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  • 1.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Bogucki, Peter
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Grygiel, Ryszard
    Lorkiewicz, Wiesl̵aw
    Schulting, Rick
    All things bright: copper grave goods and diet at the Neolithic site of Osłonki, Poland2020Ingår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 94, nr 376, s. 932-947Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding socioeconomic inequality is fundamental for studies of societal development in European prehistory. This article presents dietary (δ13C and δ15N) isotope values for human and animal bone collagen from Early Neolithic Osłonki 1 in north-central Poland (c. 4600–4100 cal BC). A new series of AMS radiocarbon determinations show that, of individuals interred at the same time, those with copper artefacts exhibit significantly higher δ13C values than those without. The authors’ results suggest a link between high-status goods and intra-community differences in diet and/or preferential access to the agropastoral landscape.

  • 2.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Galik, Alfred
    Alpaslan-Roodenberg, Songül
    Schulting, Rick
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Early Farmers in northwest Turkey: First dietary isotopes study of human diet at Neolithic Barcın Höyük2020Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 31, artikel-id 102288Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Barcın Höyük is one of the oldest Neolithic settlement sites in northwest Anatolia, with early layers of occupation radiocarbon dated to ca.6600 cal BC. The Neolithic phase at the site (ca.6600 – 6200 cal BC) has seven layers of occupation, and shows a number of affinities, in terms of structure and zooarchaeological remains, with contemporary sites in the coastal area near Istanbul (Özdoğan, 2013). The available zooarchaeological evidence suggests a diet of terrestrial fauna, with some inclusion from freshwater aquatic species. This study investigates the nature of human diet at Barcın Höyük through carbon and nitrogen analysis of human and animal bone collagen, and examines whether there is any isotopic evidence for a shift in diet after the re-organisation of the site at ca.6200 cal BC. Here we present 75 human and faunal analyses from the Neolithic layers at Barcın Höyük. Two new radiocarbon dates on human skeletons are also included in the study. 

  • 3.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    The prehistoric populations of Ukraine: stable isotope studies of fisher-hunter-forager and pastoralist-incipient farmer dietary pathways2020Ingår i: Prehistoric Ukraine: from the first hunters to the first farmers / [ed] Malmcolm C. Lillie and Inna D. Potekhina, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2020, s. 283-307Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter outlines the results of stable isotope studies of the prehistoric populations of Ukraine across the earlier to middle Holocene, ca. 10,000–3500 cal BC. The data are consistent with the continued exploitation of fisher-hunter-forager subsistence strategies across the periods studied with variations occurring in the relative amount of freshwater proteins consumed across the Epipalaeolithic through to Eneolithic periods. During the Neolithic and later periods there is a clear increase in the frequency of domesticates in zooarchaeological assemblages, indicative of an increasing emphasis on pastoralism and animal husbandry. However, the visibility of domestic fauna in dietary isotope studies is difficult to determine due to the paucity of faunal remains available for analysis. The key exception to the dominant subsistence trends appears to relate to the Trypillia farming culture, where agro-pastoralism is evidenced, and in this context isotope data from the site of Verteba Cave in western Ukraine is discussed. The majority of isotope data considered here are obtained from the cemeteries located in the Dnieper River valley, particularly those focused on the rapids, and its tributaries.

  • 4.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Continuation of fishing subsistence in the Ukrainian Neolithic: diet isotope studies at Yasinovatka, Dnieper Rapids2020Ingår i: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 12, nr 2, artikel-id 64Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Yasinovatka is one of around 30 number of prehistoric cemetery sites of hunter-fisher-foragers located along the Dnieper River in southern Ukraine. Dating to c. 5540 - 4930 cal BC, the skeletal remains at Yasinovatka suggest that around sixty-eight individuals were interred at the cemetery, during three broad phases of interment: A-type burials (c. 5540-4930 cal BC), Ƃ1 pit burials (c. 5550-4750 cal BC), and Ƃ2 pit burials (c. 4980-4460 cal BC). The burials are characterized, in part, by the inclusion of a number of Mariupol-type plates of boar tusk, in addition to deer tooth pendants, Unio shells, knife-like flint blades, Cyprinidae teeth, sherds of Neolithic pottery, and significant deposits of ochre in the later burial pits. Here we analyse δ13C and δ15N values for 50 human bone collagen samples from the site.  The majority of the isotope results show a hunter-fisher-forager population reliant predominantly on freshwater aquatic proteins, which is in keeping with previous dietary isotope studies in the area. Two individuals however have δ15N values that are clearly depleted when compared to the main population; these reflect dietary protein intakes based on plant and animal terrestrial resources rather than the predominant focus on aquatic resources. Notably, the δ13C values of these anomalous individuals are not enriched compared to the fauna samples analysed from the region; this supports the possibility that they were incomers to the area, potentially from a nearby agrarian population.

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  • 5.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Snoeck, Christophe
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    The Aquatic Neolithic: isotope, aDNA, radiocarbon, and osteological data analysis reveal asynchronous behavior in early prehistoric human societies of Ukraine2020Ingår i: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 171, nr S69, s. 40-40Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe the characterization of the Neolithic period is traditionally dominated by the advent of agro-pastoralism. Neolithic populations in the Dnieper Valley region of south-central Ukraine are notably divergent from this trend. From the Epi-Palaeolithic-Neolithic periods (ca. 10,000 - 6000 cal BC), evidence for the adoption of agro-pastoral technologies is absent from archaeological assemblages. It is not until the Eneolithic period (ca. 4500 cal BC) that we observe the beginnings of a transition to farming in the Dnieper region. One hypothesis suggests that spikes in aridity propagated a hunting crisis in Mesolithic populations, which prompted a delay in the transition and the reshaped of Mesolithic subsistence practices to focus on freshwater aquatic resources to supplement terrestrial herbivores such as boar and deer.

    This research presents 300+ human and faunal samples (including 80 unpublished results), using multi-disciplinary techniques such as DNA analysis and various isotope applications, alongside osteological analysis, to provide holistic individual life histories. The results show long-term continuation of ܪshing practices from the Epi-Palaeolithic to Neolithic periods - no distinct shift from hunting to ܪshing practices took place. DNA results show the predominance of indigenous hunter-gatherers, with limited genetic inclusions from proximal Anatolian farming populations. Thus, despite the availability of plentiful dietary resources and the westward inܫuence of extra-local farming populations, the prehistoric communities of the Dnieper region remained resistant to change and resilient in terms of their subsistence strategies, with freshwater resources providing a ‘buffer’ against any perceived impacts from climate variability.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Samuel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Miljöarkeologiska analyser av prover från fornlämning L1960:2938, Tanums socken, Bohuslän.2021Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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  • 7.
    Inall, Yvonne
    et al.
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Meaning and mnemonic in archaeological studies of death2020Ingår i: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 7-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights key characteristics of memorialisation processeslinked to dying and death. The study demonstrates that, inall periods, the mnemonic triggers engendered by multi-sensoryexperiences surrounding the treatment of the dead serve as fundamentalelements of the memorialisation processes which generatelasting impacts on the living through people’s engagement‘in a collective social act’. Roles attributed to the dead are ‘activeand powerful’, and the links between the living and the dead areimbued with myriad meanings, articulated through a variety ofactivities. These resonate across time and exist in many aspects ofcontemporary practice. We could argue that dying itself is notsimply a social process, and in reality, it is an inherently, and onoccasion an aggressively, anti-social act that is negotiated and‘normalised’ by the social conventions that society has developedto cope with dying and death. With a focus on the British context,this study explores the ways in which society has dealt with thetroublesome and anti-social aspect of death, and dying, througha consideration of past social praxis. It considers the ways in whicha broadening of contemporary societies understanding of thevariety of approaches to death, burial, bereavement and mourningin a deep time perspective can offer legitimate and authorisedoptions for future practice at a time when there a crisis in availableburial space is occurring in England (e.g).

  • 8.
    Jerand, Philip
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Fergusson, Andrew
    Monuments at risk in the Swedish arctic: Jokkmokk edition2023Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 3rd and 7th of July an archaeological survey was conducted with funding from the Arctic 5 (Arctic Centre) network under the auspices of the MARISA (Monuments At Risk In the Swedish Arctic) project in the Jokkmokk region. Seven areas were visited, the status of known sites was assessed, and new sites were recorded.

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  • 9.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Budd, Chelsea
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Diet Isotope Analysis and Related Studiesin Prehistoric Ukraine: Fact, Fiction and Fantasy2020Ingår i: Archaeology and Early History of Ukraine, ISSN 2227-4952, Vol. 37, nr 4, s. 251-267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines the results of twenty-eight years of collaborations between the authors and colleaguesin Kiev, initiated when the first author began PhD research at Sheffield University under the supervision of the late Professor Marek Zvelebil in 1992. From the outset of this doctoral research Professor Dmitri Telegin, to whom this paper is dedicated, and Dr. Inna Potekhina, were fundamental not only to the success of the original research programme, but in terms of the considerable generosity, insight and friendship that was extended to the lead author as he navigated his way through the earlier Holocene parts of Ukrainian prehistory. The current study is as much a result of the work of the currentauthors as it is of collaboration and collegiality ofthese colleagues. 

    The topics considered throughout this paper focus around the key observations and themes that have been developed since the research began. It also aims to highlight those areas where inconsistencies occur, and whereclarification is deemed warranted due to the activities of researchers who have failed to fully appreciate the nuances of Ukrainian prehistory and multi-disciplinary research agendas. It is apparent that, in light of arecent «gold rush» to claim ownership of the materials available in Ukraine, at prehistoric sites of all periods, there is clearly a need for a considered and careful approach to the data generated from dietary isotope and related studies. Furthermore, our research since the early 1990s has shown that misidentification of fragmentary or isolated bone in both primary and secondary contexts can lead to erroneous interpretations and occasional «flights of fancy». This paper will outline a number of the issues identified, and also explore issues around data use and representation in an attempt to offer some balance to discussions of prehistoric diet and chronology in Ukraine.

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  • 10.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    et al.
    School of Environmental Sciences (Geography), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Budd, Chelsea E.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Price, T. Douglas
    Sokhatsky, Mykhailo
    Nikitin, Alexey G.
    First isotope analysis and new radiocarbon dating of Trypillia (Tripolye) farmers from Verteba Cave, Biche Zolote, Ukraine2017Ingår i: Documenta Praehistorica, ISSN 1408-967X, Vol. 44, s. 306-324Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of human and animal remains from Verteba cave,near Bilche Zolote, western Ukraine. This study was prompted by a paucity of direct dates on thismaterial and the need to contextualise these remains in relation both to the transition from hunt-ing and gathering to farming in Ukraine, and their specific place within the Cucuteni-Trypillia cul-ture sequence. The new absolute dating places the remains studied here in Trypillia stages BII/CIat c. 3900–3500 cal BC, with one individual now redated to the Early Scythian period. As such,these finds are even more exceptional than previously assumed, being some of the earliest dis-covered for this culture. The isotope analyses indicate that these individuals are local to the region,with the dietary stable isotopes indicating a C3terrestrial diet for the Trypillia-period humansanalysed. The Scythian period individual has δ13C ratios indicative of either c. 50% marine, or alter-natively C4plant inputs into the diet, despite δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr ratios that are comparable to the otherindividuals studied.

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  • 11.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Palaeopathology of the prehistoric populations of Ukraine2020Ingår i: Prehistoric Ukraine: from the first hunters to the first farmers / [ed] Malmcolm C. Lillie and Inna D. Potekhina, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2020, s. 235-282Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter outlines the results of palaeopathological analysis of the prehistoric populations of Ukraine across the earlier to middle Holocene, ca. 10,000–3500 cal BC (the Epipalaeolithic–Eneolithic periods). While a number of sites throughout Ukraine have skeletal inventories (e.g. Murzak Koba and Fatma Koba in Crimea, the Dnieper-Donets culture cemeteries, etc.), to date the key sites that have been subjected to systematic analysis are the cemeteries that are located along the Dnieper River, in particular at the Dnieper Rapids. An outline of the radiocarbon dating of these sites has been presented in Chapter 6, along with an outline of the sites themselves. This chapter focuses on dental and cranial pathologies (as the cranial region is the key area conserved in collections) with a view to assessing the evidence for any significant dietary shifts or inter-site variability in expression of pathology across the study periods.

  • 12.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Budd, Chelsea
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Potekhina, Inna D.
    Radiocarbon dating of sites in the Dnieper Region and western Ukraine2020Ingår i: Prehistoric Ukraine: from the first hunters to the first farmers / [ed] Malmcolm C. Lillie and Inna D. Potekhina, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2020, s. 187-233Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the results of radiocarbon analysis at a number of Dnieper cemeteries and associated sites, undertaken by the authors since the early 1990s. These cemeteries primarily span the earlier to middle Holocene period, between ca. 10,000–3500 cal BC (the Epipalaeolithic to Eneolithic periods), although a number of sites include burials from later periods. To date, the key sites that have been subjected to systematic analysis are the cemeteries that are located along the Dnieper River and, in particular, those at the Dnieper Rapids. The radiocarbon dating of these sites, and the cemeteries themselves, form the basis of the analysis outlined in Chapters 7 and 8. Despite in excess of two decades of analysis the identification of a potential freshwater reservoir effect (FRE) has perhaps proven to be one ofthe most significant results from this extended period of study (Lillie et al. 2009). This and other aspects of the research agenda are considered.

  • 13.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. University of Hull, UK.
    Elton, Sarah
    Durham University, UK.
    Palaeoecology: considering proximate and ultimate influences on human diets and environmental responses in the early Holocene Dnieper River region of Ukraine2022Ingår i: Palaeopathology and evolutionary medicine: an integrated approach / [ed] Kimberly A. Plomp; Charlotte A. Roberts; Sarah Elton; Gilian R. Bentley, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022, s. 120-137Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Potekhina, Inna D.
    Introduction2020Ingår i: Prehistoric Ukraine: from the first hunters to the first farmers / [ed] Malcolm C. Lillie and Inna D. Potekhina, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2020, s. 1-6Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 15.
    Lillie, Malcolm C.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Potekhina, Inna D.Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Prehistoric Ukraine: from the first hunters to the first farmers2020Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume covers the Prehistory of Ukraine from the Lower Palaeolithic through to the end of the Neolithic periods. This is the first comprehensive synthesis of Ukrainian Prehistory from earliest times through until the Neolithic Period undertaken by researchers who are currently investigating the Prehistory of Ukraine. At present there are no other English language books on this subject that provide a current synthesis for these periods. The chapters in this volume provide up-to-date overviews of all aspects of prehistoric culture development in Ukraine and present details of the key sites and finds for the periods studied. The book includes the most recent research from all areas of prehistory up to the Neolithic period, and, in addition, areas such as recent radiocarbon dating and its implications for culture chronology are considered; as is a consideration of aDNA and the new insights into culture history this area of research affords; alongside recent macrofossil studies of plant use, and anthropological and stable isotope studies of diet, which all combine to allow greater insights into the nature of human subsistence and cultural developments across the Palaeolithic to Neolithic periods in Ukraine. It is anticipated that this book will be an invaluable resource for students of prehistory throughout Europe in providing an English-language text that is written by researchers who are active in their respective fields and who possess an intimate knowledge of Ukrainian prehistory.

  • 16.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, HU6 7RX, England, UK.
    Henderson, Rowena
    Budd, Chelsea
    Potekhina, Inna
    Factors influencing the radiocarbon dating of human skeletal remains from the Dnieper river system: Archaeological and stable isotope evidence of diet from the Epipalaeolithic to Eneolithic periods2016Ingår i: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 741-753Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has identified the existence of a freshwater reservoir effect influencing the radiocarbon dating of human skeletal remains from the Dnieper region of Ukraine (Lillie et al. 2009). The current study outlines the evidence for freshwater resource exploitation throughout the period ~10,200–3700 cal BC, and presents the available evidence for the existence of dietary offsets in the 14C dates obtained. We have obtained human skeletal material from 54 Epipaleolithic to Mesolithic period individuals and 267 Neolithic to Eneolithic individuals, from 13 cemeteries, since our research in Ukraine began in 1992. Here, we present the initial results of stable isotope analysis of Eneolithic individuals from the Igren VIII cemetery alongside the Epipaleolithic to Eneolithic samples that have previously been analyzed. When contrasted against the evidence from the prehistoric fauna and fish remains studied, and modern fish species from the Dnieper region, we continue to see variability in diets at the population level, both internally and across cemeteries. We also observed temporal variability in human diets across these chronological periods. The fish samples (both archaeological and modern) show a wide range of isotope ratios for both δ13C and δ15N, which could prove significant when interpreting the dietary sources being exploited. This information directly informs the 14C dating program as an inherent degree of complexity is introduced into the dating of individuals whose diets combine freshwater and terrestrial sources in differing quantities and at differing temporal and/or spatial scales (e.g. Bronk Ramsey et al. 2014)

  • 17. Mathieson, Iain
    et al.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Reich, David
    The Genomic History of Southeastern Europe2018Ingår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 555, nr 695, s. 197-203Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Farming was first introduced to Europe in the mid-seventh millennium bc, and was associated with migrants from Anatolia who settled in the southeast before spreading throughout Europe. Here, to understand the dynamics of this process, we analysed genome-wide ancient DNA data from 225 individuals who lived in southeastern Europe and surrounding regions between 12000 and 500 bc. We document a west–east cline of ancestry in indigenous huntergatherers and, in eastern Europe, the early stages in the formation of Bronze Age steppe ancestry. We show that the first farmers of northern and western Europe dispersed through southeastern Europe with limited hunter-gatherer admixture, but that some early groups in the southeast mixed extensively with hunter-gatherers without the sex-biased admixture that prevailed later in the north and west. We also show that southeastern Europe continued to be a nexus between east and west after the arrival of farmers, with intermittent genetic contact with steppe populations occurring up to 2,000 years earlier than the migrations from the steppe that ultimately replaced much of the population of northern Europe.

  • 18. Nikitin, Alexey G.
    et al.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Rohland, Nadin
    Mallick, Swapan
    Reich, David
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Biology Department, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan, United States of America.
    Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Eneolithic Trypillians from Ukraine reveals Neolithic farming genetic roots2017Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, nr 2, artikel-id e0172952Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The agricultural revolution in Eastern Europe began in the Eneolithic with the Cucuteni-Trypillia culture complex. In Ukraine, the Trypillian culture (TC) existed for over two millennia (ca. 5,400–2,700 BCE) and left a wealth of artifacts. Yet, their burial rituals remain a mystery and to date almost nothing is known about the genetic composition of the TC population. One of the very few TC sites where human remains can be found is a cave called Verteba in western Ukraine. This report presents four partial and four complete mitochondrial genomes from nine TC individuals uncovered in the cave. The results of this analysis, combined with the data from previous reports, indicate that the Trypillian population at Verteba carried, for the most part, a typical Neolithic farmer package of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages traced to Anatolian farmers and Neolithic farming groups of central Europe. At the same time, the find of two specimens belonging to haplogroup U8b1 at Verteba can be viewed as a connection of TC with the Upper Paleolithic European populations. At the level of mtDNA haplogroup frequencies, the TC population from Verteba demonstrates a close genetic relationship with population groups of the Funnel Beaker/ Trichterbecker cultural complex from central and northern Europe (ca. 3,950–2,500 BCE).

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  • 19. Patterson, Nick
    et al.
    Isakov, Michael
    Booth, Thomas
    Büster, Lindsey
    Fischer, Claire-Elise
    Olalde, Iñigo
    Ringbauer, Harald
    Akbari, Ali
    Cheronet, Olivia
    Bleasdale, Madeleine
    Adamski, Nicole
    Altena, Eveline
    Bernardos, Rebecca
    Brace, Selina
    Broomandkhoshbacht, Nasreen
    Callan, Kimberly
    Candilio, Francesca
    Culleton, Brendan
    Curtis, Elizabeth
    Demetz, Lea
    Carlson, Kellie Sara Duffett
    Fernandes, Daniel M.
    Foody, M. George B.
    Freilich, Suzanne
    Goodchild, Helen
    Kearns, Aisling
    Lawson, Ann Marie
    Lazaridis, Iosif
    Mah, Matthew
    Mallick, Swapan
    Mandl, Kirsten
    Micco, Adam
    Michel, Megan
    Morante, Guillermo Bravo
    Oppenheimer, Jonas
    Özdoğan, Kadir Toykan
    Qiu, Lijun
    Schattke, Constanze
    Stewardson, Kristin
    Workman, J. Noah
    Zalzala, Fatma
    Zhang, Zhao
    Agustí, Bibiana
    Allen, Tim
    Almássy, Katalin
    Amkreutz, Luc
    Ash, Abigail
    Baillif-Ducros, Christèle
    Barclay, Alistair
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Baxter, Katherine
    Bernert, Zsolt
    Blažek, Jan
    Bodružić, Mario
    Boissinot, Philippe
    Bonsall, Clive
    Bradley, Pippa
    Brittain, Marcus
    Brookes, Alison
    Brown, Fraser
    Brown, Lisa
    Brunning, Richard
    Budd, Chelsea
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Burmaz, Josip
    Canet, Sylvain
    Carnicero-Cáceres, Silvia
    Čaušević-Bully, Morana
    Chamberlain, Andrew
    Chauvin, Sébastien
    Clough, Sharon
    Čondić, Natalija
    Coppa, Alfredo
    Craig, Oliver
    Črešnar, Matija
    Cummings, Vicki
    Czifra, Szabolcs
    Danielisová, Alžběta
    Daniels, Robin
    Davies, Alex
    de Jersey, Philip
    Deacon, Jody
    Deminger, Csilla
    Ditchfield, Peter W.
    Dizdar, Marko
    Dobeš, Miroslav
    Dobisíková, Miluše
    Domboróczki, László
    Drinkall, Gail
    Đukić, Ana
    Edwards, Ceiridwen J.
    Ernée, Michal
    Evans, Christopher
    Evans, Jane
    Fernández-Götz, Manuel
    Filipović, Slavica
    Fitzpatrick, Andrew
    Fokkens, Harry
    Fowler, Chris
    Fox, Allison
    Gallina, Zsolt
    Gamble, Michelle
    González Morales, Manuel R.
    González-Rabanal, Borja
    Green, Adrian
    Gyenesei, Katalin
    Habermehl, Diederick
    Hajdu, Tamás
    Hamilton, Derek
    Harris, James
    Hayden, Chris
    Hendriks, Joep
    Hernu, Bénédicte
    Hey, Gill
    Horňák, Milan
    Ilon, Gábor
    Istvánovits, Eszter
    Jones, Andy M.
    Kavur, Martina Blečić
    Kazek, Kevin
    Kenyon, Robert A.
    Khreisheh, Amal
    Kiss, Viktória
    Kleijne, Jos
    Knight, Mark
    Kootker, Lisette M.
    Kovács, Péter F.
    Kozubová, Anita
    Kulcsár, Gabriella
    Kulcsár, Valéria
    Le Pennec, Christophe
    Legge, Michael
    Leivers, Matt
    Loe, Louise
    López-Costas, Olalla
    Lord, Tom
    Los, Dženi
    Lyall, James
    Marín-Arroyo, Ana B.
    Mason, Philip
    Matošević, Damir
    Maxted, Andy
    McIntyre, Lauren
    McKinley, Jacqueline
    McSweeney, Kathleen
    Meijlink, Bernard
    Mende, Balázs G.
    Menđušić, Marko
    Metlička, Milan
    Meyer, Sophie
    Mihovilić, Kristina
    Milasinovic, Lidija
    Minnitt, Steve
    Moore, Joanna
    Morley, Geoff
    Mullan, Graham
    Musilová, Margaréta
    Neil, Benjamin
    Nicholls, Rebecca
    Novak, Mario
    Pala, Maria
    Papworth, Martin
    Paresys, Cécile
    Patten, Ricky
    Perkić, Domagoj
    Pesti, Krisztina
    Petit, Alba
    Petriščáková, Katarína
    Pichon, Coline
    Pickard, Catriona
    Pilling, Zoltán
    Price, T. Douglas
    Radović, Siniša
    Redfern, Rebecca
    Resutík, Branislav
    Rhodes, Daniel T.
    Richards, Martin B.
    Roberts, Amy
    Roefstra, Jean
    Sankot, Pavel
    Šefčáková, Alena
    Sheridan, Alison
    Skae, Sabine
    Šmolíková, Miroslava
    Somogyi, Krisztina
    Somogyvári, Ágnes
    Stephens, Mark
    Szabó, Géza
    Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna
    Szeniczey, Tamás
    Tabor, Jonathan
    Tankó, Károly
    Maria, Clenis Tavarez
    Terry, Rachel
    Teržan, Biba
    Teschler-Nicola, Maria
    Torres-Martínez, Jesús F.
    Trapp, Julien
    Turle, Ross
    Ujvári, Ferenc
    van der Heiden, Menno
    Veleminsky, Petr
    Veselka, Barbara
    Vytlačil, Zdeněk
    Waddington, Clive
    Ware, Paula
    Wilkinson, Paul
    Wilson, Linda
    Wiseman, Rob
    Young, Eilidh
    Zaninović, Joško
    Žitňan, Andrej
    Lalueza-Fox, Carles
    de Knijff, Peter
    Barnes, Ian
    Halkon, Peter
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Kennett, Douglas J.
    Cunliffe, Barry
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier. Department of Geography, Geology and Environment, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Rohland, Nadin
    Pinhasi, Ron
    Armit, Ian
    Reich, David
    Large-scale migration into Britain during the Middle to Late Bronze Age2022Ingår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, s. 588-594Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Present-day people from England and Wales harbour more ancestry derived from Early European Farmers (EEF) than people of the Early Bronze Age1. To understand this, we generated genome-wide data from 793 individuals, increasing data from the Middle to Late Bronze and Iron Age in Britain by 12-fold, and Western and Central Europe by 3.5-fold. Between 1000 and 875 BC, EEF ancestry increased in southern Britain (England and Wales) but not northern Britain (Scotland) due to incorporation of migrants who arrived at this time and over previous centuries, and who were genetically most similar to ancient individuals from France. These migrants contributed about half the ancestry of Iron Age people of England and Wales, thereby creating a plausible vector for the spread of early Celtic languages into Britain. These patterns are part of a broader trend of EEF ancestry becoming more similar across central and western Europe in the Middle to Late Bronze Age, coincident with archaeological evidence of intensified cultural exchange2-6. There was comparatively less gene flow from continental Europe during the Iron Age, and Britain's independent genetic trajectory is also reflected in the rise of the allele conferring lactase persistence to ~50% by this time compared to ~7% in central Europe where it rose rapidly in frequency only a millennium later. This suggests that dairy products were used in qualitatively different ways in Britain and in central Europe over this period.

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