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  • 1.
    Häggström, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Phersson, Reece
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Holmgren, Emelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Misofoni och aptit: Hur upplevs ljud av olika grupper i en måltidsmiljö?2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    All our senses can affect our dining experience and how we perceive flavour. One of the senses that is often forgotten in the context of eating is our hearing. Different sounds in the environment, and even the sound of food itself, can affect the way we perceive our meal. How we experience the different sounds of food has an evolutionary background. Crispy sounds can tell us when something is fresh, has a high fat or nutrition content, while various liquid sounds such as snivelling or scraping noises remind us of sickness and danger. Recently phenomena such as ASMR and mukbang, online streaming of someone eating, has become popularized where food sounds attract many viewers. However the sounds that are popular within these genres are the sounds that can be triggering for people with misophonia.  

     

    Out of the 100 people surveyed 34 respondents reported that they had misophonia, 32 experienced increased noise sensitivity, 7 didn't know (if they had any increased noise sensitivity), and 27 were not noise sensitive. The survey consisted of different audio clips with food sounds and other sounds from the dinner table, as well as questions about how the respondents experienced the sounds, if the sounds affected their appetite, if they are sensitive to noise (according to the noise sensitivity scale) and what reactions occurred because of the triggering sounds. This study asks the question of how the different groups’ answers differentiate throughout these questions, how sound is perceived and why, and if misophonia has an effect on appetite. If misophonia should be considered as a separate diagnosis will be discussed. 

     

    This study shows that people with misophonia perceive sound of food as significantly worse than the people without noise sensitivity. For example, the sound of an apple being eaten is perceived as worse than the sound of a fork scraping against a plate for people with misophonia while people without noise sensitivity rate the scraping sound as the worst. People without sound sensitivity experience the audio clips as significantly more appetite enhancing than people with misophonia. This study also shows that people with misophonia respond significantly stronger to various sounds compared to the people with increased noise sensitivity. 

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