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  • 1. Ahlfors, Reetta
    et al.
    Lång, Saara
    Overmyer, Kirk
    Jaspers, Pinja
    Brosché, Mikael
    Tauriainen, Airi
    Kollist, Hannes
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Belles-Boix, Enric
    Piippo, Mirva
    Inzé, Dirk
    Palva, E Tapio
    Kangasjärvi, Jaakko
    Arabidopsis RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 belongs to the WWE protein-protein interaction domain protein family and modulates abscisic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate responses.2004Inngår i: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, Vol. 16, nr 7, s. 1925-37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments with several Arabidopsis thaliana mutants have revealed a web of interactions between hormonal signaling. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis mutant radical-induced cell death1 (rcd1), although hypersensitive to apoplastic superoxide and ozone, is more resistant to chloroplastic superoxide formation, exhibits reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate, and has altered expression of several hormonally regulated genes. Furthermore, rcd1 has higher stomatal conductance than the wild type. The rcd1-1 mutation was mapped to the gene At1g32230 where it disrupts an intron splice site resulting in a truncated protein. RCD1 belongs to the (ADP-ribosyl)transferase domain–containing subfamily of the WWE protein–protein interaction domain protein family. The results suggest that RCD1 could act as an integrative node in hormonal signaling and in the regulation of several stress-responsive genes.

  • 2.
    Bollhoner, Benjamin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Prestele, Jakob
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Xylem cell death: emerging understanding of regulation and function2012Inngår i: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 63, nr 3, s. 1081-1094Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary, as well as genetic, evidence suggests that vascular development evolved originally as a cell death programme that allowed enhanced movement of water in the extinct protracheophytes, and that secondary wall formation in the water-conducting cells evolved afterwards, providing mechanical support for effective long-distance transport of water. The extant vascular plants possess a common regulatory network to coordinate the different phases of xylem maturation, including secondary wall formation, cell death, and finally autolysis of the cell contents, by the action of recently identified NAC domain transcription factors. Consequently, xylem cell death is an inseparable part of the xylem maturation programme, making it difficult to uncouple cell death mechanistically from secondary wall formation, and thus identify the key factors specifically involved in regulation of cell death. Current knowledge suggests that the necessary components for xylem cell death are produced early during xylem differentiation, and cell death is prevented through the action of inhibitors and storage of hydrolytic enzymes in inactive forms in compartments such as the vacuole. Bursting of the central vacuole triggers autolytic hydrolysis of the cell contents, which ultimately leads to cell death. This cascade of events varies between the different xylem cell types. The water-transporting tracheary elements rely on a rapid cell death programme, with hydrolysis of cell contents taking place for the most part, if not entirely, after vacuolar bursting, while the xylem fibres disintegrate cellular contents at a slower pace, well before cell death. This review includes a detailed description of cell morphology, function of plant growth regulators, such as ethylene and thermospermine, and the action of hydrolytic nucleases and proteases during cell death of the different xylem cell types.

  • 3.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bygdell, Joakim
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Stael, Simon
    Adriasola, Mathilda
    Muñiz, Luis
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Van Breusegem, Frank
    Ezcurra, Inés
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The function of two type II metacaspases in woody tissues of Populus trees2018Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 217, nr 4, s. 1551-1565Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Metacaspases (MCs) are cysteine proteases that are implicated in programmed cell death of plants. AtMC9 (Arabidopsis thaliana Metacaspase9) is a member of the Arabidopsis MC family that controls the rapid autolysis of the xylem vessel elements, but its downstream targets in xylem remain uncharacterized. PttMC13 and PttMC14 were identified as AtMC9 homologs in hybrid aspen (Populustremulaxtremuloides). A proteomic analysis was conducted in xylem tissues of transgenic hybrid aspen trees which carried either an overexpression or an RNA interference construct for PttMC13 and PttMC14. The proteomic analysis revealed modulation of levels of both previously known targets of metacaspases, such as Tudor staphylococcal nuclease, heat shock proteins and 14-3-3 proteins, as well as novel proteins, such as homologs of the PUTATIVE ASPARTIC PROTEASE3 (PASPA3) and the cysteine protease RD21 by PttMC13 and PttMC14. We identified here the pathways and processes that are modulated by PttMC13 and PttMC14 in xylem tissues. In particular, the results indicate involvement of PttMC13 and/or PttMC14 in downstream proteolytic processes and cell death of xylem elements. This work provides a valuable reference dataset on xylem-specific metacaspase functions for future functional and biochemical analyses.

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  • 4.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Voss, Ute
    Prestele, Jakob
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Wilson, Michael
    Kenobi, Kim
    Viotti, Corrado
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    André, Domenique
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Lers, Amnon
    Bennett, Malcolm
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Programmed cell death in overlying tissues facilitates lateral root emergenceManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 5.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Stael, Simon
    Denancé, Nicolas
    Overmyer, Kirk
    Goffner, Deborah
    Van Breusegem, Frank
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Post mortem function of AtMC9 in xylem vessel elements2013Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 200, nr 2, s. 498-510Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell death of xylem elements is manifested by rupture of the tonoplast and subsequent autolysis of the cellular contents. Metacaspases have been implicated in various forms of plant cell death but regulation and execution of xylem cell death by metacaspases remains unknown. Analysis of the type II metacaspase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana supported the function of METACASPASE 9 (AtMC9) in xylem cell death. Progression of xylem cell death was analysed in protoxylem vessel elements of 3-d-old atmc9 mutant roots using reporter gene analysis and electron microscopy. Protoxylem cell death was normally initiated in atmc9 mutant lines, but detailed electron microscopic analyses revealed a role for AtMC9 in clearance of the cell contents post mortem, that is after tonoplast rupture. Subcellular localization of fluorescent AtMC9 reporter fusions supported a post mortem role for AtMC9. Further, probe-based activity profiling suggested a function of AtMC9 on activities of papain-like cysteine proteases. Our data demonstrate that the function of AtMC9 in xylem cell death is to degrade vessel cell contents after vacuolar rupture. We further provide evidence on a proteolytic cascade in post mortem autolysis of xylem vessel elements and suggest that AtMC9 is part of this cascade.

  • 6.
    Courtois-Moreau, Charleen L
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Muñiz, Luis
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kaneda, Minako
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Samuels, Lacey
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    A unique program for cell death in xylem fibers of Populus stem2009Inngår i: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 58, nr 2, s. 260-274Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Maturation of the xylem elements involves extensive deposition of secondary cell-wall material and autolytic processes resulting in cell death. We describe here a unique type of cell-death program in xylem fibers of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) stems, including gradual degradative processes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm concurrently with the phase of active cell-wall deposition. Nuclear DNA integrity, as determined by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) and Comet (single-cell gel electrophoresis) assays, was compromised early during fiber maturation. In addition, degradation of the cytoplasmic contents, as detected by electron microscopy of samples fixed by high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF-FS), was gradual and resulted in complete loss of the cytoplasmic contents well before the loss of vacuolar integrity, which is considered to be the moment of death. This type of cell death differs significantly from that seen in xylem vessels. The loss of vacuolar integrity, which is thought to initiate cell degradative processes in the xylem vessels, is one of the last processes to occur before the final autolysis of the remaining cell contents in xylem fibers. High-resolution microarray analysis in the vascular tissues of Populus stem, combined with in silico analysis of publicly available data repositories, suggests the involvement of several previously uncharacterized transcription factors, ethylene, sphingolipids and light signaling as well as autophagy in the control of fiber cell death.

  • 7.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    André, Domenique
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sztojka, Bernadette
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hall, Hardy
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Berthet, Béatrice
    Voss, Ute
    Lers, Amnon
    Maizel, Alexis
    Andersson, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysik.
    Bennett, Malcolm
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Cell Death in Cells Overlying Lateral Root Primordia Facilitates Organ Growth in Arabidopsis2020Inngår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 455-464Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant organ growth is widely accepted to be determined by cell division and cell expansion, but, unlike that in animals, the contribution of cell elimination has rarely been recognized. We investigated this paradigm during Arabidopsis lateral root formation, when the lateral root primordia (LRP) must traverse three overlying cell layers within the parent root. A subset of LRP-overlying cells displayed the induction of marker genes for cell types undergoing developmental cell death, and their cell death was detected by electron, confocal, and light sheet microscopy techniques. LRP growth was delayed in cell-deathdeficient mutants lacking the positive cell death regulator ORESARA1/ANAC092 (ORE1). LRP growth was restored in ore1-2 knockout plants by genetically inducing cell elimination in cells overlying the LRP or by physically killing LRP-overlying cells by ablation with optical tweezers. Our results support that, in addition to previously discovered mechanisms, cell elimination contributes to regulating lateral root emergence.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    André, Domenique
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå S-901 83, Sweden.
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    METACASPASE9 modulates autophagy to confine cell death tothe target cells during Arabidopsis vascular xylem differentiation2016Inngår i: Biology Open, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 5, nr 2, s. 122-129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We uncovered that the level of autophagy in plant cells undergoingprogrammed cell death determines the fate of the surrounding cells.Our approach consisted of using Arabidopsis thaliana cell culturescapable of differentiating into two different cell types: vasculartracheary elements (TEs) that undergo programmed cell death(PCD) and protoplast autolysis, and parenchymatic non-TEs thatremain alive. The TE cell type displayed higher levels of autophagywhen expression of the TE-specific METACASPASE9 (MC9) wasreduced using RNAi (MC9-RNAi). Misregulation of autophagy in theMC9-RNAi TEs coincided with ectopic death of the non-TEs, implyingthe existence of an autophagy-dependent intercellular signallingfrom within the TEs towards the non-TEs. Viability of the non-TEswas restored when AUTOPHAGY2 (ATG2) was downregulatedspecifically in MC9-RNAi TEs, demonstrating the importance ofautophagy in the spatial confinement of cell death. Our resultssuggest that other eukaryotic cells undergoing PCD might also needto tightly regulate their level of autophagy to avoid detrimentalconsequences for the surrounding cells.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Quick histochemical staining methods to detect cell death in xylem elements of plant tissues2017Inngår i: Xylem: methods and protocols / [ed] Miguel de Lucas; J. Peter Etchhells, New York: Humana Press, 2017, 1, , s. 10s. 27-36Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Histochemical assays of xylem cell death cannot take advantage of the conventional methods for detection of cell death, such as staining with propidium iodide or trypan/Evans blue or the TUNEL staining. This chapter presents two alternative histochemical methods that can be used to detect xylem cell death quickly and reliably using light microscopy. The first method is a viability stain that can be used to detect cell death of different types of xylem elements in basically any plant species. The second method reveals cell death in xylem vessel elements based on their functionality in transport of water and small water-soluble stains.

  • 10.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Latha Gandla, Madhavi
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Derba-Maceluch, Marta
    Lundqvist, Sven-Olof
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    A collection of genetically engineered Populus trees reveals wood biomass traits that predict glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 15798Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood represents a promising source of sugars to produce bio-based renewables, including biofuels. However, breaking down lignocellulose requires costly pretreatments because lignocellulose is recalcitrant to enzymatic saccharification. Increasing saccharification potential would greatly contribute to make wood a competitive alternative to petroleum, but this requires improving wood properties. To identify wood biomass traits associated with saccharification, we analyzed a total of 65 traits related to wood chemistry, anatomy and structure, biomass production and saccharification in 40 genetically engineered Populus tree lines. These lines exhibited broad variation in quantitative traits, allowing for multivariate analyses and mathematical modeling. Modeling revealed that seven wood biomass traits associated in a predictive manner with saccharification of glucose after pretreatment. Four of these seven traits were also negatively associated with biomass production, suggesting a trade-off between saccharification potential and total biomass, which has previously been observed to offset the overall sugar yield from whole trees. We therefore estimated the "total-wood glucose yield" (TWG) from whole trees and found 22 biomass traits predictive of TWG after pretreatment. Both saccharification and TWG were associated with low abundant, often overlooked matrix polysaccharides such as arabinose and rhamnose which possibly represent new markers for improved Populus feedstocks.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Luomaranta, Mikko
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gandla, Madhavi Latha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Yassin, Zakiya
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grahn, Thomas
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheepers, Gerhard
    RISE AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stener, Lars-Göran
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Ekebo, Svalöv, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Genetic markers and tree properties predicting wood biorefining potential in aspen (Populus tremula) bioenergy feedstock2023Inngår i: Biotechnology for Biofuels and Bioproducts, E-ISSN 2731-3654, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikkel-id 65Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wood represents the majority of the biomass on land and constitutes a renewable source of biofuels and other bioproducts. However, wood is recalcitrant to bioconversion, raising a need for feedstock improvement in production of, for instance, biofuels. We investigated the properties of wood that affect bioconversion, as well as the underlying genetics, to help identify superior tree feedstocks for biorefining.

    Results: We recorded 65 wood-related and growth traits in a population of 113 natural aspen genotypes from Sweden (https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gtht76hrd). These traits included three growth and field performance traits, 20 traits for wood chemical composition, 17 traits for wood anatomy and structure, and 25 wood saccharification traits as indicators of bioconversion potential. Glucose release after saccharification with acidic pretreatment correlated positively with tree stem height and diameter and the carbohydrate content of the wood, and negatively with the content of lignin and the hemicellulose sugar units. Most of these traits displayed extensive natural variation within the aspen population and high broad-sense heritability, supporting their potential in genetic improvement of feedstocks towards improved bioconversion. Finally, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed 13 genetic loci for saccharification yield (on a whole-tree-biomass basis), with six of them intersecting with associations for either height or stem diameter of the trees.

    Conclusions: The simple growth traits of stem height and diameter were identified as good predictors of wood saccharification yield in aspen trees. GWAS elucidated the underlying genetics, revealing putative genetic markers for bioconversion of bioenergy tree feedstocks.

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  • 12.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Stael, Simon
    Vainonen, Julia P.
    Willems, Patrick
    Jin, Huiting
    Kimura, Sachie
    Van Breusegem, Frank
    Gevaert, Kris
    Wrzaczek, Michael
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Extracellular peptide Kratos restricts cell death during vascular development and stress in Arabidopsis2019Inngår i: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 70, nr 7, s. 2199-2210Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During plant vascular development, xylem tracheary elements (TEs) form water-conducting, empty pipes by genetically regulated cell death. Cell death is prevented from spreading to non-TEs by unidentified intercellular mechanisms, downstream of METACASPASE9 (MC9)-mediated regulation of autophagy in TEs. Here, we identified differentially abundant extracellular peptides in vascular-differentiating wild-type and MC9-down-regulated Arabidopsis cell suspensions. A peptide named Kratos rescued the abnormally high ectopic non-TE death resulting from either MC9 knockout or TE-specific overexpression of the ATG5 autophagy protein during experimentally induced vascular differentiation in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Kratos also reduced cell death following mechanical damage and extracellular ROS production in Arabidopsis leaves. Stress-induced but not vascular non-TE cell death was enhanced by another identified peptide, named Bia. Bia is therefore reminiscent of several known plant cell death-inducing peptides acting as damage-associated molecular patterns. In contrast, Kratos plays a novel extracellular cell survival role in the context of development and during stress response.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 13.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Contribution of cellular autolysis to tissular functions during plant development2017Inngår i: Current opinion in plant biology, ISSN 1369-5266, E-ISSN 1879-0356, Vol. 35, s. 124-130Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant development requires specific cells to be eliminated in a predictable and genetically regulated manner referred to as programmed cell death (PCD). However, the target cells do not merely die but they also undergo autolysis to degrade their cellular corpses. Recent progress in understanding developmental cell elimination suggests that distinct proteins execute PCD sensu stricto and autolysis. In addition, cell death alone and cell dismantlement can fulfill different functions. Hence, it appears biologically meaningful to distinguish between the modules of PCD and autolysis during plant development.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 14.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Programmes of cell death and autolysis in tracheary elements: when a suicidal cell arranges its own corpse removal2014Inngår i: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 65, nr 5, s. 1313-1321Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Differentiation of tracheary elements (TEs) is finalized by programmed cell death (PCD) and autolysis. This review integrates TE differentiation, PCD, and autolysis in a biological and evolutionary context.Tracheary element (TE) differentiation represents a unique system to study plant developmental programmed cell death (PCD). TE PCD occurs after deposition of the secondary cell walls when an unknown signal induces tonoplast rupture and the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. TE PCD is tightly followed by autolysis of the protoplast and partial hydrolysis of the primary cell walls. This review integrates TE differentiation, programmed cell death (PCD), and autolysis in a biological and evolutionary context. The collective evidence from the evolutionary and molecular studies suggests that TE differentiation consists primarily of a programme for cell death and autolysis under the direct control of the transcriptional master switches VASCULAR NAC DOMAIN 6 (VND6) and VND7. In this scenario, secondary cell walls represent a later innovation to improve the water transport capacity of TEs which necessitates transcriptional regulators downstream of VND6 and VND7. One of the most fascinating features of TEs is that they need to prepare their own corpse removal by expression and accumulation of hydrolases that are released from the vacuole after TE cell death. Therefore, TE differentiation involves, in addition to PCD, a programmed autolysis which is initiated before cell death and executed post-mortem. It has recently become clear that TE PCD and autolysis are separate processes with separate molecular regulation. Therefore, the importance of distinguishing between the cell death programme per se and autolysis in all plant PCD research and of careful description of the morphological, biochemical, and molecular sequences in each of these processes, is advocated.

  • 15. Fracheboud, Yvan
    et al.
    Luquez, Virginia
    Björkén, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The control of autumn senescence in European aspen2009Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 149, nr 4, s. 1982-1991Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The initiation, progression, and natural variation of autumn senescence in European aspen (Populus tremula) was investigated by monitoring chlorophyll degradation in (1) trees growing in natural stands and (2) cloned trees growing in a greenhouse under various light regimes. The main trigger for the initiation of autumn senescence in aspen is the shortening photoperiod, but there was a large degree of variation in the onset of senescence, both within local populations and among trees originating from different populations, where it correlated with the latitude of their respective origins. The variation for onset of senescence with a population was much larger than the variation of bud set. Once started, autumn senescence was accelerated by low temperature and longer nights, and clones that started to senescence late had a faster senescence. Bud set and autumn senescence appeared to be under the control of two independent critical photoperiods, but senescence could not be initiated until a certain time after bud set, suggesting that bud set and growth arrest are important for the trees to acquire competence to respond to the photoperiodic trigger to undergo autumn senescence. A timetable of events related to bud set and autumn senescence is presented.

  • 16.
    Gandla, Madhavi Latha
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Skotare, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Obudulu, Ogonna
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Möller, Linus
    SweTree Technologies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bygdell, Joakim
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Hertzberg, Magnus
    SweTree Technologies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Overexpression of vesicle-associated membrane protein PttVAP27-17 as a tool to improve biomass production and the overall saccharification yields in Populus trees2021Inngår i: Biotechnology for Biofuels, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikkel-id 43Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bioconversion of wood into bioproducts and biofuels is hindered by the recalcitrance of woody raw material to bioprocesses such as enzymatic saccharification. Targeted modification of the chemical composition of the feedstock can improve saccharification but this gain is often abrogated by concomitant reduction in tree growth.

    Results: In this study, we report on transgenic hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) lines that showed potential to increase biomass production both in the greenhouse and after 5 years of growth in the field. The transgenic lines carried an overexpression construct for Populus tremula × tremuloides vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein PttVAP27-17 that was selected from a gene-mining program for novel regulators of wood formation. Analytical-scale enzymatic saccharification without any pretreatment revealed for all greenhouse-grown transgenic lines, compared to the wild type, a 20–44% increase in the glucose yield per dry weight after enzymatic saccharification, even though it was statistically significant only for one line. The glucose yield after enzymatic saccharification with a prior hydrothermal pretreatment step with sulfuric acid was not increased in the greenhouse-grown transgenic trees on a dry-weight basis, but increased by 26–50% when calculated on a whole biomass basis in comparison to the wild-type control. Tendencies to increased glucose yields by up to 24% were present on a whole tree biomass basis after acidic pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification also in the transgenic trees grown for 5 years on the field when compared to the wild-type control.

    Conclusions: The results demonstrate the usefulness of gene-mining programs to identify novel genes with the potential to improve biofuel production in tree biotechnology programs. Furthermore, multi-omic analyses, including transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analyses, performed here provide a toolbox for future studies on the function of VAP27 proteins in plants.

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  • 17. Giacomello, Stefania
    et al.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Niittylä, Totte
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    High spatial resoulution profiling in tree species2019Inngår i: Annual Plant Reviews online, ISSN 2639-3832, Vol. 2, nr 1, s. 329-359Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently, the majority of genomics assays have been performed on bulk tissue samples containing multiple cell types. Tissues such as the wood formation zone in trees contain a complex mix of cell types organised in three-dimensional space. Moreover, cells within the wood formation zone represent a continual developmental progression from meristematic cambial initials through to cell death. This spatiotemporal developmental gradient and cell type information are not assayed by bulk samples. New and improved sampling methods coupled to next-generation sequencing assays are enabling the generation of high spatial resolution and single-cell transcriptomics data, offering unprecedented insight into the biology of unique cell types and cell developmental programs. We overview the application of these approaches to the study of wood development, in particular, and highlight challenges associated with the analysis of such data.

  • 18.
    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Prestele, Jakob
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nilsson, Ove
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Transcriptional Roadmap to Seasonal Variation in Wood Formation of Norway Spruce2018Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, nr 4, s. 2851-2870Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal cues influence several aspects of the secondary growth of tree stems, including cambial activity, wood chemistry, and transition to latewood formation. We investigated seasonal changes in cambial activity, secondary cell wall formation, and tracheid cell death in woody tissues of Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout one seasonal cycle. RNA sequencing was performed simultaneously in both the xylem and cambium/phloem tissues of the stem. Principal component analysis revealed gradual shifts in the transcriptomes that followed a chronological order throughout the season. A notable remodeling of the transcriptome was observed in the winter, with many genes having maximal expression during the coldest months of the year. A highly coexpressed set of monolignol biosynthesis genes showed high expression during the period of secondary cell wall formation as well as a second peak in midwinter. This midwinter peak in expression did not trigger lignin deposition, as determined by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Coexpression consensus network analyses suggested the involvement of transcription factors belonging to the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES and MYELOBLASTOSIS-HOMEOBOX families in the seasonal control of secondary cell wall formation of tracheids. Interestingly, the lifetime of the latewood tracheids stretched beyond the winter dormancy period, correlating with a lack of cell death-related gene expression. Our transcriptomic analyses combined with phylogenetic and microscopic analyses also identified the cellulose and lignin biosynthetic genes and putative regulators for latewood formation and tracheid cell death in Norway spruce, providing a toolbox for further physiological and functional assays of these important phase transitions.

  • 19.
    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 84 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundell, David
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1430 Ås, Norway.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    NorWood: a gene expression resource for evo-devo studies of conifer wood development2017Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 216, nr 2, s. 482-494Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The secondary xylem of conifers is composed mainly of tracheids that differ anatomically and chemically from angiosperm xylem cells. There is currently no high-spatial-resolution data available profiling gene expression during wood formation for any coniferous species, which limits insight into tracheid development.

    RNA-sequencing data from replicated, high-spatial-resolution section series throughout the cambial and woody tissues of Picea abies were used to generate the NorWood.conGenIE.org web resource, which facilitates exploration of the associated gene expression profiles and co-expression networks.

    Integration within PlantGenIE.org enabled a comparative regulomics analysis, revealing divergent co-expression networks between P. abies and the two angiosperm species Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus tremula for the secondary cell wall (SCW) master regulator NAC Class IIB transcription factors. The SCW cellulose synthase genes (CesAs) were located in the neighbourhoods of the NAC factors in Athaliana and P. tremula, but not in Pabies. The NorWood co-expression network enabled identification of potential SCW CesA regulators in P. abies.

    The NorWood web resource represents a powerful community tool for generating evo-devo insights into the divergence of wood formation between angiosperms and gymnosperms and for advancing understanding of the regulation of wood development in P. abies.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 20.
    Keech, Olivier
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ahad, Abdul
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Disruption of the microtubules during dark-induced senescenceManuskript (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 21.
    Lakehal, Abdellah
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dob, Asma
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Rahneshan, Zahra
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman, Iran.
    Novak, Ondrej
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Alallaq, Sanaria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strnad, Miroslav
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bellini, Catherine
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Institut Jean-Pierre Bourgin, INRAE, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, Versailles, France.
    ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 115 integrates jasmonate and cytokinin signaling machineries to repress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis2020Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 228, s. 1611-1626Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adventitious root initiation (ARI) is ade novoorganogenesis program and a key adaptive trait in plants. Several hormones regulate ARI but the underlying genetic architecture that integrates the hormonal crosstalk governing this process remains largely elusive. In this study, we use genetics, genome editing, transcriptomics, hormone profiling and cell biological approaches to demonstrate a crucial role played by the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 115 transcription factor. We demonstrate that ERF115 functions as a repressor of ARI by activating the cytokinin (CK) signaling machinery. We also demonstrate thatERF115is transcriptionally activated by jasmonate (JA), an oxylipin-derived phytohormone, which represses ARI in NINJA-dependent and independent manners. Our data indicate that NINJA-dependent JA signaling in pericycle cells blocks early events of ARI. Altogether, our results reveal a previously unreported molecular network involving cooperative crosstalk between JA and CK machineries that represses ARI.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Lakehal, Abdellah
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umea university.
    Dob, Asma
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Rahneshan, Zahra
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Novak, Ondrej
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strnad, Miroslav
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bellini, C
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    A Jasmonate-mediated molecular network provides cell-reprogramming decisions for organogenesis in Arabidopsis2019Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 23.
    Menard, Delphine
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Life beyond death: the formation of xylem sap conduits2015Inngår i: Plant programmed cell death / [ed] Arunika N. Gunawardena; Paul F. McCabe, Springer, 2015, s. 55-76Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylem is the vascular tissue conducting water and minerals in plants. The conduction of the hydro-mineral sap in this tissue is enabled by specific conduit cells named tracheary elements (TEs). These vascular cells undergo a distinct differentiation programme which requires programmed cell death (PCD) to functionalise the cell for sap conduction: PCD empties the cell lumen leaving a hollow corpse delimited only by its cell wall to form the future vascular cylinder. In contrast to many other cell types, PCD initiates the 'physiological life' of TEs to enable the cell to conduct the hydro-mineral sap. This central role of PCD appeared as the first distinct differentiation event of TE ancestor cells during plant evolution. Breakthrough studies combining real-time live-cell imaging and TE differentiation in cell suspension cultures enabled to define the temporal succession of the pre-mortem TE differentiation events - cellulose and hemicellulose depositions in the secondary cell wall - and the post-mortem events including cell wall lignification and the clearing of the residual protoplast. The coordination between these different events and the exact timing of PCD is controlled by specific signalling molecules. 

  • 24.
    Milhinhos, Ana
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Blazquez, Miguel A.
    Novak, Ondrej
    Miguel, Celia M.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    ACAULIS5 Is Required for Cytokinin Accumulation and Function During Secondary Growth of Populus Trees2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 601858Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the primary root and young hypocotyl of Arabidopsis, ACAULIS5 promotes translation of SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS51 (SAC51) and thereby inhibits cytokinin biosynthesis and vascular cell division. In this study, the relationships between ACAULIS5, SAC51 and cytokinin biosynthesis were investigated during secondary growth of Populus stems. Overexpression of ACAULIS5 from the constitutive 35S promoter in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) trees suppressed the expression level of ACAULIS5, which resulted in low levels of the physiologically active cytokinin bases as well as their direct riboside precursors in the transgenic lines. Low ACAULIS5 expression and low cytokinin levels of the transgenic trees coincided with low cambial activity of the stem. ACAULIS5 therefore, contrary to its function in young seedlings in Arabidopsis, stimulates cytokinin accumulation and cambial activity during secondary growth of the stem. This function is not derived from maturing secondary xylem tissues as transgenic suppression of ACAULIS5 levels in these tissues did not influence secondary growth. Interestingly, evidence was obtained for increased activity of the anticlinal division of the cambial initials under conditions of low ACAULIS5 expression and low cytokinin accumulation. We propose that ACAULIS5 integrates auxin and cytokinin signaling to promote extensive secondary growth of tree stems.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25. Milhinhos, Ana
    et al.
    Prestele, Jakob
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Matos, Andreia
    Vera-Sirera, Francisco
    Rambla, Jose L
    Ljung, Karin
    Carbonell, Juan
    Blazquez, Miguel A
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Miguel, Celia M
    Thermospermine levels are controlled by an auxin-dependent feedback loop mechanism in Populus xylem2013Inngår i: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 75, nr 4, s. 685-698Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamines are small polycationic amines that are widespread in living organisms. Thermospermine, synthesized by thermospermine synthase ACAULIS5 (ACL5), was recently shown to be an endogenous plant polyamine. Thermospermine is critical for proper vascular development and xylem cell specification, but it is not known how thermospermine homeostasis is controlled in the xylem. We present data in the Populus model system supporting the existence of a negative feedback control of thermospermine levels in stem xylem tissues, the main site of thermospermine biosynthesis. While over-expression of the ACL5 homologue in Populus, POPACAULIS5, resulted in strong up-regulation of ACL5 expression and thermospermine accumulation in leaves, the corresponding levels in the secondary xylem tissues of the stem were similar or lower than those in the wild-type. POPACAULIS5 over-expression had a negative effect on accumulation of indole-3-acetic acid, while exogenous auxin had a positive effect on POPACAULIS5 expression, thus promoting thermospermine accumulation. Further, over-expression of POPACAULIS5 negatively affected expression of the classIII homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZipIII) transcription factor gene PttHB8, a homologue of AtHB8, while up-regulation of PttHB8 positively affected POPACAULIS5 expression. These results indicate that excessive accumulation of thermospermine is prevented by a negative feedback control of POPACAULIS5 transcript levels through suppression of indole-3-acetic acid levels, and that PttHB8 is involved in the control of POPACAULIS5 expression. We propose that this negative feedback loop functions to maintain steady-state levels of thermospermine, which is required for proper xylem development, and that it is dependent on the presence of high concentrations of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid, such as those present in the secondary xylem tissues.

  • 26. Minina, E. A.
    et al.
    Coll, N. S.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bozhkov, P. V.
    Metacaspases versus caspases in development and cell fate regulation2017Inngår i: Cell Death and Differentiation, ISSN 1350-9047, E-ISSN 1476-5403, Vol. 24, nr 8, s. 1314-1325Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Initially found to be critically involved in inflammation and apoptosis, caspases have since then been implicated in the regulation of various signaling pathways in animals. How caspases and caspase-mediated processes evolved is a topic of great interest and hot debate. In fact, caspases are just the tip of the iceberg, representing a relatively small group of mostly animal-specific enzymes within a broad family of structurally related cysteine proteases (family C14 of CD clan) found in all kingdoms of life. Apart from caspases, this family encompasses para-and metacaspases, and all three groups of proteases exhibit significant variation in biochemistry and function in vivo. Notably, metacaspases are present in all eukaryotic lineages with a remarkable absence in animals. Thus, metacaspases and caspases must have adapted to operate under distinct cellular and physiological settings. Here we discuss biochemical properties and biological functions of metacaspases in comparison to caspases, with a major focus on the regulation of developmental aspects in plants versus animals.

  • 27.
    Moreau, Charleen
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Aksenov, Nikolay
    García-Lorenzo, Maribel
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Segerman, Bo
    Funk, Christiane
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nilsson, Peter
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    A genomic approach to investigate developmental cell death in woody tissues of Populus trees2005Inngår i: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. R34:1-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Poplar (Populus sp.) has emerged as the main model system for molecular and genetic studies of forest trees. A Populus expressed sequence tag (EST) database (POPULUSDB) was previously created from 19 cDNA libraries each originating from different Populus tree tissues, and opened to the public in September 2004. We used this dataset for in silico transcript profiling of a particular process in the woody tissues of the Populus stem: the programmed death of xylem fibers.

    Results

    One EST library in POPULUSDB originates from woody tissues of the Populus stem where xylem fibers undergo cell death. Analysis of EST abundances and library distribution within the POPULUSDB revealed a large number of previously uncharacterized transcripts that were unique in this library and possibly related to the death of xylem fibers. The in silico analysis was complemented by a microarray analysis utilizing a novel Populus cDNA array with a unigene set of 25,000 sequences.

    Conclusions

    In silico analysis, combined with the microarray analysis, revealed the usefulness of non-normalized EST libraries in elucidating transcriptional regulation of previously uncharacterized physiological processes. The data suggested the involvement of two novel extracellular serine proteases, nodulin-like proteins and an Arabidopsis thaliana OPEN STOMATA 1 (AtOST1) homolog in signaling fiber-cell death, as well as mechanisms responsible for hormonal control, nutrient remobilization, regulation of vacuolar integrity and autolysis of the dying fibers.

  • 28.
    Muñiz, Luis
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Minguet, Eugenio G
    Singh, Sunil Kumar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Vera-Sirera, Francisco
    Moreau-Courtois, Charleen L.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Carbonell, Juan
    Blázquez, Miguel A
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    ACAULIS5 controls Arabidopsis xylem specification through the prevention of premature cell death2008Inngår i: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 135, nr 15, s. 2573-2582Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell size and secondary cell wall patterning are crucial for the proper functioning of xylem vessel elements in the vascular tissues of plants. Through detailed anatomical characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, we observed that mutations in the putative spermine biosynthetic gene ACL5 severely affected xylem specification: the xylem vessel elements of the acl5 mutant were small and mainly of the spiral type, and the normally predominant pitted vessels as well as the xylem fibers were completely missing. The cell-specific expression of ACL5 in the early developing vessel elements, as detected by in situ hybridization and reporter gene analyses, suggested that the observed xylem vessel defects were caused directly by the acl5 mutation. Exogenous spermine prolonged xylem element differentiation and stimulated cell expansion and cell wall elaboration in xylogenic cell cultures of Zinnia elegans, suggesting that ACL5 prevents premature death of the developing vessel elements to allow complete expansion and secondary cell wall patterning. This was further supported by our observations that the vessel elements of acl5 seemed to initiate the cell death program too early and that the xylem defects associated with acl5 could be largely phenocopied by induction of premature, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell death in the ACL5-expressing vessel elements. We therefore provide, for the first time, mechanistic evidence for the function of ACL5 in xylem specification through its action on the duration of xylem element differentiation.

  • 29. Nystedt, Björn
    et al.
    Street, Nathaniel Robert
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Zuccolo, Andrea
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Scofield, Douglas G.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Giacomello, Stefania
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    Vicedomini, Riccardo
    Sahlin, Kristoffer
    Sherwood, Ellen
    Elfstrand, Malin
    Gramzow, Lydia
    Holmberg, Kristina
    Hällman, Jimmie
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Klasson, Lisa
    Koriabine, Maxim
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Käller, Max
    Luthman, Johannes
    Lysholm, Fredrik
    Niittylä, Totte
    Olson, Åke
    Rilakovic, Nemanja
    Ritland, Carol
    Rosselló, Josep A.
    Sena, Juliana
    Svensson, Thomas
    Talavera-López, Carlos
    Theißen, Günter
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vanneste, Kevin
    Wu, Zhi-Qiang
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zerbe, Philipp
    Arvestad, Lars
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh
    Bohlmann, Joerg
    Bousquet, Jean
    Gil, Rosario Garcia
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    de Jong, Pieter
    MacKay, John
    Morgante, Michele
    Ritland, Kermit
    Sundberg, Björn
    Thompson, Stacey Lee
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Andersson, Björn
    Nilsson, Ove
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution2013Inngår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 497, nr 7451, s. 579-584Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000 base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding.

  • 30.
    Obudulu, Ogonna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 90183 Umeå, Sweden.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian, University of Life Sciences, 1432 Ås, Norway.
    Skotare, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bygdell, Joakim
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Ahnlund, Maria
    Latha Gandla, Madhavi
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Petterle, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian, University of Life Sciences, 1432 Ås, Norway.
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    A multi-omics approach reveals function of Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins in wood formation of​ ​​Populus​​ ​trees2018Inngår i: BMC Genomics, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 19, artikkel-id 11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs) are highly conserved 32–38 kDa proteins that are involved in membrane trafficking. A systems approach was taken to elucidate function of SCAMPs in wood formation of Populus trees. Phenotypic and multi-omics analyses were performed in woody tissues of transgenic Populus trees carrying an RNAi construct for Populus tremula x tremuloides SCAMP3 (PttSCAMP3;Potri.019G104000).

    Results: The woody tissues of the transgenic trees displayed increased amounts of both polysaccharides and lignin oligomers, indicating increased deposition of both the carbohydrate and lignin components of the secondary cell walls. This coincided with a tendency towards increased wood density as well as significantly increased thickness of the suberized cork in the transgenic lines. Multivariate OnPLS (orthogonal projections to latent structures) modeling of five different omics datasets (the transcriptome, proteome, GC-MS metabolome, LC-MS metabolome and pyrolysis-GC/MS metabolome) collected from the secondary xylem tissues of the stem revealed systemic variation in the different variables in the transgenic lines, including changes that correlated with the changes in the secondary cell wall composition. The OnPLS model also identified a rather large number of proteins that were more abundant in the transgenic lines than in the wild type. Several of these were related to secretion and/or endocytosis as well as both primary and secondary cell wall biosynthesis.

    Conclusions: Populus SCAMP proteins were shown to influence accumulation of secondary cell wall components, including polysaccharides and phenolic compounds, in the woody tissues of Populus tree stems. Our multi-omics analyses combined with the OnPLS modelling suggest that this function is mediated by changes in membrane trafficking to fine-tune the abundance of cell wall precursors and/or proteins involved in cell wall biosynthesis and transport. The data provides a multi-level source of information for future studies on the function of the SCAMP proteins in plant stem tissues.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31. Overmyer, Kirk
    et al.
    Brosché, Mikael
    Pellinen, Riikka
    Kuittinen, Tero
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ahlfors, Reetta
    Keinänen, Markku
    Saarma, Mart
    Scheel, Dierk
    Kangasjärvi, Jaakko
    Ozone-induced programmed cell death in the Arabidopsis radical-induced cell death1 mutant.2005Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, Vol. 137, nr 3, s. 1092-104Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Short, high-concentration peaks of the atmospheric pollutant ozone (O3) cause the formation of cell death lesions on the leaves of sensitive plants. Numerous similarities between the plant responses to O3 and pathogens suggest that O3 triggers hypersensitive response-like programmed cell death (PCD). We examined O3 and superoxide-induced cell death in the O3-sensitive radical-induced cell death1 (rcd1) mutant. Dying cells in O3-exposed rcd1 exhibited several of the typical morphological characteristics of the hypersensitive response and PCD. Double-mutant analyses indicated a requirement for salicylic acid and the function of the cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel AtCNGC2 in cell death. Furthermore, a requirement for ATPases, kinases, transcription, Ca2+ flux, caspase-like proteolytic activity, and also one or more phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride-sensitive protease activities was shown for the development of cell death lesions in rcd1. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinases showed differential activation patterns in rcd1 and Columbia. Taken together, these results directly demonstrate the induction of PCD by O3.

  • 32. Overmyer, Kirk
    et al.
    Kollist, Hannes
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Plant Biology, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Betz, Christian
    Langebartels, Christian
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    SLU.
    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa
    Brader, Günter
    Mullineaux, Phil
    Kangasjärvi, Jaakko
    Complex phenotypic profiles leading to ozone sensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants2008Inngår i: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 31, nr 9, s. 1237-1249Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetically tractable model plants offer the possibility of defining the plant O3 response at the molecular level. To this end, we have isolated a collection of ozone (O3)‐sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutant phenotypes and genetics were characterized. Additionally, parameters associated with O3 sensitivity were analysed, including stomatal conductance, sensitivity to and accumulation of reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, stress gene‐expression and the accumulation of stress hormones. Each mutant has a unique phenotypic profile, with O3 sensitivity caused by a unique set of alterations in these systems. O3 sensitivity in these mutants is not caused by gross deficiencies in the antioxidant pathways tested here. The rcd3 mutant exhibits misregulated stomata. All mutants exhibited changes in stress hormones consistent with the known hormonal roles in defence and cell death regulation. One mutant, dubbed re‐8, is an allele of the classic leaf development mutant reticulata and exhibits phenotypes dependent on light conditions. This study shows that O3 sensitivity can be determined by deficiencies in multiple interacting plant systems and provides genetic evidence linking these systems.

  • 33.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ethylene stimulates tracheary element differentiation in Zinnia elegans cell cultures2011Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 190, nr 1, s. 138-149Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    • The exact role of ethylene in xylogenesis remains unclear, but the Zinnia elegans cell culture system provides an excellent model with which to study its role during the differentiation of tracheary elements (TEs) in vitro. • Here, we analysed ethylene homeostasis and function during Z. elegans TE differentiation using biochemical, molecular and pharmacological methods. • Ethylene evolution was confined to specific stages of TE differentiation. It was found to peak at the time of TE maturation and to correlate with the activity of the ethylene biosynthetic 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase. The ethylene precursor ACC was exported and accumulated to high concentrations in the extracellular medium, which also displayed a high capacity to convert ACC into ethylene. The effects of adding inhibitors of the ethylene biosynthetic ACC synthase and ACC oxidase enzymes to the TE cultures demonstrated for the first time strict dependence of TE differentiation on ethylene biosynthesis and a stimulatory effect of ethylene on the rate of TE differentiation. • In a whole-plant context, our results suggest that ethylene synthesis occurs in the apoplast of the xylem elements and that ethylene participates, in a paracrine manner, in the control of the cambial stem cell pool size during secondary xylem formation.

  • 34.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Unravelling ethylene biosynthesis and its role during tracheary element formation in Zinnia elegans2007Inngår i: Advances in plant ethylene research: proceedings of the 7th international symposium on the plant hormone ethylene / [ed] Angelo Ramina, Caren Chang, Jim Giovannoni, Harry Klee, Pierdomenico Perata, Ernst Woltering, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2007, s. 147-149Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylem is the plant vascular tissue responsible for raw sap conduction. It comprises two main types of cells that are derived from differentiating cambium: tracheary elements (TEs) and fibres that have conducting and mechanical role, respectively. Xylem formation is a developmental process and is under strict hormonal control involving a stew of phytohormones including auxin, cytokinin and ethylene.

  • 35.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gorzsas, Andras
    Puhakainen, Tuula
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Serk, Henrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Escamez, Sacha
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Barbier, Odile
    Gerber, Lorenz
    Courtois-Moreau, Charleen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Alatalo, Edward
    Paulin, Lars
    Kangasjärvi, Jaakko
    Sundberg, Björn
    Goffner, Deborah
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Non-Cell-Autonomous Postmortem Lignification of Tracheary Elements in Zinnia elegans2013Inngår i: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 25, nr 4, s. 1314-1328Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Postmortem lignification of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) has been debated for decades. Here, we provide evidence in Zinnia elegans TE cell cultures, using pharmacological inhibitors and in intact Z. elegans plants using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, that TE lignification occurs postmortem (i.e., after TE programmed cell death). In situ RT-PCR verified expression of the lignin monomer biosynthetic cinnamoyl CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in not only the lignifying TEs but also in the unlignified non-TE cells of Z. elegans TE cell cultures and in living, parenchymatic xylem cells that surround TEs in stems. These cells were also shown to have the capacity to synthesize and transport lignin monomers and reactive oxygen species to the cell walls of dead TEs. Differential gene expression analysis in Z. elegans TE cell cultures and concomitant functional analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in identification of several genes that were expressed in the non-TE cells and that affected lignin chemistry on the basis of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. These data suggest that living, parenchymatic xylem cells contribute to TE lignification in a non-cellautonomous manner, thus enabling the postmortem lignification of TEs.