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  • 1.
    Adman, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Economic History.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Enlund, Desirée
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Helmersson, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Simonsson, Märit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Örestig, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    DN Debatt. 171 forskare: ”Vi vuxna bör också klimatprotestera”2019In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, , p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vuxna bör följa uppmaningen från ungdomarna i Fridays for future-rörelsen och protestera eftersom det politiska ledarskapet är otillräckligt. Omfattande och långvariga påtryckningar från hela samhället behövs för att få de politiskt ansvariga att utöva det ledarskap som klimatkrisen kräver, skriver 171 forskare i samhällsvetenskap och humaniora.

  • 2. Bjarnason, Thoroddur
    et al.
    Stockdale, Aileen
    Shuttleworth, Ian
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Shucksmith, Mark
    At the intersection of urbanisation and counterurbanisation in rural space: Microurbanisation in Northern Iceland2021In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 87, p. 404-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micropolitan centers and other regional towns have frequently been conceptualised as drivers of economic growth in rural regions, providing an ideal balance between rural and urban amenities. However, they have also been described as “sponges” that suck the population from more rural communities in the region, perhaps only to be squeezed again into the micropolitan bucket of urbanisation. In this paper, we map long-term urbanisation and microurbanisation in Iceland and evaluate the role of micropolitan Akureyri in Northern Iceland in rural migration dynamics. We find the Icelandic rural population to be highly mobile with about nine out of ten residents in different types of communities having lived elsewhere for at least a year, and between a quarter and one-third having lived in the Reykjavík capital area. Positive net in-migration to Akureyri from more rural regions corresponds exactly to negative out-migration towards the Reykjavík capital area and the steady long-term population growth of Akureyri can, thus, be attributed exclusively to natural fertility. However, micropolitan Akureyri does not appear to exacerbate rural out-migration in Northern Iceland. Residents of smaller communities in the north are not more likely to move than other rural residents – they are simply more likely to move to micropolitan Akureyri rather than the Reykjavík capital area.

  • 3. Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Thompson, Michelle
    Hayes, Matthew
    Small villages and socio-economic change in resource peripheries: a view from Northern Sweden2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 27-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many towns and villages in the inland north of Sweden were settled by independent farmers and foresters, with industry and company towns being relatively rare. In Canada and Australia industry and company towns were more common, and there is some evidence that those towns have found it more difficult to attract and retain population than what we term here as 'settler towns'. Development of alternative economic activities such as tourism has been difficult. In Sweden, however, there is no clear distinction between the recent demographic performance of industry and settler villages, and local economic activity has been relatively unimportant as most villages are well connected to regional labour markets.

  • 4. Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter sets the scene for this book. It introduces issues that we relate with living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas. We explain that 'the north' is more than an area on a geographic map. We relate this with seminal previous research on sparsely populated municipalities under constant pressure due to socio-economic challenges. This chapter also provides concrete local examples of civil society-based local development. It explains how this book nuances both myths of rural areas as struggling and dull or as ideal idylls. We relate this with views of countrysides as productivist, post-productivist and multifunctional. In turbulent times due to global political struggles, climate change and the Corona outbreak, this book shows how the north of Sweden and similar areas are heterogeneous in their dos and don’ts.

  • 5. Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Epilogue: From growth to decline to degrowth? The future of Northern SPAs2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 393-401Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This final chapter of the book wraps up the discussions in previous chapters and links back to the book's introductory chapter. We reflect on the future of sparsely populated areas in connection with growth, decline and degrowth. We do so through revisiting the intro-chapter's example of local development and broader historical and political perspectives on major current challenges such as the corona pandemic, climate change and the refugee crisis. What does this mean for the north? The need for rural people, places and products has not disappeared. On the contrary, change, transformation and adaptation have been pivotal for development, and this is what we have seen as examples throughout this book.

  • 6.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Cleary, Jen
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    de la Barre, Suzanne
    Vancouver Island University, Canada.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    New mobilities - new economies?: temporary populations and local innovation capacity in sparsely populated areas2016In: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 178-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary population mobilities – including short-term labour, residential and recreational mobilities – have long been a prominent feature of human geography in sparsely populated areas. Such mobilities are often considered from a problem-centric perspective, with both academic and public discourses focusing extensively on the negative impacts that temporary populations have on local communities. Yet, temporary mobilities may also have a range of positive impacts, as they bring new people, ideas, skills, knowledge and network connections to remote communities, and thus potentially contribute to processes of local innovation. This chapter examines how different types of temporary populations contribute to local innovation capacity and new socio-economic development in remote communities. We propose a framework for analysing how different mobile populations with their particular temporal, spatial, motivational and interactional mobility characteristics impact on various forms of community capital, and subsequent innovation outcomes through the mobilisation of such capital. We then apply the framework to review five common examples of temporary mobilities in northern Scandinavia and Outback Australia, ranging from voluntary international lifestyle migrants to displaced refugee migrants, from seasonal second home-owners to short-term transit tourists, and from service to leisure-oriented Indigenous travellers. The review suggests that temporary populations offer substantial potential to boost innovation and new socio-economic development in remote communities, but that communities and institutional structures often fail to recognise and capitalise on such potential.

  • 7.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    International winter tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden: understanding migration, lifestyle, and business motivations2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the migration, lifestyle and business motivations of international winter tourism entrepreneurs who have moved to a “low-amenity” rural area in northern Sweden. Low-amenity areas are characterised by economic decline, outmigration and limited tourism development. Based on qualitative interviews, the research applied a multi-dimensional framework to the study of migrant tourism entrepreneurship, considering personal migration drivers, the value of location-specific amenities, desired consumptive experiences, previous familiarity with the destination, business-related goals, as well as temporal and technological dimensions of mobility and self-employment. The findings suggest that the northern winter and the undeveloped low-amenity character of the place were key factors in migration choices. Consumptive lifestyle interests around counter-urban living and winter outdoor hobbies were prominent, yet there was diversity in terms of business aspirations and considerable seasonal lifestyle-business balancing. Despite noticeable contributions to winter tourism development in the low-amenity north, the study also identified a sense of temporariness and expected onward migration among migrants, raising questions about the longevity of this development.

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  • 8. David, Inês
    et al.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    An exploration of a lifestyle migration industry2015In: Practising the Good Life: Lifestyle Migration in Practices / [ed] Kate Torkington, Inês David, João Sardinha, Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, p. 138-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobility to second homes, sometimes referred to as residential tourism, can be conceptually framed within the emerging concept of lifestyle mobilities. Although related, it differs from tourism in that it refers to relatively permanent movement which entails the intention and material efforts to create a home and a living in the destination context. Tourism mobility is facilitated by agents offering services and products enabling experiences of novelty, difference, authenticity, quality of life and the like. Lifestyle mobilities in many ways taps into this production system but also include products and services related to housing, furbishing and to making a living in place. On an international level the production system is further complicated. In migration studies, the concept of a migration industry refers to the amalgam of agents making a profit out of catering to the needs of migrants. This study is a joint reflection on the production dimension of lifestyle mobilities in the European context. We explore the agents brokering lifestyle for Swedes in Malta; Swedish rural municipalities' place marketing in the Netherlands; and the role of lifestyle media in the Algarve, Portugal. We aim to answer the question: “how (if at all) could the concept of a migration industry be applied to lifestyle mobilities?”.

  • 9.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Ambivalent Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden2014In: AEMI Journal, ISSN 1729-3561, Vol. 12, p. 48-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on Dutch families who moved to Hällefors municipality (rural Sweden) in the early 21st century. It discusses ambivalent discourses comparing pre-migration to post-migration life. As studied in this text, the direction of the move (north), the destination (a deprived municipality) and the structure for the decision process (a municipality and an agency deliberately attracting incomers) are novel aspects to existing studies of lifestyle migration. The paper aims to examine the migration process of Dutch lifestyle migrants in Hällefors and their ambivalent attitudes towards returning. The main question addressed enhances our understanding of the motivations for a possible move away from Hällefors. This question is addressed through a qualitative study, conducted in 2011. The findings suggest that spontaneous movers are more ambivalent than long-term planning migrants. This leads to the conclusion that the permanent-temporary binary of movement is less valuable for conceptualising this group of migrants.

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  • 10.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Flying dutchmen?: return reasoning among dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 116-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to examine return reasoning among Dutch lifestyle migrant families in Hällefors, rural Sweden. It addresses two questions: after migrating to Hällefors, what influences return reasoning among Dutch families? What does this imply for return migration and transnationalism within lifestyle migration research? The questions are addressed through analysis of Dutch migrant families’ narratives, collected in 2011 and subsequent years. The findings are related to issues of transnationalism and return migration within lifestyle migration research. As many of these intra-EU urban–rural migrants are seriously considering returning, this study draws attention to temporary lifestyle migration over longer periods.

  • 11.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Örebro universitet.
    Holländska livsstilsmigranter i Bergslagen2014In: PLAN - Planering av stad och land, ISSN 0032-0560, no 2, p. 36-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Örebro universitet.
    "I felt confined": Narratives of ambivalence among Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden.2015In: Place and Identity: A new landscape of Social and Political change in Sweden / [ed] Marco Eimermann & Anders Trumberg, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2015, p. 31-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary era of globalisation and time-space compression (Janelle 1991), many rural areas in Sweden and Europe have experienced international urban-to-rural migration (Hedberg & Do Carmo 2011). For instance, Müller (1999) studies German second-home owners in Småland. Among population geographers in Sweden, the county of Värmland is well-known for its large Dutch population (Andersen & Engström 2005, Eriksson Robertson 2010). However, rural municipalities such as Hällefors have not been studied in the context of Dutch lifestyle migration to the Swedish countryside.

  • 13.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lifestyle migration beyond consumption – production binaries: Dutch migrants and multifunctional rural land use in Sweden: [Življenjsko-stilske migracije onkraj dvojice potrošnja – proizvodnja: Nizozemski migranti in večnamenska uporaba kmetijskih zemljišč na Švedskem]2015In: Dve Domovini / Two Homelands, ISSN 0353-6777, E-ISSN 1581-1212, no 42, p. 81-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration literature often focuses on lifestyle migrants as consumers. However, this paper shows how various modes of production are involved in everyday migrant lives as they seek to pro-duce the lifestyles sought. The paper’s aim is twofold: to explore issues of production in lifestyle mi-grants’ everyday lives, and to examine these migrants’ potential contributions to local rural develop-ment in lagging rural areas such as Swedish Bergslagen. This aim is addressed through two in-depth interview studies. The findings suggest that the respondents combine lifestyle-led motivations with seeking labour opportunities. Hence, studying these migrants is useful for investigating newcomers’ multifunctional rural land use and examining how their engagements with local rural development increases our understanding of their post-migration lives in lagging rural areas.

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  • 14.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lifestyle Migration to the North: dutch Families and the Decision to Move to Rural Sweden2015In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 68-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration is part of an ongoing quest for a better way of life. More or less affluent migrants moving to a destination with a perceived better climate are studied in the context of social rather than economic motivations. This paper focuses on Dutch families and their decision to move to the rural municipality of Hällefors in the Bergslagen area, Sweden. Such a Nordic destination, actively attracting migrants, has not previously been investigated in the context of lifestyle migration. The purpose of the paper is to examine what factors contribute to the decision to move. The research questions are the following: what are the socio-demographic characteristics of the migrating families? What meanings do the migrants attach to their work environments and places of residence prior to moving? What motivations and expectations have shaped the decision to move? These questions are addressed through an interview study. Results show that the adult family members were mainly born in the late 1950s or in the 1960s. The children were born in the 1990s and early 21st century. According to most respondents, effects of overpopulation and rapid urbanisation, both felt on the work floor and in the living environment, became a serious trigger to leave the Netherlands. Differences between the families consider the character of occupations (within or outside the creative industries) and the length of the decision process. In contrast to some other lifestyle migrant populations, families in this study considered returning as part of their ongoing quest.

  • 15.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Örebro universitet.
    Promoting Swedish countryside in the Netherlands: international rural place marketing to attract new residents2015In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 398-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban-to-rural consumption-led mobility contributes to restructuring stagnating rural areas in Europe. Against this background, this article explores international rural place-marketing efforts by Swedish municipalities towards affluent western European migrants, exemplified by campaigns in the Netherlands. The analysis is based on the concepts of rural place marketing and lifestyle migration. Research methods employed in this article are observation and a survey during migration information meetings, followed by interviews with both stakeholders and migrants. The results suggest that rural municipalities with less favourable or unfavourable geographic conditions are the most actively engaged in international place-marketing efforts. Participation in migration information meetings and the Internet are the most commonly used communication strategies. The engaged municipalities are selective in their consideration of target groups. Attracting even a few of the 'right type' of migrants (i.e. families and entrepreneurs from affluent countries) over the course of some years contributes considerably to maintaining a small municipality's population and economic viability. However, although stakeholders claim that the marketing efforts have been effective and statistics point out that the number of Dutch migrants has increased, it is hard to distinguish the effect of rural place-marketing campaigns from the myriad possibilities for migrants to gather information about potential destination areas. Therefore, regional policy makers may consider shifting their focus to actively receiving potential migrants who are in the final stage of their decision process.

  • 16.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Studying Locals and Lifestyle Migrants in Sparsely Populated Northern Sweden Using Foresight "Light"2021Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Rasmus Rasmussen (2015) views the foresight approach as a methodology for strategic local and social development, based on input from local, regional, and national actors through a structural dialogue. The approach provides a basis for action with a focus on the potential to increase living conditions in a case study area, as indicated through analysis of qualitative data, e.g., gathered via workshops. This dataset is derived from a Northern Swedish research project that applied a light version of the foresight approach to study social resilience, which Neil Adger (2000, in his abstract on p. 347) describes as “the ability of groups or communities to cope with external stresses and disturbances as a result of social, political and environmental change.” External stresses are here mainly developments in the global economy, which both mean that local jobs are lost but also that there is potential to attract lifestyle migrants escaping the rat race in densely populated European areas. The dataset files are accompanied by a Teaching Guide and a Student Guide.

    Methods: Action research, Populations, Stakeholders

    Data Type: Group Transcripts, Narratives, Other, Workshops

  • 17.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CUReS), Örebro universitet.
    Two sides of the same coin: Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs and countryside capital in Sweden2016In: Rural Society, ISSN 1037-1656, E-ISSN 2204-0536, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contrasts Sweden’s tourism policy considering sustainable growth and increased employment with experiences and evaluations of Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs in Sweden. The study employs notions of countryside capital, investigating the effects on Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs of experiences with Swedish national tourism policy aims and local populations. A tourism-migration nexus occurs where the entrepreneurs are attracted by countryside capital before migration and use this capital in their firms to attract new tourists after migration. Interviewees tell of experiences which frustrate optimal utilization of countryside capital. In combination with flexible attitudes conceptualized as multi-local living and strategic switching, this results in the risk of losing the entrepreneurs’ socio-economic impetus for lagging rural areas. The article relates this loss to incomers’ rural tourism business transfers after the initial start-up phase and questions the alleged transition from countrysides of production to countrysides of consumption.

  • 18.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Adjei, Evans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Bjarnason, Thoroddur
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Exploring population redistribution at sub-municipal levels: Microurbanisation and messy migration in Sweden’s high North2022In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 90, p. 93-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To contribute to more balanced perspectives on sub-municipal population change in sparsely populated areas(SPAs), this paper closely examines a local pocket of growth in a shrinking Northern Swedish municipality.Integrating Swedish register data with in-depth qualitative insights, the geographic study examines patterns andprocesses of uneven local population dynamics linked to life course migration. This is done through a sociospatialcluster analysis containing, first, 15 aggregate socioeconomic variables for sub-municipal areas, andthen individual characteristics like birth countries, age groups, sex ratios, educational attainment, andemployment status. A Foresight approach and interviews with locals, municipal officials, and incoming lifestylemigrants complement this. Studying these individuals’ practical compromises regarding housing, income, andleisure at sub-municipal levels helps in overcoming fallacies in population change research at broader regionallevels, and illustrates the limits of relying solely on quantitative demographic change indicators. The paper showsthat urban traits in the municipal centre and rural natural amenities around a dogsledding trail combine toattract and retain different population groups. This adds to population change studies and shows that municipaladministrative centres in SPAs are not necessarily growing while other villages are declining, and that populationredistribution at the municipal level does not automatically imply the movement of people to municipal centresfrom a municipality’s minor villages.

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  • 19.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Agnidakis, Paul
    Uppsala universitet.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    Woube, Annie
    Rural place marketing and consumption-driven mobilities in Northern Sweden: challenges and opportunities for community sustainability2017In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 12, no 2-3, p. 114-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similar to other northern peripheries, remote, and sparsely populated areas (SPAs) in Sweden’s far north have been confronted with decreasing populations and economic stagnation, forcing local governments to more actively engage in strategies for attracting and retaining populations. This exploratory community case study considers rural place-marketing efforts in the municipalities of Åsele and Storuman, with a particular focus on understanding differing local strategies for attracting consumption-driven movers to "amenity-poor" and "amenity-rich" areas. The case study examines two research questions: what target groups do these municipalities envisage as desired new populations; and to what extent, and how, do they engage in rural place-marketing efforts? Our study reveals that the municipal officials’ views on rural place-marketing strategies differ considerably, as Åsele participates in Europe’s largest emigration expo while Storuman draws on its increasing tourism development to attract seasonal residents and returning young adults in the family-building stage of the life course. The findings further illustrate how production and performance aspects of mobility are essential when studying the socio-economic sustainability of everyday life in sparsely populated northern Swedish municipalities at different geographical places and levels.

  • 20.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    European lifestyle migrant entrepreneurs and their business networks in Swedish sparsely populated areas2018In: Processes of immigration in rural Europe: the status quo, implications and development strategies / [ed] Stefan Kordel, Tobias Weidinger and Igor Jelen, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018, p. 243-269Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the perspective of declining rural areas, active lifestyle migrants are expected to contribute to demographic rejuvenation and new economic development via their networks and access to novel knowledge, markets and capital. [...] this chapter studies local and transnational social networks as critical resources mainly for enabling or constraining migrant entrepreneurs' developing business practices.

  • 21.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Towards a cordial dialogue between lifestyle migration/mobilities and rural tourism geographies2023In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 341-355Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces the special issue Changing dimensions of lifestyle mobilities in turbulent times: impacts of COVID-19 outbreaks and multiple crises. It aims not just to understand the individual drivers and consequences of mobility but their interactions with local manifestations of spatial (in)justice in various meaningful places. This editorial synthesizes the four studies of population flows in proximate and remote rural areas in Europe, and puts their contributions to the fields of lifestyle migration and mobilities in context. We introduce the lifestyle migration hub meeting that inspired this special issue and a mobility spectrum around which the article revolves. We then indicate common interests of lifestyle migration and rural tourism geographies, focusing on the contributors’ use of human geographic perspectives and aided by observations from ongoing ethnographic work about the demographic future of small villages in northern Sweden. A discussion of multiple disruptions, precarity and vulnerability is linked with a review of the papers before elaborating on destinations and communities as meaningful but vulnerable places. The conclusion outlines how concerns with people’s and place’s vulnerability and precarity in multiple disruptions to mobility flows can be further explored in cordial dialogue between scholars of lifestyle migration/mobility and tourism geography.

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  • 22.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Transforming a dogsledding community: the 'Gafsele Open' and lifestyle migrants in sparsely populated northern Sweden2023In: Handbook on tourism and rural community development / [ed] Heather Mair, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 386-402Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter increases our understanding of how intra-European lifestyle migrants may transform communities in sparsely populated areas (SPAs) through their engagements in civil society, using the example of a dogsledding community in Arctic Sweden. In-depth narrative analysis of interviews with international migrant dogsledders and longer-term residents shows the heterogeneity of communities in sparsely populated settings and their diverse perspectives on community transformation and renewal in response to challenges of demographic shrinkage (Eimermann et al., 2022). The case study village of Gafsele in Åsele municipality provides an interesting study context as it is home to a relatively large group of international migrants, many of whom were attracted by exceptional opportunities for dogsledding and an internationally renowned trail network. The local dogsledding club organizes an annual dogsledding event (the Gafsele Open) attracting Swedish and international participants. Balancing their incomes and lifestyles around dogsledding activities, migrants are engaging in the club and co-organizing the event as individuals and through their businesses (D.A. Carson et al., 2018; Eimermann & Singleton, 2021). This area is thus exploring its potential for local rural development through community- and nature-based tourism.

  • 23.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Who works in the North?: challenges and opportunities for employment2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 133-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it time for new understandings of the role of work in society? This chapter introduces the other chapters in this book's second section as it relates their contents with the meaning of work derived from sociology and political science. It discusses intrinsic motivations for work and relates these with indigenous people's traditional-ness and health issues in northern Sweden. It then relates this with old and new takes on downshifting from different angles (such as Retrotopia and Utopia). Links are also made with Thai food women entrepreneurs in rural Sweden and alternative farming and food networks in the north. This chapter argues that routinely proclaimed growth strategies should be revised to make them "adaptive" to more realistic goals.

  • 24.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Örebro universitet.
    Forsell, Håkan
    Örebro universitet.
    Introduction: themes and trajectories of urban and regional development in Swedish society2015In: Place and Identity: A new landscape of social and political change in Sweden / [ed] Eimermann, Marco & Anders Trumberg, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2015, p. 7-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hayes, MatthewKorpela, Mari
    Conference proceedings for the Lifestyle migrationHub meeting28-29 November 2019Umeå University, Sweden: GERUM Geografisk Arbetsrapport (Working paper)2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration refers to the relocation of citizens from affluent industrialised nations in order to find a more meaningful and relaxed life, usually in places with lower living costs and sunny or otherwise attractive climates. Often, they claim to be escaping from the “rat-race”, hectic lifestyles and pressures at work. Retirees, on the other hand, often claim to search for a more active old age by moving abroad. Scholars of lifestyle migration and tourism-informed mobilities are interested in the social conditions that lead individuals to pursue ‘the good life’ through geographic mobility and travel. Lifestyle-informed migration creates new forms of transnational community and identity. It also has important social and environmental effects on receiving communities. Studies have e.g. focused on North Europeans moving to Spain (O’Reilly 2000), or buying second homes in Malta (Åkerlund 2013), or on the migration of North Americans and West Europeans to Latin American destinations (Hayes 2015), and to South or Southeast Asia (Benson & O’Reilly 2018).

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  • 26.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Downshifting Dutch Rural Tourism Entrepreneurs in Sweden: Challenges, Opportunities and Implications for the Swedish Welfare State2020In: Tourism Employment in Nordic Countries: Trends, Practices, and Opportunities / [ed] Walmsley, Andreas; Åberg, Kajsa; Blinnikka, Petra; Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 303-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers a much-needed exploration of downshifting in the context of lifestyle migration and tourism entrepreneurship. Analysing results from 12 interviews with Dutch tourism entrepreneurs in rural Sweden, it draws attention to gender issues in male and female reasoning around motivations for migration and their daily business practices. It illustrates gender differences in downshifting, since more women work in tourism, while men find employment in other sectors and in less rural areas. The authors relate this with social and spatial inequality in the Swedish welfare state. They conclude with reflections on implications of increased downshifting practices for Sweden, and suggestions for future research.

  • 27.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Nuga, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hållbara livsstilar och föreställningar om landsbygd2021In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 72-73, p. 194-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussioner om nedväxling, frivillig enkelhet och omställning förekommer i tidningar, radio, tv och allt fler fora på sociala medier. Där avhandlas allt från jordnära ting som grönsaksodling och självförsörjning till systemförändringar som ska förhindra överexploatering av jordens resurser eller livsstilsförändringar med syfte att hoppa av ekorrhjulet. Vi som ligger bakom den här texten är kulturgeografer och forskare på Institutionen för geografi vid Umeå universitet. Texten syftar till att presentera vår tolkning av fenomenet nedväxling inte bara med hänsyn till våra professionella erfarenheter, utan också med hänsyn till våra respektive bakgrunder och värderingar kring hållbara livsstilar.

  • 28.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Nuga, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Is downshifting easier in the countryside?: focus group visions on individual sustainability transitions2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 195-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, few geographic studies focus on downshifting in Sweden. We address this gap and use 'downshifting' to describe a process in which people become aware of the downsides of their hectic lifestyles, and to analyse modern society as a context from which this process arises. During the 2019 Transition Conference in Umeå, we conducted a focus group workshop to address the questions 'how do you describe your desired lifestyle?' and 'how do you relate these lifestyles with your place perceptions?'. One conclusion is that inner transition is as important as spatial relocation. The participants indicated that both urban and rural areas can enable and hinder sustainable lifestyles. Policy makers need to know how these potential downshifters reason around optimal settlement sizes.

  • 29.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Karlsson, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Department of Geography, Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Swede.
    Globalising Swedish countrysides?: A relational approach to rural immigrant restaurateurs with refugee backgrounds2018In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 82-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of the article is to connect rural immigrants’ business ventures and development in Sweden to relational perspectives on their proximate and distant family and co-ethnic networks at structural and individual levels. Accordingly, the authors employ a relational approach and draw on in-depth interviews. In the context of urban–rural relationships’ meanings for the restaurateurs’ business benefits and constraints, they address two questions: (1) What does embeddedness in proximate and distant family and co-ethnic networks mean for the interviewed restaurateurs and for their businesses? and (2) How do previous and anticipated transitions in the restaurateurs' families influence their business decisions and migration trajectories? The results suggest that the interviewees employed transnational dimensions in their social embeddedness and that they maintained material and emotional relationships with their countries of origin. This relational approach thus contributes to a better understanding of what the studied businesses mean for the entrepreneurs and the selected localities. The restaurateurs contribute to a globalisation of Swedish countrysides, but their socio-economic potential for countering rural depopulation in Sweden is not fully realised. Additionally, the study illuminates how individuals influence, and are influenced by, place-to-place mobilities on a daily basis and during their life course.

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  • 30.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Kordel, Stefan
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.
    International lifestyle migrant entrepreneurs in two New Immigration Destinations: Understanding their evolving mix of embeddedness2018In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 64, p. 241-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on consumption and production in lifestyle migration to New Immigration Destinations (NIDs). The aim is to understand how and why lifestyle migrants' structural and individual peculiarities affect socio-economic changes in NIDs. Data are drawn from biographical interviews with lifestyle migrants in rural Slovenia and Sweden, adding issues of production to the otherwise prevailing focus on consumption in lifestyle migration studies. We ask how the ongoing quest for a better life and the lifestyle migrants' embedding processes in various contexts affect each other. Studying lifestyle migrants’ strives for better lives implies both an implicit and an explicit focus on temporality, which can result in a complex mix of embeddedness. Although our participants desire social relations with local populations, they establish them to only a limited degree, deploying multiple local and social networks in various locations for business purposes. As such, this article contributes to discussions on the incorporation of novel populations in NIDs and how to evaluate their contributions to local rural development.

  • 31.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Kordel, Stefan
    Singleton, Benedict
    Webster, Natasha
    Weidinger, Tobias
    Yachin, Jonathan
    Berättelser om naturen i landsbygds- och migrationsstudier2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En bloggserie av Marco Eimermann, Stefan Kordel, Benedict E. Singleton, Natasha A. Webster, Tobias Weidinger & Jonathan Yachin. Under våren 2022 har vi publicerat ett inlägg varannan vecka i den här serien, som vi kallar ”Berättelser om naturen i landsbygds- och migrationsstudier”. Detta inom ramen för "Kunskaper för landsbygder", en SLU-blogg.

  • 32.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Centre for Regional Studies, Umeå University.
    Nuancing holistic simplicity in sweden: A statistical exploration of consumption, age and gender2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 15, article id 8340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of sustainable ways of life have hitherto made limited use of register data since, e.g., voluntary simplicity is usually identified through characteristics that cannot be found in data registers. Despite this, claims about these trends have been made in many countries, at times gen-eralising the phenomena both in academia and media, based on anecdotal examples. This article draws on a quantifiable definition of holistic simplicity (Etzioni 1998) that includes certain fully measurable aspects, such as living in more affluent suburbs, moving to less affluent places and a significant reduction in individual work income. Other aspects are partially observable in register data, such as housing and car consumption. The advantage of this study is that it combines relevant theories around voluntary simplicity with register data that capture important characteristics of the entire national population (in this case, in Sweden) and thus, to some extent, also captures the mag-nitude of the phenomena. The article aims to statistically explore different demographic groups’ probability of becoming holistic simplifiers in Sweden, regarding their consumption, gender and age. It discusses opportunities and limitations for advancing our knowledge on voluntary simplicity in Sweden, with current findings suggesting more of the same consumption patterns and only initial paths to degrowth. This is discussed in the context of individuals’ agency in a state such as Sweden, which is changing from collectivist social democratic values to more neo-liberal conditions.

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  • 33.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Zhang, Jundan Jasmine
    Mobility transitions and rural restructuring in Sweden: a database study of holistic simplifiers2021In: Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy / [ed] C. Michael Hall, Linda Lundmark, Jasmine Zhang, London: Routledge, 2021, p. 54-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, living simply, and sustainably, has become a legitimate, or even trendy, way for individuals to contribute to a better society in the global North. Rural areas in this context are seen as a place for people who seek voluntary simplicity to resettle, for either business purposes or personal reasons. However, few research has examined the phenomenon of voluntary simplicity in quantitative manner and the mobility aspect is often missing from the general discussion of voluntary simplicity and degrowth literature. This chapter therefore looks at holistic simplifiers, as those who seek voluntary simplicity and move to smaller towns, rural areas or other less affluent or urbanized parts of the country, with the help of longitudinal register data (Statistics Sweden). The results show demographic and economic features of holistic simplifiers and some of them are unexpected, challenging some of the assumptions and definitions of voluntary simplicity. We conclude that the number of holistic simplifier is low in Sweden, and while individuals meet the overall criteria for voluntary simplicity they do not necessarily behave accordingly by cutting down on consumption and living a simpler life. Some possible reasons are discussed and questions for future studies are suggested. 

  • 34.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Singleton, Benedict
    Trails and tribulations. Lifestyle migration as nature-based integration in Northern Sweden2022In: More than 'Nature': Research on Infrastructure and Settlements in the North / [ed] Doris Friedrich, Markus Hirnsperger, Stefan Bauer, Wien: LIT Verlag, 2022, p. 167-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on a competitive dogsledding event – the “Gafsele Open” – near Gafsele village, in Åsele municipality in northern Sweden. Like other remote places, Åsele faces demographic and socio-economic struggles, causing debates on whether services like childcare, schools, care homes for the elderly, and other infrastructure should be concentrated in the central village (Carson et al. 2019; 2020). To address parts of these strug-gles, the municipality has engaged in rural place marketing (Eimermann et al. 2017) to encourage western European lifestyle migrants to migrate to Åsele. As elsewhere, the interaction of local and migrant population is as-sessable in terms of their integration, “successful” or not. In doing this, we examine the Gafsele Open as a potential site of “nature-based integration” (NBI). We present viewpoints from mainly western migrants, which is novel since previous studies of NBI in Scandinavian societies have mostly focused on non-western people (e.g., Gentin et al. 2018; 2019). It is beyond the scope of this chapter to consider whether western migrants integrate faster into Swedish society than non-western people (Eimermann et al. 2020). Instead, we study the Gafsele Open as an example of an institution that we interpret as a NBI project. We thus assess the extent that integration or disintegration may occur around the Gafsele Open with local and various lifestyle migrant stakeholders holding differing views on future developments. Further, the event is under pressure from climate change, the 2020 Coronavirus outbreak, and labor shortages. This sets the scene in which we connect the hitherto separate fields of NBI and lifestyle migration.

  • 35.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tillberg Mattsson, Karin
    Centre for Research and Development,Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle,Sweden.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    International tourism entrepreneurs in Swedish peripheries: compliance and collision with public tourism strategies2019In: Regional Science Policy & Practice, E-ISSN 1757-7802, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 479-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the entrepreneurial strategies and development aspirations of immigrant tourism entrepreneurs in rural Sweden, and how they support or conflict with local and regional public sector tourism strategies. Our conceptual framework contrasts the immigrant entrepreneurs' business and lifestyle priorities with public sector responsibilities and development interests. Findings from three case studies suggest that immigrants both collaborate and compete with public sector stakeholders in different tourism destination systems. We identify mismatches in terms of economic, lifestyle and public interest goals, as well as institutional and cultural differences between immigrant entrepreneurs and public sector stakeholders that hinder effective public‐private collaboration.

  • 36.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Tomozeiu, Daniel
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lifestyle migrants and intercultural communication in Swedish villages2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 107-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common assumption is that European lifestyle migrants integrate rather easily into Swedish villages because they are more culturally proximate to Swedish people. To nuance this myth, the authors combine insights from lifestyle migration studies in Swedish villages with intercultural communication models. Taking into account six dimensions of national culture and acculturation theory, this chapter discusses challenges and difficulties for incoming European lifestyle migrants and local Swedish villagers when they attempt to live and work together. In addition to individual people, and the local authorities, family structure and family dynamics, the existence of a local diaspora from the home country, as well as the attitude of the local Swedish community at an interpersonal level, all play a determining role in the final acculturation outcome.

  • 37.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Trumberg, AndersÖrebro universitet.
    Place and Identity: a new landscape of social and political change in Sweden2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is internationally renowned for its generous welfare state. However, over the past decades, changes in economic circumstances and population composition, as well as increasing population concentration in larger urban areas, have imposed new challenges to the Swedish model. What does this imply for individual and collective identity formation? Why and how have some places become more attractive than others? What individuals or groups prosper from these changes and who looses? The authors of this anthology highlight social and political change in Sweden from different perspectives, based on various studies in urban and rural Sweden. They represent five disciplines: history, human geography, political science, social work and sociology. Contextualised by theories on place and identity, the book's ten chapters focus on ageing, lifestyle migration, rural landscape, place branding, group identity, religion, music, the school as a meeting place, unsafety and residential projects. The participating authors are affiliated with the Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CUReS) at Örebro University, Sweden.

  • 38.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    David, Inês
    A critical exploration of an emerging lifestyle mobility industry2014In: Proceedings from the 23rd Nordic Symposium on Tourism andHospitality Research: The Values of Tourism / [ed] Adriana Budeanu, Marie Möckel, Szilvia Gyimóthy, Köpenhamn, 2014, p. 107-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobility to second homes, sometimes referred to as residential tourism, can be conceptually framed within the emerging concept of lifestyle mobilities. Although related, it differs from tourism in that it refers to relatively permanent movement which entails the intention and material efforts to create a home and a living in the destination context. Tourism mobility is facilitated by agents offering services and products enabling experiences of novelty, difference, authenticity, quality of life and the like. Lifestyle mobilities in many ways taps into this production system but also include products and services related to housing, furbishing and to making a living in place. On an international level the production system is further complicated. In migration studies, the concept of a migration industry refers to the amalgam of agents making a profit out of catering to the needs of migrants. This study is a joint reflection on the production dimension of lifestyle mobilities in the European context. We explore the agents brokering lifestyle for Swedes in Malta; Swedish rural municipalities' place marketing in the Netherlands; and the role of lifestyle media in the Algarve, Portugal. We aim to answer the question: “how (if at all) could the concept of a migration industry be applied to lifestyle mobilities?”.

  • 39.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Böhlin, Marie
    Den nya gröna vågen och praktiska flyttare: En intervjustudie om inflyttare till Kramfors kommun 2020–20212023Report (Other academic)
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  • 40.
    Hedlund, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Repopulating and revitalising rural Sweden? Re-examining immigration as a solution to rural decline2017In: Geographical Journal, ISSN 0016-7398, E-ISSN 1475-4959, Vol. 183, no 4, p. 400-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing international immigration is often portrayed as a potential solution to persistent economic and population decline in rural areas. Based on longitudinal register data, this study examines the extent to which international migration has contributed to demographic and labour market changes in rural Sweden between 1990 and 2010. Results show that the urbanisation rate of international migrants is very high while their employment rate in rural areas remains comparatively low. Small positive changes are noticeable in the rate of higher education, self-employment and employment in new service-related industries among particular groups of immigrants. Immigrants to rural areas are a highly heterogeneous group in terms of their demographic and labour market characteristics, which should be considered when estimating the contributions of immigration to socio-economic development in rural areas. This study shows that, while international migration may dampen population decline in rural areas to some extent, particularly in the working-age groups, its potential to stimulate socio-economic revitalisation in rural areas needs to be questioned and examined from a more nuanced and longitudinal perspective.

  • 41.
    Lundmark, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Carson, Dean B.Eimermann, MarcoUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dipping in to the North explores how changing mobility and migration is affecting the social, economic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of sparsely populated areas of northern Sweden (and places like it). It examines who lives in, works in, and visits the north; how and why this has changed over time; and what those changes mean for how the north might develop in the future. The book draws upon deep expertise and knowledge from a range of social scientists, presenting valuable insights in an accessible style for a broad audience.

  • 42.
    Lundmark, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Spillover, sponge or something else?: Dismantling expectations for rural development resulting from giga-investments in northern Sweden2022In: Fennia, E-ISSN 1798-5617, Vol. 200, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paradoxical situation of planning for growth while managing decline has long been a reality for politicians and planners in Nordic peripheries. In recent years, however, attempts to plan for demographic adaptation, smart shrinkage, and ‘right-sizing’ public services have become commonplace. While it has taken decades for this to become an accepted part of municipal planning, new opportunities are now arising in the Swedish North due to several unforeseen giga-investments. These are expected to trigger rapid socio-economic growth along the urbanized coast and in a few select inland locations. Yet the likely effects on shrinking rural and sparsely populated municipalities geographically adjacent to these investment hotspots are much less understood. Previous research suggests that such investment projects might cause pressure for rural labour and housing markets but may also offer a range of positive spillover effects and development opportunities for rural areas. We draw on structural level narratives and interviews with key informants, including local and regional political stakeholders, to identify how the prospects of the giga-investments are viewed in places that are not directly affected, and what opportunities and threats are discussed. An overarching theme identified in the empirical material concerns the a-spatiality of discourses of growth, which we divide into two concrete dilemmas: infrastructure and mobility. Our findings show that, while the investments are seen as ringing in a new ‘golden age’ for the northern region, such a-spatial understandings of regional characteristics might stand in the way of acting fast and being able to make the most of the potential spillover effects.

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  • 43.
    Nuga, Mari
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Downshifting towards voluntary simplicity: the process of reappraising the local2023In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reappraisal of the local and living a rooted life are often highlighted by international advocates for sustainable and environmentally conscious lifestyles. The purpose of this study is to explore and theorize downshifters’ lifestyle changes, with a particular focus on their living environments and sense of place, and we draw on a theoretical framework that combines insights from previous research on downshifting and voluntary simplicity. We conducted 30 life story interviews with individuals in Sweden who consider themselves downshifters or advocates of a simpler life. These materials were analysed along the dimensions of (1) spatial adaptation and appropriation; (2) local and global scales; and (3) temporality of place. Our results emphasize the non-linearity of lifestyle changes towards simplicity where, whereby commitment to sustainability varies while personal goals rely on the previous experiences and everyday practices, values and knowledge that can improve both individual and global sustainability. Our analysis shows that sense of place is a dynamic process influenced by mobilities and flows, spatial inertia and context, and memories and emotions. Our research contributes to the recent more than- relational view on space and place with concepts from humanistic geography that further assist in understanding individuals’ sense of place.

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  • 44.
    Rataj, Marcin
    et al.
    Institute of Geography, Bern University, Switzerland.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Entrepreneurship in rural Sweden: the role of weak ties, strong ties, and 'good enough' internet access2021In: The Rural Enterprise Economy, Taylor & Francis Group, 2021, p. 178-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter assesses to what extent broadband internet access and social capital influence entrepreneurship in rural Sweden. The chapter combines a quantitative assessment of the relation between broadband access and the start-up rates of micro-enterprises in Swedish municipalities between 2007 and 2012 with a qualitative case study on Dutch lifestyle migrants. Our results show that broadband access is positively correlated with entrepreneurial efforts in rural Sweden compared to larger urban regions. Nevertheless, investments in broadband access may not be the optimal allocation of public resources. Instead, the results suggest that mixing various types of social embeddedness and technical connectivity on a satisfactory, but not necessarily high, level may allow entrepreneurs to take advantage of synergies and create resilient business strategies based on local resources.

1 - 44 of 44
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