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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tyagi, Mohit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Singh, Pardeep
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Deuschmann, Adrian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jayaweera, Sanduni Wasana
    Lindgren, Anders E. G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Intramolecular Povarov Reactions for the Synthesis of Chromenopyridine fused 2-Pyridone Polyheterocycles Binding to α-Synuclein and Amyloid-β fibrils2020In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 85, no 21, p. 14174-14189Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A BF3×OEt2 catalyzed intramolecular Povarov reaction was used to synthesize a library of 15 chromenopyridine fused thiazolino-2-pyridone peptidomimetics. The reaction works with a range of O-alkylated salicylaldehydes and amino functionalized thiazolino-2-pyridones, to generate polyheterocycles with diverse substitution. The synthesized compounds were screened for their ability to bind α-synuclein and amyloid β fibrils in vitro. Analogs substituted with a nitro group bind to mature amyloid fibrils, and the activity moreover depends on the positioning of this functional group.

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  • 2.
    Aguilar, Ximena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schleucher, Jurgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Interaction Studies of the Human and Arabidopsis thaliana Med25-ACID Proteins with the Herpes Simplex Virus VP16-and Plant-Specific Dreb2a Transcription Factors2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e98575-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mediator is an evolutionary conserved multi-protein complex present in all eukaryotes. It functions as a transcriptional coregulator by conveying signals from activators and repressors to the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. The Arabidopsis thaliana Med25 (aMed25) ACtivation Interaction Domain (ACID) interacts with the Dreb2a activator which is involved in plant stress response pathways, while Human Med25-ACID (hMed25) interacts with the herpes simplex virus VP16 activator. Despite low sequence similarity, hMed25-ACID also interacts with the plant-specific Dreb2a transcriptional activator protein. We have used GST pull-down-, surface plasmon resonance-, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift experiments to characterize interactions between Dreb2a and VP16, with the hMed25 and aMed25-ACIDs. We found that VP16 interacts with aMed25-ACID with similar affinity as with hMed25-ACID and that the binding surface on aMed25-ACID overlaps with the binding site for Dreb2a. We also show that the Dreb2a interaction region in hMed25-ACID overlaps with the earlier reported VP16 binding site. In addition, we show that hMed25-ACID/Dreb2a and aMed25-ACID/Dreb2a display similar binding affinities but different binding energetics. Our results therefore indicate that interaction between transcriptional regulators and their target proteins in Mediator are less dependent on the primary sequences in the interaction domains but that these domains fold into similar structures upon interaction.

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  • 3.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Holm Nielsen, Ellen
    Svehag, SvenErik
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Only amyloidogenic inermediates of transthyretin induce apoptosis2002In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 294, no 2, p. 309-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In diseases like Alzheimer's disease and familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) amyloid deposits co-localize with areas of neurodegeneration. FAP is associated with mutations of the plasma protein transthyretin (TTR). We can here show an apoptotic effect of amyloidogenic mutants of TTR on a human neuroblastoma cell line. Toxicity could be blocked by catalase indicating a free oxygen radical dependent mechanism. The toxic effect was dependent on the state of aggregation and unexpectedly mature fibrils from FAP-patients who failed to exert an apoptotic response. Morphological studies revealed a correlation between toxicity and the presence of immature amyloid. Thus, we can show that toxicity is associated with early stages of fibril formation and propose that mature full-length fibrils represent an inert end stage, which might serve as a rescue mechanism. 

  • 4.
    Bharate, Jaideep B.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jayaweera, Sanduni Wasana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Singh, Pardeep
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Vielfort, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Tyagi, Mohit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bonde, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    K2S2O8-mediated coupling of 6-amino-7-aminomethyl-thiazolino-pyridones with aldehydes to construct amyloid affecting pyrimidine-fused thiazolino-2-pyridones2021In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 19, no 44, p. 9758-9772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein present the synthesis of diversely functionalized pyrimidine fused thiazolino-2-pyridones via K2S2O8-mediated oxidative coupling of 6-amino-7-(aminomethyl)-thiazolino-2-pyridones with aldehydes. The developed protocol is mild, has wide substrate scope, and does not require transition metal catalyst or base. Some of the synthesized compounds have an ability to inhibit the formation of Amyloid-β fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, while others bind to mature amyloid-β and α-synuclein fibrils.

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  • 5. Bharate, Jaideep B.
    et al.
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jayaweera, Sanduni Wasana
    Vielfort, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Singh, Pardeep
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tyagi, Mohit
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    K2S2O8-mediated aerobic oxidative coupling of 6-amino-7-(aminomethyl)-thiazolino-pyridones with aldehydes: Direct access to highly functionalized pyrimidine fused thiazolino-2-pyridones with amyloid fibril binding activity or inhibitors of Amyloid-β fibril formationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein present the synthesis of diversely functionalized pyrimidine fused thiazolino-2-pyridones via K2S2O8-mediated oxidative coupling of 6-amino-7-(aminomethyl)- thiazolino-2-pyridones with aldehydes. The developed protocol is mild, has wide substrate scope, and does not require transition metal catalyst or base. Some of the synthesized compounds have the ability to inhibit the formation of Amyloid-β fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, while others bind to mature Amyloid-β and α-Synuclein fibrils.

  • 6.
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Aguilar, Ximena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rautio, Linn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Björklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Interactions between DNA, transcriptional regulator Dreb2a and the Med25 mediator subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana involve conformational changes2012In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 40, no 13, p. 5938-5950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mediator is a multiprotein coregulatory complex that conveys signals from DNA-bound transcriptional regulators to the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery in eukaryotes. The molecular mechanisms for how these signals are transmitted are still elusive. By using purified transcription factor Dreb2a, mediator subunit Med25 from Arabidopsis thaliana, and a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods, we show that binding of Dreb2a to its canonical DNA sequence leads to an increase in secondary structure of the transcription factor. Similarly, interaction between the Dreb2a and Med25 in the absence of DNA results in conformational changes. However, the presence of the canonical Dreb2a DNA-binding site reduces the affinity between Dreb2a and Med25. We conclude that transcription regulation is facilitated by small but distinct changes in energetic and structural parameters of the involved proteins.

  • 7.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharibyan, Anna L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Islam, Tohidul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lee, Cheng Choo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Pamrén, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Scanning electron microscopy as a tool for evaluating morphology of amyloid structures formed on surface plasmon resonance chips2018In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 19, p. 1166-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate the use of Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) to probe and verify the formation of amyloid and its morphology on an SPR chip. SPR is a technique that measures changes in the immobilized weight on the chip surface and is frequently used to probe the formation and biophysical properties of amyloid structures. In this context it is of interest to also monitor the morphology of the formed structures. The SPR chip surface is made of a layer of gold, which represent a suitable material for direct analysis of the surface using SEM. The standard SPR chip used here (CM5-chip, GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) can easily be disassembled and directly analyzed by SEM. In order to verify the formation of amyloid fibrils in our experimental conditions we analyzed also in-solution produced structures by using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). For further details and experimental findings, please refer to the article published in Journal of Molecular Biology, (Brännström K. et al., 2018) [1].

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  • 8.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Islam, Tohidul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharibyan, Anna L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lee, Cheng Choo
    Sandblad, Linda
    Pamrén, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The Properties of Amyloid-β Fibrils Are Determined by their Path of Formation2018In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 430, no 13, p. 1940-1949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibril formation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) follows a nucleation-dependent polymerization process and is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Several different lengths of Aβ are observed in vivo, but Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 are the dominant forms. The fibril architectures of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 differ and Aβ1-42 assemblies are generally considered more pathogenic. We show here that monomeric Aβ1-42 can be cross-templated and incorporated into the ends of Aβ1-40 fibrils, while incorporation of Aβ1-40 monomers into Aβ1-42 fibrils is very poor. We also show that via cross-templating incorporated Aβ monomers acquire the properties of the parental fibrils. The suppressed ability of Aβ1-40 to incorporate into the ends of Aβ1-42 fibrils and the capacity of Aβ1-42 monomers to adopt the properties of Aβ1-40 fibrils may thus represent two mechanisms reducing the total load of fibrils having the intrinsic, and possibly pathogenic, features of Aβ1-42 fibrils in vivo. We also show that the transfer of fibrillar properties is restricted to fibril-end templating and does not apply to cross-nucleation via the recently described path of surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation, which instead generates similar structures to those acquired via de novo primary nucleation in the absence of catalyzing seeds. Taken together these results uncover an intrinsic barrier that prevents Aβ1-40 from adopting the fibrillar properties of Aβ1-42 and exposes that the transfer of properties between amyloid-β fibrils are determined by their path of formation.

  • 9.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Islam, Tohidul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The role of histidines in amyloid β fibril assembly2017In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 591, no 8, p. 1167-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low pH has a strong stabilising effect on the fibrillar assembly of amyloid β, which is associated with Alzheimer's disease. The stabilising effect is already pronounced at pH 6.0, suggesting that protonation of histidines might mediate this effect. Through the systematic substitution of the three native histidines in Aβ for alanines, we have evaluated their role in fibril stability. Using surface plasmon resonance, we show that at neutral pH the fibrillar forms of all His-Ala variants are destabilised by a factor of 4-12 compared to wild-type Aβ. However, none of the His-Ala Aβ variants impair the stabilising effect of the fibril at low pH.

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  • 10.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindhagen Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharabyan, A
    Vestling, M
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Design of oligomer-specific antibodiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindhagen-Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharibyan, Anna L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vestling, Monika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sellin, Mikael E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A Generic Method for Design of Oligomer-Specific Antibodies2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. e90857-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies that preferentially and specifically target pathological oligomeric protein and peptide assemblies, as opposed to their monomeric and amyloid counterparts, provide therapeutic and diagnostic opportunities for protein misfolding diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular properties associated with oligomer-specific antibodies are not well understood, and this limits targeted design and development. We present here a generic method that enables the design and optimisation of oligomer-specific antibodies. The method takes a two-step approach where discrimination between oligomers and fibrils is first accomplished through identification of cryptic epitopes exclusively buried within the structure of the fibrillar form. The second step discriminates between monomers and oligomers based on differences in avidity. We show here that a simple divalent mode of interaction, as within e. g. the IgG isotype, can increase the binding strength of the antibody up to 1500 times compared to its monovalent counterpart. We expose how the ability to bind oligomers is affected by the monovalent affinity and the turnover rate of the binding and, importantly, also how oligomer specificity is only valid within a specific concentration range. We provide an example of the method by creating and characterising a spectrum of different monoclonal antibodies against both the A beta peptide and alpha-synuclein that are associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, respectively. The approach is however generic, does not require identification of oligomer-specific architectures, and is, in essence, applicable to all polypeptides that form oligomeric and fibrillar assemblies.

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  • 12.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lindhagen-Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ca2+ enhances Aβ polymerization rate and fibrillar stability in a dynamic manner2013In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 450, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying factors that affect the self-assembly of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is of utmost importance in the quest to understand the molecular mechanisms causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ca2+ has previously been shown to accelerate both Aβ fibril nucleation and maturation, and a dysregulated Ca2+ homeostasis frequently correlates with development of AD. The mechanisms regarding Ca2+ binding as well as its effect on fibril kinetics are not fully understood. Using a polymerization assay we show that Ca2+ in a dynamic and reversible manner enhances both the elongation rate and fibrillar stability, where specifically the "dock and lock" phase mechanism is enhanced. Through NMR analysis we found that Ca2+ affects the fibrillar architecture. In addition, and unexpectedly, we found that Ca2+ does not bind the free Aβ monomer. This implies that Ca2+ binding requires an architecture adopted by assembled peptides, and consequently is mediated through intermolecular interactions between adjacent peptides. This gives a mechanistic explanation to the enhancing effect on fibril maturation and indicates structural similarities between prefibrillar structures and mature amyloid. Taken together we expose how Ca2+ levels affect the delicate equilibrium between the monomeric and assembled Aβ and how fluctuations in vivo may contribute to development and progression of the disease.

  • 13.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pihl, Mathias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The N-terminal Region of Amyloid β Controls the Aggregation Rate and Fibril Stability at Low pH Through a Gain of Function Mechanism2014In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 136, no 31, p. 10956-10964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease is linked to a pathological polymerization of the endogenous amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) that ultimately forms amyloid plaques within the human brain. We used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to measure the kinetic properties of Aβ fibril formation under different conditions during the polymerization process. For all polymerization processes, a critical concentration of free monomers, as defined by the dissociation equilibrium constant (KD), is required for the buildup of the polymer, for example, amyloid fibrils. At concentrations below the KD, polymerization cannot occur. However, the KD for Aβ has previously been shown to be several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations found in the cerebrospinal and interstitial fluids of the human brain, and the mechanism by which Aβ amyloid forms in vivo has been a matter of debate. Using SPR, we found that the KD of Aβ dramatically decreases as a result of lowering the pH. Importantly, this effect enables Aβ to polymerize within a picomolar concentration range that is close to the physiological Aβ concentration within the human brain. The stabilizing effect is dynamic, fully reversible, and notably pronounced within the pH range found within the endosomal and lysosomal pathways. Through sequential truncation, we show that the N-terminal region of Aβ contributes to the enhanced fibrillar stability due to a gain of function mechanism at low pH. Our results present a possible route for amyloid formation at very low Aβ concentrations and raise the question of whether amyloid formation in vivo is restricted to a low pH environment. These results have general implications for the development of therapeutic interventions.

  • 14.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Aβ peptide fibrillar architectures controlled by conformational constraints of the monomer2011In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, p. e25157-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anomalous self-assembly of the Aβ peptide into fibrillar amyloid deposits is strongly correlated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ fibril extension follows a template guided "dock and lock" mechanism where polymerisation is catalysed by the fibrillar ends. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR (H/D-exchange NMR), we have analysed the fibrillar structure and polymerisation properties of both the highly aggregation prone Aβ1-40 Glu22Gly (Aβ(40Arc)) and wild type Aβ1-40 (Aβ(40WT)). The solvent protection patterns from H/D exchange experiments suggest very similar structures of the fibrillar forms. However, through cross-seeding experiments monitored by SPR, we found that the monomeric form of Aβ(40WT) is significantly impaired to acquire the fibrillar architecture of Aβ(40Arc). A detailed characterisation demonstrated that Aβ(40WT) has a restricted ability to dock and isomerise with high binding affinity onto Aβ(40Arc) fibrils. These results have general implications for the process of fibril assembly, where the rate of polymerisation, and consequently the architecture of the formed fibrils, is restricted by conformational constraints of the monomers. Interestingly, we also found that the kinetic rate of fibril formation rather than the thermodynamically lowest energy state determines the overall fibrillar structure.

  • 15.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Characterization of SPINK9, a KLK5-specific inhibitor expressed in palmo-plantar epidermis2012In: Biological chemistry (Print), ISSN 1431-6730, E-ISSN 1437-4315, Vol. 393, no 5, p. 369-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SPINK9, a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor, is almost exclusively expressed in the palmo-plantar epidermis. SPINK9 selectively inhibits kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5), no other target enzyme is known at present. In this study, we defined the reactive loop to residues 48 and 49 of SPINK9 and characterized the inhibition and binding of different SPINK9 variants towards KLK5, KLK7, KLK8 and KLK14. Substitutions of single amino acids in the reactive loop had a large impact on both inhibitory efficiency and specificity. Binding studies showed that it is mainly the dissociation rate that is affected by the amino acid substitutions. The inhibitory effect of wild-type SPINK9 was clearly pH-dependent with an improved effect at a pH similar to that of the outer layers of the skin. Modeling of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes showed that the reactive loop of SPINK9 fits very well into the deep negatively charged binding pocket of KLK5. A decrease in pH protonates His48 of the wild-type protein resulting in a positively charged residue, thereby explaining the observed decreased dissociation rate. Interestingly, substitution with a positively charged amino acid at position 48 resulted in a more efficient inhibitor at higher pH.

  • 16.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Swedish Defence Research Agency, 906 21 Umeå, Sweden.
    Chernov, Yevgen A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK.
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ilver, Dag
    Moonens, Kristof
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Koeniger, Verena
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Liu, Hui
    Goldman, Matthew D.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Younson, Justine
    Kelly, Charles G.
    Gilman, Robert H.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.
    Nair, G. Balakrish
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Unemo, Magnus
    Danielsson, Dan
    Suerbaum, Sebastian
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Eldridge, Angela M.
    Chromy, Brett A.
    Hansen, Lori M.
    Solnick, Jay V.
    Linden, Sara K.
    Haas, Rainer
    Dubois, Andre
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Remaut, Han
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berg, Douglas E.
    Boren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence2017In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  • 17.
    Byström, Roberth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Borowik, Tomasz
    Bokvist, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindström, Fredrick
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sani, Marc-Antoine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Medicine).
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Disordered proteins: Biological membranes as two-dimensional aggregation matrices2008In: Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics, ISSN 1085-9195, E-ISSN 1559-0283, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 175-189Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aberrant folded proteins and peptides are hallmarks of amyloidogenic diseases. However, the molecular processes that cause these proteins to adopt non-native structures in vivo and become cytotoxic are still largely unknown, despite intense efforts to establish a general molecular description of their behavior. Clearly, the fate of these proteins is ultimately linked to their immediate biochemical environment in vivo. In this review, we focus on the role of biological membranes, reactive interfaces that not only affect the conformational stability of amyloidogenic proteins, but also their aggregation rates and, probably, their toxicity. We first provide an overview of recent work, starting with findings regarding the amphiphatic amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which give evidence that membranes can directly promote aggregation, and that the effectiveness in this process can be related to the presence of specific neuronal ganglioside lipids. In addition, we discuss the implications of recent research (medin as an detailed example) regarding putative roles of membranes in the misfolding behavior of soluble, non-amphiphatic proteins, which are attracting increasing interest. The potential role of membranes in exerting the toxic action of misfolded proteins will also be highlighted in a molecular context. In this review, we discuss novel NMR-based approaches for exploring membrane–protein interactions, and findings obtained using them, which we use to develop a molecular concept to describe membrane-mediated protein misfolding as a quasi-two-dimensional process rather than a three-dimensional event in a biochemical environment. The aim of the review is to provide researchers with a general understanding of the involvement of membranes in folding/misfolding processes in vivo, which might be quite universal and important for future research concerning amyloidogenic and misfolding proteins, and possible ways to prevent their toxic actions.

  • 18.
    Eneqvist, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Andersson, Karin
    Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    The beta-slip: a novel concept in transthyretin amyloidosis.2000In: Mol Cell, ISSN 1097-2765, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 1207-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin is a tetrameric plasma protein associated with two forms of amyloid disease. The structure of the highly amyloidogenic transthyretin triple mutant TTRG53S/E54D/L55S determined at 2.3 A resolution reveals a novel conformation: the beta-slip. A three-residue shift in beta strand D places Leu-58 at the position normally occupied by Leu-55 now mutated to serine. The beta-slip is best defined in two of the four monomers, where it makes new protein-protein interactions to an area normally involved in complex formation with retinol-binding protein. This interaction creates unique packing arrangements, where two protein helices combine to form a double helix in agreement with fiber diffraction and electron microscopy data. Based on these findings, a novel model for transthyretin amyloid formation is presented.

  • 19.
    Eneqvist, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Medicine).
    Ando, Yukio
    Miyakawa, Taihei
    Katsuragi, Shoichi
    Jass, Jana
    Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Disulfide-bond formation in the transthyretin mutant Y114C prevents amyloid fibril formation in vivo and in vitro.2002In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, Vol. 41, no 44, p. 13143-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Y114C mutation in human transthyretin (TTR) is associated with a particular form of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy. We show that vitreous aggregates ex vivo consist of either regular amyloid fibrils or disordered disulfide-linked precipitates that maintain the ability to bind Congo red. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vitro that the ATTR Y114C mutant exists in three forms: one unstable but nativelike tetrameric form, one highly aggregated form in which a network of disulfide bonds is formed, and one fibrillar form. The disulfide-linked aggregates and the fibrillar form of the mutant can be induced by heat induction under nonreduced and reduced conditions, respectively. Both forms are recognized by the amyloid specific antibody MAB(39-44). In a previous study, we have linked exposure of this epitope in TTR to a three-residue shift in beta-strand D. The X-ray crystallographic structure of reduced tetrameric ATTR Y114C shows a structure similar to that of the wild type but with a more buried position of Cys10 and with beta-mercaptoethanol associated with Cys114, verifying the strong tendency for this residue to form disulfide bonds. Combined with the ex vivo data, our in vitro findings suggest that ATTR Y114C can lead to disease either by forming regular unbranched amyloid fibrils or by forming disulfide-linked aggregates that maintain amyloid-like properties but are unable to form regular amyloid fibrils.

  • 20.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Islam, Tohidul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Pettersson, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Golchin, Solmaz A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundgren, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johansson, Gabriella
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Genot, Melany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schultz, Nina
    Wennström, Malin
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Apolipoprotein E Interferes with IAPP Aggregation and Protects Pericytes from IAPP-Induced Toxicity2020In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) has become a primary focus of research after the discovery of its strong linkage to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), where the ApoE4 variant is the highest genetic risk factor for this disease. ApoE is commonly found in amyloid deposits of different origins, and its interaction with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the hallmark of AD, is well known. However, studies on the interaction of ApoEs with other amyloid-forming proteins are limited. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is an amyloid-forming peptide linked to the development of type-2 diabetes and has also been shown to be involved in AD pathology and vascular dementia. Here we studied the impact of ApoE on IAPP aggregation and IAPP-induced toxicity on blood vessel pericytes. Using both in vitro and cell-based assays, we show that ApoE efficiently inhibits the amyloid formation of IAPP at highly substoichiometric ratios and that it interferes with both nucleation and elongation. We also show that ApoE protects the pericytes against IAPP-induced toxicity, however, the ApoE4 variant displays the weakest protective potential. Taken together, our results suggest that ApoE has a generic amyloid-interfering property and can be protective against amyloid-induced cytotoxicity, but there is a loss of function for the ApoE4 variant.

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  • 21.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Jayaweera, Sanduni Wasana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lehmann, Manuela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Endogenous Human Proteins Interfering with Amyloid Formation2022In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 446Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid formation is a pathological process associated with a wide range of degenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes mellitus type 2. During disease progression, abnormal accumulation and deposition of proteinaceous material are accompanied by tissue degradation, inflammation, and dysfunction. Agents that can interfere with the process of amyloid formation or target already formed amyloid assemblies are consequently of therapeutic interest. In this context, a few endogenous proteins have been associated with an anti-amyloidogenic activity. Here, we review the properties of transthyretin, apolipoprotein E, clusterin, and BRICHOS protein domain which all effectively interfere with amyloid in vitro, as well as displaying a clinical impact in humans or animal models. Their involvement in the amyloid formation process is discussed, which may aid and inspire new strategies for therapeutic interventions.

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    fulltext
  • 22.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Narayana, Vinod
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ankarcrona, Maria
    Karolinska Institute.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Emerging role of inflammatory S100A9 in Alzheimer’s disease amyloid growth and neurodegenerationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Narayana, Vinod
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Habib, Ahsan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sulniute, Rima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henein, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Inflammatory S100A9 and Aβ amyloids in heart valve of patient with aortic stenosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Goldsteins, Gundars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Andersson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Dacklin, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Baranov, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Thylén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Characterisation of two highly amyloidogenic mutants of transthyretin1997In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 36, no 18, p. 5346-5352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) has the potential to form amyloid under certain conditions. More than 50 different point mutations have been associated with amyloid formation that occurs only in adults. It is not known what structural changes are introduced into the structure of this otherwise stable molecule that results in its aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils. On the basis of calculations of the frequency of known mutations over the polypeptide, we have constructed two mutants in the D-strand of the polypeptide. These molecules, containing either a deletion or a substitution at amino acid positions 53−55, were unstable and spontaneously formed aggregates upon storage in TBS (pH 7.6). The precipitates were shown to be amyloid by staining with thioflavin T and Congo Red. Their ultrastructure was very similar to that of amyloid fibrils deposited in the vitreous body of patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy type 1 with an amino acid replacement in position 30 (TTRmet30). Like amyloid isolated from the vitreous body of the eye, the amyloid precipitates generated from the TTR mutants exposed a trypsin cleavage site between amino acid residues 48 and 49, while plasma TTRmet30 isolated from amyloidosis patients as well as wild-type TTR only showed minor trypsin sensitivity. Our data indicate that the mutants we have constructed are similar to amyloid precursors or may share structural properties with intermediates on a pathway leading to amyloid deposits of plasma TTR.

  • 25.
    Goldsteins, Gundars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Persson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Andersson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Dacklin, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Saraiva, Maria João
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Exposure of cryptic epitopes on transthyretin only in amyloid and in amyloidogenic mutants1999In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 3108-3113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural requirements for generation of amyloid from the plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) are not known, although it is assumed that TTR is partly misfolded in amyloid. In a search for structural determinants important for amyloid formation, we generated a TTR mutant with high potential to form amyloid. We demonstrated that the mutant represents an intermediate in a series of conformational changes leading to amyloid. Two monoclonal antibodies were generated against this mutant; each displayed affinity to ex vivo TTR and TTR mutants with amyloidogenic folding but not to wild-type TTR or mutants exhibiting the wild-type fold. Two cryptic epitopes were mapped to a domain of TTR, where most mutations associated with amyloidosis occur and which we propose is displaced at the initial phase of amyloid formation, opening up new surfaces necessary for autoaggregation of TTR monomers. The results provide direct biochemical evidence for structural changes in an amyloidogenic intermediate of TTR.

  • 26. Hammer, Neal D
    et al.
    McGuffie, Bryan A
    Zhou, Yizhou
    Badtke, Matthew P
    Reineke, Ashley A
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gestwicki, Jason E
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chapman, Matthew R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The C-terminal repeating units of CsgB direct bacterial functional amyloid nucleation2012In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 422, no 3, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Curli are functional amyloids produced by enteric bacteria. The major curli fiber subunit, CsgA, self-assembles into an amyloid fiber in vitro. The minor curli subunit protein, CsgB, is required for CsgA polymerization on the cell surface. Both CsgA and CsgB are composed of five predicted β–strand-loop-β–strand-loop repeating units that feature conserved glutamine and asparagine residues. Because of this structural homology, we proposed that CsgB might form an amyloid template that initiates CsgA polymerization on the cell surface. To test this model, we purified wild-type CsgB, and found that it self-assembled into amyloid fibers in vitro. Preformed CsgB fibers seeded CsgA polymerization as did soluble CsgB added to the surface of cells secreting soluble CsgA. To define the molecular basis of CsgB nucleation, we generated a series of mutants that removed each of the five repeating units. Each of these CsgB deletion mutants was capable of self-assembly in vitro. In vivo, membrane-localized mutants lacking the 1st, 2nd or 3rd repeating units were able to convert CsgA into fibers. However, mutants missing either the 4th or 5th repeating units were unable to complement a csgB mutant. These mutant proteins were not localized to the outer membrane, but were instead secreted into the extracellular milieu. Synthetic CsgB peptides corresponding to repeating units 1, 2 and 4 self assembled into ordered amyloid polymers, while peptides corresponding to repeating units 3 and 5 did not, suggesting that there are redundant amyloidogenic domains in CsgB. Our results suggest a model where the rapid conversion of CsgB from unstructured protein to a β-sheet-rich amyloid template anchored to the cell surface is mediated by the C-terminal repeating units.

  • 27.
    Horvath, Istvan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sellstedt, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Weise, Christoph
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Nordvall, Lina-Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Golla, Krishna Prasad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Larsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Modulation of α-synuclein fibrillization by ring-fused 2-pyridones: templation and inhibition involve oligomers with different structure2013In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, ISSN 0003-9861, E-ISSN 1096-0384, Vol. 532, no 2, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study we discovered that a ring-fused 2-pyridone compound triggered fibrillization of a key protein in Parkinson's disease, α-synuclein. To reveal how variations in compound structure affect protein aggregation, we now prepared a number of strategic analogs and tested their effects on α-synuclein amyloid fiber formation in vitro. We find that, in contrast to the earlier templating effect, some analogs inhibit α-synuclein fibrillization. For both templating and inhibiting compounds, the key species formed in the reactions are α-synuclein oligomers that contain compound. Despite similar macroscopic appearance, the templating and inhibiting oligomers are distinctly different in secondary structure content. When the inhibitory oligomers are added in seed amounts, they inhibit fresh α-synuclein aggregation reactions. Our study demonstrates that small chemical changes to the same central fragment can result in opposite effects on protein aggregation.

  • 28.
    Horvath, Istvan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Weise, Christoph F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Emma K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sellstedt, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bengtsson, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hultgren, Scott J
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, United States.
    Chapman, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mechanisms of Protein Oligomerization: Inhibitor of Functional Amyloids Templates α-Synuclein Fibrillation2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 7, p. 3439-3444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small organic molecules that inhibit functional bacterial amyloid fibers, curli, are promising new antibiotics. Here we investigated the mechanism by which the ring-fused 2-pyridone FN075 inhibits fibrillation of the curli protein CsgA. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we found that FN075 promotes CsgA to form off-pathway, non-amyloidogenic oligomeric species. In light of the generic properties of amyloids, we tested whether FN075 would also affect the fibrillation reaction of human α-synuclein, an amyloid-forming protein involved in Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, FN075 stimulates α-synuclein amyloid fiber formation as measured by thioflavin T emission, electron microscopy (EM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). NMR data on (15)N-labeled α-synuclein show that upon FN075 addition, α-synuclein oligomers with 7 nm radius form in which the C-terminal 40 residues remain disordered and solvent exposed. The polypeptides in these oligomers contain β-like secondary structure, and the oligomers are detectable by AFM, EM, and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Taken together, FN075 triggers oligomer formation of both proteins: in the case of CsgA, the oligomers do not proceed to fibers, whereas for α-synuclein, the oligomers are poised to rapidly form fibers. We conclude that there is a fine balance between small-molecule inhibition and templation that depends on protein chemistry.

  • 29.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Eneqvist, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    A comparative analysis of 23 structures of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin.2000In: J Mol Biol, ISSN 0022-2836, Vol. 302, no 3, p. 649-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembly of the human plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) into unbranched insoluble amyloid fibrils occurs as a result of point mutations that destabilize the molecule, leading to conformational changes. The tertiary structure of native soluble TTR and many of its disease-causing mutants have been determined. Several independent studies by X-ray crystallography have suggested structural differences between TTR variants which are claimed to be of significance for amyloid formation. As these changes are minor and not consistent between the studies, we have compared all TTR structures available at the protein data bank including three wild-types, three non-amyloidogenic mutants, seven amyloidogenic mutants and nine complexes. The reference for this study is a new 1.5 A resolution structure of human wild-type TTR refined to an R-factor/R-free of 18.6 %/21.6 %. The present findings are discussed in the light of the previous structural studies of TTR variants, and show the reported structural differences to be non-significant.

  • 30.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Medicine).
    Eneqvist, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    The β-strand D of transthyretin trapped in two discrete conformations2004In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1700, no 1, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conformational changes in native and variant forms of the human plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) induce several types of amyloid diseases. Biochemical and structural studies have mapped the initiation site of amyloid formation onto residues at the outer C and D beta-strands and their connecting loop. In this study, we characterise an engineered variant of transthyretin, Ala108Tyr/Leu110Glu, which is kinetically and thermodynamically more stable than wild-type transthyretin, and as a consequence less amyloidogenic. Crystal structures of the mutant were determined in two space groups, P2(1)2(1)2 and C2, from crystals grown in the same crystallisation set-up. The structures are identical with the exception for residues Leu55-Leu58, situated at beta-strand D and the following DE loop. In particular, residues Leu55-His56 display large shifts in the C2 structure. There the direct hydrogen bonding between beta-strands D and A has been disrupted and is absent, whereas the beta-strand D is present in the P2(1)2(1)2 structure. This difference shows that from a mixture of metastable TTR molecules, only the molecules with an intact beta-strand D are selected for crystal growth in space group P2(1)2(1)2. The packing of TTR molecules in the C2 crystal form and in the previously determined amyloid TTR (ATTR) Leu55Pro crystal structure is close-to-identical. This packing arrangement is therefore not unique in amyloidogenic mutants of TTR.

  • 31.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP).
    Wikström Hultdin, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The effect of iodide and chloride on transthyretin structure and stability2005In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 44, no 26, p. 9290-9299Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin amyloid formation occurs through a process of tetramer destabilization and partial unfolding. Small molecules, including the natural ligand thyroxine, stabilize the tetrameric form of the protein, and serve as inhibitors of amyloid formation. Crucial for TTR's ligand-binding properties are its three halogen-binding sites situated at the hormone-binding channel. In this study, we have performed a structural characterization of the binding of two halides, iodide and chloride, to TTR. Chlorides are known to shield charge repulsions at the tetrameric interface of TTR, which improve tetramer stability of the protein. Our study shows that iodides, like chlorides, provide tetramer stabilization in a concentration-dependent manner and at concentrations approximately 15-fold below that of chlorides. To elucidate binding sites of the halides, we took advantage of the anomalous scattering of iodide and used the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method to solve the iodide-bound TTR structure at 1.8 A resolution. The structure of chloride-bound TTR was determined at 1.9 A resolution using difference Fourier techniques. The refined structures showed iodides and chlorides bound at two of the three halogen-binding sites located at the hydrophobic channel. These sites therefore also function as halide-binding sites.

  • 32.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wijsekera, Alexandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Zhang, Jin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Tetrabromobisphenol A Is an Efficient Stabilizer of the Transthyretin Tetramer2016In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e0153529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid formation of the human plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) is associated with several human disorders, including familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and senile systemic amyloidosis. Dissociation of TTR’s native tetrameric assembly is the rate-limiting step in the conversion into amyloid, and this feature presents an avenue for intervention because binding of an appropriate ligand to the thyroxin hormone binding sites of TTR stabilizes the native tetrameric assembly and impairs conversion into amyloid. The desired features for an effective TTR stabilizer include high affinity for TTR, high selectivity in the presence of other proteins, no adverse side effects at the effective concentrations, and a long half-life in the body. In this study we show that the commonly used flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) efficiently stabilizes the tetrameric structure of TTR. The X-ray crystal structure shows TBBPA binding in the thyroxine binding pocket with bromines occupying two of the three halogen binding sites. Interestingly, TBBPA binds TTR with an extremely high selectivity in human plasma, and the effect is equal to the recently approved drug tafamidis and better than diflunisal, both of which have shown therapeutic effects against FAP. TBBPA consequently present an interesting scaffold for drug design. Its absorption, metabolism, and potential side-effects are discussed.

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  • 33.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pokrzywa, Malgorzata
    Walfridsson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The flavonoid luteolin, but not luteolin-7-o-glucoside, prevents a transthyretin mediated toxic response2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0128222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric plasma protein with amyloidogenic properties that has been linked to the development of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), familial amyloidotic cardiomyopathy, and senile systemic amyloidosis. The in vivo role of TTR is associated with transport of thyroxine hormone T4 and retinol-binding protein. Loss of the tetrameric integrity of TTR is a rate-limiting step in the process of TTR amyloid formation, and ligands with the ability to bind within the thyroxin binding site (TBS) can stabilize the tetramer, a feature that is currently used as a therapeutic approach for FAP. Several different flavonoids have recently been identified that impair amyloid formation. The flavonoid luteolin shows therapeutic potential with low incidence of unwanted side effects. In this work, we show that luteolin effectively attenuates the cytotoxic response to TTR in cultured neuronal cells and rescues the phenotype of a Drosophila melanogaster model of FAP. The plant-derived luteolin analogue cynaroside has a glucoside group in position 7 of the flavone A-ring and as opposed to luteolin is unable to stabilize TTR tetramers and thus prevents a cytotoxic effect. We generated high-resolution crystal-structures of both TTR wild type and the amyloidogenic mutant V30M in complex with luteolin. The results show that the A-ring of luteolin, in contrast to what was previously suggested, is buried within the TBS, consequently explaining the lack of activity from cynaroside. The flavonoids represent an interesting group of drug candidates for TTR amyloidosis. The present investigation shows the potential of luteolin as a stabilizer of TTR in vivo. We also show an alternative orientation of luteolin within the TBS which could represent a general mode of binding of flavonoids to TTR and is of importance concerning the future design of tetramer stabilizing drugs.

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  • 34.
    Iakovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Intissar, Anan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Walfridsson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Enthalpic Forces Correlate with Selectivity of Transthyretin-Stabilizing Ligands in Human Plasma2015In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 58, no 16, p. 6507-6515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) is linked to human amyloidosis. Dissociation of its native tetrameric assembly is a rate-limiting step in the conversion from a native structure into a pathological amyloidogenic fold. Binding of small molecule ligands within the thyroxine binding site of TTR can stabilize the tetrameric integrity and is a potential therapeutic approach. However, through the characterization of nine different tetramer-stabilizing ligands we found that unspecific binding to plasma components might significantly compromise ligand efficacy. Surprisingly the binding strength between a particular ligand and TTR does not correlate well with its selectivity in plasma. However, through analysis of the thermodynamic signature using isothermal titration calorimetry we discovered a better correlation between selectivity and the enthalpic component of the interaction. This is of specific interest in the quest for more efficient TTR stabilizers, but a high selectivity is an almost universally desired feature within drug design and the finding might have wide-ranging implications for drug design.

  • 35.
    Islam, Tohidul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharibyan, Anna L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Golchin, Solmaz A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Pettersson, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hedberg, Isabell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Virta, Merit-Miriam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Mr..
    Apolipoprotein E impairs amyloid-β fibril elongation and maturation2020In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 287, no 6, p. 1208-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is strongly linked to amyloid depositions of the Aβ peptide (Aβ). The lipid-binding protein apolipoprotein E (ApoE) has been found to interfere with Aβ amyloid formation and to exert a strong clinical impact to the pathology of AD. The APOE gene exists in three allelic isoforms represented by APOE ε2, APOE ε3, and APOE ε4. Carriers of the APOE ε4 variant display a gene dose-dependent increased risk of developing the disease. Aβ amyloids are formed via a nucleation-dependent mechanism where free monomers are added onto a nucleus in a template-dependent manner. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and thioflavin-T assays, we here show that ApoE can target the process of fibril elongation and that its interference effectively prevents amyloid maturation. We expose a complex equilibrium where the concentration of ApoE, Aβ monomers, and the amount of already formed Aβ fibrils will affect the relative proportion and formation rate of mature amyloids versus alternative assemblies. The result illustrates a mechanism which may affect both the clearance rate of Aβ assemblies in vivo and the population of cytotoxic Aβ assemblies.