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  • 1.
    Aripaka, Karthik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Åhrling, Samaneh Shabani
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Österman, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    von Hofsten, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TRAF6 function as a novel co-regulator of Wnt3a target genes in prostate cancer2019In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 45, p. 192-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) promotes inflammation in response to various cytokines. Aberrant Wnt3a signals promotes cancer progression through accumulation of β-Catenin. Here we investigated a potential role for TRAF6 in Wnt signaling.

    Methods: TRAF6 expression was silenced by siRNA in human prostate cancer (PC3U) and human colorectal SW480 cells and by CRISPR/Cas9 in zebrafish. Several biochemical methods and analyses of mutant phenotype in zebrafish were used to analyse the function of TRAF6 in Wnt signaling.

    Findings: Wnt3a-treatment promoted binding of TRAF6 to the Wnt co-receptors LRP5/LRP6 in PC3U and LNCaP cells in vitro. TRAF6 positively regulated mRNA expression of β-Catenin and subsequent activation of Wnt target genes in PC3U cells. Wnt3a-induced invasion of PC3U and SW480 cells were significantly reduced when TRAF6 was silenced by siRNA. Database analysis revealed a correlation between TRAF6 mRNA and Wnt target genes in patients with prostate cancer, and high expression of LRP5, TRAF6 and c-Myc correlated with poor prognosis. By using CRISPR/Cas9 to silence TRAF6 in zebrafish, we confirm TRAF6 as a key molecule in Wnt3a signaling for expression of Wnt target genes.

    Interpretation: We identify TRAF6 as an important component in Wnt3a signaling to promote activation of Wnt target genes, a finding important for understanding mechanisms driving prostate cancer progression.

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  • 2.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Swedish Defence Research Agency, 906 21 Umeå, Sweden.
    Chernov, Yevgen A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK.
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ilver, Dag
    Moonens, Kristof
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Koeniger, Verena
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Liu, Hui
    Goldman, Matthew D.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Younson, Justine
    Kelly, Charles G.
    Gilman, Robert H.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.
    Nair, G. Balakrish
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Unemo, Magnus
    Danielsson, Dan
    Suerbaum, Sebastian
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Eldridge, Angela M.
    Chromy, Brett A.
    Hansen, Lori M.
    Solnick, Jay V.
    Linden, Sara K.
    Haas, Rainer
    Dubois, Andre
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Remaut, Han
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berg, Douglas E.
    Boren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence2017In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  • 3. Ekman, Maria
    et al.
    Mu, Yabing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lee, So Young
    Edlund, Sofia
    Kozakai, Takaharu
    Thakur, Noopur
    Tran, Hoanh
    Qian, Jiang
    Groeden, Joanna
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    APC and Smad7 link TGF beta type I receptors to the microtubule system to promote cell migration2012In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 2109-2121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell migration occurs by activation of complex regulatory pathways that are spatially and temporally integrated in response to extracellular cues. Binding of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) to the microtubule plus ends in polarized cells is regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta). This event is crucial for establishment of cell polarity during directional migration. However, the role of APC for cellular extension in response to extracellular signals is less clear. Smad7 is a direct target gene for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and is known to inhibit various TGF beta-induced responses. Here we report a new function for Smad7. We show that Smad7 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase together regulate the expression of APC and cell migration in prostate cancer cells in response to TGF beta stimulation. In addition, Smad7 forms a complex with APC and acts as an adaptor protein for p38 and GSK-3 beta kinases to facilitate local TGF beta/p38-dependent inactivation of GSK-3 beta, accumulation of beta-catenin, and recruitment of APC to the microtubule plus end in the leading edge of migrating prostate cancer cells. Moreover, the Smad7-APC complex links the TGF beta type I receptor to the microtubule system to regulate directed cellular extension and migratory responses evoked by TGF beta.

  • 4.
    Fioretos, Thoas
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics, Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Office for Medical Services, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Lund, Science for Life Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wirta, Valtteri
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Genomics Uppsala, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Berglund, Eva
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Genomics Uppsala, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akhras, Michael
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Botling, Johan
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Genomics Uppsala, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics, Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Office for Medical Services, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Centre for Translational Microbiome Research, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fagerqvist, Therese
    Innovation Partnership Office, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gisselsson, David
    Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics, Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Office for Medical Services, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Office for Medical Services, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Genomics Uppsala, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Heidenblad, Markus
    Clinical Genomics Lund, Science for Life Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Höglund, Kina
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Bo
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lund University Collaboration Office, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Soller, Maria Johansson
    Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindstrand, Anna
    Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Lovmar, Lovisa
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lyander, Anna
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin, Malin
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Genomics Uppsala, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordgren, Ann
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics and Genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Pathology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Gothenburg, Science for Life Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sikora, Per
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Gothenburg, Science for Life Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Bioinformatics Data Center, Core Facilities, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenmark, Bianca
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Pathology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Division of Medical Genetics, Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Linköping, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Stranneheim, Henrik
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Clinical Genomics Stockholm, Science Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strid, Tobias
    Clinical Genomics Linköping, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Pathology, Biological and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Unit of Integrative Metabolomics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacogenomics, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wedell, Anna
    Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edsjö, Anders
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Office for Medical Services, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden; Division of Pathology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Genomic Medicine Center Karolinska, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Implementing precision medicine in a regionally organized healthcare system in Sweden2022In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 28, p. 1980-1982Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Pro-invasive properties of Snail1 are regulated by sumoylation in response to TGFβ stimulation in cancer2017In: Oncotarget, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 58, p. 97703-97726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is a key regulator of epithelial-tomesenchymal transition (EMT) during embryogenesis and in tumors. The effect of TGF beta, on EMT, is conveyed by induction of the pro-invasive transcription factor Snail1. In this study, we report that TGF beta stimulates Snail1 sumoylation in aggressive prostate, breast and lung cancer cells. Sumoylation of Snail1 lysine residue 234 confers its transcriptional activity, inducing the expression of classical EMT genes, as well as TGF beta receptor I (T beta RI) and the transcriptional repressor Hes1. Mutation of Snail1 lysine residue 234 to arginine (K234R) abolished sumoylation of Snail1, as well as its migratory and invasive properties in human prostate cancer cells. An increased immunohistochemical expression of Snail1, Sumo1, T beta RI, Hes1, and c-Jun was observed in aggressive prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their functional roles in tumorigenesis.

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  • 6.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Pro-invasive Snail1 targets TGFbeta receptor I to promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition in prostate cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Mu, Yabing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wallenius, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    TRAF6 stimulates the tumor-promoting effects of TGF beta type I receptor through polyubiquitination and activation of Presenilin 12014In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 7, no 307, article id ra2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) can be both a tumor promoter and suppressor, although the mechanisms behind the protumorigenic switch remain to be fully elucidated. The TGF beta type I receptor (T beta RI) is proteolytically cleaved in the ectodomain region. Cleavage requires the combined activities of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and TNF-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE). The cleavage event occurs selectively in cancer cells and generates an intracellular domain (ICD) of T beta RI, which enters the nucleus to mediate gene transcription. Presenilin 1 (PS1), a gamma-secretase catalytic core component, mediates intramembrane proteolysis of transmembrane receptors, such as Notch. We showed that TGF beta increased both the abundance and activity of PS1. TRAF6 recruited PS1 to the T beta RI complex and promoted lysine-63-linked polyubiquitination of PS1, which activated PS1. Furthermore, PS1 cleaved T beta RI in the transmembrane domain between valine-129 and isoleucine-130, and ICD generation was inhibited when these residues were mutated to alanine. We also showed that, after entering the nucleus, T beta RI-ICD bound to the promoter and increased the transcription of the gene encoding T beta RI. The TRAF6- and PS1-induced intramembrane proteolysis of T beta RI promoted TGF beta-induced invasion of various cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, when a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer was treated with the gamma-secretase inhibitor DBZ {(2S)-2-[2-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-acetylamino]-N-(5-methyl-6-oxo-6,7-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b, d]azepin-7-yl)-propionamide}, generation of T beta RI-ICD was prevented, transcription of the gene encoding the proinvasive transcription factor Snail1 was reduced, and tumor growth was inhibited. These results suggest that gamma-secretase inhibitors may be useful for treating aggressive prostate cancer.

  • 8.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wallenius, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the TGF beta type I receptor conveys oncogenic signals2014In: Future Oncology, ISSN 1479-6694, E-ISSN 1744-8301, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1853-1861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cells produce high levels of TGF beta, a multipotent cytokine. Binding of TGF beta to its cell surface receptors, the transmembrane serine/threonine kinases T beta RII and T beta RI, causes phosphorylation and activation of intracellular latent Smad transcription factors. Nuclear Smads act in concert with specific transcription factors to reprogram epithelial cells to become invasive mesenchymal cells. TGF beta also propagates non-canonical signals, so it is crucial to have a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms which favor this pathway. Here we highlight our recent discovery that TGF beta promotes the proteolytic cleavage of T beta RI in cancer cells, resulting in the liberation and nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain, acting as co-regulator to transcribe pro-invasive genes. This newly identified oncogenic TGF beta pathway resembles the Notch signaling pathway. We discuss our findings in relation to Notch and provide a short overview of other growth factors that transduce signals via nuclear translocation of their cell surface receptors.

  • 9. Hamidi, Anahita
    et al.
    Song, Jie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thakur, Noopur
    Itoh, Susumu
    Marcusson, Anders
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    TGF-β promotes PI3K-AKT signaling and prostate cancer cell migration through the TRAF6-mediated ubiquitylation of p85α2017In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 10, no 486, article id eaal4186Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    TGF-β signaling stimulates various intracellular pathways that can promote migration in tumor cells. These pathways are generally thought to be either dependent or independent of transcription factors called SMADs. One of the SMAD-independent pathways (PI3K-AKT) is mediated by a direct interaction between PI3K and the TGF-β type I receptor. However, Hamidi et al. found that the TGF-β–induced activation of PI3K depends on another ubiquitin ligase–mediated mechanism and a SMAD protein but is independent of the kinase function of TβRI. The binding of TGF-β to its receptor triggered the recruitment of PI3K and the ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, which polyubiquitylated the regulatory PI3K subunit p85α, thus enabling phosphorylation of the catalytic PI3K subunit p110, but only in the presence of SMAD7. The abundance of ubiquitylated p85α correlated with migration in cultured cells and prostate tumor grade in patient samples. TRAF6 mediates activation of the other “SMAD-independent” (JNK) pathway. These data suggest that, although distinct, the TGF-β signaling pathways are not as insulated from each other as was once thought.

  • 10. Hamidi, Anahita
    et al.
    von Bulow, Verena
    Hamidi, Rosita
    Winssinger, Nicolas
    Barluenga, Sofia
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Polyubiquitination of Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF beta)-associated Kinase 1 Mediates Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activation in Response to Different Inflammatory Stimuli2012In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 287, no 1, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) plays a central role in regulating inflammation in response to several external signals. The TGF beta-associated kinase 1 (TAK1) is an upstream regulator of NF-kappa B signaling. In TGF beta-stimulated cells, TAK1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination at Lys-34 by TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and is thereby activated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TAK1 polyubiquitination at Lys-34 is also essential for NF-kappa B activation via TNF receptor, IL-1 receptor and toll-like receptor 4. We observed that TAK1 polyubiquitination occurred at Lys-34 and required the E3 ubiquitin ligase TNF receptor-associated factor 6 after stimulation of cells with IL-1 beta. Polyubiquitination of TAK1 also occurred at Lys-34 in cells stimulated by TNF-alpha and LPS, which activates TLR4, as well as in HepG2 and prostate cancer cells stimulated with TGF beta, which in all cases resulted in NF-kappa B activation. Expression of a K34R-mutant TAK1 led to a reduced NF-kappa B activation, IL-6 promoter activity, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion by TNF-alpha-stimulated PC-3U cells. Similar results were obtained in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 after LPS treatment. In conclusion, polyubiquitination of TAK1 is correlated with activation of TAK1 and is essential for activation of NF-kappa B signaling downstream of several receptors.

  • 11. Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    et al.
    Landström, Maréne
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Mechanism of TGF-beta signaling to growth arrest, apoptosis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition2009In: Current Opinion in Cell Biology, ISSN 0955-0674, E-ISSN 1879-0410, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 166-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family have important roles during embryogenesis, as well as in the control of tissue homeostasis in the adult. They exert their cellular effects via binding to serine/threonine kinase receptors. Members of the Smad family of transcription factors are important intracellular messengers, and recent studies have shown that the ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 mediates other specific signals. TGF-beta signaling is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications, which regulate the activity, stability, and subcellular localization of the signaling components. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the recent findings on the mechanism of TGF-beta signaling to growth arrest, apoptosis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  • 12. Hollandsworth, Hannah M.
    et al.
    Schmitt, Verena
    Amirfakhri, Siamak
    Filemoni, Filemoni
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lyndin, Mykola
    Backert, Steffen
    Gerhard, Markus
    Wennemuth, Gunther
    Hoffman, Robert M.
    Singer, Bernhard B.
    Bouvet, Michael
    Fluorophore-conjugated Helicobacter pylori recombinant membrane protein (HopQ) labels primary colon cancer and metastases in orthotopic mouse models by binding CEA-related cell adhesion molecules2020In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 13, no 12, article id 100857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HopQ is an outer-membrane protein of Helicobacter pylori that binds to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell-adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) with high specificity. We aimed to investigate fluorescence targeting of CEACAM-expressing colorectal tumors in patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) models with fluorescently labeled recombinant HopQ (rHopQ). Western blotting, flow cytometry and ELISA were performed to determine the efficiency of rHopQ binding to CEACAMs. rHopQ was conjugated to IR800DyeCW (rHopQ-IR800). Nude mice received orthotopic implantation of colon cancer tumors. Three weeks later, mice were administered 25 μg or 50 μg HopQ-IR800 and imaged 24 or 48 h later. Intravital images were analyzed for tumor-to-background ratio (TBR). Flow cytometry and ELISA demonstrated binding of HopQ to CEACAM1, 3 and 5. Dose-response intravital imaging in PDOX models demonstrated optimal results 48 h after administration of 50 μg rHopQ-IR800 (TBR = 3.576) in our protocol. Orthotopic models demonstrated clear tumor margins of primary tumors and small regional metastases with a mean TBR = 3.678 (SD ± 1.027). rHopQ showed specific binding to various CEACAMs in PDOX models. rHopQ may be useful for CEACAM-positive tumor and metastasis detection for pre-surgical diagnosis, intra-operative imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery.

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  • 13.
    Holst, Mikkel Roland
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Vidal-Quadras, Maite
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Larsson, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Song, Jie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hubert, Madlen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundmark, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis Suppresses Cancer Cell Blebbing and Invasion2017In: Cell Reports, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1893-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular blebbing, caused by local alterations in cellsurface tension, has been shown to increase the invasiveness of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms balancing cell-surface dynamics and bleb formation remain elusive. Here, we show that an acute reduction in cell volume activates clathrinindependent endocytosis. Hence, a decrease in surface tension is buffered by the internalization of the plasma membrane (PM) lipid bilayer. Membrane invagination and endocytosis are driven by the tension- mediated recruitment of the membrane sculpting and GTPase-activating protein GRAF1 (GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1) to the PM. Disruption of this regulation by depleting cells of GRAF1 or mutating key phosphatidylinositol- interacting amino acids in the protein results in increased cellular blebbing and promotes the 3D motility of cancer cells. Our data support a role for clathrin-independent endocytic machinery in balancing membrane tension, which clarifies the previously reported role of GRAF1 as a tumor suppressor.

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  • 14.
    Hui, Zhixuan
    et al.
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    Wang, Bo
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    Liu, Zhengyan
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    Wei, Jinhui
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    Gan, Jiaxing
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Mu, Yabing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Disease, School and Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang City, China.
    TGFβ-induced EN1 promotes tumor budding of adenoid cystic carcinoma in patient-derived organoid model2024In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 154, no 10, p. 1814-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and basal cell adenoma (BCA) share many histological characteristics and often need a differential diagnosis in clinical pathology. Recently, we found homeobox protein engrailed-1 (EN1) was a potential diagnostic marker for ACC in an organoids library of salivary gland tumors (SGTs). Here we aim to confirm EN1 as a differential diagnostic marker for ACC, and further investigate the regulatory mechanism and biological function of EN1 in tumor progression. The transcriptional analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry staining were performed and revealed that EN1 was specifically and highly expressed in ACC, and accurately differentiated ACC from BCA. Furthermore, TGFβ signaling pathway was found associated with ACC, and the regulation of EN1 through TGFβ was detected in the human ACC cell lines and patient-derived organoids (PDOs). TGFβ-induced EN1 was important in promoting tumor budding in the PDOs model. Interestingly, a high level of EN1 and TGFβ1 in the budding tips was observed in ACC clinical samples, and the expression of EN1 and TGFβ1 in ACC was significantly associated with the clinical stage. In summary, our study verified EN1 is a good diagnostic marker to differentiate ACC from BCA. TGFβ-induced EN1 facilitates the tumor budding of ACC, which might be an important mechanism related to the malignant phenotype of ACC.

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  • 15.
    Karlsson, Terese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Osteoblast-derived factors promote metastatic potential in human prostate cancer cells, in part via non-canonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling2018In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 446-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) functions as a double-edged sword in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. In initial stages of the disease, TGFβ acts as a growth inhibitor upon tumor cells, whereas it in later stages of disease rather promotes invasion and metastatic potential. One well-known cellular source of TGFβ in the bone metastatic site is the bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we have studied the effects by osteoblast-derived factors on metastatic potential in several human prostate cancer cell lines.

    Methods: Effects on metastatic potential in prostate cancer cells by osteoblast-derived factors were studied in vitro using several methods, including Transwell migration and evaluation of formation of pro-migratory protrusions. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate possible changes in differentiation state in tumor cells by analysis of markers for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The Matrigel-on-top 3D culture method was used for further assessment of metastatic characteristics in tumor cells by analysis of formation of filopodium-like protrusions (FLPs).

    Results: Osteoblast-derived factors increased migration of PC-3U cells, an effect less prominent in cells overexpressing a mutated type I TGFβ receptor (TβRI) preventing non-canonical TRAF6-dependent TGFβ signaling. Osteoblast-derived factors also increased the formation of long protrusions and loss of cell-cell contacts in PC-3U cells, suggesting induction of a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, treatment with TGFβ or osteoblast-derived factors of PC-3U cells in Matrigel-on-top 3D cultures promoted formation of FLPs, previously shown to be essential for metastatic establishment.

    Conclusions: These findings suggests that factors secreted from osteoblasts, including TGFβ, can induce several cellular traits involved in metastatic potential of PC-3U cells, further strengthening the role for bone cells to promote metastatic tumor cell behavior.

  • 16.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Att upptäcka och bedöma cancer2013In: Cancerforskning på nya vägar: en bok från Forskningens dag 2013, Medicinska fakulteten vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Mattias Grundström Mitz och Lena Åminne, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2013, 1, p. 23-35Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The role of transforming growth factor beta signalling pathways in tumour biology2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S4-S4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The TAK1-TRAF6 signalling pathway2010In: International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 1357-2725, E-ISSN 1878-5875, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 585-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular responses to pathogens, growth factors, cytokines, extra- or intra-cellular stress, is a prerequisite for the cell to adapt to novel and potentially dangerous situations. If the changes in the extra- or intra-cellular milieu causes DNA-damage or revoke a signalling pathway utilized during morphogenesis, the epithelial cells might be forced to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) in the benefit for the whole organism or transform to a mesenchymal cell type (epithelial to mesenchymal transition; EMT), in respond to a specific stimuli. An overview is presented over the current knowledge for the key components in signal transduction in homeostasis, inflammation and cancer. A handful of transcription factors are crucial for the determination of the specific cellular responses, where the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is an important factor as discussed in this review.

  • 19.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Meet our editorial board member: Marene Landström2015In: Current Cancer Drug Targets, ISSN 1568-0096, E-ISSN 1873-5576, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 751-751Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Landström, Maréne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Liu, Jun
    The 2019 FASEB Science Research Conference on the TGF-β Superfamily: Signaling in Development and Disease, July 28 to August 2, 2019, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA2019In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 13064-13067Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 21.
    Landström, Maréne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TRAF62012In: Encyclopedia of Signaling Molecules / [ed] Sangdun Choi, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 1916-1921Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Aripaka, Karthik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression and association of HIF-3α with hypoxic and TGF-β signalling components in renal cell carcinomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Aripaka, Karthik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Interactions between TGF-β type I receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha mediates a synergistic crosstalk leading to poor prognosis for patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma2019In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 18, no 17, p. 2141-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the significance of expression of HIF-1 alpha, HIF-2 alpha, and SNAIL1 proteins; and TGF-beta signaling pathway proteins in ccRCC, their relation with clinicopathological parameters and patient's survival were examined. We also investigated potential crosstalk between HIF-alpha and TGF-beta signaling pathway, including the TGF-beta type 1 receptor (ALK5-FL) and the intracellular domain of ALK5 (ALK5-ICD). Tissue samples from 154 ccRCC patients and comparable adjacent kidney cortex samples from 38 patients were analyzed for HIF-1 alpha/2 alpha, TGF-beta signaling components, and SNAIL1 proteins by immunoblot. Protein expression of HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha were significantly higher, while SNAIL1 had similar expression levels in ccRCC compared with the kidney cortex. HIF-2 alpha associated with poor cancer-specific survival, while HIF-1 alpha and SNAIL1 did not associate with survival. Moreover, HIF-2 alpha positively correlated with ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, and PAI-1; HIF-1 alpha positively correlated with pSMAD2/3; SNAIL1 positively correlated with ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, PAI-1, and HIF-2 alpha. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments performed under normoxic conditions revealed that ALK5 interacts with HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha, and promotes their expression and the expression of their target genes GLUT1 and CA9, in a VHL dependent manner. We found that ALK5 induces expression of HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha, through its kinase activity. Under hypoxic conditions, HIF-alpha proteins correlated with the activated TGF-beta signaling pathway. In conclusion, we reveal that ALK5 plays a pivotal role in synergistic crosstalk between TGF-beta signaling and hypoxia pathway, and that the interaction between ALK5 and HIF-alpha contributes to tumor progression.

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  • 24.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    VHL status regulates transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways in renal cell carcinoma2018In: Oncotarget, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 23, p. 16297-16310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate the role of pVHL in the regulation of TGF-β signaling pathways in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) as well as in non-ccRCC; the expression of pVHL, and the TGF-β pathway components and their association with clinicopathological parameters and patient’s survival were explored. Tissue samples from 143 ccRCC and 58 non-ccRCC patients were examined by immunoblot. ccRCC cell lines were utilized for mechanistic in-vitro studies. Expression levels of pVHL were significantly lower in ccRCC compared with non-ccRCC. Non-ccRCC and ccRCC pVHL-High expressed similar levels of pVHL. Expression of the TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5) and intra-cellular domain were significantly higher in ccRCC compared with non-ccRCC. In non-ccRCC, expressions of ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, and PAI-1 had no association with clinicopathological parameters and survival. In ccRCC pVHL-Low, ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, and PAI-1 were significantly related with tumor stage, size, and survival. In ccRCC pVHL-High, the expression of PAI-1 was associated with stage and survival. In-vitro studies revealed that pVHL interacted with ALK5 to downregulate its expression through K48-linked poly-ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus negatively controlling TGF-β induced cancer cell invasiveness. The pVHL status controls the ALK5 and can thereby regulate the TGF-β pathway, aggressiveness of tumors, and survival of the ccRCC and non-ccRCC patients.

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  • 25.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zhou, Yang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The Synergistic Cooperation between TGF-Cancer and Fibrosis2022In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 12, no 5, article id 635Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine regulating homeostasis and immune responses in adult animals and humans. Aberrant and overactive TGF-β signaling promotes cancer initiation and fibrosis through epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as the invasion and metastatic growth of cancer cells. TGF-β is a key factor that is active during hypoxic conditions in cancer and is thereby capable of contributing to angiogenesis in various types of cancer. Another potent role of TGF-β is suppressing immune responses in cancer patients. The strong tumor-promoting effects of TGF-β and its profibrotic effects make it a focus for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against cancer and fibrosis as well as an attractive drug target in combination with immune regulatory checkpoint inhibitors. TGF-β belongs to a family of cytokines that exert their function through signaling via serine/threonine kinase transmembrane receptors to intracellular Smad proteins via the canonical pathway and in combination with co-regulators such as the adaptor protein and E3 ubiquitin ligases TRAF4 and TRAF6 to promote non-canonical pathways. Finally, the outcome of gene transcription initiated by TGF-β is context-dependent and controlled by signals exerted by other growth factors such as EGF and Wnt. Here, we discuss the synergistic cooperation between TGF-β and hypoxia in development, fibrosis and cancer.

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  • 26.
    Mu, Yabing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Non-Smad signaling pathways2012In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 347, no 1, p. 11-20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) is a key regulator of cell fate during embryogenesis and has also emerged as a potent driver of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition during tumor progression. TGF beta signals are transduced by transmembrane type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors (T beta RI and T beta RII, respectively). The activated T beta R complex phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3, converting them into transcriptional regulators that complex with Smad4. TGF beta also uses non-Smad signaling pathways such as the p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways to convey its signals. Ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and TGF beta-associated kinase 1 (TAK1) have recently been shown to be crucial for the activation of the p38 and JNK MAPK pathways. Other TGF beta-induced non-Smad signaling pathways include the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt-mTOR pathway, the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, and the Ras-Erk-MAPK pathway. Signals induced by TGF beta are tightly regulated and specified by post-translational modifications of the signaling components, since they dictate the subcellular localization, activity, and duration of the signal. In this review, we discuss recent findings in the field of TGF beta-induced responses by non-Smad signaling pathways.

  • 27.
    Mu, Yabing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Song, Jie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gao, Linlin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gahman, Timothy
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TGFβ-induced activation of PKCζ confers invasive prostate cancer growthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the hallmarks for aggressivecancer is the capability oftumor cells to become invasive and metastatic. Cancer cells and tumor stromal cells oftenproduce high levels of transforming growth factor b(TGFb) which initiates intracellular signaling pathways in cancer cells in a contextualdependentmanner. Atypical protein kinase C z(PKCz) is a multifunctional protein which maintains cell polarity of normal epithelial cells, while itsaberrantexpression and activation is linked to tumor progression. Tumor necrosisfactor receptor-associated factor6 (TRAF6) is amplified in lung cancer and caninitiate intracellular oncogenic signals. In prostate cancer cellsTRAF6 promotesligand-induced proteolytic cleavage of TGFbtype I receptor(TbRI), and nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain (ICD) to confer invasion of cancer cells. Here we report our novel findingsthat PKCzharboursa TRAF6 consensus binding site and that TRAF6 causes Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of PKCz. TGFb-induced phosphorylationof PKCzis dependent on TRAF6in prostate cancer cells and we have investigated the potential usefulness of twodifferent inhibitors of PKCzas potential novel anti-cancer drugs.

  • 28.
    Mu, Yabing
    et al.
    Rudbeck Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Thakur, Noopur
    Rudbeck Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekman, Maria
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. Rudbeck Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yakymovych, Mariya
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Annika
    Rudbeck Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dimitriou, Helen
    Rudbeck Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria Teresa
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Johan
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    TRAF6 ubiquitinates TGF beta type I receptor to promote its cleavage and nuclear translocation in cancer2011In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 2, no 330, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is a pluripotent cytokine promoting epithelial cell plasticity during morphogenesis and tumour progression. TGF beta binding to type II and type I serine/threonine kinase receptors (T beta RII and T beta RI) causes activation of different intracellular signaling pathways. T beta RI is associated with the ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Here we show that TGF beta, via TRAF6, causes Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of T beta RI, promoting cleavage of T beta RI by TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE), in a PKC zeta-dependent manner. The liberated intracellular domain (ICD) of T beta RI associates with the transcriptional regulator p300 to activate genes involved in tumour cell invasiveness, such as Snail and MMP2. Moreover, TGF beta-induced invasion of cancer cells is TACE- and PKC zeta-dependent and the T beta RI ICD is localized in the nuclei of different kinds of tumour cells in tissue sections. Thus, our data reveal a specific role for T beta RI in TGF beta mediated tumour invasion.

  • 29.
    Mu, Yabing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Engstrom, U.
    Busch, C.
    Landstrom, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TGF beta-induced phosphorylation of Par6 promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells2015In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 112, no 7, p. 1223-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The Par complex - comprising partition-defective 6 (Par6), Par3, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) - is crucial for cell polarisation, the loss of which contributes to cancer progression. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta)-induced phosphorylation of Par6 on the conserved serine 345 is implicated in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer. Here we investigated the importance of phosphorylated Par6 in prostate cancer.

    Methods:

    We generated a p-Par6(345)-specific antibody and verified its specificity in vitro. Endogenous p-Par6(345) was analysed by immunoblotting in normal human prostate RWPE1 and prostate cancer (PC-3U) cells. Subcellular localisation of p-Par6(345) in migrating TGF beta-treated PC-3U cells was analysed by confocal imaging. Invasion assays of TGF beta-treated PC-3U cells were performed. p-Par6 expression was immunohistochemically analysed in prostate cancer tissues.

    Results:

    TGF beta induced Par6 phosphorylation on Ser345 and its recruitment to the leading edge of the membrane ruffle in migrating PC-3U cells, where it colocalised with aPKC zeta. The p-Par6-aPKC zeta complex is important for cell migration and invasion, as interference with this complex prevented prostate cancer cell invasion. High levels of activated Par6 correlated with aggressive prostate cancer.

    Conclusions: Increased p-Par6Ser(345) levels in aggressive prostate cancer tissues and cells suggest that it could be a useful novel biomarker for predicting prostate cancer progression.

  • 30.
    Rakhimova, Olena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kelk, Peyman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Romani Vestman, Nelly
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Department of Endodontics, County Council of Västerbotten, Umeå, Sweden.
    Cytokine Secretion, Viability, and Real-Time Proliferation of Apical-Papilla Stem Cells Upon Exposure to Oral Bacteria2020In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 10, article id 620801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) has been proposed as a means of promoting root maturation in permanent immature teeth, and plays a significant role in regenerative dental procedures. However, the role of SCAPs may be compromised by microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxic conditions and the presence of bacteria from infected dental root canals. We aim to investigate oral bacterial modulation of SCAP in terms of binding capacity using flow cytometry and imaging, real-time cell proliferation monitoring, and cytokine secretion (IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β isoforms) under anaerobic conditions. SCAPs were exposed to key species in dental root canal infection, namely Actinomyces gerensceriae, Slackia exigua, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Enterococcus faecalis, as well as two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus gasseri strain B6 and Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938). We found that A. gerensceriae, S. exigua, F. nucleatum, and E. faecalis, but not the Lactobacillus probiotic strains bind to SCAPs on anaerobic conditions. Enterococcus faecalis and F. nucleatum exhibited the strongest binding capacity, resulting in significantly reduced SCAP proliferation. Notably, F. nucleatum, but not E. faecalis, induce production of the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 and IL-10 from SCAPs. Production of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 by SCAPs was dependent on species, cell line, and time, but secretion of TGF-β3 did not vary significantly over time. In conclusion, SCAP response is compromised when exposed to bacterial stimuli from infected dental root canals in anaerobic conditions. Thus, stem cell-mediated endodontic regenerative studies need to include microenvironmental conditions, such as the presence of microorganisms to promote further advantage in the field.

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  • 31. Song, Jie
    et al.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    TGFβ activates PI3K-AKT signaling via TRAF62017In: Oncotarget, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 59, p. 99205-99206Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 32.
    Song, Jie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Chunyan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TGFb type I receptor and endosomal APPL regulate AURKB during mitosis and cytokinesisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cytokine transforming growth factor b(TGFb) suppressescell proliferationand promotesapoptosis1. It signalsvia specific serine/threonine kinase receptors, i.e.TGFbtype I (TbRI) and type II (TbRII) receptors2,3,causing growth arrest of normal epithelial cells. However, TGFbis often overexpressed inadvanced cancers,and promotes proliferation of tumour cells and their invasion. The intracellular domain (ICD) of TbRI is cleaved offin cancer cells,and is translocated to the nucleus in an APPL1/2-dependent manner, drivingan invasiveness program4.The specific mechanism(s) whereby cancer cells escape pro-apoptotic signals induced by TGFbremainspoorly understood. Here, we report that TbRI and APPL1/2 proteins orchestrate this escape via the pro-survival protein survivin and Aurora kinase B (AURKB), a key regulatorof mitosis and chromosomal stability5. We show that TbRI and APPL1/2 control expression of AURKB and that TbRI-ICDand AURKB form a complex during the telophase in PC-3Uprostate cancerand KELLY neuroblastomacells. APPL1/2 and TbRI also form a complex with survivin, a pro-survival protein. The identified TbRI–AURKB-survivinpathwayrepresents a novel function for TbRI to promote survival and cell division of cancer cells.

  • 33.
    Song, Jie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Mu, Yabing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Chunyan
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Miaczynska, Marta
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    APPL proteins promote TGF beta-induced nuclear transport of the TGF beta type I receptor intracellular domain2016In: Oncotarget, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 279-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) is produced by several types of cancers, including prostate cancer, and promote tumour progression in autocrine and paracrine manners. In response to ligand binding, the TGF beta type I receptor (T beta RI) activates Smad and non-Smad signalling pathways. The ubiquitin-ligase tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) was recently linked to regulate intramembrane proteolytic cleavage of the T beta RI in cancer cells. Subsequently, the intracellular domain (ICD) of T beta RI enters in an unknown manner into the nucleus, where it promotes the transcription of pro-invasive genes, such as MMP2 and MMP9. Here we show that the endocytic adaptor molecules APPL1 and APPL2 are required for TGF beta-induced nuclear translocation of T beta RI-ICD and for cancer cell invasiveness of human prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, APPL proteins were found to be expressed at high levels in aggressive prostate cancer tissues, and to be associated with T beta RI in a TRAF6-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the APPL-T beta RI complex promotes prostate tumour progression, and may serve as a prognostic marker.

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  • 34.
    Song, Jie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zhou, Yang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Yakymovych, Ihor
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Chunyan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The ubiquitin-ligase TRAF6 and TGFβ type I receptor form a complex with Aurora kinase B contributing to mitotic progression and cytokinesis in cancer cells2022In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 82, article id 104155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is overexpressed in several advanced cancer types and promotes tumor progression. We have reported that the intracellular domain (ICD) of TGFβ receptor (TβR) I is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes in cancer cells, and then translocated to the nucleus in a manner dependent on the endosomal adaptor proteins APPL1/2, driving an invasiveness program. How cancer cells evade TGFβ-induced growth inhibition is unclear.

    Methods: We performed microarray analysis to search for genes regulated by APPL1/2 proteins in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. We investigated the role of TβRI and TRAF6 in mitosis in cancer cell lines cultured in 10% FBS in the absence of exogenous TGFβ. The molecular mechanism of the ubiquitination of AURKB by TRAF6 in mitosis and the formation of AURKB–TβRI complex in cancer cell lines and tissue microarrays was also studied.

    Findings: During mitosis and cytokinesis, AURKB–TβRI complexes formed in midbodies in CRPC and KELLY neuroblastoma cells. TRAF6 induced polyubiquitination of AURKB on K85 and K87, protruding on the surface of AURKB to facilitate its activation. AURKB–TβRI complexes in patient's tumor tissue sections correlated with the malignancy of prostate cancer.

    Interpretation: The AURKB–TβRI complex may become a prognostic biomarker for patients with risk of developing aggressive PC.

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  • 35.
    Sorrentino, Alessandro
    et al.
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thakur, Noopur
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Grimsby, Susanne
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Anders
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    von Bulow, Verena
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Schuster, Norbert
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zhang, Shouting
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    1.Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The type I TGF-beta receptor engages TRAF6 to activate TAK1 in a receptor kinase-independent manner2008In: Nature Cell Biology, ISSN 1465-7392, E-ISSN 1476-4679, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 1199-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates embryonic development and tissue homeostasis; however, aberrations of its activity occur in cancer. TGF-beta signals through its Type II and Type I receptors (TbetaRII and TbetaRI) causing phosphorylation of Smad proteins. TGF-beta-associated kinase 1 (TAK1), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) family, was originally identified as an effector of TGF-beta-induced p38 activation. However, the molecular mechanisms for its activation are unknown. Here we report that the ubiquitin ligase (E3) TRAF6 interacts with a consensus motif present in TbetaRI. The TbetaRI-TRAF6 interaction is required for TGF-beta-induced autoubiquitylation of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the TAK1-p38/JNK pathway, which leads to apoptosis. TbetaRI kinase activity is required for activation of the canonical Smad pathway, whereas E3 activity of TRAF6 regulates the activation of TAK1 in a receptor kinase-independent manner. Intriguingly, TGF-beta-induced TRAF6-mediated Lys 63-linked polyubiquitylation of TAK1 Lys 34 correlates with TAK1 activation. Our data show that TGF-beta specifically activates TAK1 through interaction of TbetaRI with TRAF6, whereas activation of Smad2 is not dependent on TRAF6.

  • 36.
    Sundar, Reshma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala University.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Identification of Lys178 as the acceptor lysine of TGF-beta type I receptor poly-ubiquitination.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Sundar, Reshma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TRAF6 promotes TGF beta-induced invasion and cell-cycle regulation via Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of Lys178 in TGF beta type I receptor2015In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 554-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor (TGF) can act either as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor in a context-dependent manner. High levels of TGF are found in prostate cancer tissues and correlate with poor patient prognosis. We recently identified a novel TGF-regulated signaling cascade in which TGF type I receptor (TRI) is activated by the E3 ligase TNF-receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) via the Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of TRI. TRAF6 also contributes to activation of TNF--converting enzyme and presenilin-1, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of TRI and releasing the intracellular domain of TRI, which is translocated to the nucleus to promote tumor invasiveness. In this report, we provide evidence that Lys178 of TRI is polyubiquitinated by TRAF6. Moreover, our data suggest that TRAF6-mediated Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the TRI intracellular domain is a prerequisite for TGF regulation of mRNA for cyclin D1 (CCND1), expression, as well as for the regulation of other genes controlling the cell cycle, differentiation, and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells.

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  • 38.
    Thakur, Noopur
    et al.
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala university.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Marcusson, Anders
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala university.
    Fu, Jing Ji
    Uppsala University.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    TGFβ engages TRAF6 and p38 to regulate c-Jun activity and invasion of prostate cancer cells.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Thakur, Noopur
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Ludwig Inst Canc Res, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Marcusson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Ludwig Inst Canc Res, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fu, Jing Yi
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Rudbeck Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Ludwig Inst Canc Res, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.<