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  • 1.
    Esberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Haworth, Simon
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Using Oral Microbiota Data to Design a Short Sucrose Intake Index2021In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 1400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive sucrose consumption is associated with numerous health problems, including dental caries, and is considered to play a critical role in shaping the human microbiota. Here, we aimed to confirm the association between sucrose exposure and oral microbiota profile, develop a short food-based index capturing variation among sucrose consumers and validate it against oral microbiota and dental caries in a derivation cohort with 16- to 79-year-old participants (n = 427). Intake and food preferences were recorded by questionnaires and saliva microbiota by 16S rDNA sequencing. Taxonomic similarities clustered participants into five clusters, where one stood out with highest sucrose intake and predicted sugar related metabolic pathways but lowest species diversity in the microbiota. Multivariate modelling of food intake and preferences revealed foods suitable for a sucrose index. This, similarly to sucrose intake, was related to bacterial pattern and caries status. The validity of the sucrose index was replicated in the population-based Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Dental Endpoints (GLIDE, n = 105,520 Swedish adults) cohort. This suggested that the index captured clinically relevant variation in sucrose intake and that FFQ derived information may be suitable for screening of sucrose intake in the clinic and epidemiological studies, although adjustments to local consumption habits are needed.

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  • 2.
    Esberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Haworth, Simon
    Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, Department of Population Health Sciences Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Oral Microbiota Profile Associates with Sugar Intake and Taste Preference Genes2020In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral microbiota ecology is influenced by environmental and host conditions, but few studies have evaluated associations between untargeted measures of the entire oral microbiome and potentially relevant environmental and host factors. This study aimed to identify salivary microbiota cluster groups using hierarchical cluster analyses (Wards method) based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, and identify lifestyle and host factors which were associated with these groups. Group members (n = 175) were distinctly separated by microbiota profiles and differed in reported sucrose intake and allelic variation in the taste-preference-associated genes TAS1R1 (rs731024) and GNAT3 (rs2074673). Groups with higher sucrose intake were either characterized by a wide panel of species or phylotypes with fewer aciduric species, or by a narrower profile that included documented aciduric- and caries-associated species. The inferred functional profiles of the latter type were dominated by metabolic pathways associated with the carbohydrate metabolism with enrichment of glycosidase functions. In conclusion, this study supported in vivo associations between sugar intake and oral microbiota ecology, but it also found evidence for a variable microbiota response to sugar, highlighting the importance of modifying host factors and microbes beyond the commonly targeted acidogenic and acid-tolerant species. The results should be confirmed under controlled settings with comprehensive phenotypic and genotypic data.

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  • 3.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Probiotic Lactobacilli in the context of dental caries as a biofilm-mediated disease2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The World Health Organization defines probiotics as ‘live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host’. Traditionally, probiotic microorganisms have been used to prevent or treat gastrointestinal tract diseases. In the last 15 years, there has been increasing interest of a possible probiotic impact on the oral microbiota and dental caries. Dental caries is a multifactorial disease, and the causative factor in the oral microbiota includes a shift from a balanced microflora to a microflora that includes more aciduric species such as mutans streptococci (MS), non-mutans streptococci, and Actinomyces. MS is considered an opportunistic pathogen although several other bacteria also contribute to the disease. Early acquisition of MS is associated with early development of caries; therefore a desirable complement to other prophylactic measures would be a MS colonization inhibitor.

    Objective: To better understand how selected strains of probiotic lactobacilli interact with MS in vitro and in vivo and to study the impact of probiotic lactobacilli on caries development during childhood.

    Material and methods: The in vitro properties of probiotic lactobacilli were studied with regard to (i) acid production from sugars and sugar alcohols, (ii) growth inhibition capacity on clinical isolates and reference strains of MS as well as Candida albicans and (iii) the capacity to co-aggregate with MS. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) tested the short-term effect of intervention with two Lactobacillus reuteri strains on MS, which was evaluated after treatment with chlorhexidine. The re-growth patterns of MS and 19 other selected strains were also evaluated. In the second clinical study  we investigated the long-term effect on MS prevalence and dental caries after an intervention with Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) between 4 and 13 months of age.

    Results: The results from the in vitro testing showed that strains of probiotic lactobacilli differed in their fermentation patterns, inhibition capacity and their capacity to co-aggregate, which should be kept in mind in the translation to clinical research. The clinical study on short-term effects of two L. reuteri strains on MS and other oral strains showed no effect on re-growth patterns after intervention. The clinical study on long-term effects of LF19 showed no effect on the prevalence of MS. Furthermore, the clinical follow-up at 9 years of age showed no differences in either decayed, missing, and filled surface (dmfs) or DMFS between the probiotic and placebo groups. Evaluation of saliva samples showed no signs of oral colonization with LF19 in the study group.

    Conclusion: The in vitro testing showed potentials of the selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains for interference with MS and C. albicans. The results from the clinical studies showed no such effect on MS or dental caries. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of specific probiotic applications in the prevention of dental caries is limited and does not allow for conclusions concerning the use of probiotic bacteria as a preventive measure.

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  • 4.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Granqvist, L.
    Pediatric Dentistry, Eastman Dental Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Twetman, S.
    Department of Odontology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Prevention of Recurrent Childhood Caries with Probiotic Supplements: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up2022In: Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, ISSN 1867-1306, E-ISSN 1867-1314, Vol. 14, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of drops containing probiotic bacteria on the recurrence of dental caries in preschool children. The study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded design with two parallel arms. 38 preschool children were enrolled after comprehensive restorative treatment under general anesthesia or conscious sedation (baseline), and they were followed up after 6 and 12 months. Parents of children in the test group were instructed to give 5 daily drops containing two strains of Limosilactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) at bedtime. The placebo drops were identically composed but lacked bacteria. The duration of the intervention was 12 months. The primary endpoint was recurrence of new caries lesions on subject level (yes/no), and secondary endpoints were presence of dental plaque and gingivitis. We found high rate of recurrent moderate and extensive lesions after 12 months (67%) but there were no significant differences between the groups. We observed no beneficial effects on dental plaque or gingival inflammation. The findings were however uncertain and inconclusive due to lack of power, a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. ClinTrials.gov Identifier: (NCT04929340), June 18, 2021; retrospectively registered.

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  • 5.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Hedberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Twetman, Svante
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Growth inhibition of oral mutans streptococci and candida by commercial probiotic lactobacilli: an in vitro study2010In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 10, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selected probiotic strains showed a significant but somewhat varying ability to inhibit growth of oral mutans streptococci and Candida albicans in vitro.

  • 6.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Karlsson Videhult, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Silfverdal, Sven Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    West, Christina E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Vitamin D Insufficiency among Women Post-Partum in Northern Sweden: A Public Health Concern2017In: Food and Nutrition Sciences, ISSN 2157-944X, E-ISSN 2157-9458, no 8, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnancy and post-partum represent a period of susceptibility for vitamin D insufficiency. This study investigated S-25 [OH] D levels in women in northern Sweden 4 weeks post-partum and its association with selected background factors. Blood from 100 healthy women were analyzed for iron status and serum levels of S-25[OH] D using ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS). <50 nmol/L was categorized as insufficiency and <25 nmol/L as deficiency. Maternal BMI, dietary habits, fungal infections during pregnancy, and infant birth characteristics were collected using questionnaires and medical charts. 58% were vitamin D insufficient whereas 10% had deficiency. Insufficiency was most common during winter (OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.1-6.96) and women with deficiency reported lower milk consumption; 11.3 ± 22.8 intakes per months vs. 34.0 ± 28.9 for those above 25 nmol/L (p < 0.05). Vitamin D-insufficient women had lower serum ferritin levels (p < 0.01) and higher serum transferrin levels (p < 0.05). A history of vaginal fungal infection during pregnancy was associated with insufficiency (OR = 5.10; 95% CI = 1.01-25.73), however, the confidence interval of the estimate was wide, resulting in uncertainty. It is concluded that vitamin D insufficiency 4 weeks post-partum was common in women living at 63°49'N. The odds of being insufficient were increased during winter whereas milk consumption was negatively associated with deficiency. The low vitamin D-levels particularly during winter is a public health concern. From a public health perspective it has to be considered whether dietary advices alone should be modified or if supplementation with vitamin D during pregnancy and the post-partum period also is needed.

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  • 7.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Probiotic bacteria and dental caries2020In: The Impact of Nutrition and Diet on Oral Health / [ed] Zohoori F.V., Duckworth R.M., Basel: S. Karger, 2020, no 28, p. 99-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization has defined probiotics as “Live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host.” Traditionally, probiotic microorganisms (mainly Lactobacillus ssp. and Bifidobacterium ssp.) have been used to prevent or treat diseases in the gastrointestinal tract. In the past 20 years, there has been an increased interest in possible oral health effects of probiotics. In vitro studies have shown promising results with growth inhibition of mutans streptococci (MS) and Candida albicans. There are only a few clinical studies with caries development as the primary outcome while more studies have been focusing on control of caries risk factors or so-called surrogate outcomes. Several studies have evaluated the effects of probiotic bacteria on MS in saliva and/or plaque, and a number of probiotic strains show ability to reduce the number of MS. Probiotic bacteria have not been shown to permanently colonize the oral cavity; in early-in-life interventions or in subjects with a mature microbiota. To date investigated strains are transiently present in saliva during and shortly after an intervention. There are eight randomized controlled clinical trials with dental caries as outcome and probiotic strains, administration, duration of the intervention, and target group varied. In a majority of the studies (75%), the interventions resulted in caries reduction in the treatment groups. Although a majority of these studies suggest a caries-preventive effect of probiotic bacteria, more long-term clinical studies are needed in this field before probiotics could be recommended for preventing or treating dental caries.

  • 8.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, Svante
    Caries prevalence in children with cleft lip and palate: a systematic review of case-control studies2007In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To conduct a systematic review of literature in order to examine the evidence of an increased prevalence of dental caries in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP).

    METHODS: A search of the PubMed database was conducted through May 2006. Sex- and age-matched case-control studies with noncavitated and manifest caries lesions as endpoint were targeted (n = 6). The studies were assessed independently by two reviewers and scored A-C according to predetermined criteria for methodology and performance.

    RESULTS: Significantly more caries in CLP children were reported in two of the four studies in the permanent dentition and in three out of four publications dealing with primary teeth. None of the articles were, however, assessed with the highest grade 'A' and the level of evidence was therefore based on three papers graded 'B'. There was a tendency towards higher caries scores in preschool children, but as conflicting results were revealed, the evidence that children with CLP exhibit more caries than noncleft controls was inconclusive.

    CONCLUSION: This systematic review of literature was unable to find firm evidence for the assumption that CLP children have an increased prevalence of dental caries.

  • 9.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    West, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsson Videhult, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Brandelius, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Early intervention with probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei F19 has no long-term effect on caries experience2013In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 559-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate possible long-term effects of a cereal diet supplemented with Lactobacillus paracasei F19 (LF19) during weaning on caries experience, mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LBC) in a group of 9-year-old children. A secondary aim was to evaluate if the intervention resulted in the permanent integration of LF19 as part of the oral microbiota. The study followed up on a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised trial. Among 179 infants that were randomised to a daily diet that included cereals with or without LF19 from 4 to 13 months of age, 56 from the probiotic group and 62 from the placebo group participated in the follow-up at 9 years. Data were collected by oral clinical examination and questionnaires. MS and LBC levels were assessed with conventional cultivation; LF19 was detected by using randomly amplified polymerase chain reactions (RAPD-PCR). At the follow-up, neither decayed, missing and filled surfaces for primary teeth (dmfs) nor decayed, missing and filled surfaces for permanent teeth (DMFS) differed significantly between the probiotic and placebo groups (p > 0.05). MS and LBC levels were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). RAPD-PCR showed no evidence of oral colonisation with LF19 in the study group. It is concluded that an early intervention with LF19 did not affect the frequency of dental caries, MS or LBC. LF19 did not establish itself as a permanent facet of the oral microbiota in any of the subjects included in this study.

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  • 10.
    Hedberg, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Sjöström, I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, S
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Sugar fermentation in probiotic bacteria: an in vitro study2008In: Oral Microbiology and Immunology, ISSN 0902-0055, E-ISSN 1399-302X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 482-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Food supplemented with probiotic bacteria is a rapidly growing sector of the market. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the acid production of selected probiotic strains available in commercial products.

    METHODS: Six Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and 931; Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and LB21; Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei F19, and Lactobacillus reuteri PTA 5289) were cultivated at 37 degrees C in an anaerobic atmosphere on Man, Rogosa, Shape (MRS) agar for 48 h or MRS broth for 16 h. After centrifugation, the cells were washed and resuspended in sterile phosphate-buffered saline and immediately subjected to a fermentation assay with 12 different carbohydrates (nine sugars and three sugar alcohols) in microtiter plates with a pH indicator. The plates were examined for color changes after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three scores were used: negative (pH > 6.8); weak (pH 5.2-6.8), and positive (pH < 5.2). The strains were characterized with the API 50 CH system to confirm their identity.

    RESULTS: L. plantarum fermented all the sugars except for melibiose, raffinose, and xylitol. Both L. rhamnosus strains were generally less active although L. rhamnosus GG was slightly more active than strain LB21 in the 5% CO(2) setting. The latter strain exhibited negative reactions for sucrose, maltose, arabinose, and sorbitol under anaerobic conditions. The assays with L. paracasei and L. reuteri had negative or weak reactions for all tested sugars under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    CONCLUSION: The metabolic capacity to form acid from dietary sugars differed significantly between the various probiotic strains.

  • 11.
    Hedberg, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Sjöström, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, Svante
    University of Copenhagen.
    In vitro inhibition of mutans streptococci by probiotic lactobacilli2009Report (Other academic)
  • 12. Keller, Mette Kirstine
    et al.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, Svante
    Co-aggregation and growth inhibition of probiotic lactobacilli and clinical isolates of mutans streptococci: an in vitro study2011In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Co-aggregation and growth inhibition abilities of probiotic bacteria may play a key role in their interference with the oral biofilm. The aim was to investigate the in vitro ability of selected commercial probiotic lactobacilli to co-aggregate and inhibit growth of oral mutans steptococci isolated from adults with contrasting levels of caries.

    Materials and methods: Mutans streptococci (MS) strains were isolated from caries-free (n = 3) and caries-susceptible (n = 5) young adults and processed with eight commercial probiotic lactobacilli strains. One laboratory reference strain (S. mutans Ingbritt) was selected as control. Co-aggregation was determined spectrophotometrically and growth inhibition was assessed with the agar overlay technique.

    Results: All probiotic lactobacilli showed an ability to co-aggregate with the isolated MS strains. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between strains from different individuals when compared with the reference strain. The selected lactobacilli inhibited MS growth, but the ability varied between the strains and was clearly related to pH. No differences were observed between the different MS strains from caries-free and caries-susceptible individuals.

    Conclusions: The selected lactobacilli displayed co-aggregation activity and inhibited growth of clinical mutans streptococci. The growth inhibition was strain-specific and dependent on pH and cell concentration. The findings indicate that the outcome of lactobacilli-derived probiotic therapy might vary between individuals and depend on the specific strain used.

  • 13. Keller, MK
    et al.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Dahlen, G
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Twetman, S
    Probiotic supplements (Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) do not affect regrowth of mutans streptococci after full-mouth disinfection with chlorhexidine: a randomized controlled multicenter trial2012In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of tablets containing two probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains in inhibiting regrowth of salivary mutans streptococci (MS) after full-mouth disinfection (FMD) with chlorhexidine. The null hypothesis was that the levels of MS would not differ in comparison with a placebo protocol. The study population was comprised of 62 young adults (mean age 23 years) with moderate or high counts of salivary MS who volunteered after informed consent. The study was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups. After a 3-day chlorhexidine regimen, the subjects were randomly assigned to a test group (n = 32) with probiotic lozenges (2/day) or a placebo group (n = 30). The intervention period was 6 weeks, and stimulated whole saliva was collected at baseline and after 1, 6, and 12 weeks. The samples were processed for MS by a chair-side test and DNA-DNA hybridization as an estimate of 19 bacterial strains associated with oral health and disease. There was no significant difference between the groups at inclusion, and FMD reduced the salivary MS levels significantly in both groups. The MS suppression lasted less than 6 weeks and there were no statistical differences in salivary MS regrowth between the test and control groups at any of the follow-ups. Likewise, there were no major differences in the regrowth patterns of the checkerboard panel between the two groups. We conclude that daily oral administration of L. reuteri did not seem to affect or delay the regrowth of salivary MS after FMD with chlorhexidine. Copyright (c) 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 14.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Haworth, Simon
    Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    West, Christina E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Genetic preference for sweet taste in mothers associates with mother-child preference and intake2023In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taste perception is a well-documented driving force in food selection, with variations in, e.g., taste receptor encoding and glucose transporter genes conferring differences in taste sensitivity and food intake. We explored the impact of maternal innate driving forces on sweet taste preference and intake and assessed whether their children differed in their intake of sweet foods or traits related to sweet intake. A total of 133 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes reported to associate with eating preferences were sequenced from saliva-DNA from 187 mother-and-child pairs. Preference and intake of sweet-, bitter-, sour-, and umami-tasting foods were estimated from questionnaires. A total of 32 SNP variants associated with a preference for sweet taste or intake at a p-value < 0.05 in additive, dominant major, or dominant minor allele models, with two passing corrections for multiple testing (q < 0.05). These were rs7513755 in the TAS1R2 gene and rs34162196 in the OR10G3 gene. Having the T allele of rs34162196 was associated with higher sweet intake in mothers and their children, along with a higher BMI in mothers. Having the G allele of rs7513755 was associated with a higher preference for sweets in the mothers. The rs34162196 might be a candidate for a genetic score for sweet intake to complement self-reported intakes.

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  • 15.
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Kieri, Catarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Widman, Kjerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Caries and background factors in Swedish 4-year-old children with special reference to immigrant status2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 852-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study assesses the prevalence of caries and some background factors in 4-year-old children in the city of Umse, northern Sweden, and compares this with data from earlier studies to reveal changes over time. Materials and methods. Children from the catchment areas of three Public Dental Health Service clinics in Umea (n = 224) born during the third quarter of 2008 were invited to undergo a clinical dental examination. Decayed surfaces (including both dentine and enamel, except for enamel lesions on buccal and lingual surfaces), missing and filled surfaces (dmfs) were recorded using the same methods and criteria as in a series of earlier studies performed between 1980-2007. Background data were collected in a case-history and a questionnaire. Results. The proportion of children with caries significantly decreased from 2007 (38%) to 2012 (22%) (p < 0.05). In addition, the distribution of dmfs differed significantly between these years (p < 0.05). More immigrant children had caries (42%) than non-immigrant children (15%) (p < 0.05). For children with caries, there were no significant changes in the distribution of dmfs between 1980-2012 (p > 0.05). An immigrant background was associated with a lower frequency of tooth brushing and a higher intake of ice cream, sweets and chocolate drinks (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Although the proportion of children with caries declined between 2007-2012, this decline was limited to non-immigrant children. Since 1980 the distribution of dmfs remained unchanged among children with caries. More research on interventions for changing oral health behaviours is needed, specifically for immigrant children.

  • 16.
    Vestman, Nelly Romani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Keller, Mette K
    Granström, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Roos, Stefan
    Twetman, Svante
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Lactobacillus reuteri influences regrowth of mutans streptococci after full-mouth disinfection: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial2013In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed whether the persistence of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 in saliva could delay the regrowth of mutans streptococci (MS) after a full-mouth disinfection with chlorhexidine (CHX). A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a 6-week intervention period and 3- and 6-month follow-up was performed. 62 healthy subjects with moderate to high counts of MS were randomly assigned to a test group (n = 32) or a placebo group (n = 30). Before onset of the intervention, subjects received two sessions of professional cleaning, flossing, and application of CHX varnish and rinsed their mouth with a CHX solution between the sessions (2 days). Thereafter, the test group used probiotic lozenges (2/day) containing L. reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289; 1 × 108 CFU of each strain), and the placebo group used identical lozenges lacking the lactobacilli. Saliva samples were collected and cultured onto selective media, and isolates of L. reuteri as well as DNA directly extracted from saliva were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers. Presence of salivary MS was analysed with a chair-side test. L. reuteri was frequently detected by culture during the intervention period but in only 3 test group subjects at follow-ups. Regrowth of MS statistically significantly differed depending on the presence or absence of L. reuteri DSM 17938 detected by PCR. We conclude that cultivable L. reuteri strains may only sporadically be confirmed after termination of the intervention, but subjects with PCR-detected L. reuteridemonstrated slower regrowth of MS.

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