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  • 1. Fleishmann, Fenella
    et al.
    Kristen, Cornelia
    Brinbaum, Yaël (Contributor)
    Deboosere, Patrick (Contributor)
    Granato, Nadia (Contributor)
    Jonsson, Jan O. (Contributor)
    Kilpi-Jakonen, Elina (Contributor)
    Lorenz, Georg (Contributor)
    Lutz, Amy C. (Contributor)
    Mos, David (Contributor)
    Mutarrak, Raya (Contributor)
    Phalet, Karen (Contributor)
    Rothon, Catherine (Contributor)
    Rudolphi, Frida (Contributor)
    Stockholm University.
    van de Werfhorst, Herman G. (Contributor)
    Gender Inequalities in the Education of the Second Generation in Western Countries2014In: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 143-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on comparative analyses from nine Western countries, we ask whether local-born children from a wide range of immigrant groups show patterns of female advantage in education that are similar to those prevalent in their host Western societies. We consider five outcomes throughout the educational career: test scores or grades at age 15, continuation after compulsory schooling, choice of academic track in upper-secondary education, completion of upper secondary, and completion of tertiary education. Despite great variation in gender gaps in education in immigrants’ origin countries (with advantages for males in many cases), we find that the female advantage in education observed among the majority population is usually present among second-generation immigrants. We interpret these findings in light of ideas about gender role socialization and immigrant selectivity.

  • 2. Jackson, Michelle
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University.
    Ethnic Inequality and Choice-Driven Educational Systems: A Longitudinal Study of Performance and Choice in England and Sweden2012In: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 158-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors ask whether choice-driven education systems, with comprehensive schools and mass education at the secondary and tertiary level, represented in this article by England and Sweden, provide educational opportunities for ethnic minorities. In studying educational attainment, the authors make a theoretical distinction between mechanisms connected with school performance on the one hand (primary effects) and educational choice, given performance, on the other (secondary effects). Using large national data sets and recently developed methods, they show that performance effects tend to depress the educational attainment of most, although not all, ethnic minorities, whereas choice effects increase the transition rates of these students. This pattern is repeated at the transition to university education. These results are true for many immigrant categories in both England and Sweden, although immigrant students are a heterogeneous group. Black Caribbean students in England and children of Turkish and South American descent in Sweden fare worst, while several Asian groups do extremely well. The authors conclude that it may be a generic feature of choice-driven school systems in Western societies to benefit non-European immigrants, and they discuss some possible explanations for this.

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