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  • 1.
    Bajraktari, Saranda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Hörling, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Self-managed fall preventive exercise intervention with an mHealth application: self-reported health outcomes over one yearManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bajraktari, Saranda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of the digital fall preventive intervention Safe Step among community dwelling older people aged 70 and overManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bajraktari, Saranda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Municipality of Östersund, Health and Social Care Administration, Östersund, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Reaching older people with a digital fall prevention intervention in a Swedish municipality context: an observational study2022In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 857652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is robust evidence that falls in old age can be prevented by exercise programs that include balance training, functional exercises, and strength training. For the interventions to have a population health impact, outreach to the population of focus with suitable interventions is needed. While digital interventions are promising there is limited knowledge on the characteristics of who is reached. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process, estimate reach rate at the population level and to describe participants characteristics and representativeness in a digital fall prevention intervention study.

    Methods: In a municipality-based observational study, reach of a digital fall prevention intervention was evaluated. The intervention included a digital exercise programme (Safe Step) and optional supportive strategies, complemented with a range of recruitment strategies to optimize reach. Recruitment during a period of 6 months was open to people 70 years or older who had experienced a fall or a decline in balance the past year. Reach was based on data from the baseline questionnaire including health and demographic characteristics of participants. Representativeness was estimated by comparing participants to a sample of older people from the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

    Results: The recruitment rate was 4.7% (n = 173) in relation to the estimated population of focus (n = 3,706). Most participants signed up within the first month of the intervention (n = 131). The intervention attracted primarily women, older people with high education, individuals who used the internet or digital applications almost every day and those perceiving their balance as fair or poor. Safe step participants lived more commonly alone and had higher education and better walking ability in comparison to the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

    Conclusions: With a range of recruitment strategies most participants were recruited to a digital fall intervention during the first month. The intervention attracted primarily highly educated women who frequently used the internet or smart technologies. In addition to digital fall prevention interventions, a higher diversity of intervention types (digital and non-digital) is more likely to reach a larger group of older people with different needs.

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  • 4.
    Janols, Rebecka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Older adults as designers of behavior change strategies to increase physical activity: report of a participatory design process2022In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 988470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the significant value of physical activity for the health of older adults, this population often fails to achieve recommended activity levels. Digital interventions show promise in providing support for self-managed physical activity. However, more information is needed about older adults' preferences for digital support to change physical activity behaviors as well as the process of designing them. The aim of this paper was to describe the participatory design process in which older adults were involved in the co-creation of digitally supported behavioral change strategies to support self-managed physical activity, and how the results were integrated in a prototype.

    Methods: The participatory design process involved with nine older adults and two researchers. The participants were divided in two groups, and each group participated in three workshops and completed home tasks in between workshops. Following an iterative design process influenced by theories of behavior change, the workshops and home tasks were continuously analyzed, and the content and process were developed between groups and the next set of workshops. Prototypes of a mobile health (mHealth) solution for fall preventive exercise for older adults were developed in which the conceptualized strategies were integrated. To support coherence in reporting and evaluation, the developed techniques were mapped to the Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 and the basic human psychosocial needs according to the Self-determination Theory.

    Results: The results highlight different preferences of older adults for feedback on physical activity performance, as well as the importance of transparency regarding the identification of the sender of feedback. Preferences for content and wording of feedback varied greatly. Subsequently, the design process resulted in a virtual health coach with three different motivational profiles and tools for goal setting and self-monitoring. These behavior change strategies were integrated in the exercise application Safe Step v1. The conformity of the design concepts with the needs of Self-determination Theory and Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 are presented.

    Conclusion: The participatory design process exemplifies how older adults successfully contributed to the design of theory-based digital behavior change support, from idea to finished solution. Tailoring feedback with a transparent sender is important to support and not undermine motivation.

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  • 5.
    Månsson, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Skelton, Dawn A.
    School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Feasibility of performance-based and self-reported outcomes in self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for independent older adults living in the community2022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about associations between performance-based measurements and self-reported scales, nor about ceiling effects or sensitivity to change to evaluate effects in the target population for self-managed exercise interventions. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using performance-based outcomes for gait speed, functional leg strength and balance, and self-reported outcomes of falls-efficacy and functional ability in two self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for community dwelling older adults.

    METHODS: Independent living, community-dwelling older adults (n = 67) exercised with one of two self-managed falls prevention exercise programmes, a digital programme (DP) or a paper booklet (PB) in a 4-month participant preference trial. Pre- and post-assessments, by blinded assessors, included Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and 30s Chair stand test (30s CST). Participants completed self-reported questionnaires: Activities-specific and Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Iconographical Falls Efficacy Scale (Icon-FES), Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument Function Component (LLFDI-FC). In addition, improvement in balance and leg strength was also self-rated at post-assessment. Participants' mean age was 76 ± 4 years and 72% were women.

    RESULTS: Ceiling effects were evident for the balance sub-component of the SPPB, and also indicated for ABC and Icon-FES in this high functioning population. In SPPB, gait speed, 30s CST, and LLFDI-FC, 21-56% of participants did not change their scores beyond the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID). At pre-assessment all performance-based tests correlated significantly with the self-reported scales, however, no such significant correlations were seen with change-scores. Improvement of performance-based functional leg strength with substantial effect sizes and significant correlations with self-reported exercise time was shown. There were no differences in outcomes between the exercise programmes except that DP users reported improved change of leg strength to a higher degree than PB users.

    CONCLUSION: The LLFDI-FC and sit-to-stand tests were feasible and sensitive to change in this specific population. The balance sub-component of SPPB and self-reported measures ABC and Icon-FES indicated ceiling effects and might not be suitable as outcome measures for use in a high functioning older population. Development and evaluation of new outcome measures are needed for self-managed fall-preventive interventions with high functioning community-dwelling older adults.

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  • 6.
    Månsson, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Skelton, Dawn A
    Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Self-managed fall prevention exercise guided by a digital programme or a paper booklet: effectiveness and feasibility of outcomesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Fall prevention exercise for older adults: self-management with support of digital technology2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Falls are a major public health issue, which can cause physical and psychological suffering for the individual as well as large costs for the society. To increase access and adherence to evidence-based fall prevention exercise, utilisation of older adults’ own capabilities and digital health offers promising solutions. The aim of this thesis was to explore a digital programme as support for self-management of fall preventive exercises in community-dwelling older adults with a focus on participant experiences, behaviour change, and intervention reach.

    Methods: This thesis comprises four papers, of which Papers I and II report from a feasibility study comparing two self-managed fall prevention exercise programmes, a paper booklet and the digital Safe Step programme. Papers III and IV describes a randomised controlled trial, which evaluates the effectiveness of the Safe Step programme in combination with educational videos, to reduce falls in comparison with educational videos alone. In Paper I, individual interviews were analysed with inductive qualitative content analysis to explore older adults’ experiences of self-managing their fall prevention exercise. In Paper II, a deductive and inductive approach was utilised for the analysis of comments in questionnaires, individual, and focus group interviews to explore experiences of self-determination when using the Safe Step programme. The classification system of motivational and behaviour change strategies based on Self-determination theory was utilised as a categorisation matrix. An additional analysis of behavioural regulation for exercise according to the Self-determination theory was performed in this thesis. Paper III is a protocol for a randomised controlled trial, and Paper IV describes the recruitment strategies, and reach of this trial through comparison with another representative sample of adults 70 years or older by descriptive statistics.

    Results: Results from Papers I and II show that the older adults appreciated the autonomy of a self-managed exercise programme. They expressed a capability to independently select exercises and manage their progression with support from the programme. However, some wanted the support of others in their training. The behaviour change support in the Safe Step programme was voiced as motivating and supportive, and the diversity of behaviour change strategies was emphasized as important to suit many older adults’ preferences. In Paper II, the behaviour change support were found supportive for the basic human psychological needs according to the Self-determination theory, although, support for autonomy and competence were more clearly stated than for relatedness. An additional category was formed and proposed as an amendment to the classification system used as an analytical matrix. In the thesis, expressions of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for doing the exercise from participants in Paper I were triangulated with results from the Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2. The results confirmed the trend found in the qualitative analysis of more intrinsically motivated expressions in the group using the Safe Step programme. A study protocol was written that described the design of the Safe Step randomised controlled trial, including the aims, methodology and overall organisation of the research (Paper III). In Paper IV, the most successful recruitment strategy to the randomised controlled trial was identified as advertisement in social media. The recruited participants were predominantly women, highly educated, and frequently used applications or internet on mobile devices.

    Conclusion: Finding of this thesis support implementation of fall prevention strategies through increased utilisation of older adults' self-management capabilities. Older adults’ experiences of exercising with a self-managed digital exercise program can be understood as managing pieces of a personal puzzle and was shaped more by the sum of the features and behaviour change support in the programme than by parts of the programme. The Safe step programme seems to provide support for more self-determined exercise motivation, than a paper booklet, which can support maintenance of the new exercise routines. The older adults’ experiences, as well as the characteristics of the participants reached, highlight the necessity for a variety of fall prevention strategies that reflect the diversified needs and preferences of older adults.

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  • 8.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Bajraktari, Saranda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Skelton, Dawn
    School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Recruitment strategies and reach of a digital fall-prevention intervention for community-dwelling older adults2022In: Digital health, Vol. 8, article id 20552076221126050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To have an impact on the population's health, preventive interventions have to reach a large proportion of the intended population. Digital solutions show potential for providing wider access to fall preventive exercise. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how to reach the target group. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process used in the Safe Step randomised controlled trial and the characteristics of the participants reached.

    Methods: Several recruitment methods, both digital and non-digital, were adopted to reach the intended sample size. Sociodemographic parameters from the baseline questionnaire were used to describe participant characteristics. The characteristics were also compared to a representative sample of older adults in the Swedish population.

    Results: In total, 1628 older adults were recruited. Social media proved to be the most successful recruitment strategy, through which 76% of the participants were recruited. The participants reached had a mean age of 75.9 years, lived in both urban and rural locations, were already frequent users of the Internet and applications (smartphone/tablet) (79.9%), had higher education (71.9%), and a large proportion were women (79.4%). In comparison with the general population participants in the Safe Step study were more highly educated (p < 0.001), women in the study more frequently lived alone (p < 0.001) and men more often reported poorer self-rated health (p = 0.04). Within the study, men reported a faster deteriorating balance (p = 0.003) and more prescribed medication (p < 0.001) than women.

    Conclusion: Recruitment via social media is a useful strategy for reaching older adults, especially women and frequent users of the Internet, for a fully self-managed and digital fall prevention exercise intervention. This study underlines that a range of interventions must be available to attract and suit older adults with different functional statuses and digital skills.

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  • 9.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Janols, Rebecka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Older adults’ experiences of behavior change support in a digital fall prevention exercise program: A qualitative study framed by the self-determination theory2021In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 7, article id e26235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exercise is an effective intervention to prevent falls in older adults; however, long-term adherence is often poor. To increase adherence, additional support for behavior change has been advocated. However, consistency in the reporting of interventions using behavior change techniques is lacking. Recently, a classification system has been developed to increase consistency in studies using behavior change techniques within the self-determination theory.

    Objective: This study aimed to explore expressions of self-determination among community-dwelling older adults using a self-managed digital fall prevention exercise program comprising behavior change support (the Safe Step program), which was developed in co-creation with intended users.

    Methods: The qualitative study design was based on open-ended responses to questionnaires, and individual and focus group interviews. A deductive qualitative content analysis was applied using the classification system of motivation and behavior change techniques as an analytical matrix, followed by an inductive analysis. Twenty-five participants took part in a feasibility study and exercised in their homes with the Safe Step program for 4 months. The exercise program was available on computers, smartphones, and tablets, and was fully self-managed.

    Results: In the deductive analysis, expressions of support were demonstrated for all three basic human psychological needs, namely, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. These expressions were related to 11 of the 21 motivation and behavior change techniques in the classification system. The inductive analysis indicated that autonomy (to be in control) was valued and enabled individual adaptations according to different rationales for realizing exercise goals. However, the experience of autonomy was also two-sided and depended on the participants’ competence in exercise and the use of technology. The clarity of the program and exercise videos was seen as key for support in performance and competent choices. Although augmented techniques for social support were requested, support through relatedness was found within the program.

    Conclusions: In this study, the Safe Step program supported the establishment of new exercise routines, as well as the three basic human psychological needs, with autonomy and competence being expressed as central in this context. Based on the participants’ experiences, a proposed addition to the classification system used as an analytical matrix has been presented.

  • 10.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    'Maintaining balance in life'—exploring older adults' long-term engagement in self-managed digital fall prevention exercise2023In: European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1813-7253, E-ISSN 1861-6909, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Accidental falls are one of the greatest threats to older adults’ health and well-being. The risk of falling can be significantly reduced with strength and balance interventions. However, there needs to be further knowledge into how older adults can be supported to achieve a maintained exercise behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore factors that enabled older adults to maintain their exercise during a 1-year self-managed digital fall prevention exercise intervention.

    Methods: This study used a grounded theory methodology. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted by phone or conference call. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults aged 70 years or more participated. The participants had a self-reported exercise dose of 60 min or more per week during the last three months of participation in a 12-months intervention of self-managed digital fall prevention exercise, the Safe Step randomized controlled trial. Open, axial, and selective coding, along with constant comparative analysis, was used to analyze the data.

    Results: The analysis resulted in a theoretical model. We found that the fall prevention exercise habits of adults were developed through three stages: Acting against threats to one’s own identity, Coordinating strategies to establish a routine, and Forming habits through cues and evaluation. The main category of Maintaining balance in life encases the participants transition through the three stages and reflects balance in both physical aspects and in between activities in daily life. The process of maintaining balance in life and desire to do so were mediated both by intrinsic person-dependent factors and the Safe Step application acting as an external mediator.

    Conclusion: This study identified three stages of how older adults developed self-managed fall prevention exercise habits, supported by a digital application. The generated theoretical model can inform future interventions aiming to support long-term engagement in digitally supported and self-managed fall prevention interventions.

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  • 11.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Skelton, Dawn A.
    School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Liv, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Health and Social Care Administration, Municipality of Östersund, Östersund, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e036194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1 year in older community-dwelling adults.

    Methods and analysis: A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30 min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30 s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.

    Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations’ newsletters.

    Trial registration number: NCT03963570.

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  • 12.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordin, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Ramnemark, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Neither Timed Up and Go test nor Short Physical Performance Battery predict future falls among independent adults aged ≥75 years living in the community2020In: Journal of frailty, sarcopenia and falls, E-ISSN 2459-4148, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous research has shown that balance and gait difficulties are predictors of falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of two tools reporting on balance and gait among older community living adults independent in personal activities of daily living (p-ADL).

    Methods: Prospective study design. Baseline assessment included the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Following baseline, falls were recorded monthly for one year by 202 participants (70.1% women) who were independent in p-ADL, and at least 75 years old (79.2±3.5). ROC-curves were made and AUC were calculated.

    Results: Fortyseven percent of the participants reported falls. AUCs calculated for TUG were 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6) for those with at least one fall, and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6) for recurrent fallers. Corresponding figures for SPPB were 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6).

    Conclusion: This study does not support a recommendation to use the Timed Up and Go test or the Short Physical Performance Battery as tools for the identification of fall-prone persons among older adults living in the community. These results reinforce the need for further research into appropriate tools for identifying independent but fall-prone older adults.

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  • 13.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordin, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Ramnemark, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Proposals for continued research to determine older adults’ falls risk2020In: Journal of Frailty, Sarcopenia and Falls, E-ISSN 2459-4148, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 89-91Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early detection of older adults with an increased risk of falling could enable early onset of preventative measures. Currently used fall risk assessment tools have not proven sufficiently effective in differentiating between high and low fall risk in community-living older adults. There are a number of tests and measures available, but many timed and observation-based tools are performed on a flat floor without interaction with the surrounding. To improve falls prediction, measurements in other areas that challenge mobility in dynamic conditions and that take a persons’ own perception of steadiness into account should be further developed and evaluated as single or combined measures. The tools should be easy to apply in clinical practice or used as a self-assessment by the older adults themselves.

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  • 14.
    Pettersson, Beatrice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Janols, Rebecka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Skelton, Dawn A.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    "Managing pieces of a personal puzzle': Older people's experiences of self-management falls prevention exercise guided by a digital program or a booklet2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exercise is effective in order to prevent falls in community-dwelling older people. Self-management programs have the potential to increase access and reduce costs related to exercise-based fall prevention. However, information regarding older people's views of participating in such programs is needed to support implementation. The aim of this study was to explore older people's experiences of a self-management fall prevention exercise routine guided either by a digital program (web-based or mobile) or a paper booklet.

    Methods: This qualitative study was part of a feasibility study exploring two completely self-managed exercise interventions in which the participants tailored their own program, guided either by a digital program or a paper booklet. Individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 28 participants (18 women), mean age 76yrs. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Results: Self-managing and self-tailoring these exercise programs was experienced as Managing pieces of a personal puzzle'. To independently being able to create a program and manage exercise was described in the categories Finding my own level' and Programming it into my life'. The participants experienced the flexibility and independence provided by completely self-managed exercise as positive and constructive although it required discipline. Furthermore, different needs and preferences when managing their exercise were described, as well as varying sources of motivation for doing the exercise, as highlighted in the category Defining my source of motivation'. The category Evolving my acquired knowledge' captures the participants' views of building their competence and strategies for maintenance of the exercise. It describes a combined process of learning the program and developing reflection, which was more clearly articulated by participants using the digital program.

    Conclusions: This study provides new knowledge regarding experiences, preferences and motivations of older people to engage in home-based self-managed fall prevention exercise. They expressed both a capability and willingness to independently manage their exercise. A digital program seems to have strengthened the feeling of support while creating their own exercise program and tailoring it to their preferences and circumstances, which might therefore create better opportunities for adoption and adherence in the long term.

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