Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bag, Pushan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lihavainen, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Riquelme, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    An atlas of the Norway spruce needle seasonal transcriptome2021In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1815-1829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal conifers possess a tremendous ability to survive and remain evergreen during harsh winter conditions and resume growth during summer. This is enabled by coordinated regulation of major cellular functions at the level of gene expression, metabolism, and physiology. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the annual changes in the global transcriptome of Norway spruce (Picea abies) needles as a resource to understand needle development and acclimation processes throughout the year. In young, growing needles (May 15 until June 30), cell walls, organelles, etc., were formed, and this developmental program heavily influenced the transcriptome, explained by over-represented Gene Ontology (GO) categories. Later changes in gene expression were smaller but four phases were recognized: summer (July–August), autumn (September–October), winter (November–February), and spring (March–April), where over-represented GO categories demonstrated how the needles acclimated to the various seasons. Changes in the seasonal global transcriptome profile were accompanied by differential expression of members of the major transcription factor families. We present a tentative model of how cellular activities are regulated over the year in needles of Norway spruce, which demonstrates the value of mining this dataset, accessible in ConGenIE together with advanced visualization tools.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. Blokhina, Olga
    et al.
    Laitinen, Teresa
    Hatakeyama, Yuto
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Paasela, Tanja
    Zhao, Lei
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wada, Hiroshi
    Karkonen, Anna
    Fagerstedt, Kurt
    Ray Parenchymal Cells Contribute to Lignification of Tracheids in Developing Xylem of Norway Spruce1[OPEN]2019In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 181, no 4, p. 1552-1572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative transcriptomic study and a single-cell metabolome analysis were combined to determine whether parenchymal ray cells contribute to the biosynthesis of monolignols in the lignifying xylem of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Ray parenchymal cells may function in the lignification of upright tracheids by supplying monolignols. To test this hypothesis, parenchymal ray cells and upright tracheids were dissected with laser-capture microdissection from tangential cryosections of developing xylem of spruce trees. The transcriptome analysis revealed that among the genes involved in processes typical for vascular tissues, genes encoding cell wall biogenesis-related enzymes were highly expressed in both developing tracheids and ray cells. Interestingly, most of the shikimate and monolignol biosynthesis pathway-related genes were equally expressed in both cell types. Nonetheless, 1,073 differentially expressed genes were detected between developing ray cells and tracheids, among which a set of genes expressed only in ray cells was identified. In situ single cell metabolomics of semi-intact plants by picoliter pressure probe-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detected monolignols and their glycoconjugates in both cell types, indicating that the biosynthetic route for monolignols is active in both upright tracheids and parenchymal ray cells. The data strongly support the hypothesis that in developing xylem, ray cells produce monolignols that contribute to lignification of tracheid cell walls. Transcriptomics combined with single-cell metabolomics give new information on the role of rays in lignification of developing xylem in Norway spruce.

  • 3. Capovilla, Giovanna
    et al.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Collani, Silvio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Shutava, Iryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bezrukov, Ilja
    Symeonidi, Efthymia
    Amorim, Marcella de Francisco
    Laubinger, Sascha
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    PORCUPINE regulates development in response to temperature through alternative splicing2018In: Nature plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 4, no 8, p. 534-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings suggest that alternative splicing has a critical role in controlling the responses of plants to temperature variations. However, alternative splicing factors in plants are largely uncharacterized. Here we establish the putative splice regulator, PORCUPINE (PCP), as temperature-specific regulator of development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings point to the misregulation of WUSCHEL and CLAVATA3 as the possible cause for the meristem defects affecting the pcp-1 loss-of-function mutants at low temperatures.

  • 4. Christie, N.
    et al.
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ployet, R.
    Van der Merwe, K.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Naidoo, S.
    Mizrachi, E.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Myburg, A. A.
    The Eucalyptus Genome Integrative Explorer: an online resource for systems genetics in forest tree species2020In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313XArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sundström, Görel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zamani, Neda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lantz, Henrik
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Chem Biotechnol & Food Sci, As, Norway.
    Hoppner, Marc P.
    Jern, Patric
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Grabherr, Manfred G.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Serendipitous Meta-Transcriptomics: The Fungal Community of Norway Spruce (Picea abies)2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e0139080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After performing de novo transcript assembly of >1 billion RNA-Sequencing reads obtained from 22 samples of different Norway spruce (Picea abies) tissues that were not surface sterilized, we found that assembled sequences captured a mix of plant, lichen, and fungal transcripts. The latter were likely expressed by endophytic and epiphytic symbionts, indicating that these organisms were present, alive, and metabolically active. Here, we show that these serendipitously sequenced transcripts need not be considered merely as contamination, as is common, but that they provide insight into the plant's phyllosphere. Notably, we could classify these transcripts as originating predominantly from Dothideomycetes and Leotiomycetes species, with functional annotation of gene families indicating active growth and metabolism, with particular regards to glucose intake and processing, as well as gene regulation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Gil-Munoz, Francisco
    et al.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Quinones, Ana
    Naval, Maria del Mar
    Badenes, Maria Luisa
    Garcia-Gil, M. Rosario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Salt Tolerance Mechanisms Present in Date-Plum Persimmon Rootstock (Diospyros lotus L.)2020In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 1703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture needs solutions for adapting crops to increasing salinity globally. Research on physiological and molecular responses activated by salinity is needed to elucidate mechanisms of salinity tolerance. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-Seq) is a powerful tool to study the transcriptomic profile of genotypes under stress conditions. Persimmon species have different levels of tolerance to salinity, this variability may provide knowledge on persimmon species and development of salt--tolerant rootstocks. In this study, we conducted a physiological and transcriptomic profiling of roots and leaves in tolerant and sensitive plants of persimmon rootstock grown under saline and control conditions. Characterization of physiological responses along with gene expression changes in roots and leaves allowed the identification of several salt tolerance mechanisms related to ion transport and thermospermine synthesis. Differences were observed in putative H+/ATPases that allow transmembrane ionic transport and chloride channel protein-like genes. Furthermore, an overexpression of thermospermine synthase found in the roots of tolerant plants may indicate that alterations in root architecture could act as an additional mechanism of response to salt stress. These results indicate that Diospyros lotus L. exhibits genetically-controlled variability for salt tolerance traits which opens potential opportunities for breeding salt-tolerant persimmon rootstocks in a Mediterranean environment challenged by drought and salinity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Kloth, Karen J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Petrik, Ivan
    Villard, Cloe
    Ström, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Amini, Fariba
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak, Iran.
    Novak, Ondrej
    Moritz, Thomas
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    PECTIN ACETYLESTERASE9 Affects the Transcriptome and Metabolome and Delays Aphid Feeding1[OPEN]2019In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 181, no 4, p. 1704-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plant cell wall plays an important role in damage-associated molecular pattern-induced resistance to pathogens and herbivorous insects. Our current understanding of cell wall-mediated resistance is largely based on the degree of pectin methylesterification. However, little is known about the role of pectin acetylesterification in plant immunity. This study describes how one pectin-modifying enzyme, PECTIN ACETYLESTERASE 9 (PAE9), affects the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcriptome, secondary metabolome, and aphid performance. Electro-penetration graphs showed that Myzus persicae aphids established phloem feeding earlier on pae9 mutants. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed a set of 56 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between uninfested pae9-2 mutants and wild-type plants. The majority of the DEGs were enriched for biotic stress responses and down-regulated in the pae9-2 mutant, including PAD3 and IGMT2, involved in camalexin and indole glucosinolate biosynthesis, respectively. Relative quantification of more than 100 secondary metabolites revealed decreased levels of several compounds, including camalexin and oxylipins, in two independent pae9 mutants. In addition, absolute quantification of phytohormones showed that jasmonic acid (JA), jasmonoyl-Ile, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and indole-3-acetic acid were compromised due to PAE9 loss of function. After aphid infestation, however, pae9 mutants increased their levels of camalexin, glucosinolates, and JA, and no long-term effects were observed on aphid fitness. Overall, these data show that PAE9 is required for constitutive up-regulation of defense-related compounds, but that it is not required for aphid-induced defenses. The signatures of phenolic antioxidants, phytoprostanes, and oxidative stress-related transcripts indicate that the processes underlying PAE9 activity involve oxidation-reduction reactions. PECTIN ACETYLESTERASE9 is involved in the accumulation of jasmonic acid, camalexin and antioxidants, and delays establishment of aphid phloem feeding, but is not required for aphid-induced defenses.

  • 8. Laitinen, Teresa
    et al.
    Morreel, Kris
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Gauthier, Adrien
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Nickolov, Kaloian
    Brader, Günter
    Lim, Kean-Jin
    Teeri, Teemu H.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Boerjan, Wout
    Kärkönen, Anna
    A Key Role for Apoplastic H2O2 in Norway Spruce Phenolic Metabolism2017In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 174, no 3, p. 1449-1475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoplastic events such as monolignol oxidation and lignin polymerization are difficult to study in intact trees. To investigate the role of apoplastic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in gymnosperm phenolic metabolism, an extracellular lignin-forming cell culture of Norway spruce (Picea abies) was used as a research model. Scavenging of apoplastic H2O2 by potassium iodide repressed lignin formation, in line with peroxidases activating monolignols for lignin polymerization. Time-course analyses coupled to candidate substrate-product pair network propagation revealed differential accumulation of low-molecular-weight phenolics, including (glycosylated) oligolignols, (glycosylated) flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins, in lignin-forming and H2O2-scavenging cultures and supported that monolignols are oxidatively coupled not only in the cell wall but also in the cytoplasm, where they are coupled to other monolignols and proanthocyanidins. Dilignol glycoconjugates with reduced structures were found in the culture medium, suggesting that cells are able to transport glycosylated dilignols to the apoplast. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that scavenging of apoplastic H2O2 resulted in remodulation of the transcriptome, with reduced carbon flux into the shikimate pathway propagating down to monolignol biosynthesis. Aggregated coexpression network analysis identified candidate enzymes and transcription factors for monolignol oxidation and apoplastic H2O2 production in addition to potential H2O2 receptors. The results presented indicate that the redox state of the apoplast has a profound influence on cellular metabolism.

  • 9.
    Law, Simon R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Chrobok, Daria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Juvany, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Lindén, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Forest Genetics and Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish Agriculture University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ahad, Abdul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish Agriculture University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival2018In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In plants, an individually darkened leaf initiates senescence much more rapidly than a leaf from a whole darkened plant. Combining transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we present an overview of the metabolic strategies that are employed in response to different darkening treatments. Under darkened plant conditions, the perception of carbon starvation drove a profound metabolic readjustment in which branched-chain amino acids and potentially monosaccharides released from cell wall loosening became important substrates for maintaining minimal ATP production. Concomitantly, the increased accumulation of amino acids with a high nitrogen-carbon ratio may provide a safety mechanism for the storage of metabolically derived cytotoxic ammonium and a pool of nitrogen for use upon returning to typical growth conditions. Conversely, in individually darkened leaf, the metabolic profiling that followed our 13C-enrichment assays revealed a temporal and differential exchange of metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, between the darkened leaf and the rest of the plant. This active transport could be the basis for a progressive metabolic shift in the substrates fueling mitochondrial activities, which are central to the catabolic reactions facilitating the retrieval of nutrients from the senescing leaf. We propose a model illustrating the specific metabolic strategies employed by leaves in response to these two darkening treatments, which support either rapid senescence or a strong capacity for survival.

  • 10.
    Liebsch, Daniela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Juvany, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Li, Zhonghai
    National Engineering Laboratory for Tree Breeding, College of Biological Sciences and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Hou-Ling
    National Engineering Laboratory for Tree Breeding, College of Biological Sciences and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.
    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Chrobok, Daria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Boussardon, Clément
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wen, Xing
    Department of Biology, Institute of Plant and Food Science, Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech), Guangdong, Shenzhen, China.
    Law, Simon R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Janečková, Helena
    Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lindén, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Novo Nordisk Centre for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Guo, Hongwei
    Department of Biology, Institute of Plant and Food Science, Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech), Guangdong, Shenzhen, China.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Metabolic control of arginine and ornithine levels paces the progression of leaf senescence2022In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 189, no 4, p. 1943-1960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaf senescence can be induced by stress or aging, sometimes in a synergistic manner. It is generally acknowledged that the ability to withstand senescence-inducing conditions can provide plants with stress resilience. Although the signaling and transcriptional networks responsible for a delayed senescence phenotype, often referred to as a functional stay-green trait, have been actively investigated, very little is known about the subsequent metabolic adjustments conferring this aptitude to survival. First, using the individually darkened leaf (IDL) experimental setup, we compared IDLs of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to several stay-green contexts, that is IDLs of two functional stay-green mutant lines, oresara1-2 (ore1-2) and an allele of phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (pif5), as well as to leaves from a WT plant entirely darkened (DP). We provide compelling evidence that arginine and ornithine, which accumulate in all stay-green contexts—likely due to the lack of induction of amino acids (AAs) transport—can delay the progression of senescence by fueling the Krebs cycle or the production of polyamines (PAs). Secondly, we show that the conversion of putrescine to spermidine (SPD) is controlled in an age-dependent manner. Thirdly, we demonstrate that SPD represses senescence via interference with ethylene signaling by stabilizing the ETHYLENE BINDING FACTOR1 and 2 (EBF1/2) complex. Taken together, our results identify arginine and ornithine as central metabolites influencing the stress- and age-dependent progression of leaf senescence. We propose that the regulatory loop between the pace of the AA export and the progression of leaf senescence provides the plant with a mechanism to fine-tune the induction of cell death in leaves, which, if triggered unnecessarily, can impede nutrient remobilization and thus plant growth and survival.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häggström, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Small-scale sequencing enables quality assessment of Ribo-Seq data: an example from Arabidopsis cell culture2021In: Plant Methods, E-ISSN 1746-4811, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Translation is a tightly regulated process, controlling the rate of protein synthesis in cells. Ribosome sequencing (Ribo-Seq) is a recently developed tool for studying actively translated mRNA and can thus directly address translational regulation. Ribo-Seq libraries need to be sequenced to a great depth due to high contamination by rRNA and other contaminating nucleic acid fragments. Deep sequencing is expensive, and it generates large volumes of data, making data analysis complicated and time consuming.

    Methods and results: Here we developed a platform for Ribo-Seq library construction and data analysis to enable rapid quality assessment of Ribo-Seq libraries with the help of a small-scale sequencer. Our data show that several qualitative features of a Ribo-Seq library, such as read length distribution, P-site distribution, reading frame and triplet periodicity, can be effectively evaluated using only the data generated by a benchtop sequencer with a very limited number of reads.

    Conclusion: Our pipeline enables rapid evaluation of Ribo-Seq libraries, opening up possibilities for optimization of Ribo-Seq library construction from difficult samples, and leading to better decision making prior to more costly deep sequencing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Mahmud, A. K. M. Firoj
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nandi, Soumyadeep
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    ProkSeq for complete analysis of RNA-Seq data from prokaryotes2021In: Bioinformatics, ISSN 1367-4803, E-ISSN 1367-4811, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 126-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Since its introduction, RNA-Seq technology has been used extensively in studies of pathogenic bacteria to identify and quantify differences in gene expression across multiple samples from bacteria exposed to different conditions. With some exceptions, tools for studying gene expression, determination of differential gene expression, downstream pathway analysis and normalization of data collected in extreme biological conditions is still lacking. Here, we describe ProkSeq, a user-friendly, fully automated RNA-Seq data analysis pipeline designed for prokaryotes. ProkSeq provides a wide variety of options for analysing differential expression, normalizing expression data and visualizing data and results.

    Availability and implementation: ProkSeq is implemented in Python and is published under the MIT source license. The pipeline is available as a Docker container https://hub.docker.com/repository/docker/snandids/prokseq-v2.0, or can be used through Anaconda: https://anaconda.org/snandiDS/prokseq. The code is available on Github: https://github.com/snandiDS/prokseq and a detailed user documentation, including a manual and tutorial can be found at https://prokseqV20.readthedocs.io.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Liu, H.
    Bel, M.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Serrano, A.
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vandepoele, K.
    Ayllón-Benítez, A.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    PlantGenIE-PLAZA: integrating orthology into the PlantGenIE.org resource using the PLAZA pipeline2020Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14. Nystedt, Björn
    et al.
    Street, Nathaniel Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Zuccolo, Andrea
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Scofield, Douglas G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Giacomello, Stefania
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    Vicedomini, Riccardo
    Sahlin, Kristoffer
    Sherwood, Ellen
    Elfstrand, Malin
    Gramzow, Lydia
    Holmberg, Kristina
    Hällman, Jimmie
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Klasson, Lisa
    Koriabine, Maxim
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Käller, Max
    Luthman, Johannes
    Lysholm, Fredrik
    Niittylä, Totte
    Olson, Åke
    Rilakovic, Nemanja
    Ritland, Carol
    Rosselló, Josep A.
    Sena, Juliana
    Svensson, Thomas
    Talavera-López, Carlos
    Theißen, Günter
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vanneste, Kevin
    Wu, Zhi-Qiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zerbe, Philipp
    Arvestad, Lars
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh
    Bohlmann, Joerg
    Bousquet, Jean
    Gil, Rosario Garcia
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    de Jong, Pieter
    MacKay, John
    Morgante, Michele
    Ritland, Kermit
    Sundberg, Björn
    Thompson, Stacey Lee
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Andersson, Björn
    Nilsson, Ove
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution2013In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 497, no 7451, p. 579-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000 base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding.

  • 15.
    Robinson, Kathryn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mahler, Niklas
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Önskog, Jenny
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hvidsten, Torgeir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Populus tremula (European aspen) shows no evidence of sexual dimorphism2014In: BMC Plant Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2229, Vol. 14, p. 276-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Evolutionary theory suggests that males and females may evolve sexually dimorphic phenotypic and biochemical traits concordant with each sex having different optimal strategies of resource investment to maximise reproductive success and fitness. Such sexual dimorphism would result in sex biased gene expression patterns in non-floral organs for autosomal genes associated with the control and development of such phenotypic traits.

    Results:

    We examined morphological, biochemical and herbivory traits to test for sexually dimorphic resource allocation strategies within collections of sexually mature and immature Populus tremula (European aspen) trees. In addition we profiled gene expression in mature leaves of sexually mature wild trees using whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays and RNA-Sequencing.

    Conclusions:

    We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism or differential resource investment strategies between males and females in either sexually immature or mature trees. Similarly, single-gene differential expression and machine learning approaches revealed no evidence of large-scale sex biased gene expression. However, two significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from the RNA-Seq data, one of which is a robust diagnostic marker of sex in P. tremula.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kostadima, Myrto
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rustici, Gabriella
    Training in High-Throughput Sequencing: Common Guidelines to Enable Material Sharing, Dissemination, and Reusability2016In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 12, no 6, article id e1004937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advancement of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and the rapid development of numerous analysis algorithms and pipelines in this field has resulted in an unprecedentedly high demand for training scientists in HTS data analysis. Embarking on developing new training materials is challenging for many reasons. Trainers often do not have prior experience in preparing or delivering such materials and struggle to keep them up to date. A repository of curated HTS training materials would support trainers in materials preparation, reduce the duplication of effort by increasing the usage of existing materials, and allow for the sharing of teaching experience among the HTS trainers' community. To achieve this, we have developed a strategy for materials' curation and dissemination. Standards for describing training materials have been proposed and applied to the curation of existing materials. A Git repository has been set up for sharing annotated materials that can now be reused, modified, or incorporated into new courses. This repository uses Git; hence, it is decentralized and self-managed by the community and can be forked/built-upon by all users. The repository is accessible at http://bioinformatics.upsc.se/htmr.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Seyfferth, Carolin
    et al.
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wessels, Bernard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sundberg, Björn
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Felten, Judith
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ethylene-Related Gene Expression Networks in Wood Formation2018In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thickening of tree stems is the result of secondary growth, accomplished by the meristematic activity of the vascular cambium. Secondary growth of the stem entails developmental cascades resulting in the formation of secondary phloem outwards and secondary xylem (i.e., wood) inwards of the stem. Signaling and transcriptional reprogramming by the phytohormone ethylene modifies cambial growth and cell differentiation, but the molecular link between ethylene and secondary growth remains unknown. We addressed this shortcoming by analyzing expression profiles and co-expression networks of ethylene pathway genes using the AspWood transcriptome database which covers all stages of secondary growth in aspen (Populus tremula) stems. ACC synthase expression suggests that the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) is synthesized during xylem expansion and xylem cell maturation. Ethylene-mediated transcriptional reprogramming occurs during all stages of secondary growth, as deduced from AspWood expression profiles of ethylene-responsive genes. A network centrality analysis of the AspWood dataset identified EIN3D and 11 ERFs as hubs. No overlap was found between the co-expressed genes of the EIN3 and ERF hubs, suggesting target diversification and hence independent roles for these transcription factor families during normal wood formation. The EIN3D hub was part of a large co-expression gene module, which contained 16 transcription factors, among them several new candidates that have not been earlier connected to wood formation and a VND-INTERACTING 2 (VNI2) homolog. We experimentally demonstrated Populus EIN3D function in ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ERF hubs ERF118 and ERF119 were connected on the basis of their expression pattern and gene co-expression module composition to xylem cell expansion and secondary cell wall formation, respectively. We hereby establish data resources for ethylene-responsive genes and potential targets for EIN3D and ERF transcription factors in Populus stem tissues, which can help to understand the range of ethylene targeted biological processes during secondary growth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Seyfferth, Carolin
    et al.
    Wessels, Bernard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vahala, J.
    Kangasjärvi, J.
    Bauer, G.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Eder, M.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Felten, J.
    Populus ERF85 mediates the transition between xylem cell expansion and secondary cell wall formation in hybrid aspenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Stachula, Paulina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Vergara, Alexander
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hurry, Vaughan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Essential processes determining life in cold in Arabidopsis thalianaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sullivan, Alexis R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Eldfjell, Yrin
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Asp, Torben
    Hebelstrup, Kim H.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Öber, Lisa
    Møller, Max
    Arvestad, Lars
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wang, Xiao-Ru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The Mitogenome of Norway Spruce and a Reappraisal of Mitochondrial Recombination in Plants2020In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 3586-3598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant mitogenomes can be difficult to assemble because they are structurally dynamic and prone to intergenomic DNA transfers, leading to the unusual situation where an organelle genome is far outnumbered by its nuclear counterparts. As a result, comparative mitogenome studies are in their infancy and some key aspects of genome evolution are still known mainly from pregenomic, qualitative methods. To help address these limitations, we combined machine learning and in silico enrichment of mitochondrial-like long reads to assemble the bacterial-sized mitogenome of Norway spruce (Pinaceae: Picea abies). We conducted comparative analyses of repeat abundance, intergenomic transfers, substitution and rearrangement rates, and estimated repeat-by-repeat homologous recombination rates. Prompted by our discovery of highly recombinogenic small repeats in P. abies, we assessed the genomic support for the prevailing hypothesis that intramolecular recombination is predominantly driven by repeat length, with larger repeats facilitating DNA exchange more readily. Overall, we found mixed support for this view: Recombination dynamics were heterogeneous across vascular plants and highly active small repeats (ca. 200 bp) were present in about one-third of studied mitogenomes. As in previous studies, we did not observe any robust relationships among commonly studied genome attributes, but we identify variation in recombination rates as a underinvestigated source of plant mitogenome diversity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Sundell, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Netotea, Sergiu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry,Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegi an University of Life Sciences, 1432As, Norw.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The Plant Genome Integrative Explorer Resource: PlantGenIE.org2015In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 208, no 4, p. 1149-1156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessing and exploring large-scale genomics data sets remains a significant challenge to researchers without specialist bioinformatics training. We present the integrated PlantGenIE.org platform for exploration of Populus, conifer and Arabidopsis genomics data, which includes expression networks and associated visualization tools. Standard features of a model organism database are provided, including genome browsers, gene list annotation, BLAST homology searches and gene information pages. Community annotation updating is supported via integration of WebApollo. We have produced an RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) expression atlas for Populus tremula and have integrated these data within the expression tools. An updated version of the COMPLEX resource for performing comparative plant expression analyses of gene coexpression network conservation between species has also been integrated. The PlantGenIE.org platform provides intuitive access to large-scale and genome-wide genomics data from model forest tree species, facilitating both community contributions to annotation improvement and tools supporting use of the included data resources to inform biological insight.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Sundell, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Kumar, Manoj
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Johnsson, Christoffer
    Kumar, Vikash
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fischer, Urs
    Niittyla, Totte
    Sundberg, Bjorn
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1433 Ås, Norway.
    AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula2017In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1585-1604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network.

  • 23.
    Wessels, Bernard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Seyfferth, Carolin
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vain, T.
    Antos, K.
    Vahala, J.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Kangasjärvi, J.
    Eder, M.
    Felten, J.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    An AP/ERF transcription factor ERF139 affects growth and lignin deposition in hybrid aspenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Wessels, Bernard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Seyfferth, Carolin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vain, Thomas
    Antos, Kamil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Vahala, Jorma
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Kangasjarvi, Jaakko
    Eder, Michaela
    Felten, Judith
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    An AP2/ERF transcription factor ERF139 coordinates xylem cell expansion and secondary cell wall deposition2019In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 224, no 4, p. 1585-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differentiation of xylem elements involves cell expansion, secondary cell wall (SCW) deposition and programmed cell death. Transitions between these phases require strict spatiotemporal control.

    The function of Populus ERF139 (Potri.013G101100) in xylem differentiation was characterized in transgenic overexpression and dominant repressor lines of ERF139 in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Xylem properties, SCW chemistry and downstream targets were analyzed in both types of transgenic trees using microscopy techniques, Fourier transform‐infrared spectroscopy, pyrolysis‐GC/MS, wet chemistry methods and RNA sequencing.

    Opposite phenotypes were observed in the secondary xylem vessel sizes and SCW chemistry in the two different types of transgenic trees, supporting the function of ERF139 in suppressing the radial expansion of vessel elements and stimulating accumulation of guaiacyl‐type lignin and possibly also xylan. Comparative transcriptomics identified genes related to SCW biosynthesis (LAC5, LBD15, MYB86) and salt and drought stress‐responsive genes (ANAC002, ABA1) as potential direct targets of ERF139.

    The phenotypes of the transgenic trees and the stem expression profiles of ERF139potential target genes support the role of ERF139 as a transcriptional regulator of xylem cell expansion and SCW formation, possibly in response to osmotic changes of the cells.

  • 25.
    Zare, Aman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Johansson, Anna-Mia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Karlsson, Edvin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI-Swedish, Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Stenberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI-Swedish, Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    The gut microbiome participates in transgenerational inheritance of low temperature responses in Drosophila melanogaster2018In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 592, no 24, p. 4078-4086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental perturbations induce transcriptional changes, some of which may be inherited even in the absence of the initial stimulus. Previous studies have focused on transfers through the germ-line although microbiota is also passed on to the offspring. Thus, we inspected the involvement of the gut microbiome in transgenerational inheritance of environmental exposures in Drosophila melanogaster. We grew flies in the cold versus control temperatures and compared their transcriptional patterns in both conditions as well as in their offspring. F2 flies grew in control temperature while we controlled their microbiota acquisition from either F1 sets. Transcriptional status of some genes was conserved transgenerationally, and a subset of these genes, mainly expressed in the gut, was transcriptionally dependent on the acquired microbiome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Zhang, Bo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sztojka, Bernadette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Seyfferth, Carolin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Miskolczi, Pal
    Chantreau, Maxime
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Bakó, László
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Gorzsás, András
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    The chromatin-modifying protein HUB2 is involved in the regulation of lignin composition in xylem vessels2020In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 71, no 18, p. 5484-5494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PIRIN2 (PRN2) was earlier reported to suppress syringyl (S)-type lignin accumulation of xylem vessels of Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we report yeast two-hybrid results supporting the interaction of PRN2 with HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION2 (HUB2) in Arabidopsis. HUB2 has been previously implicated in several plant developmental processes, but not in lignification. Interaction between PRN2 and HUB2 was verified by β-galactosidase enzymatic and co-immunoprecipitation assays. HUB2 promoted the deposition of S-type lignin in the secondary cell walls of both stem and hypocotyl tissues, as analysed by pyrolysis-GC/MS. Chemical fingerprinting of individual xylem vessel cell walls by Raman and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy supported the function of HUB2 in lignin deposition. These results, together with a genetic analysis of the hub2 prn2 double mutant, support the antagonistic function of PRN2 and HUB2 in deposition of S-type lignin. Transcriptome analyses indicated the opposite regulation of the S-type lignin biosynthetic gene FERULATE-5-HYDROXYLASE1 by PRN2 and HUB2 as the underlying mechanism. PRN2 and HUB2 promoter activities co-localized in cells neighbouring the xylem vessel elements, suggesting that the S-type lignin-promoting function of HUB2 is antagonized by PRN2 for the benefit of the guaiacyl (G)-type lignin enrichment of the neighbouring xylem vessel elements.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf