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  • 1.
    Andersson, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Cistercian monasteries in medieval Sweden—foundations and recruitments, 1143–14202021In: Religions, ISSN 2077-1444, E-ISSN 2077-1444, Vol. 12, no 8, article id 582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an overview of the Cistercian monasteries that were founded in Sweden in the 12th and 13th centuries. The first were Alvastra and Nydala, founded in 1143, both male monasteries. However, eventually the nunneries came to outnumber the male monasteries (7/5). The purpose of the article is also to discuss the social background of the monks and nuns who inhabited these monasteries. As for the nuns, previous studies have shown that they initially came from the society’s elite, the royal families, but also other magnates. Gradually, social recruitment broadened, and an increasing number of women from the aristocratic lower levels came to dominate the recruitment. It is also suggested that from the end of the 14th century, the women increasingly came from the burghers. The male monasteries, on the other hand, were not even from the beginning populated by men from the nobles. Their family backgrounds seem rather to be linked to the aristocratic lower layers. This difference between the sexes can most probably be explained by the fact that ideals of monastic life—obedience, equality, poverty and ban on weapons—in a decisive way broke with what in secular life was constructed as an aristocratic masculinity.

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gifts and society in fourteenth century Sweden2013In: Disputing strategies in medieval Scandinavia, Brill Academic Publishers, 2013, Vol. 16, p. 219-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
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