Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Asplund, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Åhlin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors associated with self-rated exhaustion disorder among municipal employees in rural northern Sweden2023In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1215-1229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research indicates that good organizational and psychosocial environments are vital to well-functioning workplaces and employee health. Working in the municipal sector and in the rural context may contribute to more health problems, poorer organizational and psychosocial work environments, and higher sick-leave rates.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors among municipal employees with or without self-rated exhaustion disorder (s-ED) in rural northern Sweden.

    Methods: The Modern Work Life Questionnaire and the Self-Rated Exhaustion Disorder Scale were used among 1093 municipal employees.

    Results: The results showed that there were significant differences between the s-ED and the non-s-ED group in all but one of the organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors. Various demands, i.e. quantitative, emotional, intellectual, and IT demands were some factors associated with the s-ED group. Social support, resources, and time for work and reflection were some factors associated with the non-s-ED group. Both the s-ED and the non-s-ED groups assessed significantly higher emotional demands and less resources compared to national reference values.

    Conclusion: Findings from this study are relevant to a better understanding what organizational and psychosocial work environmental work factor the employer need to pay extra attention to. Addressing risk and protective factors in the work environment could tribute to promote occupational well-being, preventing exhaustion disorder and long-term sick leave among municipal employees in rural northern Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Asplund, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åhlin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Self-rated exhaustion disorder and associated health-related factors among municipal employees in rural areas of northern Sweden2021In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, p. 659-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study among municipal employees in rural areas of northern Sweden were to assess the prevalence of self-rated exhaustion disorder (s-ED), describe plausible between-group differences in self-reported health-related factors among employees with or without s-ED, and identify health-related factors associated with s-ED.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 1093 municipal employees (76.1% women) in two rural areas using an instrument measuring s-ED and health variables drawn from the Modern Worklife Questionnaire (MWQ), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the National Board of Health and Welfare's questions about physical activity. Comparisons were made between an s-ED and a non-s-ED group. Health-related factors associated with s-ED were identified through a logistic regression.

    RESULTS: Self-rated exhaustion disorder was reported by 21.5% of the participants. Health-related factors associated with s-ED were cognitive problems, sleep problems, depressive symptoms, high stress, poor self-rated health, and stomach problems. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of participants who met the criteria of physical activity among s-ED and non-s-ED group.

    CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggest that s-ED is more common among municipal employees in rural areas than in other working populations in Sweden. Several health-related factors were associated with s-ED. Regular use of a self-rated instrument in evaluating the organizational and social work environment can identify people at risk of developing exhaustion disorder and requiring long-term sick leave.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Frykholm, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Simonsson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Levik Sandström, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention. Institute for Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen (ISMC) and Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Applicability of a supramaximal high-intensity interval training program for older adults previously not engaged in regular exercise: analyses of secondary outcomes from the Umeå HIT Study2024In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 73, article id 102647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This analysis of secondary outcomes investigated the applicability of supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) with individually prescribed external intensity performed on stationary bicycles. Sixty-eight participants with a median (min; max) age of 69 (66; 79), at the time not engaged in regular exercise were randomized to 25 twice-weekly sessions of supramaximal HIT (20-min session with 10 × 6-s intervals) or moderate-intensity training (MIT, 40-min session with 3 × 8-min intervals). The primary aim was outcomes on applicability regarding; adherence to prescribed external interval intensity, participant reported positive and negative events, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 6–20), and affective state (Feeling Scale, FS -5–5). A secondary aim was to investigate change in exercise-related self-efficacy (Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale) and motivation (Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2). Total adherence to the prescribed external interval intensity was [median (min; max)] 89 % (56; 100 %) in supramaximal HIT, and 100 % (95; 100 %) in MIT. The supramaximal HIT group reported 60 % of the positive (112 of 186) and 36 % of the negative (52 of 146) events. At the end of the training period, the median (min; max) session RPE was 15 (12; 17) for supramaximal HIT and 14 (9; 15) for MIT. As for FS, the median last within-session rating was 3 (−1; 5) for supramaximal HIT and 3 (1; 5) for MIT. Exercise-related motivation increased (mean difference in Relative Autonomy Index score = 1.54, 95 % CI [0.69; 2.40]), while self-efficacy did not change (mean difference = 0.55, 95 % CI [-0.75; 1.82]), regardless of group. This study provide support for supramaximal HIT in supervised group settings for older adults.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4. Granström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Eriksson, Staffan
    Test-retest reliability of the twenty-five-hole peg test in patients who had a stroke2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e032560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Weaknesses of the nine-hole peg test include high floor effects and a result that might be difficult to interpret. In the twenty-five-hole peg test (TFHPT), the larger number of available pegs allows for the straightforward counting of the number of pegs inserted as the result. The TFHPT provides a comprehensible result and low floor effects. The objective was to assess the test-retest reliability of the TFHPT when testing persons with stroke. A particular focus was placed on the absolute reliability, as quantified by the smallest real difference (SRD). Complementary aims were to investigate possible implications for how the TFHPT should be used and for how the SRD of the TFHPT performance should be expressed.

    Design: This study employed a test-retest design including three trials. The pause between trials was approximately 10-120 s.

    Participants, setting and outcome measure: Thirty-one participants who had suffered a stroke were recruited from a group designated for constraint-induced movement therapy at outpatient clinics. The TFHPT result was expressed as the number of pegs inserted.

    Methods: Absolute reliability was quantified by the SRD, including random and systematic error for a single trial, SRD2.1, and for an average of three trials, SRD2.3. For the SRD measures, the corresponding SRD percentage (SRD%) measure was also reported.

    Results: The differences in the number of pegs necessary to detect a change in the TFHPT for SRD2.1 and SRD2.3 were 4.0 and 2.3, respectively. The corresponding SRD% values for SRD2.1 and SRD2.3 were 36.5% and 21.3%, respectively.

    Conclusions: The smallest change that can be detected in the TFHPT should be just above two pegs for a test procedure including an average of three trials. The use of an average of three trials compared with a single trial substantially reduces the measurement error.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Biomechanical and neural aspects of eccentric and concentric muscle performance in stroke subjects: Implications for resistance training2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscle weakness is one of the major causes of post-stroke disability. Stroke rehabilitation programs now often incorporate the same type of resistance training that is used for healthy subjects; however, the training effects induced from these training strategies are often limited for stroke patients. An important resistance training principle is that an optimal level of stress is exerted on the neuromuscular system, both during concentric (shortening) and eccentric (lengthening) contractions. One potential problem for post-stroke patients might be difficulties achieving sufficient levels of stress on the neuromuscular system. This problem may be associated with altered muscular function after stroke. In healthy subjects, maximum strength during eccentric contractions is higher than during concentric contractions. In individuals with stroke, this difference in strength is often increased. Moreover, it has also been shown that individuals with stroke exhibit alteration with respect to how the strength varies throughout the range of motion. For example, healthy subjects exhibit a joint specific torque-angle relationship that normally is the same irrespective of contraction mode and contraction velocity. In contrast, individuals with stroke exhibit an overall change of the torque-angle relationship. This change, as described in the literature, consists of a more pronounced strength loss at short muscle length. In individuals with stroke, torque-angle relationships are only partially investigated and so far these relationships have not been analysed using testing protocols that include eccentric, isometric, and concentric modes of contraction.

     

    This thesis investigates the torque-angle relationship of elbow flexors in subjects with stroke during all three modes of contractions – isometric, concentric, and eccentric ­– and the relative loading throughout the range of movement during a resistance exercise. In addition, this thesis studies possible central nervous system mechanisms involved in the control of muscle activation during eccentric and concentric contractions.

     

    The torque-angle relationship during maximum voluntary elbow flexion was examined in stroke subjects (n=11), age-matched healthy subjects (n=11), and young subjects (n=11) during different contraction modes and velocities. In stroke subjects, maximum torque as well as the torque angle relationship was better preserved during eccentric contractions compared to concentric contractions. Furthermore, the relative loading during a resistance exercise at an intensity of 10RM (repetition maximum) was examined. Relative loading throughout the concentric phase of the resistance exercise, expressed as percentage of concentric torque, was found to be similar in all groups. However, relative loading during the eccentric contraction phase, expressed as the percentage of eccentric isokinetic torque, was significantly lower for the stroke group. In addition, when related to isometric maximum voluntary contraction, the loading for the stroke group was significantly lower than for the control groups during both the concentric and eccentric contraction phases.

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine differences between recruited brain regions during the concentric and the eccentric phase of imagined maximum resistance exercise of the elbow flexors (motor imagery) in young healthy subjects (n=18) and in a selected sample of individuals with stroke (n=4). The motor and premotor cortex was less activated during imagined maximum eccentric contractions compared to imagined maximum concentric contraction of elbow flexors. Moreover, BA44 in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain area that has been shown to be involved in inhibitory control of motor activity, was additionally recruited during eccentric compared to concentric conditions. This pattern was evident only on the contralesional (the intact hemisphere) in some of the stroke subjects. On the ipsilesional hemisphere, the recruitment in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex was similar for both modes of contractions. 

     

    Compared to healthy subjects, the stroke subjects exhibited altered muscular function comprising a specific reduction of torque producing capacity and deviant torque-angle relationship during concentric contractions. Therefore, the relative training load during the resistance exercise at a training intensity of 10RM was lower for subjects with stroke. Furthermore, neuroimaging data indicates that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may be involved in a mechanism that modulates cortical motor drive differently depending on mode of the contractions. This might partly be responsible for why it is impossible to fully activate a muscle during eccentric contractions. Moreover, among individuals with stroke, a disturbance of this system could also lie behind the lack of contraction mode-specific modulation of muscle activation that has been found in this population. The altered neuromuscular function evident after a stroke means that stroke victims may find it difficult to supply a sufficient level of stress during traditional resistance exercises to promote adaptation by the neuromuscular system. This insufficiency may partially explain why the increase in strength, in response to conventional resistance training, often has been found to be low among subjects with stroke.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Center for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Development and Feasibility of a Regulated, Supramaximal High-Intensity Training Program Adapted for Older Individuals2019In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High-intensity training (HIT) with extremely short intervals (designated here as supramaximal HIT) is a time-efficient training method for health and performance. However, a protocol for regulation and control of intensity is missing, impeding implementation in various groups, such as older individuals.

    Methods: This study presents the development and characteristics of a novel training protocol with regulated and controlled supramaximal intervals adapted for older people. Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we explored the feasibility of the program, performed in a group training setting, with physically active older individuals (aged 65–75, n = 7; five women). The developed supramaximal HIT program consisted of 10 × 6 s cycle sprint intervals with ∼1 min of active recovery with the following key characteristics: (1) an individual target power output was reached and maintained during all intervals and regulated and expressed as the percentage of the estimated maximum mean power output for the duration of the interval (i.e., 6 s); (2) pedaling cadence was standardized for all participants, while resistance was individualized; and (3) the protocol enabled controlled and systematic adjustments of training intensity following standardized escalation criteria.

    Aim: Our aim was to test the feasibility of a novel training regimen with regulated and controlled supramaximal HIT, adapted for older people. The feasibility criteria for the program were to support participants in reaching a supramaximal intensity (i.e., power output > 100% of estimated VO2 max), avoid inducing a negative affective response, and have participants perceive it as feasible and acceptable.

    Results: All feasibility criteria were met. The standardized escalation procedure provided safe escalation of training load up to a supramaximal intensity (around three times the power output at estimated VO2 max). The participants never reported negative affective responses, and they perceived the program as fun and feasible.

    Conclusion: This novel program offers a usable methodology for further studies on supramaximal HIT among older individuals with different levels of physical capacity. Future research should explore the effects of the program in various populations of older people and their experiences and long-term adherence compared with other forms of training.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Is better preservation of eccentric strength after stroke due to altered prefrontal function?2016In: Neurocase, ISSN 1355-4794, E-ISSN 1465-3656, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 229-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) is part of a network that exerts inhibitory control over the motor cortex (MC). Recently, we demonstrated that VLPFC was more activated during imagined maximum eccentric than during imagined concentric contractions in healthy participants. This was accompanied with lower activation levels within motor regions during imagined eccentric contractions. The aim was to test a novel hypothesis of an involvement of VLPFC in contraction mode-specific modulation of force. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine differences in VLPFC and motor regions during the concentric and the eccentric phases of imagined maximum contractions in a selected sample of subjects with stroke (n = 4). The subjects were included as they exhibited disturbed modulation of force. The previously demonstrated pattern within VLPFC was evident only on the contralesional hemisphere. On the ipsilesional hemisphere, the recruitment in VLPFC was similar for both modes of contractions. The findings support a hypothesis of the involvement of VLPFC in contraction mode-specific modulation of maximum force production. A disturbance of this system might underlie the lack of contraction mode-specific modulation commonly found among stroke subjects, often expressed as an increased ratio between eccentric and concentric strength.

  • 8.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sojka, Peter
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Insufficient loading in stroke subjects during conventional resistance training2012In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Torque-angle relationship are better preserved during eccentric compared to concentric contractions in patients with stroke2012In: Isokinetics and exercise science, ISSN 0959-3020, E-ISSN 1878-5913, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of isokinetic contraction mode and velocity on the torque-angle relationship during maximum voluntary elbow flexion in patients with stroke, age-matched healthy subjects and young subjects. To eliminate the effect of torque amplitude differences between subjects and groups, the torque values throughout the ROM were individually normalized to the peak value for each contraction velocity. The results show that in stroke patients the normalized torque angle relationship during the eccentric contractions was better preserved than during concentric contractions. Specifically, during eccentric contractions, stroke patients exhibited a torque-angle relationship that was closer to normal as the test velocity increased. The opposite trend could be seen in concentric contractions where the torque-angle relationship became more divergent from normal with a rise in the velocity. The torque-angle relationships were essentially the same for the control groups, irrespective of contraction mode or velocity. These findings may have significance for loading patterns of resistance training exercises used with stroke patients as such exercises normally are biomechanically designed for normal torque angle relationships. In clinical practice, these findings may partly explain why the strength increases due to resistance training are limited for patients with stroke.   

  • 10.
    Jakobsson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Burtin, Chris
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vestman, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Stål, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ruttens, David
    Umeå University.
    Gosker, Harry
    Universiteit Maastricht School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    De Brandt, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Effects and mechanisms of supramaximal High-Intensity Interval Training on extrapulmonary manifestations in people with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD-HIIT): study protocol for a multi-centre, randomized controlled trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Beyond being a pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents with extrapulmonary manifestations including reduced cognitive, cardiovascular, and muscle function. While exercise training is the cornerstone in the non-pharmacological treatment of COPD, there is a need for new exercise training methods due to suboptimal adaptations when following traditional exercise guidelines, often applying moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). In people with COPD, short-duration high-intensity interval training (HIIT) holds the potential to induce a more optimal stimulus for training adaptations while circumventing the ventilatory burden often associated with MICT in people with COPD. We aim to determine the effects of supramaximal HIIT and MICT on extrapulmonary manifestations in people with COPD compared to matched healthy controls.

    Methods: COPD-HIIT is a prospective, multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial with blinded assessors and data analysts, employing a parallel-group trial. In Phase 1, we will investigate the effects and mechanisms of a 12-week intervention of supramaximal HIIT compared to MICT in people with COPD (n = 92) and matched healthy controls (n = 70). Participants will perform watt-based cycling 2–3 times weekly. In Phase 2, we will determine how exercise training and inflammation impact the trajectories of neurodegeneration, in people with COPD, over 24 months. In addition to the 92 participants with COPD performing HIIT or MICT, a usual care group (n = 46) is included in phase 2. In both phases, the primary outcomes are change from baseline in cognitive function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscle power. Key secondary outcomes include change from baseline exercise tolerance, brain structure and function measured by MRI, neuroinflammation measured by PET/CT, systemic inflammation, and intramuscular adaptations. Feasibility of the interventions will be comprehensively investigated.

    Discussion: The COPD-HIIT trial will determine the effects of supramaximal HIIT compared to MICT in people with COPD and healthy controls. We will provide evidence for a novel exercise modality that might overcome the barriers associated with MICT in people with COPD. We will also shed light on the impact of exercise at different intensities to reduce neurodegeneration. The goal of the COPD-HIIT trial is to improve the treatment of extrapulmonary manifestations of the disease.

    Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT06068322. Prospectively registered on 2023-09-28.

  • 11.
    Jakobsson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    De Brandt, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Rullander, Anna-Clara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Acute physiological effects of supramaximal high-intensity interval training in people with or without COPD2023In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 55, p. 549-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-intensity exercise is essential for optimal development of cardiorespiratory fitness and health. This is, however, challenging for most people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to ventilatory limitations, leading to exercise at lower intensities accompanied by suboptimal stress on the cardiovascular and muscular system.

    PURPOSE: To compare the acute effects of a novel concept of short-duration supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in people with COPD and matched healthy controls (HC).

    METHODS: Sixteen people with mild to severe COPD (75 ± 6 yr; 8 males; 73 ± 13 FEV1%pred; 119 ± 37 W max aerobic power [MAP]) and 14 HC (74 ± 5 yr; 8 males; 106 ± 14 FEV1%pred; 169 ± 38 W MAP) performed HIIT and MICT on a cycle ergometer in a randomized order. HIIT consisted of 10x6s sprints interspersed with 1-min recovery and was performed at two intensities: 60% of max mean power output for 6-sec (MPO6) and 80%MPO6, estimated from the Borg cycle strength test. MICT consisted of 20-min at 60% of MAP, derived from a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Cardiorespiratory parameters, blood lactate concentration, ratings of exertion/symptoms, and exercise modality preference were obtained.

    RESULTS: Exercise characteristics and physiological data collected at the end of exercise are shown in Table 1. All HIIT sessions were completed, while 1 in 3 people with COPD did not complete MICT. The HIIT modality was preferred by 13/16 (COPD) and 12/14 (HC).

    CONCLUSION: Short-duration supramaximal HIIT was feasible and enabled a 3.5-fold increase in exercise intensity vs. MICT in people with COPD and HC. Notably, despite the higher exercise intensities, the cardiorespiratory demand during HIIT was similar to MICT and clinically relevant reductions in symptoms were seen in favor of HIIT, in people with COPD. Also, >80% of participants preferred HIIT over MICT.

  • 12.
    Jakobsson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    De Brandt, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Rullander, Anna-Clara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Innovative exercise for optimizing exercise intensity in COPD2022In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 60, no Suppl. 66, article id 4654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High-intensity exercise is essential for optimal physiological exercise adaptations but challenging to perform for most people with COPD due to ventilatory limitations, leading to use of lower exercise intensities accompanied by suboptimal stress on the cardiovascular and muscular system. This study compared the acute effects of a novel concept of short-duration supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in people with COPD.

    Methods: Thirteen people with COPD (75±6 yr; 8 males; 72±13 FEV1%pred; 124±37 Wpeak) performed short-duration supramaximal HIIT and MICT on a cycle ergometer in a randomized order. HIIT consisted of 10x6s sprints interspersed with 1-min recovery and was performed at two intensities (HIIT60% & HIIT80%). MICT consisted of 20-min at 60% of CPET Wpeak. Cardiorespiratory parameters, blood lactate concentration, ratings of exertion/symptoms, and exercise modality preference were obtained.

    Results: Exercise characteristics and physiological data are seen in Table 1. All patients completed HIIT, while 4 out of 13 stopped MICT prematurely. Notably, 85% preferred HIIT over MICT.

    Conclusion: The novel concept of short-duration supramaximal HIIT enabled a 3 to 4-fold increase in exercise intensity vs. MICT. Notably, the cardiorespiratory demand during HIIT was similar to MICT, and clinically relevant reductions in symptoms were even seen in favor of HIIT.

  • 13. Mellerowicz, Alexandra
    et al.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Ericsson, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Nilsson, Stefan K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Brown Adipose Tissue Activation in the Postprandial State Reflects on Plasma Lipoproteins and Immune Cell Response in Humans2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has a unique to ability to use excess energy for heat production. It is therefore an attractive target organ for counteracting obesity and related metabolic diseases where overfeeding is an underlying cause. BAT has in murine models been shown to clear postprandial lipids quickly. The postprandial response is associated to systemic inflammatory alterations and an increased lipid pressure possibly driving atherosclerosis development. We hypothesized that BAT activation would affect postprandial lipid clearance and that this would reflect in an altered immune cell response.

    Methods: Young male volunteers were subject to an oral fat tolerance test at two separate occasions during both cold stimulation and in thermoneutral control conditions. Body temperature and EMG activity was monitored and energy expenditure (EE) was measured. Blood samples were taken at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Plasma lipids and the immune cell response.

    Results: Cold stimulation during OFTT resulted in a 19,4 % higher EE compared to warm conditions (P=0,007). Surprisingly, no changes in plasma TG were observed. A 2-fold elevation in free fatty acids (FFA) was seen in cold which also correlated positively with EE (P=0,008). Total plasma cholesterol increased compared to warm conditions by 0,56 mmol/L (P=0,050). LDL-c and HDL-c were increased in cold (0,20 mmol/L difference P=0,048 and 0,16 mmol/L P=0,002) whereas remnant-c was unaltered between the two thermal conditions. White blood cell count (WBC) after OFTT was significantly increased in cold (P = 0,018) by 0,29 х 109/L.

    Discussion: BAT activation in the postprandial state results in increased HDL-c, possibly indicating increased vascular lipolysis and associated pre-β HDL particle formation. Increased VLDL production due to elevated FFA levels in the cold state and might explain why plasma TG is unaltered and also why LDL-c remains at a higher concentration in the cold.

    Conclusions: BAT might be an attractive target for obesity treatment but potentially displays pro-atherogenic properties that must be addressed in longitudinal studies.

  • 14.
    Nyberg, Andre
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Kolberg, Albin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Alm, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    The accuracy of using elastic resistance bands to evaluate muscular strength2014In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, European Journal of Physiotherapy, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elastic resistance as a tool for evaluation of muscular strength has rarely been addressed even though it is commonly used in exercise and rehabilitation regimens involving the shoulder muscles. The aim was therefore to investigate the relationship and potential difference between development of force during maximal isokinetic (maximum peak force, maximum mean force and peak mean force) and elastic (one-repetition maximum (1 RM)) concentric shoulder fl exion in healthy older adults. A total of 30 voluntary adults over the age of 50 (15 women, 15 men) were included. Intraclass correlation coefficient absolute agreement was 0.85, 0.43 and 0.48 for the isokinetic values respectively, when all subjects were analysed together. No difference was found between the isokinetic maximum peak force value and the elastic 1 RM for all participants (0.15 kg, p 0.791), for men (0.80 kg, p 0.121) or women ( 0.49 kg, p 0.135). Variations at an individual level, i.e. 95% limits of agreement, were 3.3 kg for all participants, 2.8 kg for women and 3.2 kg for men. These results imply that elastic resistance could be used to evaluate shoulder fl exion strength in both older men and women. However, thevariation on an individual level and the lower agreement among women is important to consider.

  • 15.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Increased prefrontal activity and reduced motor cortex activity during imagined eccentric compared to concentric muscle actions2012In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 6, no 255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine differences in recruited brain regions during the concentric and the eccentric phase of an imagined maximum resistance training task of the elbow flexors in healthy young subjects. The results showed that during the eccentric phase, pre-frontal cortex (BA44) bilaterally was recruited when contrasted to the concentric phase. During the concentric phase, however, the motor and pre-motor cortex (BA 4/6) was recruited when contrasted to the eccentric phase. Interestingly, the brain activity of this region was reduced, when compared to the mean activity of the session, during the eccentric phase. Thus, the neural mechanisms governing imagined concentric and eccentric contractions appear to differ. We propose that the recruitment of the pre-frontal cortex is due to an increased demand of regulating force during the eccentric phase. Moreover, it is possible that the inability to fully activate a muscle during eccentric contractions may partly be explained by a reduction of activity in the motor and pre-motor cortex.

  • 16.
    Rehn, Börje
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sandlund, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Flippade klassrum om människokroppens funktion för fysioterapeutstudenter2017In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2017: undervisning i praktiken – föreläsning, flexibelt eller mitt emellan?, Umeå: Universitetspedagogik och lärandestöd (UPL), Umeå universitet , 2017, p. 91-91Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Människokroppens funktion handlar om grundläggande biologiska förutsättningar för att möjliggöra kroppsrörelser, båda för friska människor och de med rörelsehinder, ett signum för fysioterapi och fysioterapeututbildningar. Traditionellt har undervisning inom detta område skett genom katedralföreläsningar. Syftet med det här projektet var att implementera och utvärdera flippade klassrum om människokroppens funktion för fysioterapeutstudenter i termin 2. Förhoppningen var att den nya undervisningsformen skulle fördjupa lärandet. För ett antal områden har filmer producerats och lagts ut på Umu-play i lärplattformen Cambro. Dessa filmer skulle ses av studenterna innan träff med läraren. Filmerna tog upp huvuddragen kring områdena och en del kända svåra passager. Studenterna var i övrigt hänvisade till kurslitteratur och målbeskrivning. Vid träff med läraren strukturerades denna på olika sätt, så att studenterna tillsammans och med läraren kunde diskutera innehållet. Detta ansågs av lärarna vara den viktigaste och svåraste delen med flippade klassrum, men att det skapade dialog med studenterna. Några av studenterna gillade undervisningsformen, men den kräver att man är förberedd vid träff med läraren. Andra studenter föredrag vanliga föreläsningar. Projektet började i liten skala med förändring av några områden, men kommer att gälla fler områden i framöver.

  • 17.
    Simonsson, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Jonasson Stiernman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager and Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; Department of Neurology, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen (ISMC), Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study2022In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 16, article id 997131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Autonomous motivation to exercise occurs when the activity is voluntary and with a perceived inherent satisfaction from the activity itself. It has been suggested that autonomous motivation is related to striatal dopamine D2/3-receptor (D2/3R) availability within the brain. In this study, we hypothesized that D2/3R availability in three striatal regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) would be positively associated with self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise. We also examined this relationship with additional exploratory analyses across a set of a priori extrastriatal regions of interest (ROI).

    Methods: Our sample comprised 49 older adults (28 females) between 64 and 78 years of age. The D2/3R availability was quantified from positron emission tomography using the non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]-raclopride ligand. The exercise-related autonomous motivation was assessed with the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2.

    Results: No significant associations were observed between self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise and D2/3R availability within the striatum (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) using semi-partial correlations controlling for ROI volume on D2/3R availability. For exploratory analyses, positive associations were observed for the superior (r = 0.289, p = 0.023) and middle frontal gyrus (r = 0.330, p = 0.011), but not for the inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, or anterior insular cortex.

    Conclusion: This study could not confirm the suggested link between striatal D2/3R availability and subjective autonomous motivation to exercise among older adults. The exploratory findings, however, propose that frontal brain regions may be involved in the intrinsic regulation of exercise-related behaviors, though this has to be confirmed by future studies using a more suitable ligand and objective measures of physical activity levels.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Simonsson, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Levik Sandström, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager and Hvidovre, Copenhagen, Denmark; Institute for Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen (ISMC) and Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial2023In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, no 9, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of regulated and controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) adapted for older adults, compared to moderate-intensity training (MIT), on cardiorespiratory fitness; cognitive, cardiovascular, and muscular function; and quality of life.

    METHODS: Sixty-eight nonexercising older adults (66-79 years, 44% males) were randomized to 3 months of twice-weekly HIT (20-minute session including 10 × 6-second intervals) or MIT (40-minute session including 3 × 8-minute intervals) on stationary bicycles in an ordinary gym setting. Individualized target intensity was watt controlled with a standardized pedaling cadence and individual adjustment of the resistance load. Primary outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness (V̇o2peak) and global cognitive function (unit-weighted composite).

    RESULTS: V̇o2peak increased significantly (mean 1.38 mL/kg/min, 95% CI [0.77, 1.98]), with no between-group difference (mean difference 0.05 [-1.17, 1.25]). Global cognition did not improve (0.02 [-0.05, 0.09]), nor differed between groups (0.11 [-0.03, 0.24]). Significant between-group differences in change were observed for working memory (0.32 [0.01, 0.64]), and maximal isometric knee extensor muscle strength (0.07 N·m/kg [0.003, 0.137]), both in favor of HIT. Irrespective of the group, there was a negative change in episodic memory (-0.15 [-0.28, -0.02]), a positive change in visuospatial ability (0.26 [0.08, 0.44]), and a decrease in systolic (-2.09 mmHg [-3.54, -0.64]) and diastolic (-1.27 mmHg [-2.31, -0.25]) blood pressure.

    CONCLUSIONS: In nonexercising older adults, 3 months of watt-controlled supramaximal HIT improved cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular function to a similar extent as MIT, despite half the training time. In favor of HIT, there was an improvement in muscular function and a potential domain-specific effect on working memory.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03765385.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Tronarp, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    McDonough, Suzanne
    Björklund, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Office-cycling: a promising way to raise pain thresholds and increase metabolism with minimal compromising of work performance2018In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 5427201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Establishing the effects of low intensity cycling (LC), moderate intensity cycling (MC), and standing at a simulated office workstation on pain modulation, work performance, and metabolic expenditure.

    Methods: 36 healthy adults (21 females), mean age 26.8 (SD 7.6) years, partook in this randomized 3 x 3 crossover trial with 75 minutes of LC on 20% of maximum aerobic power (MAP) output, 30 minutes of MC on 50% of MAP, and standing 30 minutes with 48-hour wash-out periods. Outcome measures were pain modulation (pressure pain threshold (PPT) and thermal pain threshold)), work performance (transcription, mouse pointing, and cognitive performance), and metabolic expenditure.

    Results: PPTs increased in all conditions. PPT trapezius showed the highest increase after LC, 39.3 kilopascals (kPa) (15.6; 78.6), compared to MC, 17.0 kPa (2.8; 49.9), and standing, 16.8 kPa (-5.6; 39.4),p = 0.015. Transcription was reduced during LC and MC. Mouse pointing precision was best during standing and worst and slowest during MC. Cognitive performance did not differ between conditions. Metabolic expenditure rates were 1.4 (1.3; 1.7), 3.3 (2.3; 3.7), and 7.5 (5.8; 8.7) kcal/minute during standing, LC, and MC, respectively (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: LC seems to be the preferred option; it raised PPTs, more than doubled metabolic expenditure, whilst minimally influencing work performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf