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  • 1.
    Islam, Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Identification and evaluation of antiviral compounds targeting Rift Valley fever virus2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a negative-stranded RNA virus, is the etiological agent of the vector-borne zoonotic disease Rift Valley fever (RVF). RVFV causes significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. RVFV is an emerging virus and is capable of infecting a broad range of mosquito species distributed around the world, so it poses a potential threat globally. A wide range of livestock animals (e.g. sheep, goats, cows, and camels) and some wild animals become highly affected by RVFV. In humans, RVFV infection presents as an acute self-limiting febrile illness that may lead to more severe hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis. The severity of the disease is mostly dependent on age and the species of mammal, but other factors are also important.

    There are no licensed RVFV vaccines for humans, and there is a lack of effective antiviral drugs. Moreover, due to the severe pathogenicity, higher-level facilities are needed―biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) or more―to work with RVFV, which makes antiviral drug development more challenging. Because RVFV causes severe disease in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, and has the potential to spread globally, it is essential that safe, efficient antiviral drugs against this virus are developed.

    The previously reported antiviral compound benzavir-2 inhibits the replication of several DNA viruses, i.e. human adenoviruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, and HSV type 2, indicating a broadranging activity. We wanted to evaluate whether benzavir-2 had an effect against the RNA virus RVFV. For these and subsequent studies, we used a recombinant, modified RVFV strain with a deleted NSs gene, which was replaced by a reporter gene (rRVFVΔNSs::Katushka), enabling the studies to be conducted under BSL-2 conditions. The NSs gene is the main virulence factor for RVFV and without it, RVFV become less pathogenic. The reporter gene made it possible for us to quantify infection with the help of the red fluorescent protein. We found that benzavir-2 effectively inhibited RVFV infection in cell culture at an effective concentration showing 50% inhibition (EC50) of 0.6 μM. Benzavir-2 also inhibited the production of progeny virus. When we studied the pharmacokinetic properties, we found that benzavir-2 had good in vitro solubility, permeability, and metabolic stability. When we investigated the oral bioavailability in mice by administering benzavir-2 in peanut butter pellets, high systemic distribution was observed without any adverse toxic effects. Benzavir-2 thus inhibited RVFV infection in cell culture and showed excellent pharmacokinetic properties, suggesting the possibility of evaluating its effectiveness in an animal model. Since benzavir-2 has a broad effect against both RNA and DNA viruses, we speculated that the antiviral mechanism affects cellular targets.

    We also wanted to explore a large number of small chemical compounds with unknown properties and identify any anti-RVFV activities. Thus, we developed a whole-cell-based high-throughput reporter-based assay, and screened 28,437 small chemical compounds. The assay was established after optimization of several parameters. After primary and secondary screening, we identified 63 compounds that inhibited RVFV infection by 60% at a concentration of 3.12 μM and showed ≥ 50% cell viability at 25 μM. After a dose-dependent screening of these 63 compounds, several compounds were identified with highly efficient anti-RVFV properties. Finally, N1-(2-(biphenyl-4-yloxy)ethyl)propane-1,3-diamine (compound 1) was selected as the lead compound. We performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of compound 1 by replacing and changing component after component of the chemical compound to see how this affected the antiviral activity. After the SAR analysis, the antiviral activity did not change, but we could improve the cytotoxicity profile. Our studies suggested that the improved compound, 13a, might be targeting the early phase of the RVFV lifecycle.

    In conclusion, we developed an efficient and reliable screening method that creates possibilities for discovering and developing antivirals against RVFV under BSL-2 conditions. We also identified several chemical compounds with anti-RVFV activities, which might lead to development of therapies for RVFV infection.

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  • 2.
    Islam, Koushikul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Carlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Qian, Weixing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marttila, Marko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Structural Modifications and Biological Evaluations of Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibitors Identified from Chemical Library Screening2022In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 6854-6868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging high-priority pathogen endemic in Africa with pandemic potential. There is no specific treatment or approved antiviral drugs for the RVFV. We previously developed a cell-based high-throughput assay to screen small molecules targeting the RVFV and identified a potential effective antiviral compound (1-N-(2-(biphenyl-4-yloxy)ethyl)propane-1,3-diamine) as a lead compound. Here, we investigated how structural modifications of the lead compound affected the biological properties and the antiviral effect against the RVFV. We found that the length of the 2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl chain of the compound was important for the compound to retain its antiviral activity. The antiviral activity was similar when the 2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl chain was replaced with a butyl piperazine chain. However, we could improve the cytotoxicity profile of the lead compound by changing the phenyl piperazine linker from the para-position (compound 9a) to the meta-position (compound 13a). Results from time-of-addition studies suggested that compound 13a might be active during virus post-entry and/or the replication phase of the virus life cycle and seemed to affect the K+ channel. The modifications improved the properties of our lead compound, and our data suggest that 13a is a promising candidate to evaluate further as a therapeutic agent for RVFV infection.

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  • 3.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Öberg, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Habjan, Matthias
    Weber, Friedemann
    Överby, Anna K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    High-Throughput Screening Using a Whole-Cell Virus Replication Reporter Gene Assay to Identify Inhibitory Compounds against Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection2016In: Journal of Biomolecular Screening, ISSN 1087-0571, E-ISSN 1552-454X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 354-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging virus that causes serious illness in humans and livestock. There are no approved vaccines or treatments for humans. The purpose of the study was to identify inhibitory compounds of RVFV infection without any preconceived idea of the mechanism of action. A whole-cell-based high-throughput drug screening assay was developed to screen 28,437 small chemical compounds targeting RVFV infection. To accomplish both speed and robustness, a replication-competent NSs-deleted RVFV expressing a fluorescent reporter gene was developed. Inhibition of fluorescence intensity was quantified by spectrophotometry and related to virus infection in human lung epithelial cells (A549). Cell toxicity was assessed by the Resazurin cell viability assay. After primary screening, 641 compounds were identified that inhibited RVFV infection by 80%, with 50% cell viability at 50 mu M concentration. These compounds were subjected to a second screening regarding dose-response profiles, and 63 compounds with 60% inhibition of RVFV infection at 3.12 mu M compound concentration and 50% cell viability at 25 mu M were considered hits. Of these, six compounds with high inhibitory activity were identified. In conclusion, the high-throughput assay could efficiently and safely identify several promising compounds that inhibited RVFV infection.

  • 4.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Carlsson, M
    Enquist, PA
    Qian, W
    Ahlm, C
    Evander, M
    Structural modifications and biological evaluations of Rift Valleyfever virus inhibitors identified from chemical library screeningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Saleeb, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Svensson, Richard
    Baranczewski, Pawel
    Artursson, Per
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Anti-Rift Valley fever virus activity in vitro, pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of benzavir-2, a broad-acting antiviral compound2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne hemorrhagic fever virus affecting both humans and animals with severe morbidity and mortality and is classified as a potential bioterror agent due to the possible aerosol transmission. At present there is no human vaccine or antiviral therapy available. Thus, there is a great need to develop new antivirals for treatment of RVFV infections. Benzavir-2 was previously identified as potent inhibitor of human adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, and type 2. Here we assess the anti-RVFV activity of benzavir-2 together with four structural analogs and determine pre-clinical pharmacokinetic parameters of benzavir-2. In vitro, benzavir-2 efficiently inhibited RVFV infection, viral RNA production and production of progeny viruses. In vitro, benzavir-2 displayed satisfactory solubility, good permeability and metabolic stability. In mice, benzavir-2 displayed oral bioavailability with adequate maximum serum concentration. Oral administration of benzavir-2 formulated in peanut butter pellets gave high systemic exposure without any observed toxicity in mice. To summarize, our data demonstrated potent anti-RVFV activity of benzavir-2 in vitro together with a promising pre-clinical pharmacokinetic profile. This data support further exploration of the antiviral activity of benzavir-2 in in vivo efficacy models that may lead to further drug development for human use.

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  • 6. Kirui, Jared
    et al.
    Abidine, Yara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Lenman, Annasara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, TWINCORE, Institute for Experimental Virology, a Joint Venture between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Yong-Dae, Gwon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lasswitz, Lisa
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Bally, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Gerold, Gisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, TWINCORE, Institute for Experimental Virology, a Joint Venture between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    The Phosphatidylserine Receptor TIM-1 Enhances Authentic Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry2021In: Cells, E-ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 1828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging, mosquito-transmitted, enveloped positive stranded RNA virus. Chikungunya fever is characterized by acute and chronic debilitating arthritis. Although multiple host factors have been shown to enhance CHIKV infection, the molecular mechanisms of cell entry and entry factors remain poorly understood. The phosphatidylserine-dependent receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (Axl), are transmembrane proteins that can serve as entry factors for enveloped viruses. Previous studies used pseudoviruses to delineate the role of TIM-1 and Axl in CHIKV entry. Conversely, here, we use the authentic CHIKV and cells ectopically expressing TIM-1 or Axl and demonstrate a role for TIM-1 in CHIKV infection. To further characterize TIM-1-dependent CHIKV infection, we generated cells expressing domain mutants of TIM-1. We show that point mutations in the phosphatidylserine binding site of TIM-1 lead to reduced cell binding, entry, and infection of CHIKV. Ectopic expression of TIM-1 renders immortalized keratinocytes permissive to CHIKV, whereas silencing of endogenously expressed TIM-1 in human hepatoma cells reduces CHIKV infection. Altogether, our findings indicate that, unlike Axl, TIM-1 readily promotes the productive entry of authentic CHIKV into target cells.

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  • 7. Näslund, Jonas
    et al.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Bucht, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lwande, Olivia Wesula
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Emerging Mosquito-Borne Viruses Linked to Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: Global Status and Preventive Strategies2021In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 731-746Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging mosquito-borne viruses continue to cause serious health problems and economic burden among billions of people living in and near the tropical belt of the world. The highly invasive mosquito species Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have successively invaded and expanded their presence as key vectors of Chikungunya virus, dengue virus, yellow fever virus, and Zika virus, and that has consecutively led to frequent outbreaks of the corresponding viral diseases. Of note, these two mosquito species have gradually adapted to the changing weather and environmental conditions leading to a shift in the epidemiology of the viral diseases, and facilitated their establishment in new ecozones inhabited by immunologically naive human populations. Many abilities of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, as vectors of significant arbovirus pathogens, may affect the infection and transmission rates after a bloodmeal, and may influence the vector competence for either virus. We highlight that many collaborating risk factors, for example, the global transportation systems may result in sporadic and more local outbreaks caused by mosquito-borne viruses related to Ae. aegypti and/or Ae. albopictus. Those local outbreaks could in synergy grow and produce larger epidemics with pandemic characters. There is an urgent need for improved surveillance of vector populations, human cases, and reliable prediction models. In summary, we recommend new and innovative strategies for the prevention of these types of infections.

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  • 8.
    Strand, Mårten
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Carlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Uvell, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Islam, Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Cullman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Altermark, Björn
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Willassen, Nils-Peder
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Isolation and characterization of anti-adenoviral secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria2014In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 799-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

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  • 9.
    Strand, Mårten
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Islam, Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Öberg, Christopher T
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Bergström, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Virol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    2-[4,5-Difluoro-2-(2-fluorobenzoylamino)-benzoylamino]benzoic acid, an antiviral compound with activity against acyclovir-resistant isolates of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 22012In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 56, no 11, p. 5735-5743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are responsible for life-long latent infections in humans, with periods of viral reactivation associated with recurring ulcerations in the orofacial and genital tract. In immunosuppressed patients and neonates, HSV infections are associated with severe morbidity, and in some cases even mortality. Today, acyclovir is the standard therapy for management of HSV infections. However, the need for novel antiviral agents is apparent since HSV isolates resistant to acyclovir therapy are frequently isolated in immunosuppressed patients. In this study, we assessed the anti-HSV activity of the anti-adenoviral compounds 2-[2-(2-benzoylamino)-benzoylamino]benzoic acid, (Benzavir-1) and 2-[4,5-difluoro-2-(2-fluorobenzoylamino)-benzoylamino]benzoic acid, (Benzavir-2) on HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both compounds were active against both viruses. Importantly, Benzavir-2 had similar potency to acyclovir against both HSV types and it was active against clinical acyclovir-resistant HSV isolates.

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  • 10.
    Zapatero-Belinchón, Francisco J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Moeller, Rebecca
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Lasswitz, Lisa
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    van Ham, Marco
    Cellular Proteome Research Group, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Becker, Miriam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany.
    Brogden, Graham
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Rosendal, Ebba
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. The Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS), Umeå, Sweden.
    Bi, Wenjie
    Cellular Proteome Research Group, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Carriquí-Madroñal, Belén
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Islam, Md. Koushikul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Lenman, Annasara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Gunesch, Antonia P.
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Hannover, Germany.
    Kirui, Jared
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Pietschmann, Thomas
    Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Hannover, Germany.
    Överby, Anna K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Jänsch, Lothar
    Cellular Proteome Research Group, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Gerold, Gisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, A Joint Venture Between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany; Department of Biochemistry & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Fluvastatin mitigates SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung cells2021In: iScience, E-ISSN 2589-0042, Vol. 24, no 12, article id 103469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical data of patients suffering from COVID-19 indicates that statin therapy, used to treat hypercholesterolemia, is associated with a better disease outcome. Whether statins directly affect virus replication or influence the clinical outcome through modulation of immune responses is unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of statins on SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung cells and found that only fluvastatin inhibited low and high pathogenic coronaviruses in vitro and ex vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative proteomics revealed that fluvastatin and other tested statins modulated the cholesterol synthesis pathway without altering innate antiviral immune responses in infected lung epithelial cells. However, fluvastatin treatment specifically downregulated proteins that modulate protein translation and viral replication. Collectively, these results support the notion that statin therapy poses no additional risk to individuals exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and that fluvastatin has a moderate beneficial effect on SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lung cells.

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