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  • 1.
    Ahti, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Holm, Minna
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Differences in psychosocial functioning between psychotic disorders in the Finnish SUPER study2022Ingår i: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 244, s. 10-17Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychotic disorders differ in their impact on psychosocial functioning. However, few studies have directly compared psychosocial functioning and its determinants between schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder (SAD), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder with psychotic features (psychotic MDD). Objective: We compared rates of independent living, employment, marriage, and having children between these diagnostic groups in a large national sample of participants with psychotic disorders in Finland.

    Methods: A cross-sectional substudy of participants (N = 9148) aged 18 to 65 years in the Finnish SUPER study, recruited nationwide from health- and social care settings and with advertisements. Psychosis diagnoses, age of onset, and hospitalizations were collected from healthcare registers. Participants were interviewed for psychosocial functioning. Associations of age of onset, hospitalizations, gender, and education with psychosocial functioning were analyzed using logistic regression models.

    Results: Of participants, 13.8% were employed or studying, 72.0% living independently and 32.5% had children. Overall, BD was associated with best, SAD and psychotic MDD with intermediate, and schizophrenia with worst level of psychosocial functioning. Greatest differences were found in independent living (OR 4.06 for BD vs. schizophrenia). In multivariate models, gender and number of hospitalizations predicted employment, marriage, and independent living in all diagnostic categories, and age of onset in some diagnostic categories.

    Conclusions: Level of functioning and psychosocial outcomes differed markedly between psychotic disorders, particularly in independent living. Outcomes were worst for schizophrenia and best for BD. Across all psychotic disorders, female gender and lifetime number of hospitalizations had strong independent associations with marriage, employment, and independent living.

  • 2. Andre, Kadri
    et al.
    Kampman, Olli
    Illi, Ari
    Viikki, Merja
    Setala-Soikkeli, Eija
    Mononen, Nina
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Haraldsson, Susann
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Koivisto, Pasi A.
    Leinonen, Esa
    SERT and NET polymorphisms, temperament and antidepressant response2015Ingår i: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, nr 7, s. 531-538Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The genetic variations in norepinephrine transporter (NET) and serotonin transporter (SERT) genes have been associated with personality traits, several psychiatric disorders and the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. Aims: We investigated the separate effects and possible interactions between NET T-182C (rs2242446) and SERT 5-HTTLPR (rs4795541) polymorphisms on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) treatment response and temperamental traits assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in a clinical sample of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Our sample of 97 patients with major depression completed the 107-item TCI temperament questionnaire (version IX) at the initial assessment of the study and after 6 weeks of follow-up. All subjects received selective SSRI medications. Temperament dimension scores at baseline (1) and endpoint (2) during antidepressant treatment were analyzed between NET and SERT genotypes. Results: SS-genotype of 5-HTTLPR was associated with higher baseline Persistence scores than SL- or LL-genotype. A corresponding but weaker association was found at endpoint. No differences were found between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and other temperament dimensions and 5-HTTLPR genotypes had no effect on treatment response. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the SS-genotype of 5-HTTLPR is associated with Persistence scores in patients with MDD. Higher Persistence could be viewed as a negative trait when recovering from stress and its association with short and "weaker" S-allele may be related to less efficient serotonin neurotransmission, possibly resulting in less effective coping strategies on a behavioral level.

  • 3.
    Archer, Mari
    et al.
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Niemelä, Onni
    Department of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Research Unit, Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Tampere University, Seinäjoki, 60220, Finland.
    Hämäläinen, Mari
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Moilanen, Eeva
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, 33014 University of Tampere, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, 33014 University of Tampere and Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Department of Psychiatry, Tampere, 33521, Finland.
    The role of alcohol use and adiposity in serum levels of IL-1RA in depressed patients2022Ingår i: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikel-id 158Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The role of Interleukin-1 Receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an innate antagonist to pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1, has attracted increasing attention due to its potential pathogenic and therapeutic implications in depression. However, the role of alcohol and adiposity in modulating IL-1Ra cytokine pathway in depressed patients has remainned unknown. The aim of this study was to follow the changes in IL-1Ra serum levels in depressed patients with or without simultaneous alcohol use disorder (AUD) and different degrees of adiposity during 6 months of follow-up.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 242 patients with depression were followed for 6 months. At baseline 99 patients had simultaneous AUD. Levels of serum IL-1Ra and common mediators of inflammation (IL-6, hs-CRP) were measured. Clinical assessments included Body Mass Index (BMI), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores.

    RESULTS: Significant reductions in clinical symptoms and IL-1Ra were observed during 6-month follow-up. In hierarchical linear regression analysis, the effect of MADRS score, age, gender, and smoking had a combined effect of 2.4% in the model. The effect of AUDIT score increased the effect to 4.2% of variance (p = 0.08), whereas adding BMI increased the effect to 18.5% (p <  0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Adiposity may influence the IL-1Ra anti-inflammatory response in depressed patients, whereas the effect of alcohol consumption in these patients seems insignificant. These findings should be considered in studies on the role of IL-1Ra in depression.

  • 4.
    Cederlöf, Erik
    et al.
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; SleepWell Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Holm, Minna
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Taipale, Heidi
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tanskanen, Antti
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. University of Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Finland; University of Turku, Faculty of Medicine, Finland; The Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Department of Psychiatry, Tampere, Finland; The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Department of Psychiatry, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; SleepWell Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Kyttälä, Aija
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Kämpe, Anders
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland.
    Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland.
    Toivola, Auli
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Neale, Benjamin
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Shen, Huei-yi
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland.
    Västrik, Imre
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Finland.
    Daly, Mark
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland; Massachusetts General Hospital Massachusetts General Hospital, United States.
    Ristiluoma, Noora
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Pietiläinen, Olli
    Neuroscience Center, HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Finland.
    Hyman, Steven E.
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Singh, Tarjinder
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Antipsychotic medications and sleep problems in patients with schizophrenia2024Ingår i: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 267, s. 230-238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sleep problems are common and related to a worse quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Almost all patients with schizophrenia use antipsychotic medications, which usually increase sleep. Still, the differences in subjective sleep outcomes between different antipsychotic medications are not entirely clear.

    Methods: This study assessed 5466 patients with schizophrenia and is part of the nationwide Finnish SUPER study. We examined how the five most common antipsychotic medications (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, and risperidone) associate with questionnaire-based sleep problems in logistic regression analyses, including head-to-head analyses between different antipsychotic medications. The sleep problems were difficulties initiating sleep, early morning awakenings, fatigue, poor sleep quality, short (≤6 h) and long sleep duration (≥10 h).

    Results: The average number of antipsychotic medications was 1.59 per patient. Clozapine was associated with long sleep duration (49.0 % of clozapine users vs 30.2 % of other patients, OR = 2.05, 95 % CI 1.83–2.30, p < .001). Olanzapine and risperidone were in head-to-head analyses associated with less sleep problems than patients using aripiprazole, quetiapine, or no antipsychotic medication. Aripiprazole and quetiapine were associated with more insomnia symptoms and poorer sleep quality. Patients without antipsychotic medications (N = 159) had poorer sleep quality than patients with antipsychotic use, and short sleep duration was common (21.5 % of patients using antipsychotics vs 7.8 % of patients using antipsychotics, OR = 2.97, 95 % CI 1.98–4.44, p < .001).

    Conclusions: Prevalence of sleep problems is markedly related to the antipsychotic medication the patient uses. These findings underline the importance of considering and assessing sleep problems when treating schizophrenia patients with antipsychotics.

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  • 5.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    et al.
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kiander, Wilma
    Division of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kidron, Heidi
    Division of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Urpa, Lea
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lintunen, Jonne
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko
    School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Auriola, Seppo
    School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Holm, Minna
    Mental Health Team, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Mehiläinen Ltd, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Vaasa, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Mental Health Team, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Mental Health Team, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Team, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden; Neuroscience Center, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; The Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research and Program in Medical and Population Genetics, The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari V.
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; The Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research and Program in Medical and Population Genetics, The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Department of Internal Medicine, Satasairaala Hospital, Pori, Finland.
    Niemi, Mikko
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Individualized Drug Therapy Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Clinical Pharmacology, HUS Diagnostic Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Functional characterization of six SLCO1B1 (OATP1B1) variants observed in Finnish individuals with a psychotic disorder2023Ingår i: Molecular Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1543-8384, E-ISSN 1543-8392, Vol. 20, nr 3, s. 1500-1508Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Variants in the SLCO1B1 (solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 1B1) gene encoding the OATP1B1 (organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1) protein are associated with altered transporter function that can predispose patients to adverse drug effects with statin treatment. We explored the effect of six rare SLCO1B1 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) occurring in Finnish individuals with a psychotic disorder on expression and functionality of the OATP1B1 protein. The SUPER-Finland study has performed exome sequencing on 9381 individuals with at least one psychotic episode during their lifetime. SLCO1B1 SNVs were annotated with PHRED-scaled combined annotation-dependent (CADD) scores and the Ensembl variant effect predictor. In vitro functionality studies were conducted for the SNVs with a PHRED-scaled CADD score of >10 and predicted to be missense. To estimate possible changes in transport activity caused by the variants, transport of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) in OATP1B1-expressing HEK293 cells was measured. According to the findings, additional tests with rosuvastatin and estrone sulfate were conducted. The amount of OATP1B1 in crude membrane fractions was quantified using a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative targeted absolute proteomics analysis. Six rare missense variants of SLCO1B1 were identified in the study population, located in transmembrane helix 3: c.317T>C (p.106I>T), intracellular loop 2: c.629G>T (p.210G>V), c.633A>G (p.211I>M), c.639T>A (p.213N>L), transmembrane helix 6: 820A>G (p.274I>V), and the C-terminal end: 2005A>C (p.669N>H). Of these variants, SLCO1B1 c.629G>T (p.210G>V) resulted in the loss of in vitro function, abolishing the uptake of DCF, estrone sulfate, and rosuvastatin and reducing the membrane protein expression to 31% of reference OATP1B1. Of the six rare missense variants, SLCO1B1 c.629G>T (p.210G>V) causes a loss of function of OATP1B1 transport in vitro and severely decreases membrane protein abundance. Carriers of SLCO1B1 c.629G>T might be susceptible to altered pharmacokinetics of OATP1B1 substrate drugs and might have increased likelihood of adverse drug effects such as statin-associated musculoskeletal symptoms.

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  • 6.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    et al.
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kiiski, Johanna I.
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Individualized Drug Therapy Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kaunisto, Mari A.
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kalso, Eija
    Pain Clinic, Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemi, Mikko
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Individualized Drug Therapy Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Clinical Pharmacology, HUS Diagnostic Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mark
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari V.
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Implementation of CYP2D6 copy-number imputation panel and frequency of key pharmacogenetic variants in Finnish individuals with a psychotic disorder2022Ingår i: The Pharmacogenomics Journal, ISSN 1470-269X, E-ISSN 1473-1150, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 166-172Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate that CYP2D6 copy-number variation (CNV) can be imputed using existing imputation algorithms. Additionally, we report frequencies of key pharmacogenetic variants in individuals with a psychotic disorder from the genetically bottle-necked population of Finland. We combined GWAS chip and CYP2D6 CNV data from the Breast Cancer Pain Genetics study to construct an imputation panel (n = 902) for CYP2D6 CNV. The resulting data set was used as a CYP2D6 CNV imputation panel in 9262 non-related individuals from the SUPER-Finland study. Based on imputation of 9262 individuals we confirm the higher frequency of CYP2D6 ultrarapid metabolizers and a 22-fold enrichment of the UGT1A1 decreased function variant rs4148323 (UGT1A1*6) in Finland compared with non-Finnish Europeans. Similarly, the NUDT15 variant rs116855232 was highly enriched in Finland. We demonstrate that imputation of CYP2D6 CNV is possible and the methodology enables studying CYP2D6 in large biobanks with genome-wide data.

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  • 7. Illi, Ari
    et al.
    Poutanen, Outi
    Setala-Soikkeli, Eija
    Kampman, Olli
    Viikki, Merja
    Huhtala, Heini
    Mononen, Nina
    Haraldsson, Susann
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    Koivisto, Pasi A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Is 5-HTTLPR linked to the response of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in MDD?2011Ingår i: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491, Vol. 261, nr 2, s. 95-102Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of a functional polymorphism in the transcriptional control region of serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, SERTPR) has been studied intensively in major depression and in the response to selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) in major depression. The findings have been contradictory, although majority of the studies indicate that the short allele is associated with poor response to SSRIs in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the association of 5-HTTLPR with treatment response to SSRI medication in Finnish Caucasian MDD patients. A secondary purpose was to study the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. The aim of the study was to replicate the previous findings in this area. Primary outcomes of the treatment were remission, defined by an exit score of seven or less, and response, defined by a reduction of at least 50% on the MADRS. We had also a control population of 375 healthy blood donors, as a secondary objective was to evaluate the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. Twenty-nine of the 85 (34.1%) patients reached the remission and 58.8% achieved the predefined response criteria. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was presented in 51.7% of those patients who achieved remission vs. 25.0% in the non-remitters (P = 0.03). The result remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, gender, medication and MADRS points at the study entry. However, the small sample size limits the reliability of this result.

  • 8.
    Juhola, Martti
    et al.
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Nikkanen, Tommi
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Niemi, Juho
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Welling, Maiju
    Patient Insurance Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Sciences (Psychiatry), University of Turku, Turku, Finland; The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Department of Psychiatry, Vaasa, Finland; Västerbotten Welfare Region, Umeå, Sweden.
    Machine learning classification of psychiatric data associated with compensation claims for patient injuries2023Ingår i: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 62, nr 05/06, s. 174-182Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adverse events are common in health care. In psychiatric treatment, compensation claims for patient injuries appear to be less common than in other medical specialties. The most common types of patient injury claims in psychiatry include diagnostic flaws, unprevented suicide, or coercive treatment deemed as unnecessary or harmful.

    Objectives: The objective was to study whether it is possible to form different categories of patient injury types associated with the psychiatric evaluations of compensation claims and to base machine learning classification on these categories. Further, the binary classification of positive and negative decisions for compensation claims was the other objective.

    Methods: Finnish psychiatric specialist evaluations for the compensation claims of patient injuries were classified into six different categories called classes applying the machine learning methods of artificial intelligence. In addition, another classification of the same data into two classes was performed to test whether it was possible to classify data cases according to their known decisions, either accepted or declined compensation claim.

    Results: The former classification task produced relatively good classification results subject to separating between different classes. Instead, the latter was more complex. However, classification accuracies of both tasks could be improved by using the generation of artificial data cases in the preprocessing phase before classifications. This preprocessing improved the classification accuracy of six classes up to 88% when the method of random forests was used for classification and that of the binary classification to 89%. Conclusion The results show that the objectives defined were possible to solve reasonably.

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  • 9. Kautto, Mervi
    et al.
    Kampman, Olli
    Mononen, Nina
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Haraldsson, Susann
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    Koivisto, Pasi A.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene polymorphisms: Susceptibility and treatment response of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression2015Ingår i: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 590, s. 116-120Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and norepinephrine transporter (NET182C) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility and treatment response in major depressive disorder (MDD). Thus, we examined association between these polymorphisms and susceptibility to treatment resistant depression, and treatment response in severe MDD patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

    In total, 119 Finnish patients with treatment resistant depression and 395 healthy volunteer blood donors were genotyped. Depression severity was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale (MADRS), with MADRS score change during ECT the treatment response indicator.

    Underrepresentation of the 5-HTTLPR 1/1 genotype in the NET TT subgroup was observed in patients compared with controls. There were no genotype or allele frequency differences between patients and control groups separately. Patients with combined 5-HTTLPR 1/1 and NET TT genotypes also had poorer treatment responses than other patients. No differences in ECT response were observed when the polymorphisms were examined separately.

    Our results suggest that a NET 182C and 5-HTTLPR polymorphism interaction is associated with susceptibility to treatment resistant depression and ECT treatment response in antidepressant resistant depression patients. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Kemppainen, Anniina
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindgren, Maija
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Adverse childhood experiences and social and occupational functioning in first-episode psychosis: a one year follow - up2022Ingår i: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 311, artikel-id 114502Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Klemettilä, Jari-Pekka
    et al.
    Tampere University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Pitkäniemi Hospital, 33380 Pitkäniemi, Finland.
    Solismaa, Anssi
    Tampere University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Pitkäniemi Hospital, 33380 Pitkäniemi, Finland; Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Seppälä, Niko
    Satasairaala, Department of Psychiatry, 28500 Pori, Finland.
    Hämäläinen, Mari
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Moilanen, Eeva
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Tampere University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Pitkäniemi Hospital, 33380 Pitkäniemi, Finland; Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Tampere University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Pitkäniemi Hospital, 33380 Pitkäniemi, Finland; Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Glucagon-like peptide-1 serum levels are associated with weight gain in patients treated with clozapine2021Ingår i: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 306, artikel-id 114227Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic syndrome and related cardiovascular risk factors are well-known comorbidities among patients with schizophrenia. Biomarkers of these antipsychotic-associated metabolic adverse effects and antipsychotic-induced weight gain are needed. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is involved in insulin secretion, regulation of satiety, inhibition of food intake, and inhibition of gastric emptying. GLP-1 also induces reduction in body weight. Visfatin/ NAMPT/ PBEF is an adipocytokine secreted by several cells and tissues. Increased plasma visfatin levels have been associated with overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, low grade inflammation, and proinflammatory markers. Associations between antipsychotic-induced weight gain and serum visfatin and GLP-1 levels have been little studied in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to test the possible role of serum GLP-1 and visfatin level alterations as markers of weight gain in association with metabolic and inflammatory markers in 190 patients (109 male, 81 female) with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment. High serum levels of GLP-1 correlated significantly with higher levels of visfatin, leptin, insulin, HOMA-IR, higher BMI, and weight change among men. Associations between serum visfatin levels and BMI or weight change were not found in the present patients. Serum GLP-1 level seems to be a marker of metabolic risk factors among men with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment. Female patients may be more sensitive to suppressive effects of clozapine on GLP-1 secretion. Patients on clozapine would benefit from GLP-1 agonists as preventive treatment.

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  • 12.
    Leijala, J.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Huhtalantie 53, Seinäjoki, 60220, Finland.
    Kampman, O.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland .
    Suvisaari, J.
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Mental Health Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
    Eskelinen, S.
    Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health Solutions, Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Daily functioning and symptom factors contributing to attitudes toward antipsychotic treatment and treatment adherence in outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders2021Ingår i: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 21, nr 1, artikel-id 37Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Poor adherence and negative attitudes to treatment are common clinical problems when treating psychotic disorders. This study investigated how schizophrenia core symptoms and daily functioning affect treatment adherence and attitudes toward antipsychotic medication and to compare patients using clozapine or other antipsychotics.

    Method: A cross-sectional study with data from 275 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Patients adherence, attitudes, insight and side-effects were evaluated using the Attitudes toward Neuroleptic Treatment scale. Overall symptomology was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale (HoNOS). The functioning was assessed using activities of daily living scale, instrumental activities of daily living scale and social functioning of daily living scale.

    Results: Self-reported treatment adherence was high. Of the patients, 83% reported using at least 75% of the prescribed medication. Having more symptoms was related with more negative attitude towards treatment. There was a modest association with functioning and treatment adherence and attitude toward antipsychotic treatment. Attitudes affected on adherence in non-clozapine but not in clozapine groups.

    Conclusion: Early detection of non-adherence is difficult. Systematic evaluation of attitudes toward the treatment could be one way to assess this problem, along with optimized medication, prompt evaluation of side effects and flexible use of psychosocial treatments.

  • 13.
    Leijala, J.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Seinäjoki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; University of Turku, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Finland; The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Department of Psychiatry, Finland; University Hospital of Umeå, Department of Psychiatry, Sweden.
    Suvisaari, J.
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Mental Health Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
    Eskelinen, S.
    Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; Department of Public Health Solutions, Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Association of somatic comorbidity and treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorder2024Ingår i: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 174, s. 1-7Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased risk for somatic comorbidity in individuals with schizophrenia has been well established. In addition, psychiatric patients with somatic illnesses are more likely to have more psychiatric readmissions. Increased burden of treatment related to chronic somatic comorbidities may be associated with lower adherence to psychiatric medication.

    Methods: Cross-sectional study of 275 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder. A general practitioner performed a complete physical health checkup for all participants, including a complete medical examination and laboratory tests. Patients’ adherence, attitudes, insight, and side-effects were evaluated using the Attitudes toward Neuroleptic Treatment Scale. Overall symptomatology was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Regression analysis was used to investigate interactions and associations among health beliefs, disease burden, and treatment adherence. Separate regression models were utilized to account for the complexity of health behavior and treatment adherence pathways.

    Results: Patients’ somatic comorbidity and health behavior were not associated with adherence or attitudes toward antipsychotic treatment. High dose of antipsychotics and obesity were related to the need for medical interventions, while a healthy diet reduced the risk. Higher BPRS score and older age were associated with having somatic symptoms. Somatic comorbidities had no negative effects on treatment adherence or attitudes.

    Conclusion: This study focuses on exploring possible associations between health beliefs and treatment adherence pathways in patients with psychotic disorders. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no evidence to support our health belief and diseases burden models and their associations.

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  • 14.
    Leppänen, Helena
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Pirkkala Municipal Health Centre, Pirkkala, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Autio, Reija
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Psychology), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Karolaakso, Tino
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Näppilä, Turkka
    Tampere University Library, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Rissanen, Päivi
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Pirkola, Sami
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Socioeconomic factors and use of psychotherapy in common mental disorders predisposing to disability pension2022Ingår i: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikel-id 983Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research in high-income countries has identified low socioeconomic status as a risk factor for disability pension (DP) due to common mental disorders (CMDs). Psychotherapy is an evidence-based treatment for the majority of CMDs along with medication and it is often targeted to prevent work disability. This study examines socioeconomic differences in the use of rehabilitative psychotherapy in Finland, where citizens have universal health coverage, but psychotherapy is partly dependent on personal finance.

    METHODS: The study subjects (N = 22,501) were all the Finnish citizens granted a DP due to CMD between 2010 and 2015 and a comparison group (N = 57,732) matched based on age, gender, and hospital district. Socioeconomic differences in psychotherapy use were studied using logistic regression models. Socioeconomic status was defined by education, income, and occupation. Age, gender, and family status were also examined.

    RESULTS: A lower level of education, lower occupational status (blue-collar worker), male gender, and older age, were associated with less frequent psychotherapy use, in both groups. Education was the strongest component of socioeconomic status associated with psychotherapy use, but the role of income was not straightforward. Unemployment when approaching DP, but not otherwise, was a risk factor for not receiving rehabilitative psychotherapy. Socioeconomic disparities were not any smaller among CMD patients approaching DP than in the comparison group.

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the disparity in the provision of psychotherapy for CMD patients, even on the verge of DP with an acute need for services. This disparity is partly related to a complex interplay of socioeconomic factors and the service system characteristics. Factors predisposing to unequal access to mental health services are presumably diverse and should be studied further.

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  • 15.
    Leppänen, Helena
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Finland.
    Autio, Reija
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Karolaakso, Tino
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Psychology), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Rissanen, Päivi
    Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Näppilä, Turkka
    Tampere University Library, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Pirkola, Sami
    Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Finland; Faculty of Social Sciences (Unit of Health Sciences), Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Socioeconomic status, psychotherapy duration, and return to work from disability due to common mental disorders2023Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Low socioecosomic status (SES) is a risk factor for work disability due to common mental disorders (CMDs), one possible reason being inequal use of services. Psychotherapy is an evidence-based treatment for CMDs. This study examines socioeconomic and sociodemographic differences in psychotherapy attendance and an association of psychotherapy duration with return to work (RTW).

    Methods: The study subjects (N = 12,263) were all Finnish citizens granted a disability pension (DP) due to CMDs in 2010–2012. Numbers of psychotherapy sessions (maximum 200) were collected from the nine-year interval around the DP grant. Socioeconomic and sociodemographic differences in psychotherapy duration (dependent variable) among DP recipients were studied using multinomial logistic regression models, likewise, the association between psychotherapy duration and RTW (dependent variable) among temporary DP recipients was examined.

    Results: Higher SES, female gender, and younger age were positively associated with attending longer psychotherapies and surpassing the early treatment termination level (>10 sessions). Attending 11–60 psychotherapy sessions was positively associated with full RTW and partial RTW, whereas longer psychotherapies were not. Early termination was positively associated with partial RTW only.

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates varying tendencies among CMD patients from different backgrounds to attend long rehabilitative psychotherapies, which may create inequalities in RTW.

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  • 16.
    Lindholm, Lars H.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Hanneksenrinne 7, Seinäjoki, FI-60220, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, PO Box 100, Tampere, FI-33014, Finland .
    Laitila, Minna
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Hanneksenrinne 7, Seinäjoki, FI-60220, Finland.
    Lassila, Antero
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Hanneksenrinne 7, Seinäjoki, FI-60220, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Department of Psychiatry, South Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Hanneksenrinne 7, Seinäjoki, FI-60220, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, PO Box 100, Tampere, FI-33014, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, PO Box 2000, Tampere, FI-33521, Finland.
    Importance of congruence between communicating and executing implementation programmes: a qualitative study of focus group interviews2020Ingår i: Implementation Science Communications, E-ISSN 2662-2211, Vol. 1, nr 1, artikel-id 94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Ostrobothnia Depression Programme (ODP) in Finland was intended to implement two evidence-based brief psychotherapy interventions, namely motivational interview and behavioural activation, in several regional psychiatric teams. A simultaneous effectiveness study was conducted. Considerable tension was encountered between these two arms, causing resistance to change. We conducted a qualitative case study to better understand this tension and to discuss how managerial and executive practices may ensure the successful running of a hybrid design programme.

    Methods: We conducted focus group interviews to evaluate the phases of preparation and practical execution of the ODP from the perspectives of management and the programme executives. To gather the data, we applied the revised Socratic approach for health technology assessment and focus group interviews. We analysed the data deductively according to the Normalization Process Theory.

    Results: We identified two main critical issues: (1) The ODP programme plan ignored the team leaders' crucial role in influencing the implementation climate and mobilizing organizational strategies. The ODP had a simplistic top-down design with minimal and delayed collaboration with its target groups in the preparation phase. (2) Incongruence occurred between what the project group had explicitly communicated about being the spearhead of the ODP and what they then actually enacted. These two issues caused tension between the implementation efforts and the effectiveness study as well as resistance to change among the staff.

    Conclusion: Early, open collaboration with all prospective stakeholders towards a shared understanding about the programme is the first action the programme administrators should take. Agreement on goals and the means to achieve them would lower tension between the two arms of a hybrid design programme, thereby reducing resistance to change. Congruence between the goals communicated and the actual managerial and executive actions is of paramount importance in getting the programme recipients on board.

  • 17.
    Luoto, Kaisa E.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, The Wellbeing Services County of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Lassila, Antero
    Department of Psychiatry, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, The Wellbeing Services County of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Vaasa, Finland.
    Predictors of short-term response and the role of heavy alcohol use in treatment of depression2023Ingår i: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 23, nr 1, artikel-id 880Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression and alcohol use disorders frequently co-occur. However, research on psychosocial interventions for treating this dual pathology is limited. The Ostrobothnian Depression Study (ODS) aimed to increase the systematic use of evidence-based methods, particularly among patients with comorbid depression and substance use in a naturalistic setting. This is a secondary analysis of the ODS study. The aim of the present study was to explore the predictors of a response to treatment during the first six months of the ODS intervention with a specific focus on the role of comorbid heavy alcohol use.

    Methods: The study sample (n = 242) comprised psychiatric specialist care patients with depression (Beck Depression Inventory score ≥ 17) at baseline. Patients with a baseline Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) score > 10 (n = 99) were assigned to the AUD (Alcohol Use Disorder) group in this study. The ODS intervention comprised behavioral activation (BA) for all and additional motivational interviewing (MI) for those in AUD group. The predictors of response to treatment (minimum of 50% reduction in depressive symptoms) during the first six months were analyzed with logistic regression models.

    Results: In the total sample at six months (n = 150), predictors of response to treatment were more severe depression (OR 1.10, CI 1.02–1.18), larger amounts of alcohol consumed (OR = 1.16, CI 1.03–1.31) and antipsychotic medication "not in use" (OR = 0.17, CI 0.07–0.44). In the non-AUD group (n = 100), more severe depression (OR 1.12, CI 1.01–1.25) and antipsychotics "not in use" (OR 0.20, CI 0.06–0.67) also predicted a positive response. Among AUD group patients (n = 50), larger amounts of alcohol consumed (OR 1.54, CI 1.04–2.27) and antipsychotic medication "not in use" (OR 0.12, CI 0.02–0.60) predicted a response to the treatment intervention.

    Conclusions: The severity of symptoms and comorbid disorders were found to predict better treatment response, suggesting that the intervention was more effective in patients with severe symptoms. Patients with depression should be treated effectively regardless of having concomitant AUD. The results of this study suggest that BA combined with MI should be one of the treatment options for this dual pathology.

    Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02520271 (11/08/2015).

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  • 18.
    Luoto, Kaisa E.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Lindholm, Lars H.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Koivukangas, Antti
    Department of Psychiatry, Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Lassila, Antero
    Department of Psychiatry, Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Sintonen, Harri
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Impact of Comorbid Alcohol Use Disorder on Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients With Depressive Symptoms2021Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 12, artikel-id 688136Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aim: In psychiatric clinical practice, comorbidity of depression and alcohol use disorder (AUD) is common. Both disorders have a negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in general population. However, research on the impact of comorbid AUD on HRQoL among clinically depressed patients is limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a psychosocial treatment intervention on HRQoL for depressive patients in specialized psychiatric care with a special focus on the impact of AUD on HRQoL.

    Material and Methods: Subjects were 242 patients of the Ostrobothnia Depression Study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02520271). Patients referred to specialized psychiatric care who scored at least 17 points on the Beck Depression Inventory at baseline and who had no psychotic disorders were included in the ODS. The treatment intervention in ODS comprised behavioral activation for all but began with motivational interviewing for those with AUD. HRQoL was assessed regularly during 24-month follow-up by the 15D instrument. In the present study, HRQoL of ODS patients with or without AUD was compared and the factors explaining 15D score analyzed with a linear mixed model. In order to specify the impact of clinical depression on HRQoL during the early phase of treatment intervention, a general population sample of the Finnish Health 2011 Survey was used as an additional reference group.

    Results: HRQoL improved among all ODS study sample patients regardless of comorbid AUD during the first year of follow-up. During 12–24 months of follow-up the difference between groups was seen as HRQoL continued to improve only among the non-AUD patients. A combination of male gender, anxiety disorder, and AUD was associated with the poorest HRQoL in this sample. In combined sample analyses with the reference group, clinical depression had an impact on HRQoL in short-term follow-up regardless of the treatment intervention.

    Conclusions: This study suggests that, in terms of improvement in HRQoL, the heterogenous group of depressive patients in specialized psychiatric care can be successfully treated with behavioral activation in combination with motivational interviewing for those with AUD.

    Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02520271. Ostrobothnia Depression Study (ODS). A Naturalistic Follow-up Study on Depression and Related Substance Use Disorders. (2015). Available online at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02520271.

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  • 19.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    et al.
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Eastern Finland, Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Holm, Minna
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Misiewicz, Zuzanna
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Services, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, TYKS Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kyttälä, Aija
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Eastern Finland, Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, TYKS Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; SleepWell Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Services, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Medical Research Centre Oulu, University Hospital of Oulu and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Vaasa, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Eastern Finland, Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hyman, Steven
    Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, MA, Cambridge, United States.
    Neale, Benjamin
    Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Daly, Mark
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Cohort profile: SUPER-Finland - the Finnish study for hereditary mechanisms of psychotic disorders2023Ingår i: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, nr 4, artikel-id e070710Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: SUPER-Finland is a large Finnish collection of psychosis cases. This cohort also represents the Finnish contribution to the Stanley Global Neuropsychiatric Genetics Initiative, which seeks to diversify genetic sample collection to include Asian, Latin American and African populations in addition to known population isolates, such as Finland.

    PARTICIPANTS: 10 474 individuals aged 18 years or older were recruited throughout the country. The subjects have been genotyped with a genome-wide genotyping chip and exome sequenced. A subset of 897 individuals selected from known population sub-isolates were selected for whole-genome sequencing. Recruitment was done between November 2015 and December 2018.

    FINDINGS TO DATE: 5757 (55.2%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 944 (9.1%) schizoaffective disorder, 1612 (15.5%) type I or type II bipolar disorder, 532 (5.1 %) psychotic depression, 1047 (10.0%) other psychosis and for 530 (5.1%) self-reported psychosis at recruitment could not be confirmed from register data. Mean duration of schizophrenia was 22.0 years at the time of the recruitment. By the end of the year 2018, 204 of the recruited individuals had died. The most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease (n=61) followed by neoplasms (n=40). Ten subjects had psychiatric morbidity as the primary cause of death.

    FUTURE PLANS: Compare the effects of common variants, rare variants and copy number variations (CNVs) on severity of psychotic illness. In addition, we aim to track longitudinal course of illness based on nation-wide register data to estimate how phenotypic and genetic differences alter it.

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  • 20.
    Mazumder, Atiqul Haq
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
    Barnett, Jennifer
    Cambridge Cognition, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB25 9TU, UK.
    Isometsä, Erkki Tapio
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland.
    Torniainen-Holm, Minna
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, 70240 Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, 00260 Helsinki, Finland.
    Kerkelä, Martta
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, 20521 Turku, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, 33014 Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, 33521 Tampere, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland;Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, 00260 Helsinki, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, 70240 Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Cederlöf, Erik
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, 00099 Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, 00099 Helsinki, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, 33014 Tampere, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, 70240 Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, 11364 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, 00099 Helsinki, Finland.
    Vainio, Seppo Juhani
    nfotech Oulu, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Northern Finland Biobank Borealis, Oulu University Hospital, 90220 Oulu, Finland; Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Kvantum Institute, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, 00260 Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
    Niemelä, Solja
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, 20521 Turku, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, 90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Reaction time and visual memory in connection to alcohol use in persons with bipolar disorder2021Ingår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, nr 9, artikel-id 1154Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of cognition with hazardous drinking and alcohol-related disorder in persons with bipolar disorder (BD). The study population included 1268 persons from Finland with bipolar disorder. Alcohol use was assessed through hazardous drinking and alcohol-related disorder including alcohol use disorder (AUD). Hazardous drinking was screened with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) screening tool. Alcohol-related disorder diagnoses were obtained from the national registrar data. Participants performed two computerized tasks from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) on A tablet computer: the 5-choice serial reaction time task, or reaction time (RT) test and the Paired Associative Learning (PAL) test. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Mental Health Inventory with five items (MHI-5). However, no assessment of current manic symptoms was available. Association between RT-test and alcohol use was analyzed with log-linear regression, and eβ with 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. PAL first trial memory score was analyzed with linear regression, and β with 95% CI are reported. PAL total errors adjusted was analyzed with logistic regression and odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI are reported. After adjustment of age, education, housing status and depression, hazardous drinking was associated with lower median and less variable RT in females while AUD was associated with a poorer PAL test performance in terms of the total errors adjusted scores in females. Our findings of positive associations between alcohol use and cognition in persons with bipolar disorder are difficult to explain because of the methodological flaw of not being able to separately assess only participants in euthymic phase.

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  • 21.
    Mazumder, Atiqul Haq
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Barnett, Jennifer
    Cambridge Cognition, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Isometsä, Erkki Tapio
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Torniainen-Holm, Minna
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kerkelä, Martta
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Cederlöf, Erik
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, City of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vainio, Seppo Juhani
    Infotech Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Northern Finland Biobank Borealis, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Kvantum Institute, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Pohjoinen Hesperiankatu 17 C, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Niemelä, Solja
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Department of Psychiatry, Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Reaction time and visual memory in connection to hazardous drinking polygenic scores in schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorder2021Ingår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, nr 11, artikel-id 1422Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of cognition with hazardous drinking Polygenic Scores (PGS) in 2649 schizophrenia, 558 schizoaffective disorder, and 1125 bipolar disorder patients in Finland. Hazardous drinking PGS was computed using the LDPred program. Participants performed two computerized tasks from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) on a tablet computer: the 5-choice serial reaction time task, or Reaction Time (RT) test, and the Paired Associative Learning (PAL) test. The association between hazardous drinking PGS and cognition was measured using four cognition variables. Log-linear regression was used in Reaction Time (RT) assessment, and logistic regression was used in PAL assessment. All analyses were conducted separately for males and females. After adjustment of age, age of onset, education, household pattern, and depressive symptoms, hazardous drinking PGS was not associated with reaction time or visual memory in male or female patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder.

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  • 22. Mazumder, Atiqul Haq
    et al.
    Barnett, Jennifer
    Isometsä, Erkki Tapio
    Lindberg, Nina
    Torniainen-Holm, Minna
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Kerkelä, Martta
    Ahola-Olli, Ari
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Kampman, Olli
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Cederlöf, Erik
    Haaki, Willehard
    Kajanne, Risto
    Wegelius, Asko
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Paunio, Tiina
    Vainio, Seppo Juhani
    Palotie, Aarno
    Niemelä, Solja
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Veijola, Juha
    Reaction Time and Visual Memory in Connection to Hazardous Drinking Polygenic Scores in Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Bipolar Disorder.2021Ingår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, nr 11, artikel-id 1422Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of cognition with hazardous drinking Polygenic Scores (PGS) in 2649 schizophrenia, 558 schizoaffective disorder, and 1125 bipolar disorder patients in Finland. Hazardous drinking PGS was computed using the LDPred program. Participants performed two computerized tasks from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) on a tablet computer: the 5-choice serial reaction time task, or Reaction Time (RT) test, and the Paired Associative Learning (PAL) test. The association between hazardous drinking PGS and cognition was measured using four cognition variables. Log-linear regression was used in Reaction Time (RT) assessment, and logistic regression was used in PAL assessment. All analyses were conducted separately for males and females. After adjustment of age, age of onset, education, household pattern, and depressive symptoms, hazardous drinking PGS was not associated with reaction time or visual memory in male or female patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder.

  • 23.
    Mazumder, Atiqul Haq
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Barnett, Jennifer
    Cambridge Cognition, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Torniainen-Holm, Minna
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kerkelä, Martta
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki Tapio
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jukuri, Tuomas
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Häkkinen, Katja
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Cederlöf, Erik
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Haaki, Willehard
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kajanne, Risto
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Männynsalo, Teemu
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Social Services and Health Care Sector, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemelä, Solja
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, The Broad Institute of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Harvard, MA, Cambridge, United States; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, United States.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Veijola, Juha
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Reaction time and visual memory in connection with alcohol use in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder2021Ingår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, nr 6, artikel-id 688Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association between cognition and hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorder in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Cognition is more or less compromised in schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder and alcohol use might aggravate this phenomenon. The study population included 3362 individuals from Finland with diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Hazardous drinking was screened with the AUDIT-C (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption) screening tool. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnoses were obtained from national registrar data. Participants performed two computerized tasks from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) on a tablet computer: The Five-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT) or the reaction time (RT) test and the Paired Associative Learning (PAL) test. The association between alcohol use and the RT and PAL tests was analyzed with log-linear regression and logistic regression, respectively. After adjustment for age, education, housing status, and the age at which the respondents had their first psychotic episodes, hazardous drinking was associated with a lower median RT in females and less variable RT in males, while AUD was associated with a poorer PAL test performance in terms of the total errors adjusted scores (TEASs) in females. Our findings of positive associations between alcohol and cognition in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder are unique.

  • 24.
    Mäkipelto, Ville
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hakulinen, Christian
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Welfare State Research and Reform, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Niemelä, Solja
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Lähteenvuo, Markku
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Wegelius, Asko
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kieseppä, Tuula
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Niuvanniemi Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland; Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere, Finland; The Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Department of Psychiatry, Tampere, Finland; The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Department of Psychiatry, Finland.
    Lahdensuo, Kaisla
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Finland; Mehiläinen, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mazumder, Atiqul
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland; Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Holm, Minna
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Mental Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Association of antidepressant and benzodiazepine use, and anticholinergic burden with cognitive performance in schizophrenia2024Ingår i: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 266, s. 118-126Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia is characterized by cognitive impairment affecting everyday functioning. Earlier research has hypothesized that antidepressants may associate with better cognitive functioning, but results are mixed. This study explored the association between antidepressant use and cognitive performance in terms of reaction time and visual learning in a clinical sample. In addition, we examined benzodiazepine use and anticholinergic burden. Study participants were drawn from the SUPER-Finland cohort, collected among patients with psychotic illnesses in 2016–2018 throughout Finland (n = 10,410). The analysis included adults with a schizophrenia diagnosis (F20) and results from a cognitive assessment (n = 3365). Information about medications and psychosocial factors were gathered through questionnaire and interview. Cognitive performance was assessed with the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) with two subtests measuring reaction time and visual learning. Almost 36 % of participants used at least one antidepressant. The use of antidepressants in general was not associated with performance in the reaction time and visual learning tasks. However, the use of SNRI antidepressants was associated with a faster reaction time. Benzodiazepine use and a higher anticholinergic burden were associated with poorer performance in both tests. The results strengthen earlier findings that there is no association between antidepressant use in general and cognitive performance in schizophrenia. However, the association of SNRI medications with a faster reaction time warrants further research. Moreover, the results suggest that more attention should be paid to the anticholinergic burden of the medications used by patients with schizophrenia, as well as avoiding continuous benzodiazepine use.

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  • 25.
    Puolakka, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Solismaa, Anssi
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Tampere, Finland.
    Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center-Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Viikki, Merja
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Seppälä, Niko
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Satasairaala Hospital, The Satakunta Wellbeing Services County, Pori, Finland.
    Mononen, Nina
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center-Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center-Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Vaasa, Finland.
    Polymorphisms in ERBB4 and TACR1 associated with dry mouth in clozapine-treated patients2024Ingår i: Acta Neuropsychiatrica, ISSN 0924-2708, E-ISSN 1601-5215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Sialorrhea is a common and uncomfortable adverse effect of clozapine, and its severity varies between patients. The aim of the study was to select broadly genes related to the regulation of salivation and study associations between sialorrhea and dry mouth and polymorphisms in the selected genes.

    Methods: The study population consists of 237 clozapine-treated patients, of which 172 were genotyped. Associations between sialorrhea and dry mouth with age, sex, BMI, smoking, clozapine dose, clozapine and norclozapine serum levels, and other comedication were studied. Genetic associations were analyzed with linear and logistic regression models explaining sialorrhea and dry mouth with each SNP added separately to the model as coefficients.

    Results: Clozapine dose, clozapine or norclozapine concentration and their ratio were not associated with sialorrhea or dryness of mouth. Valproate use (p=0.013) and use of other antipsychotics (p=0.015) combined with clozapine were associated with excessive salivation. No associations were found between studied polymorphisms and sialorrhea. In analyses explaining dry mouth with logistic regression with age and sex as coefficients, two proxy-SNPs were associated with dry mouth: epidermal growth factor receptor 4 (ERBB4) rs3942465 (adjusted p=0.025) and tachykinin receptor 1 (TACR1) rs58933792 (adjusted p=0.029).

    Conclusion: Use of valproate or antipsychotic polypharmacy may increase the risk of sialorrhea. Genetic variations in ERBB4 and TACR1 might contribute to experienced dryness of mouth among patients treated with clozapine.

  • 26.
    Rask, Susanna Maria
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Pitkäniemi, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Pitkäniemen sairaala, Pitkäniemi, FI-33380, Finland .
    Luoto, Kaisa E.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Pitkäniemi, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Pitkäniemen sairaala, Pitkäniemi, FI-33380, Finland .
    Solismaa, Anssi
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Pitkäniemi, Finland; Psychiatric Unit, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Tampere, Finland.
    Jokinen, Elina
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Jussila, Airi
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Pitkäniemi, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Pitkäniemen sairaala, Pitkäniemi, FI-33380, Finland.
    Clozapine-Related diarrhea and Colitis: report of 4 cases.2020Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 40, nr 3, s. 293-296Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During clozapine treatment, diarrhea is a rare but clinically relevant adverse effect. Cases of microscopic colitis and eosinophilic colitis have been previously reported.

    Procedures: We present 4 patients who developed severe diarrhea in early weeks of clozapine therapy.

    Findings: Two patients had significant peripheral eosinophilia 1 week after diarrhea symptoms. One of these patients also had Charcot-Leyden crystals in stool afterward, confirming the presence of eosinophils in the gut lumen. One of our patients had a confirmed microscopic colitis and later also neutropenia, which required treatment.

    Conclusions: Charcot-Leyden crystals in stool may be associated with concurrent diarrhea and eosinophilia during clozapine treatment, which is a previously unreported finding. Occurrence of blood dyscrasias with diarrhea symptoms during clozapine treatment needs further investigation to understand the possible shared mechanisms.

  • 27.
    Salminen, Simo-Pekko
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Solismaa, Anssi
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Paavonen, Vesa
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Mononen, Nina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Västerbotten Welfare Region, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    University of Turku, Department of Clinical Sciences (Psychiatry), Turku, Finland; The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Vaasa, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Genetic risk scores associated with temperament clusters in finnish depression patients2023Ingår i: Acta Neuropsychiatrica, ISSN 0924-2708, E-ISSN 1601-5215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Cloninger's temperament dimensions have been studied widely in relation to genetics. In this study, we examined Cloninger's temperament dimensions grouped with cluster analyses and their association with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study included 212 genotyped Finnish patients from the Ostrobothnia Depression Study.

    Methods: The temperament clusters were analysed at baseline and at six weeks from the beginning of the depression intervention study. We selected depression related catecholamine and serotonin genes based on a literature search, and 59 SNPs from ten different genes were analysed. The associations of single SNPs with temperament clusters were studied. Using the selected genes, genetic risk score (GRS) analyses were conducted considering appropriate confounding factors.

    Results: No single SNP had a significant association with the temperament clusters. Associations between GRSs and temperament clusters were observed in multivariate models that were significant after permutation analyses. Two SNPs from the DRD3 gene, two SNPs from the SLC6A2 gene, one SNP from the SLC6A4 gene, and one SNP from the HTR2A gene associated with the HHA/LRD/LP (high harm avoidance, low reward dependence, low persistence) cluster at baseline. Two SNPs from the HTR2A gene associated with the HHA/LRD/LP cluster at six weeks. Two SNPs from the HTR2A gene and two SNPs from the COMT gene associated with the HP (high persistence) cluster at six weeks.

    Conclusion: GRSs seem to associate with an individual's temperament profile, which can be observed in the clusters used. Further research needs to be conducted on these types of clusters, and their clinical applicability.

  • 28.
    Sorri, Annamari
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland .
    Järventausta, Kaija
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland .
    Kampman, Olli
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland .
    Lehtimäki, Kai
    Department of Neurosurgery, Neurology and Rehabilitation, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Björkqvist, Minna
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Tuohimaa, Kati
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Hämäläinen, Mari
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Moilanen, Eeva
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland .
    Electroconvulsive therapy increases temporarily plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with major depressive disorder2021Ingår i: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 11, nr 8, artikel-id e02001Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been related to the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings involving the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on the VEGF levels have been conflicting. The aim was to examine the possible changes in the VEGF levels and their associations with clinical outcome in patients with MDD during ECT.

    Methods: The study comprised 30 patients suffering from MDD. Their plasma VEGF levels were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 hr after the first, fifth, and last ECT session. The severity of depression was quantified by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS).

    Results: The VEGF levels increased between the 2-hr and 4-hr measurements during the first (p = .003) and the fifth (p = .017) sessions. The baseline VEGF levels between individual ECT sessions remained unchanged during the ECT series. No correlations were found between the increased VEGF levels and the clinical outcome.

    Conclusions: Electroconvulsive therapy increased the VEGF levels repeatedly at the same time point in two different ECT sessions. These increases had no association with the response to ECT. Consequently, VEGF may act as a mediator in the mechanism of action of ECT.

  • 29. Suokas, Kimmo
    et al.
    Hakulinen, Christian
    Sund, Reijo
    Kampman, Olli
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Pirkola, Sami
    Mortality in persons with recent primary or secondary care contacts for mental disorders in Finland2022Ingår i: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 470-471Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 30.
    Suokas, Kimmo
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Arvo Ylpön katu 34 (Arvo 1), Tampere, Finland.
    Kurkela, Olli
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Arvo Ylpön katu 34 (Arvo 1), Tampere, Finland; National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Laurea University of Applied Sciences, Vantaa, Finland.
    Nevalainen, Jaakko
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Arvo Ylpön katu 34 (Arvo 1), Tampere, Finland.
    Suvisaari, Jaana
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hakulinen, Christian
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Health and Social Care Systems, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri. Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Pirkanmaa Wellbeing Services County, Tampere, Finland; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine (Psychiatry), University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, The Wellbeing Services County of Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Pirkola, Sami
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Arvo Ylpön katu 34 (Arvo 1), Tampere, Finland; Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Geographical variation in treated psychotic and other mental disorders in Finland by region and urbanicity2024Ingår i: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 59, s. 37-49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In Finland, prevalence of schizophrenia is higher in the eastern and northern regions and co-occurs with the distribution of schizophrenia polygenic risk scores. Both genetic and environmental factors have been hypothesized to contribute to this variation. We aimed to examine the prevalence of psychotic and other mental disorders by region and degree of urbanicity, and the impacts of socio-economic adjustments on these associations.

    Methods: Nationwide population registers from 2011 to 2017 and healthcare registers from 1975 to 2017. We used 19 administrative and three aggregate regions based on the distribution of schizophrenia polygenic risk scores, and a seven-level urban–rural classification. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were calculated by Poisson regression models and adjusted for gender, age, and calendar year (basic adjustments), and Finnish origin, residential history, urbanicity, household income, economic activity, and physical comorbidity (additional adjustments) on an individual level. Average marginal effects were used to visualize interaction effects between region and urbanicity.

    Results: A total of 5,898,180 individuals were observed. All mental disorders were slightly more prevalent (PR 1.03 [95% CI, 1.02–1.03]), and psychotic disorders (1.11 [1.10–1.12]) and schizophrenia (1.19 [1.17–1.21]) considerably more prevalent in eastern and northern than in western coastal regions. After the additional adjustments, however, the PRs were 0.95 (0.95–0.96), 1.00 (0.99–1.01), and 1.03 (1.02–1.04), respectively. Urban residence was associated with increased prevalence of psychotic disorders across all regions (adjusted PR 1.21 [1.20–1.22]).

    Conclusion: After adjusting for socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors, the within-country distribution of mental disorders no longer followed the traditional east–west gradient. Urban–rural differences, on the other hand, persisted after the adjustments.

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