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  • 1.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Witzell, Johanna
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wulff, Sören
    Luquez, Virginia MC
    Ågren, Rickard
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Large scale geographic clines of parasite damage to Populus tremula L2010In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 483-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In conclusion, clines of Phyllocnistis were stronger and more persistent compared to Melampsora, which showed contrasting clines of varying strength. Our data thus support the assumption of the GMTC model that clines exist in the border between hot and cold spots and that they may be less persistent for parasites with an elevated gene flow, and/or for parasites which cover relatively larger hot spots surrounded by fewer cold spots.

  • 2.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Siddique, Abu Bakar
    Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität Greifswald, Institut für Botanik und Landschaftsökologie, Greifswald, Germany.
    Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Unterseher, Martin
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Both plant genotype and herbivory shape aspen endophyte communities2018In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 187, no 2, p. 535-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicinoid phenolic glycosides are common defence substances in salicaceous trees and specialist leaf beetles use these compounds for their own defence against predators. Salicinoids vary qualitatively and qualitatively in aspen (Populus tremula) and this variation has a genetic basis. The foliar endophyte mycobiome is plentiful and we hypothesised that it is related to plant genotype, potentially mediated by salicinoid composition, and that interactions with the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula may alter this relationship. We studied these three-way interactions in controlled greenhouse experiments. Endophytic fungi were isolated from sterilised leaf tissues with and without beetle damage, and from beetles. We confirmed that endophyte composition was influenced by host genotype. Beetle activity added generalist morphs to the mycobiome that overrode the initial host association. Yeast-like genera (Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula) were isolated only from beetle-damaged tissues and from beetles, whereas fast-growing filamentous fungi dominated beetle-free control plants. Competition experiments between filamentous fungi of plant origin and beetle-related yeasts suggested interaction of both stimulating and inhibiting modes of action amongst the fungi. As a result, we detected examples of amensalism, commensalism, parasitism and competition between the morphs tested, but we found no evidence of mutualism, and consequently no co-evolutionary relationship could be demonstrated, between yeasts carried by beetles, host genotype and associated filamentous morphs. Endophyte studies are method-dependent and high-throughput sequencing technology best define the fungal mycobiome, culturing however continues to be a cheap way to provide fundamental ecological insights and it is also required for experimental studies.

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  • 3. Apuli, Rami-Petteri
    et al.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Inferring the Genomic Landscape of Recombination Rate Variation in European Aspen (Populus tremula)2020In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 299-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rate of meiotic recombination is one of the central factors determining genome-wide levels of linkage disequilibrium which has important consequences for the efficiency of natural selection and for the dissection of quantitative traits. Here we present a new, high-resolution linkage map for Populus tremula that we use to anchor approximately two thirds of the P. tremula draft genome assembly on to the expected 19 chromosomes, providing us with the first chromosome-scale assembly for P. tremula (Table 2). We then use this resource to estimate variation in recombination rates across the P. tremula genome and compare these results to recombination rates based on linkage disequilibrium in a large number of unrelated individuals. We also assess how variation in recombination rates is associated with a number of genomic features, such as gene density, repeat density and methylation levels. We find that recombination rates obtained from the two methods largely agree, although the LD-based method identifies a number of genomic regions with very high recombination rates that the map-based method fails to detect. Linkage map and LD-based estimates of recombination rates are positively correlated and show similar correlations with other genomic features, showing that both methods can accurately infer recombination rate variation across the genome. Recombination rates are positively correlated with gene density and negatively correlated with repeat density and methylation levels, suggesting that recombination is largely directed toward gene regions in P. tremula.

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  • 4.
    Bag, Pushan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lihavainen, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Riquelme, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    An atlas of the Norway spruce needle seasonal transcriptome2021In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1815-1829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal conifers possess a tremendous ability to survive and remain evergreen during harsh winter conditions and resume growth during summer. This is enabled by coordinated regulation of major cellular functions at the level of gene expression, metabolism, and physiology. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the annual changes in the global transcriptome of Norway spruce (Picea abies) needles as a resource to understand needle development and acclimation processes throughout the year. In young, growing needles (May 15 until June 30), cell walls, organelles, etc., were formed, and this developmental program heavily influenced the transcriptome, explained by over-represented Gene Ontology (GO) categories. Later changes in gene expression were smaller but four phases were recognized: summer (July–August), autumn (September–October), winter (November–February), and spring (March–April), where over-represented GO categories demonstrated how the needles acclimated to the various seasons. Changes in the seasonal global transcriptome profile were accompanied by differential expression of members of the major transcription factor families. We present a tentative model of how cellular activities are regulated over the year in needles of Norway spruce, which demonstrates the value of mining this dataset, accessible in ConGenIE together with advanced visualization tools.

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  • 5.
    Bandau, Franziska
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    European aspen with high compared to low constitutive tannin defenses grow taller in response to anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment2021In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 487, article id 118985Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal forests receive nitrogen-(N)-enrichment via atmospheric deposition and industrial fertilization. While it is known that N-enrichment can intensify interactions with natural antagonists, it remains poorly understood how genetic variability in plant defense chemistry can affect biotic interactions and height growth in N-enriched environments. We grew replicates of five low- and high-tannin Populus tremula genotypes, respectively, under three N-treatments (ambient, 15, and 150 kg N ha−1 yr−1). We assessed shoot blight occurrence (i.e. symptoms caused by Venturia fungi) during four growing seasons, and tree height growth during the same period. Damage by Venturia spp. increased with N-addition during all years, likely due to enhanced foliar quality. Low–tannin plants showed higher incidences of Venturia infection than high-tannin plants, regardless of the N-input-level. Height responded to an N-by-tannin-group interaction, which occurred because high-tannin plants grew taller than low-tannin plants at the high N-treatment, but not under the other N-levels. This pattern indicates that innate resource investment into tannin production yields a positive effect on growth under N-enriched conditions. Given that N-deposition is increasing globally, our research suggests that further studies are needed to investigate how N-enrichment interacts with plant defense traits globally. Moreover, our research suggests that N-deposition may provide an advantage for well-defended, high-tannin plants; and further, that genetic diversity in plant defense may be a key mechanism by which plant populations respond to this change.

  • 6.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Univ Copenhagen, Sect Plant Biochem, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, DK-1871 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Geographic structure in metabolome and herbivore community co-occurs with genetic structure in plant defence genes2013In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 791-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plantherbivore interactions vary across the landscape and have been hypothesised to promote local adaption in plants to the prevailing herbivore regime. Herbivores that feed on European aspen (Populus tremula) change across regional scales and selection on host defence genes may thus change at comparable scales. We have previously observed strong population differentiation in a set of inducible defence genes in Swedish P. tremula. Here, we study the geographic patterns of abundance and diversity of herbivorous insects, the untargeted metabolome of the foliage and genetic variation in a set of wound-induced genes and show that the geographic structure co-occurs in all three data sets. In response to this structure, we observe local maladaptation of herbivores, with fewer herbivores on local trees than on trees originated from more distant localities. Finally, we also identify 28 significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs from defence genes and a number of the herbivore traits and metabolic profiles.

  • 7.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Population differentiation in arthropod community structure and phenotypic association with inducible defense genes in European Aspen (Populus tremula L., salicaceae)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant-herbivore interactions are known to vary across a landscape due to both variation in abiotic and biotic factors. Such spatial variation tends to promoting local adaption of plants to the prevailing herbivore regime. Here we use data from a common garden to look for patterns across populations in the abundance and diversity of herbivorous insects. We also screen for variation in the untargeted metabolome of the foliage of a subset of the same trees. We also search for phenotypic associations between genetic variation in a number of wound-induced genes and phenotypic variation in herbivore abundance, diversity and in metabolomes. We observe significant genetic variation in a number of herbivore-related traits but low correlations between traits. We do observe substantial genetic structure in both herbivore community structure and in metabolic profiles and this structure is aligned with genetic structure we have previously documented for a set of defense genes. We also identify a number of significant associations between SNPs from wound-induced defense genes and a number of the herbivore traits and metabolic profiles. However, these associations are likely not causal, but are rather caused by the underlying population structure we observe. These results highlight to the importance of historical processes and the need to better understand both the current-day geographic distribution of different herbivore species as well as the post-glacial colonization history of both plants and herbivores.

  • 8.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Luomaranta, Mikko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gandla, Madhavi Latha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Yassin, Zakiya
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grahn, Thomas
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheepers, Gerhard
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stener, Lars-Göran
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Ekebo, Svalöv, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Genetic markers and tree properties predicting wood biorefining potential in aspen (Populus tremula) bioenergy feedstock2023In: Biotechnology for Biofuels and Bioproducts, E-ISSN 2731-3654, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wood represents the majority of the biomass on land and constitutes a renewable source of biofuels and other bioproducts. However, wood is recalcitrant to bioconversion, raising a need for feedstock improvement in production of, for instance, biofuels. We investigated the properties of wood that affect bioconversion, as well as the underlying genetics, to help identify superior tree feedstocks for biorefining.

    Results: We recorded 65 wood-related and growth traits in a population of 113 natural aspen genotypes from Sweden (https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gtht76hrd). These traits included three growth and field performance traits, 20 traits for wood chemical composition, 17 traits for wood anatomy and structure, and 25 wood saccharification traits as indicators of bioconversion potential. Glucose release after saccharification with acidic pretreatment correlated positively with tree stem height and diameter and the carbohydrate content of the wood, and negatively with the content of lignin and the hemicellulose sugar units. Most of these traits displayed extensive natural variation within the aspen population and high broad-sense heritability, supporting their potential in genetic improvement of feedstocks towards improved bioconversion. Finally, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed 13 genetic loci for saccharification yield (on a whole-tree-biomass basis), with six of them intersecting with associations for either height or stem diameter of the trees.

    Conclusions: The simple growth traits of stem height and diameter were identified as good predictors of wood saccharification yield in aspen trees. GWAS elucidated the underlying genetics, revealing putative genetic markers for bioconversion of bioenergy tree feedstocks.

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  • 9. Grimberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Lager, Ida
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Marttila, Salla
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.
    Storage lipid accumulation is controlled by photoperiodic signal acting via regulators of growth cessation and dormancy in hybrid aspen2018In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 219, no 2, p. 619-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The signalling pathways that control seasonal modulation of carbon metabolism in perennial plants are poorly understood. Using genetic, metabolic and natural variation approaches, we identify factors mediating photoperiodic control of storage lipid accumulation in the model tree hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides). We characterized lipid accumulation in transgenic hybrid aspen with impaired photoperiodic and hormonal responses. Genome-wide association mapping was performed in Swedish aspen (P.tremula) genotypes to determine genetic loci associated with genotype variation in lipid content. Our data show that the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulates in cambial meristem and pith rays of aspen in response to photoperiodic signal controlling growth cessation and dormancy induction. We show that photoperiodic control of TAG accumulation is mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS T/CONSTANS module, which also controls the induction of growth cessation. Hormonal and chromatin remodelling pathways also contribute to TAG accumulation by photoperiodic signal. Natural variation exists in lipid accumulation that is controlled by input from multiple loci. Our data shed light on how the control of storage metabolism is temporally coordinated with growth cessation and dormancy by photoperiodic signal, and reveals that storage lipid accumulation between seeds and perennating organs of trees may involve distinct regulatory circuits.

  • 10.
    Lihavainen, Jenna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Edlund, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Björkén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bag, Pushan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Stem girdling affects the onset of autumn senescence in aspen in interaction with metabolic signals2021In: Physiologia Plantarum, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 172, no 1, p. 201-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autumn senescence in aspen (Populus tremula) is precisely timed every year to relocate nutrients from leaves to storage organs before winter. Here we demonstrate how stem girdling, which leads to the accumulation of photosynthates in the crown, influences senescence. Girdling resulted in an early onset of senescence, but the chlorophyll degradation was slower and nitrogen more efficiently resorbed than during normal autumn senescence. Girdled stems accumulated or retained anthocyanins potentially providing photoprotection in senescing leaves. Girdling of one stem in a clonal stand sharing the same root stock did not affect senescence in the others, showing that the stems were autonomous in this respect. One girdled stem with unusually high chlorophyll and nitrogen contents maintained low carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio and did not show early senescence or depleted chlorophyll level unlike the other girdled stems suggesting that the responses depended on the genotype or its carbon and nitrogen status. Metabolite analysis highlighted that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, salicylic acid pathway, and redox homeostasis are involved in the regulation of girdling-induced senescence. We propose that disrupted sink-source relation and C/N status can provide cues through the TCA cycle and phytohormone signaling to override the phenological control of autumn senescence in the girdled stems.

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  • 11.
    Lihavainen, Jenna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Šimura, Jan
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bag, Pushan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Section of Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Fataftah, Nazeer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Novák, Ondřej
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Laboratory of Growth Regulators, Faculty of Science, Palacký University and Institute of Experimental Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Šlechtitelů 27, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Ljung, Karin
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Salicylic acid metabolism and signalling coordinate senescence initiation in aspen in nature2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 4288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deciduous trees exhibit a spectacular phenomenon of autumn senescence driven by the seasonality of their growth environment, yet there is no consensus which external or internal cues trigger it. Senescence starts at different times in European aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes grown in same location. By integrating omics studies, we demonstrate that aspen genotypes utilize similar transcriptional cascades and metabolic cues to initiate senescence, but at different times during autumn. The timing of autumn senescence initiation appeared to be controlled by two consecutive “switches”; 1) first the environmental variation induced the rewiring of the transcriptional network, stress signalling pathways and metabolic perturbations and 2) the start of senescence process was defined by the ability of the genotype to activate and sustain stress tolerance mechanisms mediated by salicylic acid. We propose that salicylic acid represses the onset of leaf senescence in stressful natural conditions, rather than promoting it as often observed in annual plants.

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  • 12. Lin, Yao-Cheng
    et al.
    Wang, Jing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Centre for Integrative Genetics (CIGENE), Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Faculty of Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Sundström, Görel
    Zuccolo, Andrea
    Nystedt, Björn
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    de la Torre, Amanda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ.
    Cossu, Rosa M.
    Hoeppner, Marc P.
    Lantz, Henrik
    Scofield, Douglas G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Ecology and Genetics: Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala Multidisciplinary Center for Advanced Computational Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zamani, Neda
    Johansson, Anna
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Leitch, Ilia J.
    Pellicer, Jaume
    Park, Eung-Jun
    Van Montagu, Marc
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Grabherr, Manfred
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen2018In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 46, p. E10970-E10978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Populus genus is one of the major plant model systems, but genomic resources have thus far primarily been available for poplar species, and primarily Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray), which was the first tree with a whole-genome assembly. To further advance evolutionary and functional genomic analyses in Populus, we produced genome assemblies and population genetics resources of two aspen species, Populus tremula L. and Populus tremuloides Michx. The two aspen species have distributions spanning the Northern Hemisphere, where they are keystone species supporting a wide variety of dependent communities and produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites. Our analyses show that the two aspens share a similar genome structure and a highly conserved gene content with P. trichocarpa but display substantially higher levels of heterozygosity. Based on population resequencing data, we observed widespread positive and negative selection acting on both coding and noncoding regions. Furthermore, patterns of genetic diversity and molecular evolution in aspen are influenced by a number of features, such as expression level, coexpression network connectivity, and regulatory variation. To maximize the community utility of these resources, we have integrated all presented data within the PopGenIE web resource (PopGenIE.org).

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  • 13.
    Michelson, Ingrid H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Edlund, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Eriksson, Maria E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nilsson, Ove
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Autumn senescence in aspen is not triggered by day length2018In: Physiologia Plantarum, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 162, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autumn senescence in mature aspens, grown under natural conditions, is initiated at almost the same date every year. The mechanism of such precise timing is not understood but we have previously shown that the signal must be derived from light. We studied variation in bud set and autumn senescence in a collection of 116 natural Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula) genotypes, from 12 populations in Sweden and planted in one northern and one southern common garden, to test the hypothesis that onset of autumn senescence is triggered by day length. We confirmed that, although bud set seemed to be triggered by a critical photoperiod/day length, other factors may influence it. The data on initiation of autumn senescence, on the other hand, were incompatible with the trigger being the day length per se, hence the trigger must be some other light-dependent factor.

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  • 14.
    Mähler, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Terebieniec, Barbara K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Vucak, Matej
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bailey, Mark
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Leaf shape in Populus tremula is a complex, omnigenic trait2020In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 11922-11940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaf shape is a defining feature of how we recognize and classify plant species. Although there is extensive variation in leaf shape within many species, few studies have disentangled the underlying genetic architecture. We characterized the genetic architecture of leaf shape variation in Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula L.) by performing genome‐wide association study (GWAS) for physiognomy traits. To ascertain the roles of identified GWAS candidate genes within the leaf development transcriptional program, we generated RNA‐Seq data that we used to perform gene co‐expression network analyses from a developmental series, which is publicly available within the PlantGenIE resource. We additionally used existing gene expression measurements across the population to analyze GWAS candidate genes in the context of a population‐wide co‐expression network and to identify genes that were differentially expressed between groups of individuals with contrasting leaf shapes. These data were integrated with expression GWAS (eQTL) results to define a set of candidate genes associated with leaf shape variation. Our results identified no clear adaptive link to leaf shape variation and indicate that leaf shape traits are genetically complex, likely determined by numerous small‐effect variations in gene expression. Genes associated with shape variation were peripheral within the population‐wide co‐expression network, were not highly connected within the leaf development co‐expression network, and exhibited signatures of relaxed selection. As such, our results are consistent with the omnigenic model.

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  • 15. Müller, Niels A.
    et al.
    Kersten, Birgit
    Leite Montalvão, Ana P.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    Bräutigam, Katharina
    Carracedo Lorenzo, Zulema
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hoenicka, Hans
    Kumar, Vikash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mader, Malte
    Pakull, Birte
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sabatti, Maurizio
    Vettori, Cristina
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Cronk, Quentin
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Fladung, Matthias
    A single gene underlies the dynamic evolution of poplar sex determination.2020In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-0278, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 630-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although hundreds of plant lineages have independently evolved dioecy (that is, separation of the sexes), the underlying genetic basis remains largely elusive. Here we show that diverse poplar species carry partial duplicates of the ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 17 (ARR17) orthologue in the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. These duplicates give rise to small RNAs apparently causing male-specific DNA methylation and silencing of the ARR17 gene. CRISPR–Cas9-induced mutations demonstrate that ARR17 functions as a sex switch, triggering female development when on and male development when off. Despite repeated turnover events, including a transition from the XY system to a ZW system, the sex-specific regulation of ARR17 is conserved across the poplar genus and probably beyond. Our data reveal how a single-gene-based mechanism of dioecy can enable highly dynamic sex-linked regions and contribute to maintaining recombination and integrity of sex chromosomes.

  • 16.
    Rendón-Anaya, Martha
    et al.
    Linnean Centre for Plant Biology, Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wilson, Jonathan
    Linnean Centre for Plant Biology, Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sveinsson, Sæmundur
    Matis Ltd, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Fedorkov, Aleksey
    Institute of Biology, Komi Science Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Syktyvkar, Russian Federation.
    Cottrell, Joan
    Forest Research, Northern Research Station, Roslin, United Kingdom.
    Bailey, Mark E. S.
    School of Life Sciences, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Ruņis, Dainis
    Genetic Resource Centre, Latvian State Forest Research Institute "silava", Salaspils, Latvia.
    Lexer, Christian
    Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Linnean Centre for Plant Biology, Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adaptive Introgression Facilitates Adaptation to High Latitudes in European Aspen (Populus tremula L.)2021In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 5034-5050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding local adaptation has become a key research area given the ongoing climate challenge and the concomitant requirement to conserve genetic resources. Perennial plants, such as forest trees, are good models to study local adaptation given their wide geographic distribution, largely outcrossing mating systems, and demographic histories. We evaluated signatures of local adaptation in European aspen (Populus tremula) across Europe by means of whole-genome resequencing of a collection of 411 individual trees. We dissected admixture patterns between aspen lineages and observed a strong genomic mosaicism in Scandinavian trees, evidencing different colonization trajectories into the peninsula from Russia, Central and Western Europe. As a consequence of the secondary contacts between populations after the last glacial maximum, we detected an adaptive introgression event in a genome region of ∼500 kb in chromosome 10, harboring a large-effect locus that has previously been shown to contribute to adaptation to the short growing seasons characteristic of Northern Scandinavia. Demographic simulations and ancestry inference suggest an Eastern origin—probably Russian—of the adaptive Nordic allele which nowadays is present in a homozygous state at the north of Scandinavia. The strength of introgression and positive selection signatures in this region is a unique feature in the genome. Furthermore, we detected signals of balancing selection, shared across regional populations, that highlight the importance of standing variation as a primary source of alleles that facilitate local adaptation. Our results, therefore, emphasize the importance of migration–selection balance underlying the genetic architecture of key adaptive quantitative traits.

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  • 17.
    Robinson, Kathryn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mahler, Niklas
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Önskog, Jenny
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hvidsten, Torgeir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Populus tremula (European aspen) shows no evidence of sexual dimorphism2014In: BMC Plant Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2229, Vol. 14, p. 276-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Evolutionary theory suggests that males and females may evolve sexually dimorphic phenotypic and biochemical traits concordant with each sex having different optimal strategies of resource investment to maximise reproductive success and fitness. Such sexual dimorphism would result in sex biased gene expression patterns in non-floral organs for autosomal genes associated with the control and development of such phenotypic traits.

    Results:

    We examined morphological, biochemical and herbivory traits to test for sexually dimorphic resource allocation strategies within collections of sexually mature and immature Populus tremula (European aspen) trees. In addition we profiled gene expression in mature leaves of sexually mature wild trees using whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays and RNA-Sequencing.

    Conclusions:

    We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism or differential resource investment strategies between males and females in either sexually immature or mature trees. Similarly, single-gene differential expression and machine learning approaches revealed no evidence of large-scale sex biased gene expression. However, two significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from the RNA-Seq data, one of which is a robust diagnostic marker of sex in P. tremula.

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  • 18.
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hauzy, Céline
    Loeuille, Nicolas
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
    Relative impacts of environmental variation and evolutionary history on the nestedness and modularity of tree-herbivore networks2015In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 5, no 14, p. 2898-2915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nestedness and modularity are measures of ecological networks whose causative effects are little understood. We analyzed antagonistic plant-herbivore bipartite networks using common gardens in two contrasting environments comprised of aspen trees with differing evolutionary histories of defence against herbivores. These networks were tightly connected owing to a high level of specialization of arthropod herbivores that spend a large proportion of the life cycle on aspen. The gardens were separated by ten degrees of latitude with resultant differences in abiotic conditions. We evaluated network metrics and reported similar connectance between gardens but greater numbers of links per species in the northern common garden. Interaction matrices revealed clear nestedness, indicating subsetting of the bipartite interactions into specialist divisions, in both the environmental and evolutionary aspen groups, although nestedness values were only significant in the northern garden. Variation in plant vulnerability, measured as the frequency of herbivore specialization in the aspen population, was significantly partitioned by environment (common garden) but not by evolutionary origin of the aspens. Significant values of modularity were observed in all network matrices. Trait-matching indicated that growth traits, leaf morphology, and phenolic metabolites affected modular structure in both the garden and evolutionary groups, whereas extra-floral nectaries had little influence. Further examination of module configuration revealed that plant vulnerability explained considerable variance in web structure. The contrasting conditions between the two gardens resulted in bottom-up effects of the environment, which most strongly influenced the overall network architecture, however, the aspen groups with dissimilar evolutionary history also showed contrasting degrees of nestedness and modularity. Our research therefore shows that, while evolution does affect the structure of aspen-herbivore bipartite networks, the role of environmental variations is a dominant constraint.

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  • 19.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)2012In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e37679-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

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  • 20.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Möller, Linus
    SweTree Technologies AB, Sweden.
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hertzberg, Magnus
    SweTree Technologies AB, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Variation in non-target traits in genetically modified hybrid aspens does not exceed natural variation2021In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 64, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetically modified hybrid aspens (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.), selected for increased growth under controlled conditions, have been grown in highly replicated field trials to evaluate how the target trait (growth) translated to natural conditions. Moreover, the variation was compared among genotypes of ecologically important non-target traits: number of shoots, bud set, pathogen infection, amount of insect herbivory, composition of the insect herbivore community and flower bud induction. This variation was compared with the variation in a population of randomly selected natural accessions of P. tremula grown in common garden trials, to estimate how the “unintended variation” present in transgenic trees, which in the future may be commercialized, compares with natural variation. The natural variation in the traits was found to be typically significantly greater. The data suggest that when authorities evaluate the potential risks associated with a field experiment or commercial introduction of transgenic trees, risk evaluation should focus on target traits and that unintentional variation in non-target traits is of less concern.

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  • 21.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Stangl, Zsofia R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Vergara, Alexander
    Kurepin, Leonid V.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ivanov, Alexander G.
    Way, Danielle
    Hüner, Norman P.A.
    Hurry, Vaughan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Elevated CO2 does not mitigate the effect of increased temperature at the whole plant or transcriptome scaleManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Terebieniec, Barbara K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    An integrated functional genomics and systems genetics analysis of leaf shape in Populus tremula Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaf shape is an important component of our relationship with the living world, representing a defining feature of how we recognise and classify plant species. There is extensive variation in the form and function of leaves within and between species. In the current study we utilised variation in leaf shape represented among individuals of a collection of Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula L.) sampled across Sweden and the remarkable extent of heterophylly present to establish morphological, cellular and transcriptional developmental time lines. We performed gene expression network and phenotypical regression analyses to identify genes of central importance or that were highly predictive of shape and size phenotypes during leaf development using a systems biology approach. We complemented this developmental study with a genome wide association study of leaf shape variation to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with leaf shape and size, their genomic context and the biological role of associated genes. We then compared these association candidate genes to differentially expressed genes between groups of genotypes with highly contrasting leaf shapes, also considering whether there were expression quantitative trait loci associated with the genes. We demonstrate that our developmental gene expression series captured known biology for homologs of functionally characterised Arabidopsis thaliana genes and biological processes of importance during leaf development. We identified genes of high importance from the developmental series and natural variation analyses. These included genes with characterised functions in leaf development in addition to many novel candidates. Our systems genetics approach identified numerous genes supported by the developmental time series, phenotypic and expression association mapping and differential expression between phenotypic extremes. As such, we describe a rich resource for directing future functional characterisation studies and a comprehensive data resource characterising the role of gene expression during leaf development in aspen.

  • 23. Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y
    et al.
    Guy, Robert D
    Street, Nathaniel R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Silim, Salim N.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens2015In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 6, article id 528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (g(S)) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (delta C-13) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects.

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  • 24.
    Wang, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Centre for Integrative Genetics, Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Ding, Jihua
    Tan, Biyue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Stora Enso Biomaterials, 13104 Nacka, Sweden.
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Michelson, Ingrid H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Johansson, Anna
    Nystedt, Bjorn
    Scofield, Douglas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Multidisciplinary Center for Advanced Computational Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant2018In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 19, article id 72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The initiation of growth cessation and dormancy represent critical life history trade offs between survival and growth and have important fitness effects in perennial plants Such adaptive life history traits often show strong local adaptation along environmental gradients but, despite then importance, the genetic architecture of these traits remains poorly understood.

    Results: We integrate whole genome re sequencing with environmental and phenotypic data from common garden experiments to investigate the genomic basis of local adaptation across a latitudinal gradient in European aspen (Populus tremula). A single genomic region containing the PtFT2 gene mediates local adaptation in the timing of bud set and explains 65% of the observed genetic variation in bud set This locus is the likely target of a recent selective sweep that originated right before or during colonization of northern Scandinavia following the last glaciation Field and greenhouse experiments confirm that variation in PtFT2 gene expression affects the phenotypic variation in bud set that we observe in wild natural populations.

    Conclusions: Our results reveal a major effect locus that determines the timing of bud set and that has facilitated rapid adaptation to shorter growing seasons and colder climates in European aspen. The discovery of a single locus explaining a substantial fraction of the variation in a key life-history trait is remarkable, given that such traits are generally considered to be highly polygenic. These findings provide a dramatic illustration of how loci of large effect for adaptive traits can arise and be maintained over large geographical scales in natural populations.

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