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  • 1. Butchart, Maggie
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Carr, Val
    The maternity unit window: Ulrich revisited2007In: Environmental Psychology: Putting Research into Practice, Newcastle UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2007, p. 110-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Forbes, Jane
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Working with risky consumers: multiprofessional cre for substance-using pregnant women2006In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Substance use is increasingly common in many countries. Consumption and lifestyles associated with consumption often involve a number of specific health and legal risks for users. For pregnant women, the risks extend to the health and care of their unborn children. A multi-professional approach to the management of substance use in pregnancy is recommended as best practice but, as with all strategies, effectiveness depends on the way that professional workers implement policy. This study evaluated evidence of multi-professional working within local maternity services in and around a Scottish city by (a) collating and analysing data from the maternity records of 163 substance-using women, who delivered between January 2001 and December 2003; and (b) conducting a questionnaire survey in 2004 with 120 midwives and neonatal nurses for their views on maternity care for substance-using women and their babies. Despite the importance placed on multi-professional working by midwives and neonatal nurses, maternity records indicated operational inconsistencies with implementation in some cases and not in others. Policy was not yet to be seen embedded in everyday practice.

  • 3.
    Fraser, Scott
    et al.
    DawnFresh Ltd..
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Chef perceptions of modernist equipment and techniques in the kitchen2018In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modernist techniques and equipment (MTE) have enabled chefs to create otherwise impossible dishes and achieve excellent levels of consistency and precision. This research aimed to map the diffusion of these techniques to the broader field of hospitality and the impact they had on the skills, identity, and creativity of chefs. An online survey of 87 Edinburgh (UK) chefs and interviews with 11 of these chefs informed the enquiry. It was found that MTE had been adopted by 64.4% of restaurant kitchens, not only in fine dining but also by casual restaurants and public houses. Chefs’ views of these techniques can be characterized as qualified acceptance and, in some cases, ambivalence. Some skills were thought to be lost, but it was felt that using these techniques reskilled rather than deskilled chefs. That said, there was some resistance to their introduction. However, they currently have a notable influence on Edinburgh chefs.

  • 4. Kasambala, J.
    et al.
    Kempen, E.
    Labschagne, J.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Uncovering the influence of personal values on the preference for certain casual clothing: intrinsic product evaluative criteria2019In: The Retail and Marketing Review, E-ISSN 2708-3209, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since consumers are supporters of market growth and help to maintain the competitive advantage, an integral part of any clothing retailer's task is to understand consumer purchasing behaviour, especially important factors that drive their purchasing decisions. The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of personal values on intrinsic evaluative criteria in terms of female consumers' preference during clothing purchasing decisions. An exploratory quantitative research design was used to collect data from 316 female respondents (18 to 66 years) residing in Johannesburg, South Africa. Nonlinear canonical correlation analysis (OVERALS) results suggested that female consumers are aware of what they want to communicate through clothing, and they are therefore likely to consider evaluative criteria that will help them achieve their goals. More specifically, the study has brought about an understanding of the significance of certain evaluative criteria in the achievement of female consumers' personal values.

  • 5.
    Kautto, Ethel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Alex, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Living with celiac disease: norms of femininity and the complications of everyday life2017In: International Journal of Celiac Disease, ISSN 2334-3427, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with celiac disease are often described as being exposed to negative emotions and experiences related to the treatment of celiac disease, the gluten-free diet. To explore the daily consequences of diagnosis and their daily experiences of living with celiac disease, interviews were conducted with seven Swedish young women who had been diagnosed with celiac disease by screening in early adolescence. The semi-structured interview transcripts were content analysed using a gender perspective. The analysis showed that these young women`s daily experiences were coloured by the conjunction of their dietary treatment, their social relationships, and social norms. This means that recurrent food situations often clash with the normative constructions of femininity and social norms of eating with an adverse effect on dietary compliance.

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  • 6.
    Kautto, Ethel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lyon, Phil
    School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management, Queen Margaret University, UK.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Alex, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Seeking a new normality: masculinity, interaction and a gluten free diet2016In: International Journal of Celiac Disease, ISSN 2334-3486, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 138-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From earlier studies, men diagnosed with celiac disease are known to be less troubled by their experiences of living with the disease than are diagnosed women. Previous studies, concentrating on men with celiac disease have been mostly quantitative, and have a bio-medical emphasis. The aim of this study was to explore the social experience of young men with screening-detected celiac disease and to highlight daily life situations five years after diagnosis. Seven young men, diagnosed with celiac disease when they were 13 years-olds through a large Swedish school-based celiac screening-study, were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were analyzed from a gender perspective which resulted in three themes; being subjected to changes, striving for normality and emphasizing commitment. These were underpinned by several sub-themes. The young men dissociated themselves from being seen as a person with a life-long chronic disease. The analysis also showed that the young men’s daily experiences of living with celiac disease largely depended on their use of characteristics known to be associated with masculinity: such as being self-assured, demanding, and behaving authoritatively. In food situations, where the young men had the ability to make use of such characteristics in their informal group, they experienced fewer negative aspects of the disease. If the young men did not hold a strong position in their informal group, their situation was insecure and vulnerable and this could lead to avoidance of contacts and social meal situations.

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  • 7.
    Kinney, Dave
    et al.
    Independent Researcher, Edinburgh, UK.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Grocers’ window displays: the eclipse of a British tradition2013In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 467-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By reference to period retailing narratives, this paper examines the changed significance of shop window displays for British grocers with the transition from counter-based to self-service from the late 1940s to the 1960s. The ‘well-dressed’ window showing a selection of goods and price offers became an early casualty of changed retail practices. Opportunities presented by self-service for comprehensive stock displays and in-store promotion proved a decisive challenge to the art of the grocer's window display. These displays had been ubiquitous; large and small shops alike tried to impress passers-by with examples of their stock range. Self-service shops had different internal space requirements and soon it was more important that potential customers could see the well-stocked aisles and activity within.

  • 8.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    A drink for all reasons: newspaper advertising for Lucozade in 19392024Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lucozade is a long-established flavoured glucose drink in Britain and is traditionally associated with convalescence, helping people get over an illness, or recover from surgery. The name dates back to 1929, but the history is longer. Over the years, the narrative has changed with the most recent transformation being from sickroom drink to become a performance-enhancing sports energy drink. Thereafter, the marketing focus has been on the replacement of lost energy following activity. There was a continuing narrative of health utility but the emphasis was different: the product had been recast for consumer concerns in a new era.

    However, there had been earlier, and arguably more dramatic changes to the narrative. There were two phases to this but both led to broader claims for effectiveness. Lucozade’s origins had not been as the sickroom standby, it was developed as an unbranded drink in the early 1900s and used clinically as a precaution before chloroform anaesthesia. In this, it was a pre-emptive life-saver, not something to generally aid recovery from illness. This later purpose appears to have been an accidental attribution, first gaining popular traction around Newcastle. The drink was subsequently branded, first as Glucozade in 1927 and as Lucozade in 1929, by a manufacturing by a chemist. Acquisition by Beechams in 1938 and their substantial 1939 newspaper advertising campaign gave Lucozade much wider recognition and consolidated this claim of generic utility by invoking well-established advertising ideas about tonic preparations. In the course of that year, it was portrayed as the answer to many everyday problems. General help with convalescence was still assured but now Lucozade’s effectiveness was framed as a bulwark against several ill-defined afflictions – poor appetite, nervousness, listlessness, depression and all manner of personal debility. These were terms designed to resonate with readers, the advertisements referenced problems in their lives and alluded to Lucozade’s approval by doctors and nurses. This presentation examines the scope and scale of newspaper advertising during this 1939 Lucozade campaign. 

  • 9.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Advertising anxiety: Lucozade narratives in the 1939 newspaper promotion campaign2024In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lucozade is a British soft drink consisting of flavoured glucose that has very specific clinical origins but has more generally been associated with convalescence. That name was first used in 1929 and, over the years, the product has undergone metamorphoses to survive changed social and economic circumstances. From a largely local success in the north-east of England, much wider recognition can be attributed to a concerted newspaper advertising campaign in 1939 which extended a narrative of relief, and the prospect of cure, from ill-defined health afflictions. This promotion featured the techniques long-established for tonic preparations. Using the British Library Newspaper Archive, participating print titles were identified as were the complete range of Lucozade advertisements used there. The scale and scope of these presentational efforts can be illustrated. From February to December 1939, town and regional newspaper titles across England, Scotland and Wales were used to advertise 37 different problem scenarios with the consistent message of Lucozade’s effectiveness, and the suggestion of medical endorsement far beyond those clinical origins.

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  • 10.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    [Book review] Sanders Bros. The Rise and Fall of a British Grocery Giant2015In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 58, no 3-4, p. 603-604Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    British picnics come of age: food and fashionability in the 1930s2018In: Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, ISSN 2169-2971, E-ISSN 2169-298X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Picnics are an ephemeral feature of social life and suggest a meal that is different in form, eaten in unfamiliar surroundings, and often representing an escape from routine. Although picnics might be regarded as a longstanding tradition in Britain, they were popularized in the 1930s as an adjunct to substantial changes in leisure patterns, and by the opportunities provided by private and public transport. Newspapers reflected this popularity in their coverage. Using digital archive material, primarily for The Times and the Manchester Guardian, period newspaper reports were analyzed in terms of popularity, advice on what to eat, the consumer market for equipment, and rural impact. Picnics, goods, and services connected with them, and the negative environmental consequences of picnicking were regular features of media discourse during the period 1930–1939: this coverage represent a window into the perhaps surprising fashionability of what is now a tacit feature of food culture.

  • 12.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dining out: restaurants and British society in the 1930s2020In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 177-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the social circumstances supporting wider restaurant use and the problems encountered as this became established in 1930s Britain. A documentary research approach was used to collect the perspectives of those who witnessed, at first hand, these changes in British society and food culture. The data comprise accounts in the contemporary literature and period newspaper reports. In the 1930s, significant social and economic changes supported a much broader demand for restaurants. New types of customer were attracted and many were exposed to a cuisine which bore little relationshi pto their meals at home. Unfamiliar dishes along with a menu language and service practices derived from the traditional élite food culture created social settings offering embarrassment for the unwary. Restaurant guides and dining advice were published for those wanting to dine with greater confidence and provide insight into social attitudes at the time.

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  • 13. Lyon, Phil
    Good food and hard times:Ambrose Heath's contribution to British food culture of the 1930s and the war years2014In: Food & History, ISSN 1780-3187, E-ISSN 2034-2101, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, little attention is paid to Ambrose Heath (1891-1969), although he was a prolific British food writer in the 1930s and during the Second World War. Heath’s remarkable output for national and regional newspapers in Britain and the many books he wrote, co-authored, edited, contributed to or translated provided a considerable encouragement for what he termed “good food.” In one sense, he might be viewed simply as an intermediary between “authentic” gastronomic voices and a wider readership; however, his engagement with that audience was no mean feat and, arguably, was important for the successful diffusion of a more cosmopolitan culinary culture. Although a staunch defender of British ingredients and traditional dishes, he was perplexed by what he saw as the widespread atrophy of cooking skills in Britain and reached for French culinary ideas to show what might be done - simply and economically but producing the hallmark “good food” he espoused.

    With the outbreak of the Second World War, the “good food” narrative was largely eclipsed but, on the basis of his pre-war popularity, he contributed significantly to the way that the wartime government, and ordinary people, tried to make inadequate food supplies meet demands. He wrote and broadcast to advise the civilian population what they could do to make food interesting even with restricted supplies and vital ingredients missing. Although he played an important part in that wartime resilience, he is now virtually forgotten in reviews of that era. This article examines his contribution to British food culture in the 1930s and the war years.

  • 14.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Lucozade goes to war2024Other (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    New approaches to consumer research2010In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 367-368Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    [Obituary] Robert Bayliss: an accidental home economist 16 July 1927-25 October 20172018In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 1p. 195-195Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rethinking the Older Consumer2009In: Food in Contemporary Society / [ed] Janhonen-Abruquah, H. & Palojoki, P. (eds), Helsinki: Helsinki University , 2009, p. 9-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although those who achieve longevity have always had to contend with the pace - and accumulated products - of change, the association of increased longevity and accelerated pace has never been stronger. We all will need to live with the realisation that our experience is quickly - and maybe repeatedly - outmoded. By this frame of reference, the old struggle for relevance amidst economic, cultural and domestic transitions.

    This is, however, a gross oversimplification of the relationship between age and social context in the United Kingdom (UK). If we accept this analysis, we accept homogeneity of redundancy and that is as limiting as the belief that all old people are the same. In this paper, it is argued that we should be more critical of assumptions about the irrelevance of the old.

  • 18.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Tasteful advertising: Marcel Boulestin’s recipes in four trade booklets2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    The International Journal of Consumer Studies and the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise2006In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 107-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Turning point: Marcel Boulestin's 1923 Simple French Cooking for English Homes2023In: Petits Propos Culinaires, ISSN 0142-4857, no 125, p. 28-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Uncertain Progress: British Kitchens in the 1920S2020In: Home Cultures, ISSN 1740-6315, E-ISSN 1751-7427, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 205-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    British domestic kitchens are a product of long evolution but went through a period of great innovation one hundred years ago. Some sections of British society started to take an interest in a space that had been largely disregarded. The “servant problem” and suburban building were factors in this changed perspective. By reference to period newspaper archives, the nature of those changes can be demonstrated in some detail. Although there was a narrative of efficiency, and design ideas from Europe and the United States, progress for British kitchens was piecemeal and conflicted by fuel-choice issues as well as the question of how to equip the space for personal use. Ideas that survived this period of experimentation were to form the basis of kitchen development in subsequent decades.

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  • 22.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Alexander, Emily
    The full Edwardian breakfast2005In: Consumer Sciences Today, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 2-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Alho, Eija-Riitta
    Hillman, Marjatta
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Healthier futures: primary care nurses' food knowledge and patient advice2007In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland there are valid questions being asked about the sustainability of the current provision in state healthcare systems. Structurally, lower birth rates and greater longevity mean that populations age and present the challenge of chronic illness management in later life for a larger proportion of the population. Culturally, some 50 years after the introduction of a state healthcare system, ageing populations will have greater expectations of service quality than their predecessors. Paradoxically, they will also have a greater engagement with lifestyles which themselves will bring new challenges to long-term health status. There is no single solution to the complex problem of service sustainability but undoubtedly health education provides some potential to limit future demands. Diet-related illness and incapacity are specific health challenges for the coming decades but the problems can be substantially reduced by changing current behaviour. To make such changes possible, knowledge needs to be communicated effectively in terms of simplicity, accuracy and with appropriate timing. Health education can make a major contribution to service sustainability. This paper reports a study of primary care nurses (n = 50) in the Tampere area and examines their capacity to provide healthy eating advice. In this sample, nurses often demonstrated good levels of nutritional knowledge on which to base patient advice, but there was considerable variation. Arguably, focused in-service training would provide updating on theory and practice for more consistent advice and better prospects for behavioural change.

  • 24.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Collie, Viv
    Kvarnbrink, Eva Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Fresh food and producer sales: what do farmers' markets reveal about consumer perspectives?2008In: Culinary Arts and Sciences VI: Global, National and Local Perspectives, 2008, p. 331-340Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Collie, Viv
    Kvarnbrink, Eva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    School of Contemporary Sciences, University of Abertay Dundee,.
    Shopping at the farmers' market: consumers and their perspectives2009In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, E-ISSN 1745-4506, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While farmers' markets are a colourful addition to urban shopping, they are periodic, relatively expensive and provide for a very limited range of consumer requirements. In fact, they are the antithesis of supermarket ubiquity, price sensitivity, wide product/service range and extended opening hours. So, despite their small role in total food retail sales, why are they a growing presence and what do farmers' markets say about the consumer needs that supermarkets do not satisfy? This article reports the findings of a questionnaire-based survey of 391 farmers' market customers in five Scottish towns during 2006. Customers were seeking high quality food products, even if that meant premium prices, and put a particular value on direct transactions with the producer. Although these data have a specific geographic context, they have resonance for the growing schism between producer and customer in the UK and other countries.

  • 26.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhon, Anne
    Hillman, Marjatta
    Alho, Eija-Riitta
    Healthy eating: information and advice in primary care2006In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General practice surgeries and health centres often provide patients with healthy eating advice during consultation for specific problems, or in the context of general health monitoring. In some circumstances, patients will be referred for specialist dietary advice but, for most, all advice is provided from the resources of the practice. Advice about what patients should be eating or avoiding has long been a legitimate part of the consultation process for some illnesses, but diet is now seen as significant in a wider range of conditions, and in actively promoting healthy lifestyle. The research evidence as to whether primary care staff are able to effectively deliver healthy eating advice is equivocal. This paper reports Scottish data (n = 101) collected in a study of Scottish and Finnish practice nurses' practical food knowledge conducted in 2003/2004. In this sample, practice nurses often demonstrated very good levels of nutritional knowledge to underpin basic advice, although sometimes there was considerable variation among these nurses. By comparison with earlier studies in the UK, practical cooking advice was extremely limited. This may have reflected an awareness of changed eating-out patterns, and the increased consumption of processed foods or ready meals at home, but the need for care with snacking behaviour or the need to restrict portion size, whether eating at home or eating out, was not typically part of their healthy eating advice.

  • 27.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Réchauffé: Food for Fears2004In: Consumer Sciences Today, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 7-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Abruquah-Janhonen, Hille
    Consumer confidence and UK food retailing: why does local food matter?2003In: Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment, ISSN 1459-0255, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 50 years, the UK fresh food market has been increasingly challenged by the growth and domination of large grocery chains. Supermarkets now source supplies on a national and international basis. They have purchasing power to undercut smallscale local production and distribution systems that minimise many of the past advantages of short distances between the producer and the consumer. This alters producer perspectives. Larger-scale production and sales contracts for national distribution are favoured. Smaller producers focusing on supply to local markets have tended to struggle as retail opportunities for their fresh produce diminished. Street markets for fresh food, once the main source for the UK urban population, are now a minor contributor to overall sales. In part this results from a larger population and the limited number of markets operating within traditional constraints of time and location. In part, also, consumer perceptions of quality in street markets declined with the ascent of prewashed bimbo fruit and vegetables along with the disembodied, pre-packed meat favoured by many. Excessive pesticide use, BSE, foot & mouth disease and E.coli problems have all recently taken their toll of consumer confidence and have disturbed taken-for-granted urban assumptions about food safety. Furthermore, media attention on factory farming techniques have focussed public disquiet on issues that, until a few years ago, many consumers were happy to ignore. Vegetarianism, organic production methods and attempts to reconnect food producers and local consumers are arguably related strategies emerging from these problematic issues of consumer confidence. By reference to UK experiences over the last 10 years, the paper explores food shopping trend convergence, reduced consumer trust, and attempts to restore confidence.

  • 29.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Alexander, Emily
    Deskilling the domestic kitchen: national tragedy or the making of a modern myth?2003In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, Vol. 3, no 3/4, p. 167-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the UK, television cookery programmes engage the attention and enthusiasm of large audiences. Celebrity chefs are household names whose books nearly always top best-seller lists. Magazines and newspapers routinely include meal recipes and reports on food-related issues. In this sense, the domestic preparation of food has probably never attracted greater public interest. Paradoxically, much is also now said and written about the general loss of practical cooking skills. The latter takes on a special significance especially in relation to adverse changes in UK eating patterns and food safety problems. The paper contributes to an understanding of this paradox by examining what has happened to food preparation skills. The 20th century was a context for massive social and technological changes, and these were reflected in the domestic environment. Among younger cohorts many of traditional food preparation skills have atrophied but to some extent we can view this in terms of changed timescales of acquisition. Also, on the basis of historical evidence, there may be grounds for optimism in a re-evaluation of the extent and diversity of cooking skills in the past.

  • 30.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Kinney, Dave
    Food shopping in the 1950s: the social context of customer loyalty2004In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 28-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food shopping – although often dismissed as dreary necessity – has always served a range of latent functions. In the 1950s, food storage limitations and tight budgets gave rise to weekly – often daily – shopping patterns that also allowed shoppers to meet certain social needs. Going to food shops, and the way that customer service was organized, produced significant interactional opportunities which were valued by participants. Exchanging news with other customers may have reinforced shopping patterns but shopkeepers, and knowledgeable assistants, were also useful intermediaries for product and usage information. Functional specialization in food commodities bestowed the aura of expertise, and direct accountability for the quality of what was sold provided a more personal style of retailing than is currently typical. Much depended on the perception of relationships. The 1950s were an important transitional period in the UK. Rationing gave way to wider choice and availability, while the market position of corner shops was increasingly eclipsed by town centre supermarkets. This article explores the social context of food shopping, and its relationship to the specific issue of customer loyalty.

  • 31.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Kautto, Ethel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    A healthy diet: british newspaper narratives in the 1920s2022In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 107-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early years of twentieth-century Britain were a transitional period for the way that food was understood. Diet adequacy was now being increasingly thought of as not simply a matter of the quantity of food but the qualities that food needed to have to sustain optimum health. A number of ‘fad diet’ books were circulating and proposed what readers should eat or avoid, and even how to eat. Science, meanwhile, was making progress with the identification of vitamins and these were added to the discourse. Newspapers in the 1920s had an important communication role in the struggle to separate dietary fact from fiction and this study examines how they represented ideas to their readers. Rather than giving a voice to ‘fad diets’, press stories endorsed the ‘common sense’ of normal varied diets although these could be socially and economically variable. Using fad ridicule and other techniques, as well as the reported opinion from well-known medical figures, newspapers emerge as responsible intermediaries in the transition.

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  • 32.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Kautto, Ethel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Care, Cookery and Commerce: Advertising Invalid Foods in 1920s-1930s Britain2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Serving special meals to invalids is long-established as a way to encourage better nutritional uptake and improve patient well-being. As recently as the 1920s and 1930s, the term ‘invalid food’ was still widely understood as a special category of food for people with chronic conditions, and those who were convalescing from illness or injury.

    At a time when there was still limited capacity to restore full health with effective treatments, even for those who had access to the best medical attention, being an invalid was often protracted. Care at home, usually by family, was commonplace especially for poorer households in a period of substantial economic and social change. Generally, the impact of nutritional science on doctors was minimal and households often turned to mass market cookery books, newspapers and the newly-available radio for practical advice about the preparation of meals to stimulate the appetite, or to give some other benefit to the patient.

    Alongside the special meals that might be prepared at home, several commercial products were advertised to improve health in some way. These classified or display advertisements were regularly seen in period newspapers and little regulation existed to ensure product safety or dietary effectiveness. However, considerable claims were made: ease of digestion and appetite stimulation were the usual selling points although sometimes the fear of inadequate domestic efforts was used to suggest the value of a consistent commercial product. For reassurance, professional endorsement suggested product usefulness for a broad range of feeding needs. This profitable invalid food market even attracted the attention of more prosaic branded goods that might be advertised also as beneficial to those with delicate appetites.

    By reference to period materials, primarily cookery books and digital newspaper archives, this paper explores the problems confronted by invalid households and the role of commercial products at a time when nutritional science was developing but not widely embedded in medical education, and was even less well understood by the carers who needed to provide meals every day with little to guide them in the task.

  • 33.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Kautto, Ethel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Fortnum’s for the Fickle Appetite: Lessons from a Sales Catalogue2020Other (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Kautto, Ethel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Half the battle is fought in the kitchen: convalescence and cookery in 1920s and 1930s Britain2021In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 345-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Invalid food" was still widely understood in the 1920s and 1930s as a special category of food for people with chronic conditions and those who were convalescing from illness or injury. In an era when there was still limited capacity to restore full health quickly with effective treatments, even for those who had access to the best medical attention, being an invalid was often protracted. Care at home was commonplace especially for the poor in a period of significant economic and social change. Generally, the impact of nutritional science on medical education was minimal and households often turned to mass market cookery books, newspapers, and the radio for practical advice about the preparation of meals to give some benefit to the patient, or to stimulate the appetite. By reference to period materials, this article explores the nature of that advice and the transition to more targeted publications offering a greater menu range and guidance for those preparing food.

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    fulltext
  • 35.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Kettuen, Tuula
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Food and residential care in old age2004In: Nutrition and Food Science, ISSN 0034-6659, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 83-88Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Scotland and Finland, a relatively small proportion of older people are in some form of residential care, but their numbers are not insubstantial given generally increased longevity. Moreover, those currently in residential care tend to be among the most vulnerable survivors of their generation. Residential care for older people has always been something of a paradox. The state has extensively recognised the vulnerability of those who can no longer care for themselves, or be cared for by their partner and family. However, provision is seldom adequate for the scale of demand and even commercial provision is characterised by low staffing ratios and unmet training needs. This paper outlines the development of Leonardo funded training materials for use across the European Union.

  • 36.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Kinney, Dave
    Convenience and choice for consumers: the domestic acceptability of canned food between the 1870s and 1930s2013In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 130-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canned food once represented an astonishingly innovative technology although it is now largely ignored in food discourse. As with so much in our lives, familiarity renders an object invisible. To explore the changing social significance of canned food, as the format developed from scientific curiosity to domestic ubiquity, this paper examines reports in The Scotsman newspaper from the late 1870s to the 1930s. Although canned foods were slow to break into the mass market they were little short of revolutionary in the way they brought new tastes from across the world to ordinary British households. A few cans in the larder provided simple storage and reassurance that the unexpected visitor could be fed – perhaps with something a little out of the ordinary. Against this background of quiet assimilation into our food culture, canned food has been controversial and provided an unwitting rehearsal for contemporary food narratives. In these old newspapers, it was somewhat surprising to find reports of disquiet that are recognizable in our own times – the convenience of canned food posed a threat to culinary skills; questions were raised about the nutritional value and safety of processed food; we had become excessively reliant on imported food and disregarded our own produce.

  • 37.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Kinney, Dave
    dkimaging.
    Repurposing Retail Premises: The Life and Times of 54-56 Fossgate, York2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are increasingly familiar with demise of retailers who were important for a while, were seemingly indispensable for customer needs and then slipped first into decline, then to nostalgic reflection. Seldom, though, are we able to photograph the last days of a once vibrant business and collect reminiscences of the owners.

    The Army and Navy store in Fossgate, York, opened in 1919 and closed in 2012. Over that period it had reinvented itself several times to address changing customer needs and the premises’ interior was occasionally rearranged to provide appropriate sales and storage areas. It was famous locally for the traditional counter service internal configuration, as well as for the varied workwear, outdoor leisure clothing and equipment it stocked. Eventually, market changes overwhelmed its ability to adapt and, with retirement, the premises were sold to become a bar-bistro. While this is consistent with the current narrative of decline in retail diversity on urban streets, it has to be remembered that these premises had been repurposed several times before 1919 and were part of a longer-term dynamic of business initiation and extinction. The Fossgate premises illustrate a longer-term historical reality sometimes overlooked in the genuine collective sense of loss felt when a familiar shop closes: the repurposing of commercial buildings is not restricted to our own times although each event will be produced by distinctive conditions.

    Our presentation today provides a photographic record of the interior, a brief oral history from audio recordings taken at the time, and is set in the context of changed ownership and purpose over the years as reflected in newspaper archive material.

  • 38.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Kinney, Dave
    Colquhoun, Anne
    High Street paradox: can fewer shops mean more consumer choice?2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    UK High Streets are increasingly characterised not only by the similarity of constituent shops in different towns but by a reduction in diversity, and therefore mirror each other with a relatively small number of national retailers. This contrasts sharply with the large number of independent local retailers in town centres 100 or even 50 years ago and which created the impression of substantive differences between towns. This paper reports findings from a single town study of the contraction of retailer diversity – especially in relation to food shops. Unlike many UK towns, Dundee has a central nexus of shopping streets that is relatively unchanged over the years. Using photographic evidence and street directories for 1908/9 and 1958/9, as well as reporting the current situation, features of the contraction are analysed and illustrated. In discussion, data are related to the frequently-voiced contention that consumers are now offered a greater choice of products.

  • 39.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janhonen-Abruquah, Hille
    Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Schröder, Monika
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee, Scotland.
    Continuity in the kitchen: how younger and older women compare in their food practices and use of cooking skills2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparisons between younger and older women in the kitchen usually focus on the historical argument that younger women do not have the domestic cooking skills of their mothers or grandmothers. At one level, this is convincing because there is now demonstrably greater reliance on ready meals and processed foods, and less on the home production of meals from raw ingredients. Compared with the immediate post-Second World War years, not so much time is routinely spent in the kitchen, and food preparation is no longer a task central to the lives of many women. The availability of meals or meal components requiring less domestic labour and improved kitchen technology are both factors in this transformation of women's lives. However, they are not just available to the young. So, this research questions the impact of these factors across the age spectrum. Older women may have had very different domestic experiences earlier in their lives but have they now converged with the practices of younger women? How do younger and older women compare in terms of their food practices and the cooking skills they currently use in the kitchen? Using Scottish questionnaire data from a cross-national study, this paper reports on the differences and similarities for 37 younger women (25–45 years; mean 32 years) and 43 older women (60–75 years; mean 68 years) in their actual use of specific food preparation and cooking techniques, the kind of meals they made, and the extent to which they ate out or ordered in meals for home consumption. Results indicated that while there were some differences in food preparation, the use of fresh ingredients and the style of cooking undertaken in the home, these were mostly marginal. There were similar response patterns for the adequacy of their domestic facilities and equipment. There was, however, a notable divergence in their patterns of eating meals out, or phoning out for meals. These data suggest that while younger and older women – different cooking generations – do differ, the way they differ is related more to current lifestyle factors than to any highly differentiated domestic food preparation and cooking skills.

  • 40.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland UK.
    Ross, Liz
    Broadcasting cookery: BBC radio programmes in the 1920s and 1930s2016In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 327-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of British radio broadcasting technology in the 1920s and 1930s and,equally importantly, the progressively widespread purchase and use of radio setsestablished a new platform from which to engage and influence the population on anumber of matters. The British Broadcasting Corporation’s public service principles ofprogrammes to inform, educate and entertain gave rise to various content experiments ata time when there were very few precedents. One such innovation was the cookery talk.This was broadcast live, accomplished without the possibility of practical demonstration,and constituted a new, and abstract, form of communication primarily designed forwomen in their own homes. In this, women were the earliest and most frequentcontributors, and their broadcast content differed from that provided by men. Byreference to archive material, this article examines the social context and the thinkingbehind those early years of radio cookery talks and documents the contributors who wereto establish this now-familiar genre of broadcasting.

  • 41.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Schröder, Monika
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh UK.
    Bell, Fiona
    NHS Education for Scotland.
    The eclipse of cooking and meals: how primary care nurses now frame dietary advice2010In: Health education: challenges, issues and impact / [ed] Andre Fortier; Sophie Turcotte, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diet related health problems attract considerable media attention in the UK. TV programmes, newspapers and magazines reflect on the ways that typical diets and patterns of energy expenditure in western-style societies lead more of us to chronic ill-health. Social and political concern about rising national healthcare costs mean that diet and activity are no longer seen as simply a matter of individual choice. So, in the UK and many other societies, efforts are made by health authorities and professionals to promote healthier eating but the problem is largely unabated. This chapter examines the role of primary care practice nurses in making patients aware of changes that could improve their health. It concludes that there are opportunities to improve on the current nutritional focus of their advice by taking into account the patient's routine food purchasing, preparation and consumption practices.

  • 42.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Food that makes you different: the stigma experienced by adolescents with celiac disease2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 976-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For adolescents with celiac disease (CD), a gluten-free diet(GFD) is crucial for health, but compliance is problematic andnoncompliance is common even among those aware of the risks.To better understand their lives with the disease, Swedish CDadolescents were invited to take part in focus group discussions.Data were analyzed for recurrent stigma-related themes acrossthe groups. Adolescents described an awareness of being differentfrom others that was produced by meal appearance and the pooravailability of gluten-free food. The GFD often required discussionsand special requests, so eating in public had the effect ofmaking an invisible condition visible, and thereby creatinga context for felt or enacted stigma. Maintaining invisibilityavoided negative consequences of stigma, and other strategieswere used to reduce the costs of visibility. The results ofthe study show that the GFD can produce stigma experiences inadolescence, and that dietary compliance (or lack thereof) canbe understood in terms of dealing with GFD concealment and disclosure.

  • 43.
    Ross, Liz
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Cathcart, Craig
    School of Business, Enterprise and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Consumer choice for hearing aids and listening devices: newspaper advertisements for UK private sector provision2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 95-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the UK there can be several ways to access health care and this is true of hearing aid provision. Although there may appear to be a well-defined distinction between the National Health Service (NHS) and independent dispenser hearing aid provision, there have been many examples of overlap between the two and recent government policy initiatives mean that distinctions have become less clear. This article outlines the changing relationship between the two sectors and the problems that potential consumers face accessing information on private sector options for amplification devices. A 1-year sample of newspaper advertisements was content-analysed for clarity of information provided. The analysis highlighted a range of provision, from well-known hearing aid dispensers to the greyer areas of listening device retailers and intermediary services. Some advertisements were found to have been reported to the Advertising Standards Authority. Sufficiently misleading adverts may also infringe consumer protection legislation. The article concludes there is the possibility of consumer confusion about products and their potential for amelioration.

  • 44. Ross, Liz
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    Escaping a silent world: profound earing loss, cochlear implants and household interaction2006In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some people with profound hearing loss, cochlear implants offer a way back to patterns of communication that most of us take for granted. Travel, shopping and work contexts are largely dependent on the ability to recognize and respond to speech. This study examined implant user and partner perspectives on problems and coping strategies. The aim was to map the experiences of adults and their hearing partners living with deafness; and the changes brought about by cochlear implant use.

    Information was gathered by means of recorded joint interviews in a semi-structured form with implant users and their partners. Interview themes including social isolation, employment difficulties and loss of confidence emerged as main difficulties prior to implantation. All participants were positive regarding the use of cochlear implants and, after implantation, benefits accrued in communication and social interaction. Provision of multidisciplinary support and consumer information for severe/profoundly hearing impaired adults was seen as problematic. Sample size – six couples – reflected the limited number of adult cochlear implant operations performed in Scotland. However, the results indicate their interactional experiences to be worthy of further investigation on a larger scale.

  • 45. Ross, Liz
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Division of Business, Enterprise and Management, School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh EH21 6UU.
    Cathcart, Craig
    Pills, potions and devices: treatments for hearing loss advertised in mid-nineteenth century British newspapers2014In: Social history of medicine, ISSN 0951-631X, E-ISSN 1477-4666, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 530-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the ameliorative options facing people with hearing loss in mid-nineteenth-century Britain. As reflected in professional journals of the day, medical understanding of diseases and dysfunctions of the ear was limited, yet there was vigorous assertion and counter-claim as to the cause and treatment of problems. At the time, medicine was largely unregulated and quack practitioners were also able to promote their nostrums and services to a credulous the general public with little chance of a genuine cure for their hearing loss. Using the nineteenth-century British Library Newspapers Archive for 1850, 379 advertisements offering cures for deafness were identified and examined to illustrate the variety of nostrums and devices offered to the public. Individuals with hearing loss were easy prey when even qualified medical practitioners had little understanding of cause or treatment, and when scant legal protection protected them from fraudulent treatment claims or offered redress for their failure.

  • 46.
    Schröder, Monika
    et al.
    School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management, Queen Maragret University, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Embedding healthy eating: nudging or toolbox?2013In: Nutrition & Food Science, ISSN 0034-6659, E-ISSN 1758-6917, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 330-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the rationale and limitations of public nudging approaches currently to be found in the UK food choice environment.

    Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a critical review of the literature with case studies.

    Findings Nudging has potential value to assist healthier food choices, although the current focus of proponents tends to be the individual micro-environment for selection rather than the wider food choice context. Ethical questions are raised by nudging as a policy and limited evidence of success to date would suggest that a combination of personalised tools and public nudges – individual empowerment and attention to the choice environment – might be more effective for embedded healthier eating.

    Originality/value This paper contrasts the underlying assumptions of the nudge approach by reference to the behavioural toolbox.

  • 47. Scott, Hazel
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Food and Nutrition.
    No easy solutions: lessons learned from an intervention to reduce clinic non-attendance rates in a Scottish hospital2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 458-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospital waiting lists and times have become the public measure of government success or failure. This research examined existing hospital outpatient capacity and considered the age-old problem of patients who fail to attend their appointment. A reduction in did-not-attend (DNA) rates would maximize utilization of capacity, ensure early diagnosis and drive down waiting times. The research was designed to determine whether the introduction of outpatient letters, which included the need for positive confirmation of attendance, decreased the incidence of patient non-attendance. Utilizing an experimental design, data gathered at two Plastic Surgery clinics were compared over two three-month periods, pre- and post-implementation. Total attendance and non-attendance were examined in terms of new and review patients, gender and age profile. The research concludes that the intervention tested in this form can now be discounted thus allowing the exploration of subtler solutions.

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