Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dignum, Frank
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Davidsson, Paul
    Ghorbani, Amineh
    van der Hurk, Mijke
    Jensen, Maarten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Kammler, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lorig, Fabian
    Ludescher, Luis Gustavo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Melchior, Alexander
    Mellema, Rene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pastrav, Cezara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Vanhee, Lois
    Verhagen, Harko
    Analysing the Combined Health, Social and Economic Impacts of the Corovanvirus Pandemic Using Agent-Based Social Simulation2020In: Minds and Machines, ISSN 0924-6495, E-ISSN 1572-8641, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 177-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the COVID-19 crisis there have been many difficult decisions governments and other decision makers had to make. E.g. do we go for a total lock down or keep schools open? How many people and which people should be tested? Although there are many good models from e.g. epidemiologists on the spread of the virus under certain conditions, these models do not directly translate into the interventions that can be taken by government. Neither can these models contribute to understand the economic and/or social consequences of the interventions. However, effective and sustainable solutions need to take into account this combination of factors. In this paper, we propose an agent-based social simulation tool, ASSOCC, that supports decision makers understand possible consequences of policy interventions, but exploring the combined social, health and economic consequences of these interventions.

  • 2.
    Kammler, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Utilizing the full potential of norms for the agent’s decision process2023In: Advances in social simulation: Proceedings of the 17th Social Simulation Conference, European Social Simulation Association, Cham: Springer, 2023, p. 193-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norms are a crucial part of human behavior that received a lot of attention within the social simulation community. However, some aspects—up until now—have not been addressed in existing agent architectures, such as their motivational aspects and their importance and impact in planning and action selection. In this paper we present an agent architecture capable of grasping this potential of norms. We use perspectives to reflect how different people engage with a norm, and how it effects their long-term goals, their planning, and course of action. Our architecture is capable of having fast habitual-like behavior, as well as more complex deliberation if necessary.

  • 3.
    Kammler, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Changing Perspectives: Adaptable Interpretations of Norms for Agents2022In: Multi-Agent-Based Simulation XXII: 22nd International Workshop, MABS 2021, Virtual Event, May 3-7, 2021, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Koen H. Van Dam; Nicolas Verstaevel, Springer, 2022, Vol. 13128 LNAI, p. 139-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For agent-based social simulations to be a powerful tool for policy makers and other decision makers in a given context (e.g. the current COVID-19 pandemic), they need to be socially realistic and thus, appropriately represent complex social concepts, such as social rules. In this paper, we focus on norms. Norms describe ‘normal’ behavior and aim at assuring the interests and values of groups or the society as a whole. People react differently to norms, and focus only on the parts that are relevant for them. Furthermore, norms are not only restrictions on behavior, but also trigger new behavior. Seeing a norm only as a restriction on certain behavior misses important aspects and leads to simulations that can be very misleading. Different perspectives need to be incorporated into the simulation to capture the variety of ways different stakeholders react to a norm and how this affects their interaction. We therefore present an approach to include these different perspectives on norms, and their consequences for different people and groups in decision support simulations. A perspective is specified by their goals, actions, effects of those actions, priorities in values, and social affordances. Through modeling perspectives we enable policy makers and other decision makers (the users) to be active in the modeling process and to tailor the simulation to their specific needs, by representing norms as modifiable objects, and providing textual and graphical representations of norms. This provides them with differentiated insights meaningful for the decisions they are faced with. We indicate the requirements for both the simulation platform as well as the agents that follow from our approach. Early explorations of our social simulation are showing the necessity of our approach.

  • 4.
    Kammler, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Mellema, Rene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Agents dealing with norms and regulations2023In: Multi-agent-based simulation XXIII: 23rd International Workshop, MABS 2022, virtual event, May 8-9, 2022: Revised selected papers / [ed] Fabian Lorig; Emma Norling, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2023, p. 134-146Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norms influence behaviour in many ways. In situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic where the effect of policies on the spread of the virus is evaluated, this leads to disputes about their effectiveness. In order to build agent-based social simulations that give proper support for this evaluation process we need agents that properly deal with norms. In this paper we present a new agent deliberation architecture that takes more aspects of norms into account than traditional architectures have done. Dealing properly with norms means that agents can reason through the consequences of the norms, that they are used to motivate and not just constrain behaviour, and that the agents can violate the norm as well. For the former we use the ideas of perspectives on norms, while the latter is enabled through the use of values. Within our architecture we can also represent habitual behaviour, context sensitive planning, and through the use of landmarks, reactive planning. We use the example of a restaurant-size based restriction to show how our architecture works.

  • 5.
    Kreulen, Kurt
    et al.
    Faculty of technology, policy and management, Technical University (TU) of Delft, Jaffalaan 5, Delft, Netherlands.
    de Bruin, Bart
    Faculty of technology, policy and management, Technical University (TU) of Delft, Jaffalaan 5, Delft, Netherlands.
    Ghorbani, Amineh
    Faculty of technology, policy and management, Technical University (TU) of Delft, Jaffalaan 5, Delft, Netherlands.
    Mellema, René
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Kammler, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Vanhee, Loïs
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Dignum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    How culture influences individual behavior during a pandemic: a social simulation of the COVID-19 crisis2022In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 25, no 3, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its first appearance in Wuhan (China), countries have been employing, to varying degrees of success, a series of non-pharmaceutical interventions aimed at limiting the spread of SARS-CoV-2 within their populations. In this article, we build on scientific work that demonstrates that culture is part of the explanation for the observed variability between countries in their ability to effectively control the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. We present a theoretical framework of how culture influences decision-making at the level of the individual. This conceptualization is formalized in an agent-based model that simulates how cultural factors can combine to produce differences across populations in terms of the behavioral responses of individuals to the COVID-19 crisis. We illustrate that, within our simulated environment, the culturally-dependent willingness of people to comply with public health related measures might constitute an important determinant of differences in infection dynamics across populations. Our model generates the highest rates of non-compliance within cultures marked as individualist, progressive and egalitarian. Our model illustrates the potential role of culture as a population-level predictor of infections associated with COVID-19. In doing so, the model, and theoretical framework on which it is based, may inform future studies aimed at incorporating the effect of culture on individual decision-making processes during a pandemic within social simulation models.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf