Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 9 of 9
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Children's Heart Center, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mora, Mariela Acuna
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Academy of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Saarijärvi, Markus
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Burström, Åsa
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skogby, Sandra
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Paediatric Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernlund, Eva
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Division of Paediatrics, Crown Princess Victoria Childreńs Hospital, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, paediatric Cardiology, Lund, Sweden.
    Fadl, Shalan
    Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Hanseus, Katarina
    Children's Heart Centre, Skåne University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Kazamia, Kalliopi
    Children's Heart Centre Stockholm-Uppsala, Karolinska University Hospital and Akademiska University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moons, Philip
    Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; KU Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Effectiveness of the STEPSTONES transition program for adolescents with congenital heart disease: a randomized controlled trial2023Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 73, nr 4, s. 655-663Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Adolescents with congenital heart disease transition from childhood to adulthood and transfer from pediatric-oriented to adult-oriented care. High-level empirical evidence on the effectiveness of transitional care is scarce. This study investigated the empowering effect (primary outcome) of a structured person-centered transition program for adolescents with congenital heart disease and studied its effectiveness on transition readiness, patient-reported health, quality of life, health behaviors, disease-related knowledge, and parental outcomes e.g., parental uncertainty, readiness for transition as perceived by the parents (secondary outcomes).

    Methods: The STEPSTONES-trial comprised a hybrid experimental design whereby a randomized controlled trial was embedded in a longitudinal observational study. The trial was conducted in seven centers in Sweden. Two centers were allocated to the randomized controlled trial-arm, randomizing participants to intervention or control group. The other five centers were intervention-naïve centers and served as contamination check control group. Outcomes were measured at the age of 16 years (baseline), 17 years, and 18.5 years.

    Results: The change in empowerment from 16 years to 18.5 years differed significantly between the intervention group and control group (mean difference = 3.44; 95% confidence interval = 0.27–6.65; p = .036) in favor of intervention group. For the secondary outcomes, significant differences in change over time were found in parental involvement (p = .008), disease-related knowledge (p = .0002), and satisfaction with physical appearance (p = .039). No differences in primary or secondary outcomes were detected between the control group and contamination check control group, indicating that there was no contamination in the control group.

    Discussion: The STEPSTONES transition program was effective in increasing patient empowerment, reducing parental involvement, improving satisfaction with physical appearance, and increasing disease-related knowledge.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Emami, Habib
    et al.
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences.
    Ghazinour, mehdi
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Psykiatri.
    Rezaeishiraz, Hamed
    Department of Health Behavior, Rosewell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
    Richter, Jörg
    Centres of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Regions East and South, Oslo, Norway.
    Mental health of adolescents in Tehran, Iran2007Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 571-576Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate mental health in Iranian adolescents, particularly in high school students from urban areas. METHOD: A sample of 4599 girls and boys was selected from third year classes from high schools in Tehran by a stratified cluster random sampling method. They were investigated by means of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in a cross-sectional study. Following the recommendations of Goldberg et al, the chosen cut-off point for the differentiation between individuals with and without psychiatric morbidity was a score of 7 because of the high mean score within the population. RESULTS: Of the students, 1270 (19.5%) achieved a GHQ-12 score above the threshold. Significantly more girls (34.1%) than boys (23.7%) had GHQ-12 scores indicating some psychiatric morbidity. On average, the 18-year-old adolescents reported a higher level of mental health problems compared with 17-year-old adolescents in the same school year. CONCLUSION: A considerable proportion of adolescent high school students experience mental disorders, with girls experiencing such disorders more frequently than boys. Periodic mental health surveys in high schools are proposed to identify students in need of counselling or treatment to improve their coping skills and problem-solving abilities.

  • 3.
    Jerdén, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Burell, Gunilla
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Gender differences and predictors of self-rated health development among Swedish adolescents2011Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 143-150Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During adolescence, girls reported lower self-rated health than boys and this gender difference increased over the years. High empowerment is related to high self-rated health, and positive school experiences and a good mood in the family seem to be important predictors of a positive development of self-rated health.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för kostvetenskap.
    Klock, Kritine
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Nordrehaug Åstrøm, Anne
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Haugejorden, Olle
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för kostvetenskap.
    Lifestyle-related characteristics of adolescent low-meat-consumers and omnivores in Sweden and Norway2002Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 31, nr 2, s. 190-198Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods: A total of 2041 students (578 from Umeå, Sweden; 504 from Stockholm, Sweden; and 959 from Bergen, Norway), with a mean age of 15.5 years, completed a questionnaire. Information was collected about physical characteristics, and health, family situation, social, exercise, alcohol, and tobacco habits. The response rate was 95% in Umeå, 91% in Stockholm, and 83% in Bergen. Statistical analyses included Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.

    Results: There was no reported difference between low-meat consumers and omnivores with respect to alcohol use, smoking, weight, or amount of exercise. Female low-meat consumers more frequently used smokeless tobacco, reported having more sick days during the last year, attached less importance to “being healthy,” and had been depressed more often than female omnivores. Male low-meat consumers reported, to a greater extent than male omnivores, having been tired without reason, having often had headaches and having been depressed. Female low-meat consumers had parents with a higher average level of education than did female omnivores and more often spent time with friends after school.

    Conclusions: Vegetarianism or low-meat consumption is mainly a female phenomenon among adolescents in this study. The study indicates that the lifestyle of young low-meat consumers differs from the lifestyle found in previous studies of vegetarians with respect to the respondents’ exercise habits, their perception of their own health, and their use of alcohol and tobacco. Contrary to findings from other studies, adherence to a low-meat diet may not correlate with other health promotion practices among adolescents in Sweden and Norway.

  • 5. Medina, Doris M Rivera
    et al.
    Valencia, Alejandra
    de Velasquez, Alet
    Huang, Li-Min
    Prymula, Roman
    García-Sicilia, Jose
    Rombo, Lars
    David, Marie Pierre P
    Descamps, Dominique
    Hardt, Karin
    Dubin, Gary
    Silfverdal, Sven Arne
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Safety and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine: a randomized, controlled trial in adolescent girls2010Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 46, nr 5, s. 414-421Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Immunization of girls against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types before sexual debut is important for cervical cancer prevention. This phase III blinded, randomized, controlled trial in adolescent girls assessed safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine.

    METHODS: Girls (mean age 12 years) in 12 countries received the HPV-16/18 L1 virus-like particle AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (N = 1,035) or hepatitis A virus vaccine as control (N = 1,032) at 0, 1, and 6 months. The primary objective was to compare the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) between groups. HPV-16 and HPV-18 antibody titers were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay post-vaccination.

    RESULTS: Up to study month 7, 11 girls in the HPV-16/18 vaccine group reported 14 SAEs and 13 girls in the control group reported 15 SAEs. The difference in SAE incidence between groups was .20% (95% CI, -.78, 1.20). No SAE in the HPV-16/18 vaccine group was considered related to vaccination or led to withdrawal. The incidence of solicited local and general symptoms up to 7 days post-vaccination was moderately higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than with control. The incidence of unsolicited symptoms, new onset of chronic diseases, and medically significant conditions was similar between groups. All girls seroconverted for both antigens after three doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine; geometric mean titers were 19,882.0 and 8,262.0 EU/mL for anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies, respectively, in initially seronegative girls.

    CONCLUSIONS: The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine was generally well tolerated and immunogenic when administered to young adolescent females, the primary target of organized vaccination programs.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    It takes two: reducing adolescent smoking uptake through sustainable adolescent-adult partnership2006Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 39, nr 6, s. 880-886Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To assess the effects of a long-term intervention for tobacco use prevention that targets adolescents (Tobacco Free Duo).

    Methods School-based community intervention combined with repeated cross-sectional surveys over 7 years. The intervention was performed in the County of Västerbotten, Sweden, where survey data were collected in grade seven to nine schools on an annual basis for 7 years. Data for comparison were collected in grade nine on the national level in Sweden. In the intervention area, the annual number of seventh to ninth grade students participating in the study varied between 1300 and 1650. In the reference data, the number of participating ninth grade students approximated 4500 annually.

    Results A significant decrease of nearly 50% was seen in smoking prevalence in the intervention area. The decrease was evident in grades eight and nine (ages 14–15 years) in both boys and girls. At the start of the intervention, smoking prevalence in grade nine was 16.1% in the intervention area and 23% in the national reference group. Although the prevalence in the national sample remained stable, there was a decrease to 9.0% in the intervention area at the end of the study period.

    Conclusions These results suggest that the Tobacco Free Duo program contributed to a reduction in adolescent smoking among both boys and girls. Using a multi-faceted intervention that includes adolescent–adult partnership can reduce adolescent smoking uptake, and the intervention has been proven to be sustainable within communities.

  • 7. Panday, Saadhna
    et al.
    Reddy, S Priscilla
    Ruiter, Robert A C
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Folkhälsa och klinisk medicin. Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    de Vries, Hein
    Nicotine dependence and withdrawal symptoms among occasional smokers2007Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 40, nr 2, s. 144-150Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study describes the levels of nicotine dependence, withdrawal symptoms, depressive mood, and risk behavior reported by male and female weekly and monthly adolescent smokers in South Africa.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 554 grade 9–11 weekly and monthly smokers in the Southern Cape-Karoo Region. Differences between the gender groups and smoking status were analyzed while controlling for demographic characteristics.

    Results

    Weekly and monthly smokers were classified as light smokers having smoked 6–10 cigarettes and 0–1 cigarettes a week, respectively. However, they displayed substantial levels of dependence, with 11.6% of weekly smokers classified as highly dependent. Furthermore, 55.9% of weekly smokers and 47.1% of the overall sample experienced more than two withdrawal symptoms. Although dependency levels and withdrawal symptoms were higher among weekly smokers, the levels were not negligible among monthly smokers. Weekly smokers reported higher levels of depressive mood and risk behavior than monthly smokers. Females reported higher levels of dependence, withdrawal symptoms, depressive mood, and lower levels of risk behavior than males. Gender differences were not found on the number of cigarettes smoked in a week.

    Conclusions

    This study demonstrates multiple symptoms of dependence among a large sample of adolescent occasional smokers in a multi-ethnic cultural setting. Smoking cessation programs may, therefore, be required to help adolescents quit smoking and possibly consider pharmacotherapy for highly dependent smokers. Prevention programs should also consider providing occasional smokers skills to identify and cope with withdrawal symptoms.

  • 8. Pedersen, Court
    et al.
    Breindahl, Morten
    Aggarwal, Naresh
    Berglund, Johan
    Oroszlán, György
    Silfverdal, Sven Arne
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Szüts, Péter
    O'Mahony, Michael
    David, Marie-Pierre
    Dobbelaere, Kurt
    Dubin, Gary
    Descamps, Dominique
    Randomized trial: immunogenicity and safety of coadministered human papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in girls.2012Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 50, nr 1, s. 38-46Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This randomized, open, controlled, multicenter study (110886/NCT00578227) evaluated human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18 vaccine) coadministered with inactivated hepatitis A and B (HAB) vaccine. Coprimary objectives were to demonstrate noninferiority of hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and HPV-16/18 immune responses at month 7 when vaccines were coadministered, compared with the same vaccines administered alone.

    Methods: Healthy girls (9–15 years) were age-stratified (9, 10–12, and 13–15 years) and randomized to receive HPV (n = 270), HAB (n = 271), or HPV + HAB (n = 272). Vaccines were administered at months 0, 1, and 6. Immunogenicity was evaluated at months 0 and 7.

    Results: The hepatitis A immune response was noninferior for HPV + HAB, versus HAB, for seroconversion rates (100% in each group) and geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) (95% CI) (4,504.2 [3,993.0–5,080.8] and 5,288.4 [4,713.3–5,933.7] mIU/mL, respectively). The hepatitis B immune response was noninferior for HPV + HAB, versus HAB, for anti-HBs seroprotection rates (98.3% and 100%); GMTs were 3,136.5 [2,436.0–4,038.4] and 5,646.5 [4,481.3–7,114.6] mIU/mL, respectively. The HPV-16/18 immune response was noninferior for HPV + HAB, versus HPV, for seroconversion rates (99.6% and 100% for both antigens) and GMTs (22,993.5 [20,093.4–26,312.0] and 26,981.9 [23,909.5–30,449.1] EL.U/mL for HPV-16; 8,671.2 [7,651.7–9,826.6] and 11,182.7 [9,924.8–12,600.1] EL.U/mL for HPV-18, respectively). No subject withdrew because of adverse events. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. Immune responses and reactogenicity were similar in girls aged 9 years compared with the entire study population.

    Conclusions: Results support coadministration of HPV-16/18 vaccine with HAB vaccine in girls aged 9–15 years. The HPV-16/18 vaccine was immunogenic and generally well tolerated in 9-year-old girls.

  • 9. Stoner, Marie C. D.
    et al.
    Neilands, Torsten B.
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana .
    Hughes, James P.
    Gomez-Olive, F. Xavier
    Twine, Rhian
    Tollman, Stephen
    Laeyendecker, Oliver
    MacPhail, Catherine
    Ahern, Jennifer
    Lippman, Sheri A.
    Pettifor, Audrey
    Multilevel Measures of Education and Pathways to Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in Adolescent Girls and Young Women in South Africa2019Inngår i: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 65, nr 6, s. 723-729Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Schooling is associated with a lower risk of Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in adolescent girls and young women, but there is little understanding of the pathways underlying this relationship.

    Methods: We used data from adolescent girls and young women in South Africa enrolled in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 068 study. We tested a structural equation model where individual household and community education measures were associated directly and indirectly with incident HSV-2 through HIV knowledge, future aspirations, age-disparate partnerships, sex in the last 12 months, and condomless sex.

    Results: Community, household, and individual measures of schooling were all associated with incident HSV-2 infection through mediated pathways that increased the likelihood of having sex. Low school attendance (<80% of school days) increased the likelihood of having sex through increased age-disparate partnerships and reduced future aspirations. Fewer community years of education increased the likelihood of having sex through increased age-disparate partnerships. Parental education level was indirectly associated with HSV-2 overall, although we could not identify the individual pathways that were responsible for this association.

    Conclusions: Community and individual schooling interventions may reduce the risk of HSV-2 infection by influencing the likelihood of having sex, partner age, and future aspirations.

1 - 9 of 9
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf