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  • 1.
    Duffy, Stephen W.
    et al.
    Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Tabár, László
    Department of Mammography, Falun Central Hospital, Falun, Sweden; School of Oral Hygiene, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Dean, Peter B.
    Department of Cancer Control Sciences, American Cancer Society, GA, Atlanta, United States.
    Smith, Robert A.
    Department of Cancer Control Sciences, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Ga.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Department of Health Care Management, College of Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia
    Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Chen, Sam Li-Sheng
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jen, Grace Hsiao-Hsuan
    Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Ku, May Mei-Sheng
    Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Hsu, Chen-Yang
    Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maroni, Roberta
    Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi
    Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Beneficial effect of consecutive screening mammography examinations on mortality from breast cancer: a prospective study2021In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 299, no 3, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previously, the risk of death from breast cancer was analyzed for women participating versus those not participating in the last screening examination before breast cancer diagnosis. Consecutive attendance patterns may further refine estimates.

    Purpose: To estimate the effect of participation in successive mammographic screening examinations on breast cancer mortality.

    Materials and Methods: Participation data for Swedish women eligible for screening mammography in nine counties from 1992 to 2016 were linked with data from registries and regional cancer centers for breast cancer diagnosis, cause, and date of death (Uppsala University ethics committee registration number: 2017/147). Incidence-based breast cancer mortality was calculated by whether the women had participated in the most recent screening examination prior to diagnosis only (intermittent participants), the penultimate screening examination only (lapsed participants), both examinations (serial participants), or neither examination (serial nonparticipants). Rates were analyzed with Poisson regression. We also analyzed incidence of breast cancers proving fatal within 10 years.

    Results: Data were available for a total average population of 549 091 women (average age, 58.9 years 6 6.7 [standard deviation]). The numbers of participants in the four groups were as follows: serial participants, 392 135; intermittent participants, 41 746; lapsed participants, 30 945; and serial nonparticipants, 84 265. Serial participants had a 49% lower risk of breast cancer mortality (relative risk [RR], 0.51; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.55; P ,.001) and a 50% lower risk of death from breast cancer within 10 years of diagnosis (RR, 0.50; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.55; P ,.001) than serial nonparticipants. Lapsed and intermittent participants had a smaller reduction. Serial participants had significantly lower risk of both outcomes than lapsed or intermittent participants. Analyses correcting for potential biases made little difference to the results.

    Conclusion: Women participating in the last two breast cancer screening examinations prior to breast cancer diagnosis had the largest reduction in breast cancer death. Missing either one of the last two examinations conferred a significantly higher risk.

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  • 2. Jamshidi, Neema
    et al.
    Jonasch, Eric
    Zapala, Matthew
    Korn, Ronald L.
    Aganovic, Lejla
    Zhao, Hongjuan
    Sitaram Raviprakash, Tumkur
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tibshirani, Robert J.
    Banerjee, Sudeep
    Brooks, James D.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kuo, Michael D.
    The Radiogenomic Risk Score: construction of a Prognostic Quantitative, Noninvasive Image-based Molecular Assay for Renal Cell Carcinoma2015In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 277, no 1, p. 114-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of constructing radiogenomic-based surrogates of molecular assays (SOMAs) in patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) by using data extracted from a single computed tomographic (CT) image.

    Materials and Methods: In this institutional review board approved study, gene expression profile data and contrast material–enhanced CT images from 70 patients with CCRCC in a training set were independently assessed by two radiologists for a set of predefined imaging features. A SOMA for a previously validated CCRCC-specific supervised principal component (SPC) risk score prognostic gene signature was constructed and termed the radiogenomic risk score (RRS). It uses the microarray data and a 28-trait image array to evaluate each CT image with multiple regression of gene expression analysis. The predictive power of the RRS SOMA was then prospectively validated in an independent dataset to confirm its relationship to the SPC gene signature (n = 70) and determination of patient outcome (n = 77). Data were analyzed by using multivariate linear regression–based methods and Cox regression modeling, and significance was assessed with receiver operator characteristic curves and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.

    Results: Our SOMA faithfully represents the tissue-based molecular assay it models. The RRS scaled with the SPC gene signature (R = 0.57,P < .001, classification accuracy 70.1%, P < .001) and predicted disease-specific survival (log rank P < .001). Independent validation confirmed the relationship between the RRS and the SPC gene signature (R = 0.45, P < .001, classification accuracy 68.6%, P < .001) and disease-specific survival (log-rank P < .001) and that it was independent of stage, grade, and performance status (multivariate Cox model P < .05, log-rank P < .001).

    Conclusion: A SOMA for the CCRCC-specific SPC prognostic gene signature that is predictive of disease-specific survival and independent of stage was constructed and validated, confirming that SOMA construction is feasible.

  • 3.
    Salé, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    15-year natural course of temporomandibular joints in asymptomatic and symptomatic non-patient volunteers: a prospective clinical and MR imaging study2013In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 267, no 1, p. 183-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine the incidence, prevalence, and progression of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings and symptoms during 15 years in adult asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers (nonpatients).

    Materials and Methods: A regional committee for medical research ethics approved the study, and informed volunteer consent was obtained. Fifty-three volunteers were examined at study inception. For clinical assessment, a self-administered questionnaire was given, followed by an interview with each volunteer at study inception, at 1 year later, and at 15 years later. Bilateral TMJ MR imaging and clinical examination were performed at inception and at 15-year follow-up. The MR images were assessed for disk position, bone status, and joint fluid. All 53 volunteers participated at 1-year follow-up, and 50 of 53 volunteers participated at 15-year follow-up; of these 50 volunteers, 47 underwent MR imaging. The Fisher exact test was used to determine differences between groups, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine differences in prevalence of TMJ symptoms among the three examination times.

    Results: At study inception, TMJ disk displacement was observed in 31% of asymptomatic volunteers (nine of 29) compared with 89% of symptomatic volunteers (16 of 18, P < .001). Inceptive TMJ status was maintained after 15 years in 91% (43 of 47). Unilateral progression was observed in four volunteers (9%); one was symptomatic and three were asymptomatic. Progression involved development of new disk displacement (n = 1), development of new bone changes (n = 2), and aggravation from reducing to non-reducing disk displacement (n = 1). Prevalence of TMJ symptoms did not change significantly between examination times (P = .77). TMJ clicking was the most common clinical symptom.

    Conclusion: Volunteers with mild symptoms had a prevalence of disk displacement of the same magnitude as that reported in patients, although most volunteers, symptomatic as well as asymptomatic, maintained their TMJ status during 15 years.

  • 4. Sardanelli, Francesco
    et al.
    Bashir, Humayun
    Berzaczy, Dominik
    Cannella, Guglielmo
    Espeland, Ansgar
    Flor, Nicola
    Helbich, Thomas
    Hunink, Myriam
    Malone, Dermot E.
    Mann, Ritse
    Muzzupappa, Claudia
    Petersen, Lars J.
    Åhlström Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Sconfienza, Luca M.
    Serafin, Zbigniew
    Spronk, Sandra
    Stoker, Jaap
    Van Beek, Edwin J. R.
    Vorwerk, Dierk
    Di Leo, Giovanni
    The Role of Imaging Specialists as Authors of Systematic Reviews on Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging and Its Impact on Scientific Quality: Report from the EuroAIM Evidence-based Radiology Working Group2014In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 272, no 2, p. 533-540Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the inclusion of radiologists or nuclear medicine physicians (imaging specialists) as authors of systematic reviews (SRs) on imaging and imaging-guided diagnostic procedures and to determine the impact of imaging specialists' presence as authors on the overall quality of the reviews.

    Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search was performed for SRs of diagnostic and interventional image-guided procedures that were published from January 2001 to December 2010. SRs about procedures primarily performed by nonimaging specialists were excluded. The inclusion of imaging specialists among the SR authors and the frequency of publication in imaging journals were evaluated. The quality of a subset of 200 SRs (100 most recent SRs with imaging specialists as authors and 100 most recent SRs without imaging specialists as authors) was rated by using a 12-item modified assessment of multiple SRs (AMSTAR) evaluation tool. Spearman, chi(2), and Mann-Whitney statistics were used.

    Results: From among 3258 retrieved citations, 867 SRs were included in the study. Neuroimaging had the largest number of SRs (28% [241 of 867]), 41% (354 of 867) of SRs concerned diagnostic performance, and 26% (228 of 867) of SRs were published in imaging journals. Imaging specialists were authors (in any position) in 330 (38%) of 867 SRs; they were first authors of 176 SRs and last authors of 161 SRs. SRs with imaging specialists as authors were more often published in imaging journals than in nonimaging journals (54% [179 of 330] vs 9% [49 of 537]; P < .001). The median number of modified AMSTAR quality indicators was nine in SRs with imaging specialists as authors, while that in SRs without imaging specialists as authors was seven (P = .003).

    Conclusion: Only 38% (330 of 867) of SRs on radiology or nuclear medicine-related imaging published from January 2001 to December 2010 included imaging specialists as authors. However, the inclusion of imaging specialists as authors was associated with a significant increase in the scientific quality (as judged by using a modified AMSTAR scale) of the SR. 

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