved by applying these more non-conventional approaches, while effects on learning outcomes are less coherent. Hence, further insights are needed into the structure of context-based problems in comparison to traditional problems, and into students’ problem-solving strategies. Therefore, a suitable framework is necessary, both for the analysis of tasks and strategies. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore traditional and context-based tasks as well as students’ responses to exemplary tasks to identify a suitable frame- work for future design and analyses of context-based problems. The paper dis- cusses different established frameworks and applies the Higher-Order Cognitive Skills/Lower-Order Cognitive Skills (HOCS/LOCS) taxonomy and the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C) to analyse traditional tasks and students’ responses. Sample: Upper secondary students (n=236) at the Natural Science Programme, i.e. possible future scientists, are investigated to explore learning outcomes when they solve chemistry tasks, both more conventional as well as context-based chemistry problems. Design and methods: A typical chemistry examination test has been analysed, first the test items in themselves (n=36), and thereafter 236 students’ responses to one representative context-based problem. Content analysis using HOCS/ LOCS and MHC-C frameworks has been applied to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data, allowing us to describe different problem-solving strategies. Results: The empirical results show that both frameworks are suitable to identify students’ strategies, mainly focusing on recall of memorized facts when solving chemistry test items. Almost all test items were also assessing lower order think- ing. The combination of frameworks with the chemistry syllabus has been found successful to analyse both the test items as well as students’ responses in a sys- tematic way. The framework can therefore be applied in the design of new tasks, the analysis and assessment of students’ responses, and as a tool for teachers to scaffold students in their problem-solving process. Conclusions: This paper gives implications for practice and for future research to both develop new context-based problems in a structured way, as well as pro- viding analytical tools for investigating students’ higher order thinking in their responses to these tasks.

  • 29.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and content: Upper secondary students’ strategies when solving context-based chemistry problems2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking. One way to develop higher order thinking is through the use of meaningful tasks, in this study perceived as context-based chemistry tasks. To explore students’ problem-solving strategies when approaching these tasks, both students’ responses as well as scaffolding from the interviewer using the Model of Hierarchical Complexity (MHC-C) have been analysed. Through think-aloud interviews with 20 upper secondary students who solved context-based chemistry tasks, results show that students are used to lower order thinking and stating “the correct answer” by memorising factual knowledge. Two different groups of problem-solving strategies will be presented in the presentation, one group of students who only gave responses through recall of factual knowledge, and one group who gave responses not only by stating facts but instead also could explain structure-property relationships on their own. However, both groups of students could develop their responses and improve their problem solving through scaffolding from the interviewer’s use of MHC-C operators (i.e. name, describe, and explain). If students are going to solve problems not only through recall of facts, the process of problem-solving has to be practiced and emphasised in school;; not only the task’s response in itself is important if we want students to learn chemistry in a meaningful way. Teachers can develop their students’ problem-solving strategies by scaffolding using suitable frameworks, such as the MHC-C. Besides making students aware of higher ordering thinking, one way to practice such skills is through reasoning and argumentation;; when students develop their argumentation skills, they also challenge their thinking. For argumentation to be rewarding, it must rely on both facts and higher order cognitive skills as transfer, critical thinking and asking questions. 

  • 30.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and Topic: Which Aspects of Context-Based Chemistry Problems Do Upper Secondary Students Perceive Most Relevant and Interesting?2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 31.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Using Model-based Scaffolds to Support Students Solving Context-based Chemistry Problems2018Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, nr 10, s. 1176-1197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning aims to make learning more meaningful by raising meaningful problems. However, these types of problems often require reflection and thinking processes that are more complex and thus more difficult for students, putting high demands on students’ problem-solving capabilities. In this paper, students’ approaches when solving context-based chemistry problems and effects of systematic scaffolds are analysed based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity. Most answers were initially assigned to the lowest level of the model; higher levels were reached without scaffolds only by few students and by most students with scaffolds. The results are discussed with regard to practical implications in terms of how teachers could make use of context-based tasks and aligned scaffolds to help students in this activity.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holmboe, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Combining Virtual Reality and Zoom to visualize chemical structures in 3D and develop the spatial ability of university chemistry students2021Inngår i: Book of abstracts: 9th European Variety in University Chemistry Education Conference EUROVARIETY 2021, University of Ljubljana , 2021, s. -60Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 33.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holmboe, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Virtual Reality and Zoom in combination to visualise chemical structures and develop students' spatial ability during the Corona pandemic2021Inngår i: Den 8:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar: Detaljerat program, Karlstads universitet , 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In chemistry education, students need to develop their competence to visualise chemical structures and reaction mechanisms, for example, to be able to predict how chemical compounds react. As a chemistry or biotechnology engineering student, this competence needs to be practiced. In our project, students have since 2018 used Virtual Reality (VR) to learn to “see” chemistry, and to move between 2D and 3D representations, i.e., spatial ability or spatial thinking. During the Corona pandemic, several teaching challenges have had to be handled, and Zoom has become the most common teaching and communication platform in Sweden. When combining VR with Zoom, students had a possibility to develop their spatial ability even though distance teaching, something described in this paper. The combination of VR and Zoom is explored further for future teaching implications even post-Covid.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holmboe, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Magkakis, Konstantinos
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Virtual Reality to visualise chemistry in higher education: Digital tools to enhance student learning2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Visualisation of molecular representations is an important area within chemistry education that has been explored for a long time, from several different perspectives. In the 1950s, Linus Pauling and Robert Koltun defined the CPK-model, describing the colours of the different atoms used in wood or plastic ball-and-stick models, for example, the black carbon, the white hydrogen, and the red oxygen. These analogue ball-and-stick models (e.g., MolyMod) are still used both in schools and at universities to help students “see” chemistry in three dimensions (3D). Today, with digitalisation, new tools are available to represent and visualise chemistry(Bernholt, Broman, Siebert, & Parchmann, 2019). With these modern digital tools, there are less limitations in molecular size to represent molecules, and even large structures and reaction mechanisms can be explored (Won, Mocerino, Tang, Treagust, & Tasker, 2019). In our project, interventions applying Virtual Reality (VR) as the digital tool during organic chemistry workshops and tutorials, have been explored related to cognitive and affective learning.

    VR gives students the possibility to practice spatial ability, i.e., to move between 2D and 3D. In textbooks, chemistry is presented in 2D using, for example, Lewis structures. However, in real life, chemistry is three-dimensional, and the move between 2D and 3D is something students, as novices, need to practice to understand why and how chemicals react. In our project, university students practice their spatial ability through the application of VR. This on-going project started in 2018, and different workshops and tutorials have been implemented in different chemistry courses for bachelor, master, and engineering students. As presented in previous recent research from Brown and colleagues (2021), our students were very positive, enthusiastic and engaged to work with VR to develop their spatial ability and to visualise chemistry. In the presentation, we will give examples on how students can improve their learning and interest with the use of VR to represent chemical structures.

  • 35.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holmboe, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Magkakis, Konstantinos
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Virtual Reality: visualization of chemical structures to enhance student interest and learning2022Inngår i: ECRICE 2022: chemistry teaching and learning in a global unified world: abstract book, Weizmann Institute of Science , 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the fundamental aspects of chemistry learning is to visualize chemical structures. Through the application of Alex Johnstone's (1991) multilevel thought, the submicroscopic level is often a challenge for students, especially the shift between 2D and 3D, i.e., spatial thinking or spatial ability (Harle & Towns, 2011). With small molecules, plastic ball-and-stick models are commonly used, but on university level, the structures are often larger. By applying digital tools and techniques, as Virtual Reality (VR), there are less limitations in size to represent molecules, and even large structures and reaction mechanisms can be explored (Won et al., 2019). In a five-year design-based research project (Anderson & Shattuck, 2012), a collaboration between university chemistry teachers and a chemistry education researcher, has had an aim to develop university chemistry students' spatial thinking.

    Students and teachers have, in workshops and tutorials, applied VR with both simple and more advanced tools, see figures 1 and 2. Empirical data has been collected using surveys, interviews, and observations. Standard ethical considerations have been considered throughout the whole project.

    In this presentation, students' cognitive and affective learning related to spatial thinking will be discussed, as well as students', teachers', and researcher’s perspectives from the application of VR to visualize chemistry will be elaborated further. Implications for chemistry teaching at all levels will also be explored.

  • 36.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holmboe, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Zoom combined with Virtual Reality (VR) to visualize chemical structures inorganic chemistry2021Inngår i: Universitetspedagogiskakonferensen 2021: den goda utbildningsmiljön 2.1, Umeå: Universitetspedagogik och lärandestöd (UPL), Umeå universitet , 2021, s. 12-13Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to visualize chemistry and to move between two-dimensional (2D) representations presented in textbooks, and three-dimensional (3D) representations of the real molecular structures and mechanisms, is an important competence to master in university chemistry. In research, this is called spatial thinking or spatial ability (Hegarty, 2014). Through spatial thinking, chemists can predict how and why chemical compounds react. Chemistry experts are used to apply this spatial thinking, i.e., visualization through the move between 2D and 3D, without realizing it, whereas novices as students often find spatial thinking or spatial ability challenging (Harle & Towns, 2011). Spatial ability is a competence that is possible to develop through practice (Kozma & Russel, 2005), and in this project, chemistry students had the possibility to use virtual reality, VR, to visualize organic molecular structures and improve their spatial thinking. VR has a potential as a digital learning tool to explore 3D representation  During the last one and a half years, Covid 19 has influenced teaching strategies at universities, and Zoom has become the most common software to teach students. At a first-cycle chemistry course in biological chemistry within a bachelor programme in life science, students were given the opportunity to visualize 3D representations of chemical structures. Due to the Covid 19 restrictions, the teachers could not help students attending the course to be active VR users. Instead, one teacher applied the VR application, Oculus Rift combined with Nanome software (https://nanome.ai), and streamed the visualization over Zoom. The second university chemistry teacher, and the students, used simple VR glasses with their smartphones to visualize the 3D projected molecules, and the teacher explained what was presented. This design-based research project (Anderson & Shattuck, 2012), where the university chemistry teachers collaborated with a chemistry education researcher and a digitalization researcher, will elaborate further on how Zoom as a digital teaching tool also can be applied to facilitate spatial thinking for students even post-Covid. The chemistry teachers and chemistry education researcher designed an intervention from where examples of the visualizations will be presented together with survey results on students’ responses of the application of digital techniques as a way to practice their visualization competence and spatial ability. Preliminary results show that students find this visualization combining VR and Zoom valuable to practice their spatial thinking, and examples of teaching activities will be presented.

    For more information about the project, see https://www.umu.se/en/feature/vr-glasses-help-students-visualize-molecules-/or https://www.umu.se/reportage/vr-glasogon-hjalper-studenter-visualisera-molekyler/

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Christensson, Camilla
    Katedralskolan, Lund.
    Kemin satt i sammanhang: hur gör vi ämnet relevant för elever?2019Inngår i: Kemi för alla: bidrag från konferensen i Stockholm 1-2 oktober 2018 i Stockholm arrangerad av Kemilärarnas resurscentrum / [ed] Karin Stolpe och Gunnar Höst, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019, s. 25-41Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att öka intresset för kemi hos elever och visa på ämnets relevans, har det visat sig viktigt att eleverna får chans att se att kemin finns i vardagen och inte enbart i klassrummet. Detta kan göras genom sammanhang, så kallade kontexter. Kontextbaserad undervisning i de naturvetenskapliga ämnena används i flera länder; i Nederländerna har man till exempel valt att helt skriva om styrdokumenten för att undervisningen ska bli kontextbaserad. Lärare och forskare har där tillsammans utvecklat kontextbaserade undervisningsmaterial. Men hur vet vi vad elever uppfattar som intressant och relevant? Vilka sammanhang kan användas för att både öka elevernas intresse samtidigt som de får lära sig viktiga kemikunskaper? Ett av ledorden för kontextbaserad undervisning är "need-to-know", vad behöver jag kunna/veta för att till exempel förstå varför någonting luktar? I denna artikel diskuterar vi utifrån forskningsperspektiv och konkreta undervisningsexempel hur gymnasiekemin kan sättas i intressanta och relevanta sammanhang. Fastän exemplen kommer från gymnasiet kan idéerna med fördel användas även på högstadiet.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    School of Education, Malmö university.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Chemistry in crisis?: Perspectives on teaching and learning chemistry in Swedish upper secondary schools2011Inngår i: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 43-60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations for a decline in the number of students studying chemistry at advanced level all over the world have been sought for quite some time. Many students do not find chemistry relevant and meaningful and there have been difficulties in developing school chemistry courses that engage students sufficiently and tempt them to further studies in the field. In this study, Swedish upper secondary school students (Ns=372) and their teachers (Nt=18) answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the content and the working methods of their chemistry course. They were also given the opportunity to express ideas on how to make chemistry courses more interesting and meaningful. The results point out some subject areas as both easy and interesting, e.g. atomic structure; while other areas are hard to understand but still interesting, e.g. biochemistry. The students find chemistry lessons teacher-centred, something they appreciate. When teachers and students gave suggestions on how to improve the relevance of chemistry education at upper secondary level, more laboratory work and connections to everyday life were the most common proposals. But on the whole, these students seem quite satisfied with their chemistry courses.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Broman 2011
  • 39.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Linda
    Casa Montessori Partille, Sweden.
    Development of a context-based digital textbook for secondary school: how to combine researchers' and teachers' perspectives to make impact on student learning2022Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 40.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Engineering students going “flipped”: a new teaching approach in organic chemistry to increase students’ interest and value2019Inngår i: 7:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, Luleå tekniska universitet , 2019Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a longitudinal design-based research study where a university organic chemistry course has changed teaching and learning focus, from more conventional teaching into flipped teaching. Engineering students have been followed with surveys, observations, interviews and analysis of how the teaching material was used; results on students’ perceived interest and value are discussed. The project shows that flipped learning with peer instruction is an applicable way to increase students’ interest in organic chemistry and perceived value of the problem-solving process and peer instruction when learning chemistry. Moreover, the paper also discusses the design-based aspect, and how researchers and practitioners can collaborate to develop university teaching with an aim to enhance students’ higher-order thinking and deep learning.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Flipped Learning as a New Approach for University Organic Chemistry2018Inngår i: 14th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education: Book of Abstracts, 2018, s. 20-20Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Flipped learning approaches have emerged since the beginning of the 21st century to make students’ learning environments more active and thereby improve learning outcomes as well as student engagement [1]. In the US, several flipped projects have focused on university chemistry courses, normally the student groups are large, from hundreds up to thousands of students [2], while some research also is found on smaller groups [3]. Here we study an organic chemistry university course both quantitatively and qualitatively during two years when changing from a more traditional teaching method to a new pedagogical approach (i.e., flipped learning), for empirical data see Table 1. In Sweden, flipped learning approaches are uncommon compared to the US and a Swedish university chemistry department had intentions improve students’ learning outcomes and increase students’ engagement in chemistry. The organic course has been perceived difficult and, according to previous course evaluations, also been ascribed as having bad quality in general. Therefore, a change was requested both from students and teachers.

    From the empirical data we will elaborate on students’ opinions when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. Students’ challenges with the organic chemistry course are discussed relating to their opinions about chemistry in general and flipped learning in specific. How students used the different learning material and how they made use of each other through peer interaction when solving problems in class will be discussed according to both constructivist and socio-cultural perspectives. Furthermore, students’ own perception of how they used the course material related to an exact analysis of how the material actually was adapted will be presented together to explore how flipped learning have been applied within the course.

  • 42.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Flipped organic chemistry: in the light of Corona2021Inngår i: Book of abstracts: 9th European Variety in University Chemistry Education Conference EUROVARIETY 2021, University of Ljubljana , 2021, s. -62Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Flipping the class: University chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching and learning approach2019Inngår i: Chemistry Teacher International, ISSN 2569-3263, Vol. 1, nr 1, artikkel-id 20180004Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar conventional approach to teaching, with chem- istry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education with positive results. In particular, US innovations in this area have made positive im- pressions on Swedish university chemistry educators, resulting in an interest and curiosity in integrating a flipped model into the course curricula. The rationale behind flipped learning is to incorporate an active learn- ing approach into lecture, thereby increasing both student engagement and learning outcomes. In this paper, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning, will be presented. The focus in this mixed-methods study will be on students’ cognitive and affective responses when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. Through following a project where a conventional approach to an organic chemistry course is changed into a more student-active focus, we elaborate on implications for course development of chemistry curricula.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Flipping the class: university chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching approach2017Inngår i: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2017: undervisning i praktiken – föreläsning, flexibelt eller mitt emellan?, Umeå: Universitetspedagogik och lärandestöd (UPL), Umeå universitet , 2017, s. 14-18Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar approach to teaching, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this study, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented. The focus will be on students’ experiences when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. 

  • 45.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Organic chemistry going ‘flipped’ – university students’ perceptions of a new teaching and learning approach2019Inngår i: European Variety In Chemistry Education 2019: Abstract Booklet, 2019, s. 32-32Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 46.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    To flip or not to flip: Students’ use of the learning material in a flipped university organic chemistry course2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have had a similar approach to teaching for a long time, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this presentation, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented.

  • 47.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Interaktiva medier och lärande (IML).
    Uvell, Hanna
    Maja Beskowgymnasiet.
    Vestling, Monika
    Maja Beskowgymnasiet.
    Gymnasiearbete (GARB) – an upper secondary school recepit before entering university studiies2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    At Swedish upper secondary school, all students have to pass a mandatory course with thename “Gymnasiearbete”. This course is different from all other courses due to severalreasons, for example, being a project work related only to the programme orientation andwithout an explicit course curriculum. In this project, we have followed students from theNatural Science Programme taking this course, and studied their interest, engagement andepistemic beliefs. Through observations, interviews, and questionnaires, we have foundtriggers important to emphasise to make students more engaged and interested to enhancetheir knowledge. We will, from both a teacher and researcher perspective, discuss this courserelated to both affective and cognitive variables.

  • 48.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Interaktiva medier och lärande (IML).
    Application of Digital Tools in Chemistry Education: Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Gamification2019Inngår i: 2019 ESERA, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In a politician-decided top-down implementation of digital tools into the school curricula, chemistry education researchers and teacher educators try to develop relevant and meaningful digital tools possible to use to increase students’ learning. To exemplify and explore the impact of digital tools on students’ learning processes, two chemistry education projects are discussed in this presentation. When are digital tools applicable to enhance learning and how should teachers embed and frame this application of the digital tools? The projects present how Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR) and gamification can be used to enhance students’ perceived interest and value.

  • 49.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Digital Tools in Chemistry Education - Virtual/Augmented Reality & Gamification2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is a digital boom within education, in Sweden all school curricula are re-written where use of digital tools has been added as mandatory in all subject syllabi from the autumn of 2018. This has made teachers, as well as educational researchers, interested to find relevant digital tools where students enhance their learning, not only finding them fun and exciting. In this presentation, the role of technologies as Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR) and gamification is explored to study how students learn chemistry, both regarding affective as well as cognitive aspects of learning [1]. Students’ perceived interest and value are studied using Krapp and Prenzel’s framework of interest [2] and Wenger and colleagues framework of value creation in communities and networks [3]. Part of the interest in VR technology has to do with the availability when a smartphone can be converted to a VR headset at a very low cost. AR technology is much more complicated and expensive, however, the multiple sensory modalities makes it interesting [4]. Gamification in the classroom, where application of game-design in learning processes, has recently attracted a lot of attention [5]. The main aim with gamification is to enhance students’ internal motivation through for example clues and possibilities to “level-up”.

    To explore how digital tools influence students learning, we will present two projects. The first is a university organic chemistry course where students practice their spatial competence using VR as a tool to visualise stereochemistry. The students study stereoisomers (for example simple molecules as 2-chlorobutane and more complex stereoisomers as muscarine and nicotine) and we have studied their perceived interest and value of the digital tools using a survey, interviews and observations. In the second project, engineering students have developed a teaching module for upper secondary chemistry using gamification, VR and AR as a way to motivate school students to learn about the protein synthesis. Here, we have conducted a survey and interviews with both the engineering students who developed the module, as well with the school students and teachers who have used the module. In the presentation, possibilities and challenges with the digital tools will be discussed, and examples for practice will be demonstrated.

  • 50.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Virtual reality i kemiundervisningen: hur kan man arbeta med digitalisering?2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
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