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  • 1.
    Alharbi, Adel F.
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; Medina Regional Laboratory, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Medina, Saudi Arabia.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Nicol, Katie
    Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Hollox, Edward J.
    Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Balancing selection at the human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) driven by host-microbe interactions2022Ingår i: iScience, E-ISSN 2589-0042 , Vol. 25, nr 5, artikel-id 104189Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Discovering loci under balancing selection in humans can identify loci with alleles that affect response to the environment and disease. Genome variation data have identified the 5′ region of the DMBT1 gene as undergoing balancing selection in humans. DMBT1 encodes the pattern-recognition glycoprotein DMBT1, also known as SALSA, gp340, or salivary agglutinin. DMBT1 binds to a variety of pathogens through a tandemly arranged scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain, with the number of domains polymorphic in humans. We show that the signal of balancing selection is driven by one haplotype usually carrying a shorter SRCR repeat and another usually carrying a longer SRCR repeat. DMBT1 encoded by a shorter SRCR repeat allele does not bind a cariogenic and invasive Streptococcus mutans strain, in contrast to the long SRCR allele that shows binding. Our results suggest that balancing selection at DMBT1 is due to host-microbe interactions of encoded SRCR tandem repeat alleles.

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  • 2. Barman, Malin
    et al.
    Murray, Fiona
    Bernardi, Angelina I.
    Broberg, Karin
    Bölte, Sven
    Hesselmar, Bill
    Jacobsson, Bo
    Jonsson, Karin
    Kippler, Maria
    Rabe, Hardis
    Ross, Alastair B.
    Sjöberg, Fei
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Vahter, Marie
    Wold, Agnes E.
    Sandberg, Ann-Sofie
    Sandin, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik. Sunderby Research Unit, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment (NICE): a prospective birth cohort in northern Sweden2018Ingår i: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, nr 10, artikel-id e022013Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Prenatal and neonatal environmental factors, such as nutrition, microbes and toxicants, may affect health throughout life. Many diseases, such as allergy and impaired child development, may be programmed already in utero or during early infancy. Birth cohorts are important tools to study associations between early life exposure and disease risk. Here, we describe the study protocol of the prospective birth cohort, 'Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment' (NICE). The primary aim of the NICE cohort is to clarify the effect of key environmental exposures-diet, microbes and environmental toxicants-during pregnancy and early childhood, on the maturation of the infant's immune system, including initiation of sensitisation and allergy as well as some secondary outcomes: infant growth, obesity, neurological development and oral health. Methods and analysis The NICE cohort will recruit about 650 families during mid-pregnancy. The principal inclusion criterion will be planned birth at the Sunderby Hospital in the north of Sweden, during 2015-2018. Questionnaires data and biological samples will be collected at 10 time-points, from pregnancy until the children reach 4 years of age. Samples will be collected primarily from mothers and children, and from fathers. Biological samples include blood, urine, placenta, breast milk, meconium, faeces, saliva and hair. Information regarding allergic heredity, diet, socioeconomic status, lifestyle including smoking, siblings, pet ownership, etc will be collected using questionnaires. Sensitisation to common allergens will be assessed by skin prick testing and allergic disease will be diagnosed by a paediatrician at 1 and 4 years of age. At 4 years of age, the children will also be examined regarding growth, neurobehavioural and neurophysiological status and oral health. Ethics and dissemination The NICE cohort has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Umea, Sweden (2013/18-31M). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and communicated on scientific conferences.

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  • 3.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik. Swedish Defence Research Agency, 906 21 Umeå, Sweden.
    Chernov, Yevgen A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK.
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Ilver, Dag
    Moonens, Kristof
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Koeniger, Verena
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för medicin.
    Liu, Hui
    Goldman, Matthew D.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Younson, Justine
    Kelly, Charles G.
    Gilman, Robert H.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.
    Nair, G. Balakrish
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Unemo, Magnus
    Danielsson, Dan
    Suerbaum, Sebastian
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Eldridge, Angela M.
    Chromy, Brett A.
    Hansen, Lori M.
    Solnick, Jay V.
    Linden, Sara K.
    Haas, Rainer
    Dubois, Andre
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik.
    Remaut, Han
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Berg, Douglas E.
    Boren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence2017Ingår i: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 376-389Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  • 4.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Chernov, Yevgen A
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK..
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Department of Pathology, Medical Institute, State University, Sumy, Ukraine.
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Université de Strasbourg, Institut de Chimie, Strasbourg, France.
    Moonens, Kristof
    Structural and Molecular Microbiology, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Belgium.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik. FOI Totalförsvarets Forskningsinstitut, Umeå, Sweden..
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Königer, Verena
    Max von Pettenkofer Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, LMU, Munich, Germany.
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Ilver, Dag
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Liu, Hui
    Department of Medicine, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Goldman, Matthew
    Department of Pediatrics, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, USUHS, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Kelly, Charles G
    King's College London, Dental Institute, London, UK.
    Gilman, Robert H
    Department of International Health, John Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Centre for Liver Research, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education & Research, Kolkata, India.
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K
    Division of Bacteriology, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Kolkata, India.
    Nair, Balakrish G
    Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Haryana, India.
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Dan
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sebastian, Suerbaum
    Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Epidemiology Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology, School of Chemistry, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Eldridge, Angela
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Chromy, Brett A
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Hansen, Lori
    Departments of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    Solnick, Jay
    Departments of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    Haas, Rainer
    Max von Pettenkofer Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad fysik och elektronik.
    Lindén, Sara K
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dubois, Andre
    Department of Medicine, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Remaut, Han
    Structural and Molecular Microbiology, VIB Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Berg, Douglas E
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Acid Responsive Helicobacter pylori Adherence: Implications for Chronic Infection and DiseaseManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 5.
    Drobni, Mirva
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hallberg, K
    Öhman, Ulla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Persson, Karina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Sequence analyses of fimbriae subunit FimA proteins on Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and Actinomyces odontolyticus with variant carbohydrate binding specificities.2006Ingår i: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 43, nr 6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 express type-2 fimbriae (FimA subunit polymers) with variant Galbeta binding specificities and Actinomyces odontolyticus a sialic acid specificity to colonize different oral surfaces. However, the fimbrial nature of the sialic acid binding property and sequence information about FimA proteins from multiple strains are lacking. RESULTS: Here we have sequenced fimA genes from strains of A.naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 4) and genospecies 2 (n = 4), both of which harboured variant Galbeta-dependent hemagglutination (HA) types, and from A.odontolyticus PK984 with a sialic acid-dependent HA pattern. Three unique subtypes of FimA proteins with 63.8-66.4% sequence identity were present in strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and A. odontolyticus. The generally high FimA sequence identity (> 97.2%) within a genospecies revealed species specific sequences or segments that coincided with binding specificity. All three FimA protein variants contained a signal peptide, pilin motif, E box, proline-rich segment and an LPXTG sorting motif among other conserved segments for secretion, assembly and sorting of fimbrial proteins. The highly conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs are present in fimbriae proteins from other Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, only strains of genospecies 1 were agglutinated with type-2 fimbriae antisera derived from A. naeslundii genospecies 1 strain 12104, emphasizing that the overall folding of FimA may generate different functionalities. Western blot analyses with FimA antisera revealed monomers and oligomers of FimA in whole cell protein extracts and a purified recombinant FimA preparation, indicating a sortase-independent oligomerization of FimA. CONCLUSION: The genus Actinomyces involves a diversity of unique FimA proteins with conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs, depending on subspecies and associated binding specificity. In addition, a sortase independent oligomerization of FimA subunit proteins in solution was indicated.

  • 6.
    Drobni, Mirva
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Li, Tong
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Krüger, Karina
    Loimaranta, Vuokko
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Kilian, Mogens
    Hammarström, Lennart
    Jörnvall, Hans
    Bergman, Tomas
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    A host-derived pentapeptide enhancing host-bacteria commensalisms and communication2006Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 74, nr 11, s. 6293-6299Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) attach commensal Actinomyces and Streptococcus species to teeth. Here, gel filtration, mass spectrometry and Edman degradation were applied to show the release of a pentapeptide, RGRPQ, from PRP-1 upon proteolysis by Streptococcus gordond. Moreover, synthetic RGRPQ and derivatives were used to investigate associated innate properties and responsible motifs. The RGRPQ peptide increased 2.5-fold the growth rate of S. gordonii via a Q-dependent sequence motif and selectively stimulated oral colonization of this organism in a rat model in vivo. In contrast, the growth of Streptococcus mutans, implicated in caries, was not affected. While the entire RGRPQ sequence was required to block sucrose-induced pH-decrease by S. gordonii and S. mutans, the N-terminal Arg residue mediated the pH increase (i.e., ammonia production) by S. gordonii alone (which exhibits Arg catabolism to ammonia). Strains of commensal viridans streptococci exhibited PR-P degradation and Arg catabolism, whereas cariogenic species did not. The RGRPQ peptide mediated via a differential Q-dependent sequence motif, adhesion inhibition, and desorption of PRP-1-binding strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 2 (5 of 10 strains) but not of S. gordonii (n = 5). The inhibitable A. naeslundii strains alone displayed the same binding profile as S. gordond to hybrid peptides terminating in RGRPQ or GQSPQ, derived from the middle or C-terminal segments of PRP-1. The present findings indicate the presence of a host-bacterium interaction in which a host peptide released by bacterial proteolysis affects key properties in biofilm formation.

  • 7.
    Drobni, Mirva
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi.
    Olsson, Ing-Marie
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Kemi.
    Eriksson, Christer
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Kemi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Multivariate design and evaluation of a set of RGRPQ-derived innate immunity peptides2006Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, nr 22, s. 15164-15171Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii proteolytically cleave the salivary PRP-1 polypeptide into an RGRPQ innate peptide. The Arg and Gln termini are crucial for RGRPQ-mediated ammonia production and proliferation by S. gordonii SK12 and adhesion inhibition and desorption by Actinomyces naeslundii T14V, respectively. Here we have applied (i) a multivariate approach using RGRPQ-related peptides varied at amino acids 2, 3, and 4 simultaneously and (ii) size and N- and C-terminal modifications of RGRPQ to generate structure activity information. While the N-terminal arginine motif mediated ammonia production independent of peptide size, other responses required more or less full-length peptide motifs. The motifs for adhesion inhibition and desorption were the same. The adhesion and proliferation motifs required similarly a hydrophobic/low polarity amino acid 4 but differentially a hydrophilic or hydrophobic character of amino acids 2/3, respectively; polar peptides with small/hydrophilic and hydrophilic amino acids 2 and 3, respectively, had high adhesion inhibition/desorption activity, and lipophilic peptides with large/hydrophobic amino acids 2 and 3 had high proliferation activity. Accordingly, while RIWWQ had increased proliferation but abolished adhesion/desorption activity, peptides designed with hydrophilic amino acids 2 and 3 were predicted to behave in the opposite way. Moreover, a RGRPQ mimetic for all three responses should mimic small hydrophilic, large nitrogen-containing, and hydrophobic/low polarity amino acids 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Peptides fulfilling these criteria were 1-1.6-fold improved in all three responses. Thus, both mimetics and peptides with differential proliferation and adhesion activities may be generated for evaluation in biofilm models.

  • 8.
    Enerbäck, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Mai Lin
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Westerlund, Anna
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Public Dental Service, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Effect of high-fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse on the prevention of demineralized lesions during orthodontic treatment: a randomized controlled trial2023Ingår i: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 45, nr 5, s. 477-484Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of high-fluoride mouth rinse and high-fluoride toothpaste on the development of demineralized lesions (DLs) during orthodontic treatment.

    TRIAL DESIGN: Three-armed parallel-group randomized controlled trial.

    METHODS: The trial was performed with 270 adolescent orthodontic patients. Randomization was performed in blocks of 30, enrolling the patients into one of the following groups: the fluoride mouth rinse (FMR) group receiving 0.2% sodium fluoride (NaF) mouth rinse plus 1450 ppm fluoride (F) toothpaste; high-fluoride toothpaste (HFT) group receiving 5000 ppm F toothpaste; and the Control (CTR) group receiving 1450 ppm F toothpaste. Inclusion criteria were patients scheduled for treatment in both arches with fixed appliances and age between 12 and 20 years. The primary outcome variable was the proportion of participants with at least one new demineralized lesion as assessed on digital photos taken before and after treatment, analysed by a blinded clinician. The analysis included all teeth or teeth in the aesthetic zone, i.e. all central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines. A random sample of 30 participants was assessed to check intra- and inter-reliability. For pairwise comparison between groups, Fisher's non-parametric permutation test was used for continuous variables. Blinding was employed during the caries registration and data analysis.

    RECRUITMENT: October 2010 to December 2012.

    RESULTS: In total, 270 patients were randomized, of which 22 were excluded during treatment. Therefore, 248 participants were included in the study. The number of patients with an increase of ≥1 DL, including only central- and lateral incisors and canines, during orthodontic treatment, was significantly lower in the HFT group, 51/85 60%, compared to the CTR group, 64/82 78%, RR 0.77 (CI 0.62; 0.95), P = .01 and in the FMR group, 47/81 58%, compared to the CTR group, RR 0.74 (CI 0.60; 0.92), P < .01.

    CONCLUSIONS: To prevent demineralized lesions in the aesthetic zone, high-fluoride mouth rinse and high-fluoride toothpaste may be recommended.

    LIMITATIONS: The protocol was not registered, and the present study did not use a double-blinded design.

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  • 9.
    Eriksson, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Frängsmyr, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Danielsson Niemi, Liza
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Loimaranta, Vuokko
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Holmskov, U
    Bergman, T
    Leffler, H
    Jenkinson, HF
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Variant size- and glycoforms of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein gp-340 with differential bacterial aggregation2007Ingår i: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 24, nr 2-3, s. 131-142Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycoprotein gp-340 aggregates bacteria in saliva as part of innate defence at mucosal surfaces. We have detected size- and glycoforms of gp-340 between human saliva samples (n = 7) and lung gp-340 from a proteinosis patient using antibodies and lectins in Western blots and ELISA measurements. Western blots of saliva samples, and of gp-340 purified, from the seven donors using a gp-340 specific antibody distinguished four gp-340 size variants, designated I to IV (n = 2,2,2 and 1). While saliva gp-340 variants I to III had single bands of increasing sizes, variant IV and lung gp-340 had double bands. Purified I to IV proteins all revealed a N-terminal sequence TGGWIP upon Edman degradation. Moreover, purified gp-340 from the seven donors and lung gp-340 shared N-glycans, sialylated Galbeta1-3GalNAc and (poly)lactosamine structures. However, the larger size gp-340 grouping II/III (n = 4) and smaller size grouping I/IV correlated with a secretor, Se(+), and a non secretor, Se(-), dependent glycoform of gp-340, respectively (p = 0.03). The Se(+) glycoforms contained ABH, Le(b), Le(y) and polylactosamine structures, while the Se(-) glycoforms lacked ABH antigens but expressed Le(a), Le(x) and lactosamine structures. By contrast, lung gp-340 completely lacked ABH, Le(a/b), Le(x/y) or sLe(x) structures. Gp-340 and secretor typing of saliva from additional donors (n = 29) showed gp-340 glycoforms I to IV for 6, 16, 4 and 0 donors, respectively, and 3 non-typeable donors, and verified that gp-340 glycoforms I and II/III correlate with Se(-) and Se(+) phenotypes, respectively (p < 0.0001). The glycoforms of saliva and lung gp-340 mediated differential aggregation of Le(b)- (Helicobacter pylori), sialylpolylactosamine- (Streptococcus suis) or sialic acid- (Streptococcus mutans) binding bacteria. In conclusion, variant size- and glycoforms of gp-340 are expressed by different individuals and may modulate the biological properties of gp-340 pertinent to health and disease.

  • 10.
    Esberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Öhman, Ulla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Host and bacterial phenotype variation in adhesion of streptococcus mutans to matched human hosts2012Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 80, nr 11, s. 3869-3879Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The commensal pathogen Streptococcus mutans uses AgI/II adhesins to adhere to gp340 adsorbed on teeth. Here we analyzed isolates of S. mutans (n = 70 isolates) from caries and caries-free human extremes (n = 19 subjects) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), AgI/II full-length gene sequencing, and adhesion to parotid saliva matched from the strain donors (nested from a case-control sample of defined gp340 and acidic proline-rich protein [PRP] profiles). The concatenated MLST as well as AgI/II gene sequences showed unique sequence types between, and identical types within, the subjects. The matched adhesion levels ranged widely (40% adhesion range), from low to moderate to high, between subjects but were similar within subjects (or sequence types). In contrast, the adhesion avidity of the strains was narrow, normally distributed for high, moderate, or low adhesion reference saliva or pure gp340 regardless of the sequence type. The adhesion of S. mutans Ingbritt and matched isolates and saliva samples correlated (r = 0.929), suggesting that the host specify about four-fifths (r(2) = 0.86) of the variation in matched adhesion. Half of the variation in S. mutans Ingbritt adhesion to saliva from the caries cases-controls (n = 218) was explained by the primary gp340 receptor and PRP coreceptor composition. The isolates also varied, although less so, in adhesion to standardized saliva (18% adhesion range) and clustered into three major AgI/II groups (groups A, B-1, and B-2) due to two variable V-region segments and diverse AgI/II sequence types due to a set of single-amino-acid substitutions. Isolates with AgI/II type A versus types B-1 and B-2 tended to differ in gp340 binding avidity and qualitative adhesion profiles for saliva gp340 phenotypes. In conclusion, the host saliva phenotype plays a more prominent role in S. mutans adhesion than anticipated previously.

  • 11.
    Esberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Mårell, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Persson, Karina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Streptococcus Mutans Adhesin Biotypes that Match and Predict Individual Caries Development2017Ingår i: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 24, s. 205-215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental caries, which affects billions of people, is a chronic infectious disease that involves Streptococcus mutans, which is nevertheless a poor predictor of individual caries development. We therefore investigated if adhesin types of S.mutans with sucrose-independent adhesion to host DMBT1 (i.e. SpaP A, B or C) and collagen (i.e. Cnm, Cbm) match and predict individual differences in caries development. The adhesin types were measured in whole saliva by qPCR in 452 12-year-old Swedish children and related to caries at baseline and prospectively at a 5-year follow-up. Strains isolated from the children were explored for genetic and phenotypic properties. The presence of SpaP B and Cnm subtypes coincided with increased 5-year caries increment, and their binding to DMBT1 and saliva correlated with individual caries scores. The SpaP B subtypes are enriched in amino acid substitutions that coincided with caries and binding and specify biotypes of S. mutans with increased acid tolerance. The findings reveal adhesin subtypes of S. mutans that match and predict individual differences in caries development and provide a rationale for individualized oral care.

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  • 12. Hakkarainen, J
    et al.
    Toivanen, M
    Leinonen, A
    Frängsmyr, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Idrottsmedicin.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Lapinjoki, S
    Nassif, X
    Tikkanen-Kaukanen, C
    Human and bovine milk oligosaccharides inhibit Neisseria meningitidis pili attachment in vitro.2005Ingår i: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 135, nr 10, s. 2445-2448Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Milk oligosaccharides have been shown to interfere with adhesion of many pathogens to host mucosal surfaces. Characterization of the adhesion mechanisms of the bacteria to host cell surface is needed to develop novel functional food, infant formulas, and anti-infective drugs. Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis, a human specific pathogen causing meningitis and septicemia, is not completely understood but is mediated by type IV pili. Here, we developed a microtiter well pili binding assay to investigate the binding activities of N. meningitidis isolated type IV pili to different glycoproteins. Pili binding activities to bovine thyroglobulin and human salivary agglutinin but not to chicken ovalbumin were present. Inhibition of these binding activities was demonstrated by fractionated human or bovine milk oligosaccharides. The binding of neisserial pili to bovine thyroglobulin was most effective and was clearly inhibited by human milk neutral or bovine milk acidic oligosaccharides.

  • 13. Jakubovics, N.S.
    et al.
    Brittan , J.L.
    Kerrigan, S.
    Cox, D.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Jenkinson, H.F.
    Interactions of mitis group streptococci with sialic acid receptors2006Ingår i: International Congress Series 1289, Elsevier B.V. , 2006, s. 275-278Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The serine-rich repeat glycoprotein Hsa in Streptococcus gordonii Challis mediates bacterial cell interactions with fetuin, glycocalicin, fibronectin and human platelets. Different strains of S.gordonii vary markedly in their adhesion levels to sialylated proteins, while other mitis group streptococci have distinct patterns of recognition of sialylated or desialylated receptor oligosaccharides.  2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 14. Jakubovics, NS
    et al.
    Kerrigan, SW
    Nobbs, AH
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    van Dolleweerd, CJ
    Cox, DM
    Kelly, CG
    Jenkinson, HF
    Functions of cell surface-anchored antigen I/II family and Hsa polypeptides in interactions of Streptococcus gordonii with host receptors.2005Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 73, nr 10, s. 6629-6638Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Streptococcus gordonii colonizes multiple sites within the human oral cavity. This colonization depends upon the initial interactions of streptococcal adhesins with host receptors. The adhesins that bind salivary agglutinin glycoprotein (gp340) and human cell surface receptors include the antigen I/II (AgI/II) family polypeptides SspA and SspB and a sialic acid-binding surface protein designated Hsa or GspB. In this study we determined the relative functions of the AgI/II polypeptides and Hsa in interactions of S. gordonii DL1 (Challis) with host receptors. For an isogenic mutant with the sspA and sspB genes deleted the levels of adhesion to surface-immobilized gp340 were reduced 40%, while deletion of the hsa gene alone resulted in >80% inhibition of bacterial cell adhesion to gp340. Adhesion of S. gordonii DL1 cells to gp340 was sialidase sensitive, verifying that Hsa has a major role in mediating sialic acid-specific adhesion to gp340. Conversely, aggregation of S. gordonii cells by fluid-phase gp340 was not affected by deletion of hsa but was eliminated by deletion of the sspA and sspB genes. Deletion of the AgI/II polypeptide genes had no measurable effect on hsa mRNA levels or Hsa surface protein expression, and deletion of hsa did not affect AgI/II polypeptide expression. Further analysis of mutant phenotypes showed that the Hsa and AgI/II proteins mediated adhesion of S. gordonii DL1 to human HEp-2 epithelial cells. Hsa was also a principal streptococcal cell surface component promoting adhesion of human platelets to immobilized streptococci, but Hsa and AgI/II polypeptides acted in concert in mediating streptococcal cell-platelet aggregation. The results suggest that Hsa directs primary adhesion events for S. gordonii DL1 (Challis) with immobilized gp340, epithelial cells, and platelets. AgI/II polypeptides direct gp340-mediated aggregation, facilitate multimodal interactions necessary for platelet aggregation, and modulate S. gordonii-host engagements into biologically productive phenomena.

  • 15. Jakubovics, NS
    et al.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    van Dolleweerd, CJ
    Kelly, CG
    Jenkinson, HF
    Differential binding specificities of oral streptococcal antigen I/II family adhesins for human or bacterial ligands.2005Ingår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 55, nr 5, s. 1591-1605Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The antigen I/II (AgI/II) family polypeptides, ranging from 1310 to 1653 amino acid (aa) residues, are cell wall anchored adhesins expressed by most indigenous species of oral streptococci. The polypeptides interact with a wide range of host molecules, in particular salivary agglutinin glycoprotein (SAG or gp340), and with ligands on other oral bacteria. To determine the receptor recognition properties of six different AgI/II family polypeptides from strains of Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans, the genes were cloned and expressed on the surface of the surrogate host Lactococcus lactis. The S. gordonii SspA and SspB polypeptides mediated higher binding levels of L. lactis cells to surface immobilized gp340 than did S. intermedius Pas protein, or S. mutans SpaP or PAc proteins. However, the AgI/II proteins were all similar in their abilities to mediate aggregation of lactococci by fluid phase gp340. The SpaP(I) polypeptide from S. mutans Ingbritt, which was C-terminally truncated by approximately 400 aa residues, did not bind gp340. Lactococci expressing AgI/II proteins, including SpaP(I), were aggregated by a synthetic 16 aa residue peptide SRCRP2 derived from the aa repeat block sequences within gp340. In coaggregation assays, SspB from S. gordonii was unique in mediating coaggregation with only group A and group E strains of Actinomyces naeslundii. All the other AgI/II polypeptides mediated coaggregation with group C and group D strains of A. naeslundii. Analysis of chimeric protein constructs revealed that coaggregation specificity was determined by sequences within the N-terminal half of AgI/II protein. A synthetic peptide (20 aa residues), which defines a putative adhesion epitope within the C-terminal region of polypeptide, inhibited AgI/II-mediated aggregation by gp340 but did not affect coaggregation with A. naeslundii. These results suggest that different mechanisms operate in interactions of AgI/II family polypeptides with native gp340, gp340 SRCR domain peptide, and A. naeslundii. Specificity of these interactions appears to be determined by discontinuous but interacting regions of the polypeptides, thus providing flexibility in receptor recognition for streptococcal colonization of the human host.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Bratt, P
    Hay, DI
    Schluckebier, S
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Adhesion of Candida albicans, but not Candida krusei, to salivary statherin and mimicking host molecules2000Ingår i: Oral Microbiology and Immunology, ISSN 0902-0055, E-ISSN 1399-302X, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 112-118Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify salivary molecules affecting adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida krusei to salivary pellicles and epithelial cells. Strains of C. albicans (GDH18, GDH3339, CA1957, ATCC 28366 and ATCC 10321), but not C. krusei (strains ATCC 14243 and Ck9), bound to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and buccal epithelial cells. Parotid saliva fractions containing statherin, glycosylated proline-rich proteins (PRP) and as yet unidentified components mediated adhesion of strain GDH18; Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-4Glc partly inhibited the adhesion to those fractions not containing statherin. Pure statherin, but not PRP-1, mediated dose-dependent adhesion of C. albicans strain GDH18 to hydroxyapatite beads. Candida isolates (GDH18, GDH3339 and CA1957) bound somewhat more avidly to statherin/saliva relative to ATCC strains 28366 and 10321, while the opposite was true for adhesion to buccal epithelial cells. Adhesion of C. albicans strain GDH18 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and buccal epithelial cells was completely (93%) and partly (43%) blocked by statherin-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, respectively. Control IgG antibodies did not block Candida adhesion. Blockage of Candida adhesion to epithelial cells also occurred with Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-4Glc (49%) and N-acetylglucosamine (38%), while statherin specific IgG antibodies in combination with Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-4Glc almost completely eliminated Candida adhesion (79%). In addition, statherin in solution blocked the adhesion of strain GDH18 to epithelial cells by inducing aggregation of Candida cells.

  • 17.
    Jonasson, Anette
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Eriksson, C
    Jenkinson, HF
    Källestål, C
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Innate immunity glycoprotein gp-340 variants may modulate human susceptibility to dental caries2007Ingår i: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 11, nr 7, s. 57-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial adhesion is an important determinant of colonization and infection, including dental caries. The salivary scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein gp-340, which mediates adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (implicated in caries), harbours three major size variants, designated gp-340 I to III, each specific to an individual saliva. Here we have examined the association of the gp-340 I to III polymorphisms with caries experience and adhesion of S. mutans. METHODS: A case-referent study was performed in 12-year-old Swedish children with high (n = 19) or low (n = 19) caries experiences. We measured the gp-340 I to III saliva phenotypes and correlated those with multiple outcome measures for caries experience and saliva adhesion of S. mutans using the partial least squares (PLS) multivariate projection technique. In addition, we used traditional statistics and 2-year caries increment to verify the established PLS associations, and bacterial adhesion to purified gp-340 I to III proteins to support possible mechanisms. RESULTS: All except one subject were typed as gp-340 I to III (10, 23 and 4, respectively). The gp-340 I phenotype correlated positively with caries experience (VIP = 1.37) and saliva adhesion of S. mutans Ingbritt (VIP = 1.47). The gp-340 II and III phenotypes tended to behave in the opposite way. Moreover, the gp-340 I phenotype tended to show an increased 2-year caries increment compared to phenotypes II/III. Purified gp-340 I protein mediated markedly higher adhesion of S. mutans strains Ingbritt and NG8 and Lactococcus lactis expressing AgI/II adhesins (SpaP or PAc) compared to gp-340 II and III proteins. In addition, the gp-340 I protein appeared over represented in subjects positive for Db, an allelic acidic PRP variant associated with caries, and subjects positive for both gp-340 I and Db tended to experience more caries than those negative for both proteins. CONCLUSION: Gp-340 I behaves as a caries susceptibility protein.

  • 18. Jonsson, AP
    et al.
    Griffiths, WJ
    Bratt, P
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Jörnvall, H
    Bergman, T
    A novel Ser O-glucuronidation in acidic proline-rich proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry.2000Ingår i: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 475, nr 2, s. 131-4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human acidic proline-rich salivary protein PRP-1 and its C-terminally truncated form PRP-3 were analyzed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Post-translational modifications were detected and characterized. A pyroglutamic acid residue was demonstrated at the N-terminus, Ser-8 and Ser-22 were shown to be phosphorylated and an O-linked glucuronic acid conjugation was identified. The latter modification was located to Ser-17 and found to be present in approximately 40% of the polypeptides.

  • 19. Li, T
    et al.
    Bratt, P
    Jonsson, AP
    Ryberg, M
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Griffiths, WJ
    Bergman, T
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Possible release of an ArgGlyArgProGln pentapeptide with innate immunity properties from acidic proline-rich proteins by proteolytic activity in commensal streptococcus and actinomyces species.2000Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 68, nr 9, s. 5425-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study suggests degradation of salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) into potential innate-immunity-like peptides by oral Streptococcus and Actinomyces species. PRP degradation paralleled cleavage of Pro-containing substrates. PRP degradation by S. gordonii strain SK12 instantly released a Pyr(1)-Pro(104)Pro(105) and a Gly(111)-Pro(149)Gln(150) peptide together with a presumed Arg(106)Gly(107)Arg(108)Pro(109)Gln(110) pentapeptide. The synthetic Arg(106)Gly(107)Arg(108)Pro(109)Gln(110) peptide desorbed bound bacteria and counteracted sucrose-induced decrease of dental plaque pH in vitro.

  • 20. Li, T
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hay, DI
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strains of Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus exhibit structurally variant fimbrial subunit proteins and bind to different peptide motifs in salivary proteins.1999Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 67, nr 5, s. 2053-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral strains of Actinomyces spp. express type 1 fimbriae, which are composed of major FimP subunits, and bind preferentially to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (APRPs) or to statherin. We have mapped genetic differences in the fimP subunit genes and the peptide recognition motifs within the host proteins associated with these differential binding specificities. The fimP genes were amplified by PCR from Actinomyces viscosus ATCC 19246, with preferential binding to statherin, and from Actinomyces naeslundii LY7, P-1-K, and B-1-K, with preferential binding to APRPs. The fimP gene from the statherin-binding strain 19246 is novel and has about 80% nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity to the highly conserved fimP genes of the APRP-binding strains (about 98 to 99% sequence identity). The novel FimP protein contains an amino-terminal signal peptide, randomly distributed single-amino-acid substitutions, and structurally different segments and ends with a cell wall-anchoring and a membrane-spanning region. When agarose beads with CNBr-linked host determinant-specific decapeptides were used, A. viscosus 19246 bound to the Thr42Phe43 terminus of statherin and A. naeslundii LY7 bound to the Pro149Gln150 termini of APRPs. Furthermore, while the APRP-binding A. naeslundii strains originate from the human mouth, A. viscosus strains isolated from the oral cavity of rat and hamster hosts showed preferential binding to statherin and contained the novel fimP gene. Thus, A. viscosus and A. naeslundii display structurally variant fimP genes whose protein products are likely to interact with different peptide motifs and to determine animal host tropism.

  • 21. Li, T
    et al.
    Khah, MK
    Slavnic, S
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Different type 1 fimbrial genes and tropisms of commensal and potentially pathogenic Actinomyces spp. with different salivary acidic proline-rich protein and statherin ligand specificities.2001Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 69, nr 12, s. 7224-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Actinomyces spp. exhibit type 1 fimbria-mediated adhesion to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and statherin ligands. Actinomyces spp. with different animal and tissue origins belong to three major adhesion types as relates to ligand specificity and type 1 fimbria genes. (i) In preferential acidic-PRP binding, strains of Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 from human and monkey mouths displayed at least three ligand specificities characterized by preferential acidic-PRP binding. Slot blot DNA hybridization showed seven highly conserved type 1 fimbria genes (orf1- to -6 and fimP) in genospecies 1 and 2 strains, except that orf5 and orf3 were divergent in genospecies 1. (ii) In preferential statherin binding, oral Actinomyces viscosus strains of rat and hamster origin (and strain 19246 from a human case of actinomycosis) bound statherin preferentially. DNA hybridization and characterization of the type 1 fimbria genes from strain 19246 revealed a homologous gene cluster of four open reading frames (orfA to -C and fimP). Bioinformatics suggested sortase (orfB, orf4, and part of orf5), prepilin peptidase (orfC and orf6), fimbria subunit (fimP), and usher- and autotransporter-like (orfA and orf1 to -3) functions. Those gene regions corresponding to orf3 and orf5 were divergent, those corresponding to orf2, orf1, and fimP were moderately conserved, and those corresponding to orf4 and orf6 were highly conserved. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses using a fimP probe separated human and monkey and rat and hamster strains into phylogenetically different groups. (iii) In statherin-specific binding, strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 from septic and other human infections displayed a low-avidity binding to statherin. Only the orf4 and orf6 gene regions were highly conserved. Finally, rat saliva devoid of statherin bound bacterial strains avidly irrespective of ligand specificity, and specific antisera detected either type 1, type 2, or both types of fimbria on the investigated Actinomyces strains.

  • 22.
    Loimaranta, V
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Jakubovics, NS
    Hytönen, J
    Finne, J
    Jenkinson, HF
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Fluid- or surface-phase human salivary scavenger protein gp340 exposes different bacterial recognition properties.2005Ingår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 73, nr 4, s. 2245-2252Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein gp340 aggregates streptococci and other bacteria as part of the host innate defense system at mucosal surfaces. In this article, we have investigated the properties of fluid-phase gp340 and hydroxylapatite surface-adsorbed gp340 in aggregation and adherence, respectively, of viridans group streptococci (e.g., Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans), non-viridans group streptococci (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus suis), and oral Actinomyces. Fluid-phase gp340 and surface-phase gp340 bioforms were differentially recognized by streptococci, which formed three phenotypic groupings according to their modes of interaction with gp340. Group I streptococci were aggregated by and adhered to gp340, and group II streptococci preferentially adhered to surface-bound gp340, while group III streptococci were preferentially aggregated by gp340. Each species of Streptococcus tested was found to contain strains representative of at least two of these gp340 interaction groupings. The gp340 interaction modes I to III and sugar specificities of gp340 binding strains coincided for several species. Many gp340 interactions were sialidase sensitive, and each of the interaction modes (I to III) for S. gordonii was correlated with a variant of sialic acid specificity. Adherence of S. gordonii DL1 (Challis) to surface-bound gp340 was dependent upon expression of the sialic acid binding adhesin Hsa. However, aggregation of cells by fluid-phase gp340 was independent of Hsa and involved SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides. Conversely, both gp340-mediated aggregation and adherence of S. mutans NG8 involved antigen I/II polypeptide. Deletion of the mga virulence regulator gene in S. pyogenes resulted in increased cell aggregation by gp340. These results suggest that salivary gp340 recognizes different bacterial receptors according to whether gp340 is present in the fluid phase or surface bound. This phase-associated differential recognition by gp340 of streptococcal species of different levels of virulence and diverse origins may mediate alternative host responses to commensal or pathogenic bacterial phenotypes.

  • 23. Loimaranta, Vuokko
    et al.
    Hytönen, Jukka
    Pulliainen, Arto T
    Sharma, Ashu
    Tenovuo, Jorma
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Finne, Jukka
    Leucine-rich repeats of bacterial surface proteins serve as common pattern recognition motifs of human scavenger receptor gp340.2009Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 284, nr 28, s. 18614-23Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Scavenger receptors are innate immune molecules recognizing and inducing the clearance of non-host as well as modified host molecules. To recognize a wide pattern of invading microbes, many scavenger receptors bind to common pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids. Similarly, the gp340/DMBT1 protein, a member of the human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein family, displays a wide ligand repertoire. The peptide motif VEVLXXXXW derived from its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains is involved in some of these interactions, but most of the recognition mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used mass spectrometry sequencing, gene inactivation, and recombinant proteins to identify Streptococcus pyogenes protein Spy0843 as a recognition receptor of gp340. Antibodies against Spy0843 are shown to protect against S. pyogenes infection, but no function or host receptor have been identified for the protein. Spy0843 belongs to the leucine-rich repeat (Lrr) family of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. Experiments with truncated forms of the recombinant proteins confirmed that the Lrr region is needed in the binding of Spy0843 to gp340. The same motif of two other Lrr proteins, LrrG from the Gram-positive S. agalactiae and BspA from the Gram-negative Tannerella forsythia, also mediated binding to gp340. Moreover, inhibition of Spy0843 binding occurred with peptides containing the VEVLXXXXW motif, but also peptides devoid of the XXXXW motif inhibited binding of Lrr proteins. These results thus suggest that the conserved Lrr motif in bacterial proteins serves as a novel pattern recognition motif for unique core peptides of human scavenger receptor gp340.

  • 24. Maddocks, Sarah E.
    et al.
    Wright, Christopher J.
    Nobbs, Angela H.
    Brittan, Jane L.
    Franklin, Linda
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Kadioglu, Aras
    Jepson, Mark A.
    Jenkinson, Howard F.
    Streptococcus pyogenes antigen I/II-family polypeptide AspA shows differential ligand-binding properties and mediates biofilm formation2011Ingår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 81, nr 4, s. 1034-1049Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The streptococcal antigen I/II (AgI/II)-family polypeptides are cell wall-anchored adhesins expressed by most indigenous oral streptococci. Proteins sharing 30-40% overall amino acid sequence similarities with AgI/II-family proteins are also expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. The S. pyogenes M28_Spy1325 polypeptide (designated AspA) displays an AgI/II primary structure, with alanine-rich (A) and prolinerich (P) repeats flanking a V region that is projected distal from the cell. In this study it is shown that AspA from serotype M28 S. pyogenes, when expressed on surrogate host Lactococcus lactis, confers binding to immobilized salivary agglutinin gp-340. This binding was blocked by antibodies to the AspA-VP region. In contrast, the N-terminal region of AspA was deficient in binding fluid-phase gp-340, and L. lactis cells expressing AspA were not agglutinated by gp-340. Deletion of the aspA gene from two different M28 strains of S. pyogenes abrogated their abilities to form biofilms on saliva-coated surfaces. In each mutant strain, biofilm formation was restored by trans complementation of the aspA deletion. In addition, expression of AspA protein on the surface of L. lactis conferred biofilm-forming ability. Taken collectively, the results provide evidence that AspA is a biofilm-associated adhesin that may function in host colonization by S. pyogenes.

  • 25.
    Nordlund, Åke
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Källestål, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Ericson, Thorild
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Improved ability of biological and previous caries multimarkers to predict caries disease as revealed by multivariate PLS modelling2009Ingår i: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 9, nr 28Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dental caries is a chronic disease with plaque bacteria, diet and saliva modifying disease activity. Here we have used the PLS method to evaluate a multiplicity of such biological variables (n=88) for ability to predict caries in a cross-sectional (baseline caries) and prospective (2-year caries development) setting. METHODS: Multivariate PLS modelling was used to associate the many biological variables with caries recorded in thirty 14-year-old children by measuring the numbers of incipient and manifest caries lesions at all surfaces. RESULTS: A wide but shallow gliding scale of one fifth caries promoting or protecting, and four fifths non-influential, variables occurred. The influential markers behaved in the order of plaque bacteria > diet > saliva, with previously known plaque bacteria/diet markers and a set of new protective diet markers. A differential variable patterning appeared for new versus progressing lesions. The influential biological multimarkers (n=18) predicted baseline caries better (ROC area 0.96) than five markers (0.92) and a single lactobacilli marker (0.7) with sensitivity/specificity of 1.87, 1.78 and 1.13 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick, respectively. Moreover, biological multimarkers (n=18) explained 2-year caries increment slightly better than reported before but predicted it poorly (ROC area 0.76). By contrast, multimarkers based on previous caries predicted alone (ROC area 0.88), or together with biological multimarkers (0.94), increment well with a sensitivity/specificity of 1.74 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick. CONCLUSION: Multimarkers behave better than single-to-five markers but future multimarker strategies will require systematic searches for improved saliva and plaque bacteria markers.

  • 26.
    Persson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    The pilin protein FimP from Actinomyces oris: crystal structure and sequence analyses2012Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 10, s. e48364-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Actinomyces oris type-1 pili are important for the initial formation of dental plaque by binding to salivary proteins that adhere to the tooth surface. Here we present the X-ray structure of FimP, the protein that is polymerized into the type-1 pilus stalk, assisted by a pili-specific sortase. FimP consists of three tandem IgG-like domains. The middle and C-terminal domains contain one autocatalyzed intramolecular isopeptide bond each, a feature used by Gram-positive bacteria for stabilization of surface proteins. While the N-terminal domain harbours all the residues necessary for forming an isopeptide bond, no such bond is observed in the crystal structure of this unpolymerized form of FimP. The monomer is further stabilized by one disulfide bond each in the N- and C-terminal domains as well as by a metal-coordinated loop protruding from the C-terminal domain. A lysine, predicted to be crucial for FimP polymerization by covalent attachment to a threonine from another subunit, is located at the rim of a groove lined with conserved residues. The groove may function as a docking site for the sortase-FimP complex. We also present sequence analyses performed on the genes encoding FimP as well as the related FimA, obtained from clinical isolates.

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  • 27. Prakobphol, A
    et al.
    Xu, F
    Hoang, VM
    Larsson, T
    Bergström, J
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Frängsmyr, L
    Holmskov, U
    Leffler, H
    Nilsson, C
    Borén, Thomas
    Wright, JR
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Fisher, SJ
    Salivary agglutinin, which binds Streptococcus mutans and Helicobacter pylori, is the lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein gp-340.2000Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 275, nr 51, s. 39860-6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary agglutinin is a high molecular mass component of human saliva that binds Streptococcus mutans, an oral bacterium implicated in dental caries. To study its protein sequence, we isolated the agglutinin from human parotid saliva. After trypsin digestion, a portion was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which gave the molecular mass of 14 unique peptides. The remainder of the digest was subjected to high performance liquid chromatography, and the separated peptides were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/post-source decay; the spectra gave the sequences of five peptides. The molecular mass and peptide sequence information showed that salivary agglutinin peptides were identical to sequences in lung (lavage) gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein family. Immunoblotting with antibodies that specifically recognized either lung gp-340 or the agglutinin confirmed that the salivary agglutinin was gp-340. Immunoblotting with an antibody specific to the sialyl Le(x) carbohydrate epitope detected expression on the salivary but not the lung glycoprotein, possible evidence of different glycoforms. The salivary agglutinin also interacted with Helicobacter pylori, implicated in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, Streptococcus agalactiae, implicated in neonatal meningitis, and several oral commensal streptococci. These results identify the salivary agglutinin as gp-340 and suggest it binds bacteria that are important determinants of either the oral ecology or systemic diseases.

  • 28.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Mårell, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Sitaram, Raviprakash Tumkur
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Anna
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Narrowed Streptococcus mutans adhesion and human receptor phenotypes that match mono-, poly- and metamicrobial characters of dental cariesManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 29.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Mårell, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Anna
    Department of Orthodontics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Human PRH1, PRH2 susceptibility and resistance and Streptococcus mutans virulence phenotypes specify different microbial profiles in caries2024Ingår i: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 101, artikel-id 105001Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle- and sucrose-dependent polymicrobial ecological shifts are a primary cause of caries in populations with high caries prevalence. In populations with low prevalence, PRH1, PRH2 susceptibility and resistance phenotypes may interact with the Streptococcus mutans adhesin cariogenicity phenotype to affect caries progression, but studies are lacking on how these factors affect the microbial profile of caries.

    Methods: We analysed how the residency and infection profiles of S. mutans adhesin (SpaP A/B/C and Cnm/Cbm) phenotypes and commensal streptococci and lactobacilli influenced caries progression in a prospective case–referent sample of 452 Swedish adolescents with high (P4a), moderate (P6), and low (P1) caries PRH1, PRH2 phenotypes. Isolates of S. mutans from participants were analysed for adhesin expression and glycosylation and in vitro and in situ mechanisms related to caries activity.

    Findings: Among adolescents with the resistant (P1) phenotype, infection with S. mutans high-virulence phenotypes was required for caries progression. In contrast, with highly (P4a) or moderately (P6) susceptible phenotypes, caries developed from a broader polymicrobial flora that included moderately cariogenic oral commensal streptococci and lactobacilli and S. mutans phenotypes. High virulence involved unstable residency and fluctuating SpaP ABC, B-1, or Cnm expression/glycosylation phenotypes, whereas low/moderate virulence involved SpaP A phenotypes with stable residency. Adhesin phenotypes did not display changes in individual host residency but were paired within individuals and geographic regions.

    Interpretation: These results suggest that receptor PRH1, PRH2 susceptibility and resistance and S. mutans adhesin virulence phenotypes specify different microbial profiles in caries. Funding: Swedish Research Council and funding bodies listed in the acknowledgement section.

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  • 30.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Westerlund, Anna
    Mårell, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Österrman, Lennart
    Hollox, Ed
    Larsson, Pär
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    DMBT1 protein isoform and genetic polymorphisms that allow prediction and classification of individual caries progressionManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 31. Stenudd, C
    et al.
    Nordlund, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Ryberg, M
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Källestål, Carina
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    The association of bacterial adhesion with dental caries.2001Ingår i: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 80, nr 11, s. 2005-10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Saliva adhesion of bacteria is a key event in oral biofilm formation. Here, we used partial least-squares (PLS) analysis to correlate adhesion of cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt) and commensal (Actinomyces naeslundii LY7) model bacteria, and their agglutinin and acidic proline-rich protein ligands, respectively, with high and low caries experiences in 38 children reflecting today's skewed caries distribution. Adhesion of S. mutans was among the factors correlating strongest with high caries experience when PLS modeled together with traditional factors (e.g., sugar intake, lactobacilli counts). Saliva phenotypes with high agglutinin levels and Db-s (an acidic PRP variant) coincided with both high caries experience and S. mutans adhesion. A. naeslundii adhesion correlated with low caries experience. Non-Db phenotypes (i.e., acidic PRP-1 and PRP-2 variants) coincided with both low caries experience and S. mutans, but high A. naeslundii, adhesion. Thus, bacterial adhesion may modulate susceptibility and resistance to dental caries.

  • 32.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Ahlfors, S
    Borén, Thomas
    Bratt, P
    Hallberg, K
    Hammarström, KJ
    Holm, C
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Järvholm, M
    Kihlberg, J
    Li, T
    Ryberg, M
    Zand, G
    Anti-adhesion and diagnostic strategies for oro-intestinal bacterial pathogens.1996Ingår i: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 408, s. 9-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 33.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Mårell, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Källestål, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Department of Women’s and Children’s Health/International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Genetic- and Lifestyle-dependent Dental Caries Defined by the Acidic Proline-rich Protein Genes PRH1 and PRH22017Ingår i: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 26, s. 38-46Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease that affects billions of people with large individual differences in activity. We investigated whether PRH1 and PRH2 polymorphisms in saliva acidic proline-rich protein (PRP) receptors for indigenous bacteria match and predict individual differences in the development of caries. PRH1 and PRH2 variation and adhesion of indigenous and cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans) model bacteria were measured in 452 12-year-old Swedish children along with traditional risk factors and related to caries at baseline and after 5-years. The children grouped into low-to-moderate and high susceptibility phenotypes for caries based on allelic PRH1, PRH2 variation. The low-to-moderate susceptibility children (P1 and P4a-) experienced caries from eating sugar or bad oral hygiene or infection by S. mutans. The high susceptibility P4a (Db, PIF, PRP12) children had more caries despite receiving extra prevention and irrespective of eating sugar or bad oral hygiene or S. mutans-infection. They instead developed 3.9-fold more caries than P1 children from plaque accumulation in general when treated with orthodontic multibrackets; and had basic PRP polymorphisms and low DMBT1-mediated S. mutans adhesion as additional susceptibility traits. The present findings thus suggest genetic autoimmune-like (P4a) and traditional life style (P1) caries, providing a rationale for individualized oral care.

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