Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Using the typology of teacher power and control (TTPC) to explore emergent practice in a new innovative learning environment2023In: ECER 2023: Programme, EERA , 2023, article id 56232Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a school development project of an innovative learning environment (ILE). Staff and pupils from two traditionally build corridor schools have merged into a new build school, whose architecture is described as new, innovative, modern, and flexible (OECD, 2017). Instead of having one classroom with a standardised size of 60m2, the ILE consists of different rooms both regarding size and furniture. Another change was that teachers had to be prepared to go from the traditional practice of individually teaching a class with approx. 25 students to the practice of team teaching with 2-5 teachers teaching a whole grade with approx. 60-100 students. The narrative of the project focused on the shift from teacher-centred teaching to student-centred learning, which in previous research have been a challenge due to well established teacher-centred methods (Cardellino & Woolner, 2019; Sigurdadottir & Hjartson, 2016; Gislason, 2010). 

    The present research project started two years before the teachers moved into the new ILE. During these two years, school leaders prepared teachers for the new practice. Among these preparatory activities, one core activity consisted of prototype ILE classrooms where teachers could practice student-centred learning methods. In our research, the materiality of the new classroom and teachers’ played-out practice are operationalised as two dimensions (Bergström & Wiklund-Engblom, 2022; Bergström, 2019). The first, a vertical dimension, concerns preconditions of the physical learning environment embodied through the arrangement of desks, use of teachers’ and students’ areas, relations between learning resources, and selection of software applications. The second, a horizontal dimension, includes teachers’ communication in practice pertaining to their selection of content, sequence, pace, and speech space (cf. Bernstein, 2000). The combination of the two dimensions creates a theoretical framework for an ecology of teacher practice as an “emergent phenomenon” (Carvalho & Yeoman, 2018, p. 5). This is an illustrative metaphor for the practice that emerge in teacher preparation for teaching in an ILE.

    The aim of this study is to examine and unpack emergent and varying practices in the prototype classrooms with regard to the two dimensions. The following research questions were asked: 1) What variations in teachers played-out practice emerge from teachers’ organisation of the classroom space and communication in practice? 2) How can the teachers’ reasoning further explain the variation of these emergent ILE practices?

    Theory: One outcome of our prior studies is the development of a new theory-driven analysing tool, the Typology of Teacher Power and Control (TTPC) (e.g., Bergström & Wiklund-Engblom, 2022, Bergström, 2019), constructed from Bernstein’s (2000) theory of power and control. In the vertical dimension of the TTPC-typology, Bernstein’s relative concept of classification is used to analyse how power emerge from the relationship between objects in the classroom. In short, strong classification keeps things apart, which indicates a strong symbolic power relationship. The opposite is true for weak classification. For example, desks in rows keep students apart and indicates a strong classification and teachers’ power. In the horizontal dimension of the TTPC-typology, Bernstein’s relative concept of framing is used to analyse how control emerge from teachers’ communication in practice. Framing is also a relative concept on a scale from strong to weak. Stronger framing indicates that the teacher has more control in the communication, while weaker framing indicates increased student control. Framing is operationalised as the variation of selection, sequence, pacing, evaluation, and teacher-student and student-student communication. Hence, the concepts of framing and classification represent the two dimensions, which construct a two-dimensional matrix illustrating the emerging teaching practices in the prototype classrooms.

    Method: We adhere to a convergent mixed methods design where two types of data (classroom observations and retrospective teacher interviews) were integrated through several steps of analysis, data transformation, and integration (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2018; Johnson & Onwuegbuzie, 2004; Bazeley and Kemp, 2012). The rationale for the approach is that observational data, representing objective, formative data, shows the reality of the classroom activities, while the teacher interview data, representing subjective, formative data, provides insights into how teachers’ beliefs and attitudes relate to the choices made in their teaching practice (Bergström & Wiklund-Engblom, 2022). Thus, the use of both observational data and interview data aims for an integration analysis in which conclusions are drawn based on a broader explanation of the variations found in the emergent teacher practice.The classroom observations were conducted from three prototype learning environments in School A, B, and C. School A is a grade 6-9 school where teachers (N=4) were observed during five lessons. School B is a grade 1-6 school where teachers (N=3) were observed during five lessons. School C is a grade 1-6 school where teachers (N=2) were observed during four lessons. During the observations, the teachers’ communication was recorded and field notes and photographs were taken. The recorded material ranges between 20 and 60 minutes. The retrospective interviews (N=10) comprise nine individual teacher interviews and one group interview with the two teachers at School C. These semi-structured interviews included two themes: the physical learning space and teachers’ communication in practice. The audio recordings from both the classroom observations and teacher interviews were transcribed verbatim.In the first main step, the transcripts and the fieldnotes from the classroom observations were analysed using the TTPC typology as it specifically targets variations in teacher-centred teaching and student-centred learning, i.e., to what extent teachers maintain or distribute power and control in played-out practice. Furthermore, in addition to exploring how typologies vary, we also explore why this could be based on the interview data. Accordingly, an integrative analysis was conducted with the TTPC clusters and teacher interviews by using crosstab queries in the QSR NVivo software.

    Exected outcomes: The findings will be presented in two phases pertaining to the two research questions. Firstly, the results regarding variations in teachers played-out practice, are based on a quantification of the observational data and teacher audio recordings. Thereafter, a quantitative analysis using the TTPC framework identified clusters of teacher practice. The preliminary analysis indicate three clusters: i) teacher power and control, ii) mixed distribution of power and control, and iii) student power and control. These clusters are plotted in the TTPC-matrix as a visual summary where each teachers’ emergent practice can be identified. In these preliminary findings, we can see that only one teacher is found in the first cluster pertaining to teacher power and control. This cluster is defined by a strong distinction between a majority of the seven subcategories of the classroom organisation. Hence, this teacher had refurnished the classroom space back to a traditional classroom setting. Furthermore, the teachers’ communication was based on strong control in all six control categories. Moreover, the preliminary analysis indicates that the majority of the teachers are located in the second cluster pertaining to mixed distribution of power and control. Such practice is defined by a blurred distinction between the categories of classroom organisation, as well as the categories of teacher control in their communication.Secondly, in our aim to answer the second research question, the interview data will be analysed using thematic analysis. We expect to find themes related to the physical learning space of the prototype classrooms and other themes on influencing factors regarding teachers’ communication. We expect to find connections between teacher beliefs and choices made in their played-out practice by using both types of data in an integrative analysis.

  • 2.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Kampa, Nele
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Edelsbrunner, Peter
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Development of students’ epistemic beliefs profiles across secondary school2019In: Book of abstracts: EARLI 2019, RWTH Aachen University , 2019, p. 131-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the field of epistemic cognition is still growing, only few studies so far have dealt with the question of how epistemic beliefs of school children can be described in a valid way, taking different learning opportunities as possibilities for developmental trajectories into account. A valuable research approach to overcome some of the methodological problems might be classifying students into homogeneous groups according to their epistemic beliefs in science. In our study, we ask 1) what kind of science-related epistemic profiles, exist across grades 5 to 12, 2) how these profiles differ with regard to learning related outcomes, and 3) how students’ epistemic belief profiles change during secondary school? A longitudinal survey with two starting cohorts (grades 5 and 9) was administered to secondary school students over a period of 4 years. The results indicate that it is valuable to identify distinctive groups of students with homogenous science-related epistemic belief patterns in both cohorts. Furthermore, results show that the epistemic belief patterns differ with regard to motivational and cognitive outcomes indicating more helpful but also more diametrical patterns of beliefs with respect to science learning in school. Moreover, results of transition analyses strengthen the finding of high stability of students’ beliefs. The results will be discussed with regard to learning opportunities in every-day school live as well as adaptive interventions for specific subgroups of students for a helpful development of students’ beliefs about knowledge and knowing for science learning.

  • 3.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education.
    Kampa, Nele
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. UmSER.
    Profiling School Students' Epistemic Beliefs From Grades 5 to 122018In: AERA Online Paper Repository, American Educational Research Association , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual’s beliefs about the nature of knowing and learning have been investigated under the label of epistemic beliefs. Although the area of epistemic beliefs is still growing, only a few studies deal with school children. A valuable research approach in this area is classifying students in more homogeneous groups according as it is done in Latent Profil Analyses. Therefore, we investigated 3088 secondary students across grades 5 to 12 with LTAs. We found three distinctive profiles (‘sophisticated’, ‘evidence-based/dynamic’, ‘multiplist’) according to students’ science-related epistemic beliefs. As a justification for this approach, results show several differences between these profiles regarding school and background variables, cognitive outcomes in general and in science as well as science related motivational characteristics.

  • 4.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany and their interrelations with classroom characteristics2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 54-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of epistemic belief research, more studies on how these beliefs are formed in different cultural contexts are called for. Moreover, there are strong assumptions that teachers’ instructional practices are paramount to the development of students’ epistemic beliefs. The current study aims at investigating differences between Sweden and Germany in both, and in their relationships. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,731 students in Grades 5 through 11. To sum up, latent multi group comparison revealed several differences in the level of students’ beliefs and classroom characteristics. Moreover, latent regression analyses showed that the observed classroom characteristics were significant predictors of students’ beliefs concerning the justification and development of knowledge, and that the prediction pattern differ between countries.

  • 5.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany: Correlations with classroom characteristics2017In: Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics: Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good. Book of Abstracts, 2017, p. 678-678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims at describing students’ epistemic beliefs over school years 5–11, investigating differences between Sweden and Germany regarding the ‘trajectories’ of epistemic beliefs over the grades, and if classroom factors can explain these differences. A cross-sectional survey, covering grades 5–11, was distributed to 1501 students in Sweden and 2839 in Germany to assess their epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment in chemistry. Factor analysis revealed four valid constructs for students’ epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment, respectively.  A common trend for both countries was an increasing sophistication over grades as to the Certainty of knowledge and an emphasis in all grades on the need for evidence from several sources to make claims of knowing (Justification). Trust in authorities decreased over the grades in Germany, while Swedish students showed similar levels in all grades. Beliefs in dynamic and changing knowledge was strong in both countries, with an increasing trend in Germany while stable in Sweden. Significant correlations between epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment were found in both countries, but stronger in Sweden than Germany

  • 6.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Uvell, Hanna
    Maja Beskowgymnasiet.
    Vestling, Monika
    Maja Beskowgymnasiet.
    Gymnasiearbete (GARB) – an upper secondary school recepit before entering university studiies2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At Swedish upper secondary school, all students have to pass a mandatory course with thename “Gymnasiearbete”. This course is different from all other courses due to severalreasons, for example, being a project work related only to the programme orientation andwithout an explicit course curriculum. In this project, we have followed students from theNatural Science Programme taking this course, and studied their interest, engagement andepistemic beliefs. Through observations, interviews, and questionnaires, we have foundtriggers important to emphasise to make students more engaged and interested to enhancetheir knowledge. We will, from both a teacher and researcher perspective, discuss this courserelated to both affective and cognitive variables.

  • 7.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Uvell, Hanna
    Vestling, Monika
    Gymnasiearbetet: en länk mellan skola och universitet2019In: Forum för forskningsbaserad NT-undervisning, Linköping, 17-18 oktober, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Eklöf, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Departement of Educational Measurement.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Who Makes an Effort? A Person-Centered Examination of Motivation and Beliefs as Predictors of Students’ Effort and Performance on the PISA 2015 Science Assessment2022In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 6, article id 791599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each time new PISA results are presented, they gain a lot of attention. However, there are many factors that lie behind the results, and they get less attention. In this study, we take a person-centered approach and focus on students’ motivation and beliefs, and how these predict students’ effort and performance on the PISA 2015 assessment of scientific literacy. Moreover, we use both subjective (self-report) and objective (time-based) measures of effort, which allows us to compare these different types of measures. Latent profile analysis was used to group students in profiles based on their instrumental motivation, enjoyment, interest, self-efficacy, and epistemic beliefs (all with regard to science). A solution with four profiles proved to be best. When comparing the effort and performance of these four profiles, we saw several significant differences, but many of these differences disappeared when we added gender and the PISA index of economic, social, and cultural status (ESCS) as control variables. The main difference between the profiles, after adding control variables, was that the students in the profile with most positive motivation and sophisticated epistemic beliefs performed best and put in the most effort. Students in the profile with unsophisticated epistemic beliefs and low intrinsic values (enjoyment and interest) were most likely to be classified as low-effort responders. We conclude that strong motivation and sophisticated epistemic beliefs are important for both the effort students put into the PISA assessment and their performance, but also that ESCS had an unexpectedly large impact on the results.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    "Kunskap är vad du vet, och vet du inte kan du alltid googla!": elevers epistemic beliefs i naturvetenskaplig undervisningskontext2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One important goal of science education is to help students develop an adequate understanding of what science is and how it is done. An understanding of science includes epistemic beliefs, that is, individuals’ beliefs about the nature of knowledge, how knowledge is constructed, and how knowledge can be justified. The epistemic beliefs are hypothesized to exist on a continuum ranging from naïve to sophisticated. Students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic cognition have been shown to influence various facets of learning. The overarching purpose of this thesis is to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the role played by epistemic beliefs within the context of science education. The thesis intended to answer the following three general questions within a scientific context: 1) What prerequisites for drawing conclusions about epistemic beliefs are given based on the choice of questionnaire as a measurement method, including its design and content? 2) What is the relation between students’ epistemic beliefs and other phenomena that are important in learning situations? 3) What is the relation between students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic practices?

    The studies used both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine students’ epistemic beliefs and epistemic practices. Data sources included questionnaires, video and screen observations, and semi-structured interviews. Participants in the studies were students in Grade 5-11 in Sweden and Germany. A series of four papers address the purpose of the thesis and respond to the three general questions. The first paper investigate relations between students’ epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom characteristics and whether differences could be found between the two countries. The second paper investigate the relative importance of epistemic beliefs dimensions for predicting achievement goals in Grade 5 through 11, in both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study. The third paper explore the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs, their problemsolving process, and the quality of solutions produced by students. Finally, the fourth paper describe students’ epistemic practices of problem solving in science and their sense making in the moment, to deepen the understanding of the process of the students’ epistemic cognition. In relation to the first question, results indicate that the chosen measurement method for epistemic beliefs generates certain prerequisites for how epistemic beliefs can be understood and characterized. This in turn may have consequences when epistemic beliefs are studied in relation to, for example, other phenomena and epistemic practices. With regard to the second question, findings show that there are many relationships between epistemic beliefs and other phenomena, but also that they are in many cases context and/or situation dependent. Regarding the third question, the results point out that the relationship between students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic practices should be understood by how the students show, through words and actions, that they understand what the situation requires. Thus, there is no universal relationship between sophisticated epistemic beliefs and successful epistemic practices. It can be concluded that students’ epistemic beliefs do not exist in a vacuum without interacting with other phenomena, but that they depend on the surrounding context or situation in different ways. More studies that take into account different types of situations are required. This would in turn most likely also contribute to a better understanding of how students’ epistemic beliefs, epistemic cognition, and epistemic practices develop in relation to the surrounding teaching context.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (pdf)
    spikblad
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
  • 10.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Simon, Shirley
    University College London, London, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Unpacking students' epistemic cognition in a physics problem‐solving environment2020In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 695-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely held view that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they think and learn in a given context, however, in the science learning context, the relationship between sophisticated epistemic beliefs and success in scientific practice is sometimes ambiguous. Taking this inconsistency as a point of departure, we examined the relationship between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their epistemic practices, and their epistemic cognition in a computer simulation in classical mechanics. Tenth grade students’ manipulations of the simulation, spoken comments, and behavior were screen and video‐recorded and subsequently transcribed and coded. In addition, a stimulated recall interview was undertaken to access students’ thinking and reflections on their practice, in order to understand their practice and make inferences about their process of epistemic cognition. The paper reports on the detailed analysis of the data sets for three students of widely different SEB and performance levels. Comparing the SEB, problem solutions and epistemic practices of the three students has enabled us to examine the interplay between SEB, problem‐solving strategies (PS), conceptual understanding (CU), and metacognitive reflection (MCR), to see how these operate together to facilitate problem solutions. From the analysis, we can better understand how different students’ epistemic cognition is adaptive to the context. The findings have implications for teaching science and further research into epistemic cognition.

  • 11.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Simon, Shirley
    Unpacking students’ epistemic cognition in a problem solving environment2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely held view that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn and think in any given context. However, in the science learning context, the relation between the sophistication of epistemic beliefs and success in scientific practice is sometimes ambiguous. Taking this inconsistency as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their epistemic practices, and hence their epistemic cognition in a computer simulation in classical mechanics. The 19 tenth grade students’ manipulations of the simulation, spoken comments, behavior, and embodied communication were screen and video-recorded and subsequently described and coded by an inductive approach. The screen and video recordings were triangulated with a stimulated recall interview to access a broader understanding of the dynamic processes of epistemic cognition. Our findings focusing on three different students reveal a dynamic pattern of interactions between SEB and knowledge, i.e., epistemic cognition, showing how epistemic cognition can be understood in a specific problem solving context due to the actions the student express.

  • 12.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Simon, Shirley
    Unpacking students’ epistemic cognition in a problem-solving environment2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely held view that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn and think in any given context. However, in the science learning context, the relation between the sophistication of epistemic beliefs and success in scientific practice is sometimes ambiguous. Taking this inconsistency as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their epistemic practices, and hence their epistemic cognition in a computer simulation in classical mechanics. The 19 tenth grade students’ manipulations of the simulation, spoken comments, behavior, and embodied communication were screen and video-recorded and subsequently described and coded by an inductive approach. The screen and video recordings were triangulated with a stimulated recall interview to access a broader understanding of the dynamic processes of epistemic cognition. Our findings focusing on three different students reveal a dynamic pattern of interactions between SEB and knowledge, i.e., epistemic cognition, showing how epistemic cognition can be understood in a specific problem solving context due to the actions the student express.

  • 13.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The search for professional digital competence in Swedish teacher education policy: a content analysis of the prerequisites for teacher educators’ dual didactic task2023In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 2272994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is an exploration of the prerequisites in Swedish teacher education policy for teacher educators’ dual didactic task of developing student teachers’ professional digital competence to such a level that they are capable of developing K–12 pupils’ adequate digital competence. Data were collected from 20 Swedish teacher education institutions offering teacher education programs in which student teachers could earn the degree of Master of Arts in Primary Education for School Years 4–6. Overall, the data comprised national guidelines and curriculum regulations for teacher education in Sweden (e.g. the Swedish Higher Education Ordinance; N = 1), program syllabi at the selected teacher education institutions (N = 20), and course plans (for all 240 ECTS, 4-year full-time studies; N = 450), in total N = 471 policy documents. Signs of professional digital competence in policy were few, and most were found in the course plans for mathematics and natural sciences. In the discussion, findings are problematized in relation to the challenging role of teacher educators as second-order teachers seeking to fulfill their dual didactic task.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The search for professional digital competence in Swedish teacher education policy: a content analysis on the prerequisites for teacher educators’ dual didactical task2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the prerequisites in Swedish teacher education (TE) policy for teacher educators to fulfil their dual didactical task. That is, to use digital technology in a way that ensures student teachers graduate from teacher education with the professional digital competence (PDC) needed for their future working lives in a digitalised school. TE seems often to be high on the political agenda and according to, for example, Jackson and Burch (2019) this can be due to teacher quality being strongly associated to a nation’s economic status. Hanell (2018) in his turn suggests another recent reason for the political interest in TE - the large introduction and use of digital technology in K-12 schools.

    Building on challenges reported in Lindfors et al (2021), we will conduct a content analysis (Zhang & Wildemuth’s, 2009) of policy documents that govern Swedish TE. Data were collected from 20 primary TE institutions for grades 4-6 spread out in Sweden. Data includes: (a) National guidelines and curriculum regulations for TE in Sweden (e.g., the Swedish Higher Education Ordinance), (b) Program syllabuses at the selected TE institutions, and (c) Course plans (in all 240 higher education credits, 4-year full-time studies) (including Subject courses: Swedish, English & mathematics – 90 credits; Subject courses by choice – 30 credits (e.g., social subjects, natural science subjects & practical or artistic subjects); Educational science courses – 60 credits; Practicum placement courses – 30 credits; Student thesis course(s) – 30 credits). The outcome will be problematized due to the role of teacher educators as a second-order teacher and the fulfilment of their dual didactical task in TE and thereafter related to a framework on teachers’/teacher educators’ PDC.

    Hanell, F. (2018). What is the ‘problem’ that digital competence in Swedish teacher education is meant to solve? Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 13(3), 137–151.

    Jackson, A., & Burch, J. (2019) New directions for teacher education: investigating school/ university partnership in an increasingly school-based context. Professional Development in Education, 45(1), 138-150.

    Lindfors, M., Pettersson, F., & Olofsson A.D. (2021, online first). Conditions for professional digital competence: the teacher educators’ view. Education Inquiry. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/20004508.2021.1890936

    Zhang, Y., & Wildemuth, B. M. (2009). Qualitative analysis of content. In B.M., Wildemuth, (Ed), Applications of social research methods to questions in information and library science (pp. 308-319). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

  • 15.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pettersson, Fanny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    K–12 Students’ Experiences of the Synchronous Remote Teaching and Learning Environment2021In: Journal of Online Learning Research, ISSN 2374-1473, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of online, distance, and remote teaching is a growing phenomenon in the K–12 context. However, within this field of research, focus has primarily been on the use of asynchronous (not real-time) remote teaching and with a specific focus on the experience of teachers. The aim of this pilot study was to explore K–12 students’ experiences of the synchronous (real-time) remote teaching and learning environment. The following research questions were posed: (1) What possibilities and challenges can be identified from the perspective of students? (2) What development needs can be discerned for unexperienced teachers and students in synchronous remote teaching and learning environments? The data was collected from 177 students, using a quantitative instrument with questions in four dimensions: teacher support, involvement, cooperation, and autonomy support. Findings reveal both possibilities and challenges experienced by students in the synchronous remote teaching environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pettersson, Fanny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Conditions for professional digital competence: the teacher educators’ view2021In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 390-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how Swedish teacher educators view individual, collegial, and organisational conditions framing the fulfilment of their dual didactical task, which is to use digital technology in a way that ensures student teachers graduate from teacher education (TE) with the professional digital competence (PDC) needed for their future working lives in a digitalised school. Using a purposive sampling approach, we used thematic coding to analyse 13 semistructured interviews with teacher educators representing 21 mandatory courses in educational science at one teacher education institution in Sweden. The findings cover aspects of the teacher educators’ PDC, how to act as a digital role model for the student teachers, support in educational policy and assignments, and the possibilities for participating in continuous professional development (CPD) in PDC. This study demonstrates an urgent need to improve conditions for successful fulfilment of teacher educators’ dual didactical task. For example, TE policy requires a strong focus on digital technology and PDC. CPD activities should be easy to access in order for teacher educators to develop their PDC. Moreover, leaders at the organisational level in TE institutions should acknowledge and place higher value on teacher educators’ work to digitalise educational practices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Roos, Helena
    Linneus university, Sweden.
    Bagger, Anette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The nature of knowing and students in need of special education2019In: Book of abstracts: EARLI 2019, RWTH Aachen University , 2019, p. 142-142Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to explore teachers’ mathematical epistemic beliefs in relation to students in need of special education in mathematics (SEM-students). Teachers’ views on the subject and the students in need are central aspects for the support (Scherer, Beswick, DeBlois, Healey & Opitz, 2016). In more detail, the interest lies in revealing the epistemologies of teachers’ beliefs on the nature of knowing in two very different educational practices: the general situation of the teaching and learning and in the practice of national testing. The research process is guided by four steps: 1; The identification of statements regarding the justification of and source of knowledge 2; The explanatory paraphrasing into groups of statements. 3; A search for concurrence, differences and patterns within and between groups. 4. Finally, a summary of what is characteristic for the nature of knowing in mathematics in relation to SEM-students in these two practices is given.

  • 18.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The role of scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn, think and reason in any given context (Schommer-Aikins, 2004). However, in the science learning context, the relationship between the level of epistemic sophistication, learning, and learning outcomes is sometimes ambiguous (Elby & Hammer, 2001). Taking this result as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their approaches to a computer simulated task, and the quality of their solutions. 19 tenth grade students, with different SEB, were selected to participate in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. Constructionist learning environments emphasize the scope for students’ to take control of their own learning, draw their own conclusions, and use their own knowledge in order to construct objects (Harel & Papert, 1991). Students’ manipulations of the simulation and any spoken comments were video-recorded and subsequently coded by an inductive approach. Relationships between students’ SEB and problem solving quality were explored by hierarchical orthogonal partial least squares analysis. The results revealed that different sets of SEB were conducive to different aspects of students’ problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, our results suggest that there might not be a universal relationship between the degree of theoretical sophistication of students’ SEB and quality of learning outcomes. The relationship can only be understood in terms of the actions they induce, and the results of these actions. It is therefore of great importance to further explore the productiveness of SEB in different types of learning situations.

  • 19.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 124-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on how epistemic beliefs influence students' learning in different contexts is ambiguous. Given this, we have examined the relationships between students' scientific epistemic beliefs, their problem solving, and solutions in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. The problem solving process and performance of 19 tenth grade students, with different scientific epistemic beliefs, was video recorded and inductively coded. Quantitative analysis revealed that different sets of epistemic beliefs were conducive to different aspects of students' problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, authority dependence was associated with high degree of adherence to instructions. Hence, there might not be a universal relationship between theoretical sophistication of students' epistemic beliefs and quality of learning outcomes. We suggest that the conduciveness to desired outcomes is a better measure of sophistication than theoretical non-contextualized a priori assumptions.

  • 20.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University; Malmö University.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bagger, Anette
    Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap, Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sverige.
    Educational settings in relation to special educational needs in mathematics2020In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, NOMAD: [Nordic Studies in Mathematics Education], ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on students in need of special education in mathematics (SEM students) and highlights teachers’ and principals’ reflections upon these students’ construction of knowledge in relation to two educational settings: the regular teaching setting and the test setting. The findings indicate that SEM students’ knowledge is legitimized only when displayed. However, there appear to be differences according to the specific setting. Different settings imply different knowledge representations, norms, and practices that need to be taken into account when reflecting, planning, and carrying out teaching in mathematics in relation to SEM.

  • 21.
    Wiklund-Engblom, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bergström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Exploring teachers’ emergent practice in prototypes of innovative learning environments2023In: Koulutus ja tutkimus yhteiskunnassa – yhteiskunta koulutuksessa ja tutkimuksessa: abstraktit/abstracts, Vasa: FERA; Åbo Akademi , 2023, p. 158-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers in three schools in a community in the northern part of Sweden tested prototype classrooms designed as innovative learning environments. This was an introductory step before merging the schools into one new school building, whose architecture was “new, innovative, modern, and flexible”. Our study spans six years of following this process with regard to how the aimed concept of student-centred learning develops during this time. The results presented here are based on data from the prephase, while the teachers explored the prototype classrooms to learn how these facilities created new preconditions, but also for preparing students for the move. The mixed data consist of both audio recordings of nine teachers during classes and retrospective interviews with the same teachers.

    The analysis is based on our theory-driven framework, the Typology of Teacher Power and Control (TTPC) (Bergström & Wiklund-Engblom, 2022), derived from Bernstein’s (2000) theory of power and control. In TTPC, Bernstein’s concept of framing is interpreted as teacher’s use of control in communicative practice, while the concept of classification represents teacher’s power distribution regarding classroom organisation. Each of the two dimensions include several subcategories, which are our evaluative tool to identify variation of emerging teaching practices. 

    In the first analysis, three clusters of teacher practice emerged, ranging from teacher-centred teaching to student-centred learning. These clusters were used in an integrated analysis with interview data, thematically analysed, to illuminate how teachers themselves reasoned. These results show differences in beliefs about power and control distribution in the classroom. The cluster of increased student-centredness had dialogical and relational approaches and beliefs, in contrast to the teacher-centred cluster, which discussed their choices in their practice in relation to controlling students and student behaviour in the environment. 

  • 22.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Relationships between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals: developmental trends over grades 5–112019In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 295-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examining how students' epistemic beliefs (EB) influence their cognition is central to EB research. Recently, the relation between students' EB and their motivation has gained attention. In the present study, we investigate the development of the relationship between students' EB and their achievement goals (AG) over grades 5–11. Previous studies on this topic are limited, in both number and range, and have produced inconsistent results. We performed a cross-sectional study, ranging over grades 5–11, and a 3-year longitudinal study (n = 1230 and 323, respectively). Data on students' EB and AG were collected via questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a two-factor goal model (Mastery and Performance goals) and a structure of students' EB comprising Certainty, Source, Development, and Justification. For each grade, students' CFA scores on the respective goals were regressed on their scores on the EB dimensions by orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis. Although results indicated a weak relation between students' EB and AG, trends in the cross-sectional data were largely replicated in the longitudinal study. Though naïve EB were in general associated with performance goals and sophisticated EB with mastery goals, the transition to upper secondary school was associated with changes in the relationship between students' EB and AG. We discuss how the commonly used formulations of EB items may affect their ability to measure the naïve-sophisticated continuum, in turn affecting the predictive roles of EB dimensions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. UmSER.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Bernholt, Andrea
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Höft, Lars
    Blankenburg, Janet
    Kampa, Nele
    Kognition, kunskapssyn, intresse och motivation i kemi: en jämförelse av elevers utveckling över skolåren 5–10 i Sverige och Tyskland2019In: Resultatdialog 2019, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2019, p. 112-116Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf