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  • 1.
    Lantto, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Det åsidosatta folket: Samerna, renskötseln och de första planerna på en storskalig utbyggnad av vattenkraften i Sverige2011In: Oknytt, ISSN 0349-1706, Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 61-87Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sandström, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sehlin Macneil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Åsa, Össbo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Vänd på perspektiven Umeå20142013In: Västerbottens Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Lundström, Kjell-Åke
    et al.
    Silversparf, Agneta
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Samiska skatteland2016In: Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi / [ed] Axelsson, Per; Engberg, Elisabeth; Lantto, Patrik & Wisselgren, Maria J., Solna: Sveriges Släktforskarförbund , 2016, p. 75-88Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Löf, Annette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Andersson, Tore
    Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Horstkotte, Tim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sehlin Macneil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Okunskap om samisk kultur grogrund för strukturell diskriminering2013In: Västerbottens-Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Daniels-Mayes, Sheelagh
    The University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia.
    Akbar, Skye
    University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Marsh, Jillian
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Wik-Karlsson, Jenny
    Sámiid Riikkasearvi, Umeå, Sweden.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Social Life Cycle Assessment Used in Indigenous Contexts: A Critical Analysis2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 5158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates the method Social Life Cycle Assessment (S-LCA) from the perspectives of Indigenous methodologies and Indigenous standpoint, in order to identify some strengths and limitations of using S-LCA in Indigenous contexts. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to measure environmental impacts connected with all stages of the life cycle of a commercial product, process, or service. S-LCA is a methodology designed to include the social aspects of sustainability in the LCA methodology. S-LCA emphasizes stakeholder involvement and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) S-LCA guidelines (2020) lists Indigenous communities as possible stakeholders. With a focus on Indigenous communities in the Arctic region we also include comparative aspects from Australia to generate new conceptualizations and understandings. The paper concludes that S-LCA has the potential to facilitate opposing worldviews and with some further developments can be a valuable methodology for Indigenous contexts.

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  • 6.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Svonni, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå Universitet.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Nyansera debatten om makten2018In: Norrländska Socialdemokraten, ISSN 1103-9787Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Stoor, Jon Petter A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Inledning2021In: Psykisk hälsa och välmående på svensk sida av Sápmi: en antologi / [ed] Åsa Össbo och Patrik Lantto, Umeå: Várdduo-Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2021, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    "A constant reminder of what we had to forfeit": Swedish industrial colonialism and intergenerational effects on Sámi living conditions in the area of upper Stuor Julevädno2021In: International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, ISSN 1837-0144, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the intergenerational effects of hydropower expansion on Sámi living conditions. In-depth conversations were conducted with five research participants from three different generations living in a hydropower impacted area on the Swedish side of Sápmi. The aim is to analyse how natural resource extraction has affected living conditions for the Indigenous Sámi people, using an intergenerational approach. The questions cover how to deal with the consequences and how coping strategies have affected the living conditions for the research participants and the participants' families, both older and younger generations. Historical unresolved grief connected to large-scale resource extraction is an important component for understanding experiences of colonialism in a Nordic Indigenous context. Furthermore, an intergenerational approach is essential for studying long-term impacts on Indigenous communities. From the conversations, four main themes are crystallised: bereavement, fear and worries, agreements with the energy company, and reconciliation and strategies for the future.

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  • 9.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Back to square one. Green sacrifice zones in Sápmi and Swedish policy responses to energy emergencies2023In: Arctic Review on Law and Politics, ISSN 1891-6252, E-ISSN 2387-4562, Vol. 14, p. 112-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the enthusiasm for green energy, previously contested energy and mining projects can be framed as part of a green transition. When state authorities decide to forego the standard procedural protections and the processes and forums for deliberation and local influence, it contributes to constructing green sacrifice zones. This paper compares two Swedish energy policy processes. The first is occurred during World War II and the hydropower expansion of the 1940s and 1950s. The second takes place today when wind power is expanding to increase renewable energy production. In Sweden, policymaking seems to be back to square one in the green transition, leaving out both important knowledge of the past and contemporary voices of the ongoing and probable consequences. In certain issues, such as how the recognition of the Indigenous status of the Sámi actually affects the legislative process and how to address the Indigenous rights of the Sámi, policymaking is particularly slow to adapt. The green transition industry is already affecting the Sámi, as the construction of the Nordic welfare society has done during the last century, and still does. It deepens an ongoing colonial wave that started in the 1300s. By showing how the Swedish legislative process, historically as well as currently, has neglected to involve Sámi representatives, this study points to the importance and obligation of Swedish policymaking to engage Sámi representatives in an early phase to avoid further sacrifice zones in Sápmi.

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  • 10.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    En vattendelare i samisk historia: renbeteslagen 18862017In: Historielärarnas förenings årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, p. 91-106Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    From Lappmark Statutes to Company Towns Swedish Settler Colonialism towards Sapmi2020In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 420-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay analyzes Swedish policy towards the Sami in relation to settler colonialism, employing a theoretical framework that articulates invasion not as a single event but rather functioning as a structure in a certain area towards its inhabitants. The policies and practices of the state and both regional and local authorities regarding Sarni issues follow settler colonial principles in striving to secure the territory by several means, eliminating Indigenous peoples as well as Indigenous self-determination. This is analyzed and discussed through diverse examples of Swedish policies and their impacts, including demarcation, forced dislocation, categorization and elimination in colonial archives, "authenticity"-making, and appropriation of Indigenous culture and rights. In the end, centuries of settler colonial policies and practices have created a complex fabric of actors, each carrying their different personal burdens and responsibilities. A concluding discussion articulates the necessity of decolonization and reconciliation on equal terms stemming from an intertwined settler colonial history.

  • 12.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Från lappmarksplakat till anläggarsamhällen: Svensk bosättarkolonialism gentemot Sápmi2020In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 420-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay analyzes Swedish policy towards the Sámi in relation to settler colonialism, employing a theoretical framework that articulates invasion not as a single event but rather functioning as a structure in a certain area towards its inhabitants. The policies and practices of the state and both regional and local authorities regarding Sámi issues follow settler colonial principles in striving to secure the territory by several means, eliminating Indigenous peoples as well as Indigenous self-determination. This is analyzed and discussed through diverse examples of Swedish policies and their impacts, including demarcation, forced dislocation, categorization and elimination in colonial archives, “authenticity”-making, and appropriation of Indigenous culture and rights. In the end, centuries of settler colonial policies and practices have created a complex fabric of actors, each carrying their different personal burdens and responsibilities. A concluding discussion articulates the necessity of decolonization and reconciliation on equal terms stemming from an intertwined settler colonial history.

  • 13.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    "Hans själ är nomadens": Valdemar Lindholms författarskap och engagemang för skogssamiska frågor2020In: Skogssamisk vilja: en jubileumsantologi om skriften "Dat läh mijen situd", Karin Stenberg och skogssamisk historia och nutid / [ed] Åsa Össbo, Bertil Marklund, Lena Maria Nilsson, Krister Stoor, Ubmeje/Umeå: Várdduo - Centrum för samisk forskning , 2020, p. 201-228Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här kapitlet belyses och diskuteras en bit av Valdemar Lindholms omfångsrika författarskap i förhållande till hans litterära samtid och en möjlig bakgrund till att han ställde sin penna till förfogande för den skogssamiska saken i kampskriften Dat läh mijen situd. Det är vår vilja! Valdemar Lindholm har omtalats som folklorist för sin författarmetod och som vildmarksromantiker för sitt ämnesval. Men vad drev Valdemar Lindholm att tillsammans med Karin Stenberg skriva om samiska – och i synnerhet skogssamiska – rättigheter och förhållanden? I en tid då vildmarksromantik kritiserades och författare som Olof Högberg och senare Ludvig Nordström framhöll Norrlands plats i den svenska historien, verkar Lindholm spela på en annan planhalva. Den vildmarksromantiska genre som många andra av tidens etablerade författare arbetade i ”kritisk dialog med” verkar istället Lindholm välja som röst. Efter att ha försökt sätta sig in i det samiska språket för att göra uppteckningar av samiska sagor och berättelser, var det kanske en röst som enligt Lindholm samsades väl med urfolkets rättighetsfrågor? Eller var de samiska rättighetsfrågorna bara en parentes i Lindholms författarbana, i övrigt överensstämmande med norrlandsförfattarna under tidigt 1900-tal? I Dat läh mijen situd ställs skogssamiska tolkningar av historiska händelser och samiska narrativ i ett samtida och framtida ljus, som ett flödande bevis på och kritik mot bosättarkoloniala samhällens problematik: att leva genom att utradera, att inte erkänna de som inte låter sig utraderas.

  • 14.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Hydropower company sites: a study of Swedish settler colonialism2023In: Settler Colonial Studies, ISSN 2201-473X, E-ISSN 1838-0743, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 115-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The settler colonial perspective has until recently gained modest attention from scholars analysing the relations between the Swedish state and the Indigenous Sámi people throughout history. This article explores the dynamics of settler colonialism in the Swedish state’s relation to the Sámi people through the expansion of hydropower. I argue that the hydropower invasion beginning in the 1910s reinforced Swedish settler colonialism, ultimately shown in the hydropower company town of Porjus. This industrial colonialism in Swedish hydropower politics and practice with following consequences continues the settler colonial policy from the passing of the ‘Lappmarks Placat’ in 1673 when agrarian settlers of various origins were encouraged to take up farmstead settlements and populate areas perceived as uninhabited. During the nineteenth century several policies and administrative practices made invisible and devastated Sámi self-determination and land rights. When Sámi land rights had been devalued and westernised, the time was ripe for a new colonial policy, a policy promoting industrial extraction of hydroelectricity from the rivers of Sápmi – the traditional country of the Sámi people, situated in the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Kola Peninsula.

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  • 15.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Hydropower histories and narrative injustice: state-owned energy companies’ narratives of hydropower expansion in Sápmi2023In: Water History, ISSN 1877-7236, E-ISSN 1877-7244, Vol. 15, p. 201-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For over one hundred years, hydropower expansion has taken place in Sápmi, the land ofthe Indigenous Sámi people in Northern Fenno-Scandia and the Kola Peninsula. In modern energy company narratives, certain parts of history remain unmentioned. Among these are the narratives belonging to Sámi people who were negatively impacted by hydropower expansion. Thus, the aim of this article is to analyse three state-owned energy companies’narratives about their hydropower expansion in Sápmi and compare them with challenging voices or counter-narratives. The sources used are the companies’ websites and the official documents and material found there, as well as other documentary sources, literature,and research spanning a time period of 1910 to 2021. The overall questions are: To what extent and in what ways are Sámi experiences regarding hydropower expansion part of the companies’ narratives. This study uses counter-narrative and narrative justice as conceptual framework and shows that the full impact that hydropower expansion has had on Sámi people’s situations is insufficiently communicated in the companies’ narratives. Instead,  the companies mainly construct their narratives as hydropower expansion in Sápmi being a phenomenon located in history without connection to ongoing consequences on Sámi lands and lives.

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  • 16.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Industrialisering och kolonialisering: reflektioner kring vattenkraftutbyggnad på svensk sida Sápmi2015In: Sápmi i ord och bild: en antologi. 1 / [ed] Kajsa Andersson, Västra Frölunda: On Line , 2015, 1, p. 162-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Lokalsamhällen spelas ut till vattenkraftutövarens fördel2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Nya vatten, dunkla speglingar: industriell kolonialism genom svensk vattenkraftutbyggnad i renskötselområdet 1910-19682014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydropower development was one of the first systematic large-scale exploitations in the reindeer herding areas within Swedish borders. Therefore, this thesis departs from postcolonial approaches wherein the Swedish state policy and practice towards Sami, reindeer herders and Sápmi, the Sami homeland, is analysed as colonialism in relation to hydropower development.

    The study spans over the first large-scale hydropower projects in the reindeer herding area during the 1910’s and 1920’s, continuing with the decreased legal security during the second world war, and finally the opposition and opinion in the 1950’s and 1960’s, enabled by the establishment of a national association for Swedish Sami, SSR.

         The industrialisation of watercourses in the reindeer herding areas were brought about by the works of an institutional framework consisting of the Water Act and the Reindeer Grazing Act together with the tutelage of a Lapp Administration. These institutions made invisible both reindeer herding as an industry and the herders rights. Authorities as well as hydropower companies acted and argued within an industrial colonial discourse. One technique was the re-writing of history and of the herders’ rights in favour of power developers. The Swedish hydropower system was built up based on cheap energy from the North, at the expense of stakeholders’ rights. This was made possible by arguing that exploitation was for the sake of ”the common good”. When reindeer herders eventually were noted in the process, reindeer herding was regarded as a vested interest and reindeer herding rights as a privilege given to the Sami by the state. In this system reindeer herders were given a more vulnerable legal position than farmers, in addition non-reindeer herding Sami were in some aspects even more affected by discriminating structures. By damming the watercourses, the grazing lands were reduced which affected the amount of herders that could practice reindeer husbandry and thereby also the amount of individuals holding Sami rights.

         During the 1950’s and 1960’s the self-evidenced hydropower development was questioned by a Sami struggle for justice. With regards to Sami rights, the situation was more stagnant due to the state avoiding official investigation of certain legal issues that were object for trial. However, the industrial colonial discourse and the governing of hydropower politics were challenged and the authorities changed some of their notions of reindeer herders. Nevertheless, the Sami were denied representation and involvement in governing the finances that were aimed at alleviation of the consequences of various interferences in the herding area.

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  • 19.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Recurring Colonial Ignorance: A Genealogy of the Swedish Energy System2018In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, E-ISSN 2004-4658, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 63-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter sketches a genealogy of the backbone of the Swedish energy system—hydroelectricity, starting with the recent state investigation on Water Activities and its version of history that stands in contrast to research showing the historical as well as present-day colonialism manifested in Swedish policy on hydropower development in Sápmi and the apparent exclusionary practice of only inviting certain stakeholders to participate in the investigation, none of whom represented Sami organisations or institutions. In order to trace the formation of this practice, a lineage is established through a study of the uncharted judicial and political impacts of an exemption act facilitating hydroelectric power extraction during the Second World War, an act that eventually became conventional law. After the war, Swedish hydropower expansion was mainly pursued in the northern parts of the country, which coincide with Sápmi—the traditional land of the Indigenous Sami people. Sweden’s environmental policies of today are focused on what is perceived as renewable and sustainable energy sources. While leaning heavily on hydropower, these policies rarely acknowledge the consequences of hydropower extraction in Sápmi. Nor are the traces of water rights left in the terrain recognised, traces that make possible a recurring colonial practice of ignorance among present-day Swedish decision makers.

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  • 20.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Som en skänk från ovan eller skada på kredit?: narrativ om svensk vattenkraft i Sápmi från de rörliga bildernas arkiv2024In: Sápmi på film och TV / [ed] Ragnhild Nilsson; Mats Rohdin; Ulf Mörkenstam, Umeå: Umeå University, 2024, p. 208-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här studien undersöker hur vattenkraft skildrats på film och i tv-program som tillkommit under åren 1957 och 1995. På vilket sätt har vattenkraftutbyggnaden relaterats till samer i första hans, men även lokalsamhällena generellt. Undersökningen bygger på 20 filmer och televisionsprogram från Kungliga bibliotekets Svensk mediadatabas (SMDB) som också ingår i kollektionen "Sápmi på film och TV". Materialet har olika avsändare (Statens Vattenfallsverk/Vattenfall AB, fristående producenter, public service) och analyseras utifrån vad de olika bidragen fokuserar på i relation till tillkomstår och avsändare. Innehållsanalysen utförs mot bakgrund av tidigare forskning, och analyserar övergripande teman från positivt och negativt inriktade narrativ om vattenkraftutbyggnad. Public service står bakom en större del av materialet och där ses också ett bredare spektrum av narrativ där samiska röster får ge sina synpunkter medan Vattenfall har ett snävare budskap som i lägre grad relateras till det samiska samhället. Vattenkraftens fördelar lyfts fram medan inverkningar och skador och bolagets hantering av det formuleras om till något positivt. Bland materialet har, inte oväntat, utbyggnaderna i Stora Luleälvs övre del en särställning. Materialet från fristående producenter visar också en bredd av utbyggnadsmotstånd, nostalgiska återblickar i industrivänlig ton samt opinionsbildande om miljö och arbetsliv kring reglerade vatten.

  • 21.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Sveriges kolonisering av Sápmi2020In: Expo: demokratisk tidskrift, ISSN 1400-9846, no 4, p. 36-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskaren Åsa Össbo beskriver Sveriges relation till Sápmi och Norrland som bosättarkolonialism. Men svenska staten har aldrig erkänt sig själv som kolonialmakt. Det har ofta ansetts vara ett ingenmansland – ett terra nullius. Men området som sträcker sig över stora delar av Norge, Sverige, Finland och Kolahalvön i Ryssland var inget ingenmansland. Det skulle mer korrekt beskrivas som Sápmi, en benämning som avser såväl folket samerna, som samernas land och språk.

  • 22.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    'The Land of the Future' and Swedish Settler Colonialism Revisited: Green transistion industrialisation in Sápmi2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A couple of years ago, the city of Skellefteå won the competition to house a factory for the production of batteries for electric cars. Shortly afterwards, the state-owned mining company LKAB presented an investment in fossil-free steel production in Gällivare, another company with the same focus established itself in Boden. The arguments for the location were the proximity to renewable electricity production, i.e. hydropower and wind power. Since then, interest in the Norrland region has grown enormously in Sweden. Again.

    The green transition and the industrialization that it entails carry many repetitions and traces of the past. It would be possible to talk about a third settler colonial wave that is currently sweeping across Sápmi, the Indigenous Sámi's traditional area. While the first and second waves consist of agrarian colonial and industrial colonial processes in parallel, from today's perspective a gap arises, a silence between the second and the third wave. This presentation analyses, from the perspective of settler colonial theory, the debate about the “Land of the Future” that has re-emerged in the wake of the green transition.

  • 23.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Tillbaka till den koloniala framtiden2022In: Provins, ISSN 0280-9974, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En essä som lyfter fram att dagens debatt om Norrland som "ett framtidsland" är i själva verket den tredje i raden av framtidslandsprojektioner mot de nordliga områdena som administreras av Sverige. Samtidigt pågår en tredje våg av bosättarkolonialism gentemot Sápmi i den gröna omställningens namn, där beslutet om Gállok och inrättandet av en sanningskommission samt samisk konsultationsordning står på var sin sida om ett till synes oförenligt gap.

  • 24.
    Össbo, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Colonial Tutelage and Industrial Colonialism: Reindeer husbandry and early 20th-century hydroelectric development in Sweden2011In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 324-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incentives for large-scale hydropower development in Sweden are usually explained in terms of the early 20th-century belief in progress and the need for energy to fuel industrialization and modernization. For reindeer husbandry, the consequences and cumulative effects of this large-scale landscape conversion, and the societal changes it entailed are still largely a story to be told as impacts and effects constantly evolve in the socio-ecological system of the reindeer grazing lands. The present article investigates hydropower development in the northern parts of Sweden, and how the reindeer husbandry of the indigenous Sami people was involved, through a case study of three hydropower projects in the early 20th century. An additional perspective is illuminated: how early hydroelectric development in the reindeer grazing areas was made possible through an immersed colonialism

  • 25.
    Össbo, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Lantto, PatrikUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Psykisk hälsa och välmående på svensk sida av Sápmi: en antologi2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna antologi samlas åtta bidrag kring samisk hälsoforskning. De inledande kapitlen är originalbidrag till antologin medan ytterligare två kapitel är omarbetade artiklar från internationella vetenskapliga tidskrifter. Fyra kapitel utgör omarbetade examensarbeten inom ramen för psykologutbildningen vid Umeå universitet och har ett antal år på nacken. Tillsammans ger bidragen en insikt i forskning kring samisk hälsa och frågor som påverkat samers hälsa sedan början av 2000-talet.

    En befolknings hälsa och välbefinnande ska naturligt alltid stå i centrum av dess politiska liv. Texterna i denna antologi har varit aktuella och relevanta för det samiska samhället under lång tid, och därför är det med glädje vi ser att Sametinget nyligen antagit sitt första hälsopolitiska program, där de särskilt lyfter fram betydelsen av att arbeta för en god psykisk hälsa hos det samiska folket. Samiska perspektiv på hälsa ser ut att ha kommit för att stanna, i politiken och akademin såväl som i konkreta vårdmöten. Redaktörernas förhoppning är att kunskapen och kunskapsutbytet i antologin ska bidra till att vitalisera Sametingets och andra centrala aktörers arbete på området. För alla människors rätt till en god hälsa.

  • 26.
    Össbo, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Hundra år av skogssamisk vilja: en inledning2020In: Skogssamisk vilja: en jubileumsantologi om skriften "Dat läh mijen situd", Karin Stenberg och skogssamisk historia och nutid / [ed] Åsa Össbo, Bertil Marklund, Lena Maria Nilsson, Krister Stoor, Ubmeje/Umeå: Várdduo - Centrum för samisk forskning , 2020, 1, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Össbo, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Marklund, BertilUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.Nilsson, Lena MariaUmeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.Stoor, KristerUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Várdduo – Centre for Sámi Research.
    Skogssamisk vilja: en jubileumsantologi om skriften "Dat läh mijen situd", Karin Stenberg och skogssamisk historia och nutid2020Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skogssamisk vilja är en jubileumsantologi till hundraårsminnet av att den skogssamiska läraren Karin Stenberg med hjälp av författaren Valdemar Lindholm gav ut skriften Dat läh mijen situd (Det är vår vilja). En vädjan till Svenska Nationen från Samefolket. Det är en politisk kampskrift om den skogssamiska situationen i Sverige för hundra år sedan som på många sätt är aktuellt också idag. Antologin inleds med ursprungstexten Dat läh mijen situd men innehåller ytteligare tolv bidrag som på olika sätt tar utgångspunkt i Stenbergs (och Lindholms) skrift, person och kunskaper om samernas historia.

    Kapitlen som följer med sina olika inriktingar utgör en fortsättning på Karin Stenbergs pionjärinsats för det skogssamiska folket. Bidragen omfattar även studier om Karin Stenberg som barn och vuxen. Bland kapiteln finns fem bidrag skrivna av skogssamer som träffade henne i vardagen, var släkt med henne eller varit hennes elever. Vi får vidare följa hennes litterära samtid i texter om samerna. Karin Stenberg hade troligen redan under 1920-talet förvärvat kunskaper om samernas utbredning söderut. Forskningens framsteg till idag hade säkerligen fångat hennes intresse.

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